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Parrots are funny, curious and intelligent birds. They have the most beautiful and colorful plumage, although their predominant color is usually green. Further, some species can imitate a large number of sounds, including the person’s voice. This has made them very popular with bird lovers.

Unlike other birds, parrots are quite long-lived.

Although the life expectancy depends on the species, a macaw can reach 100 years of life if it has the necessary care. A cockatoo, for example, lives between 60 and 20 years, while Amazons usually reach 50 years. In the case of parrots, they usually live between 15 and 20 years.

On the other hand, these birds make great pets. They are very social and enjoy the company of humans, so it is not surprising that they are very popular on social media. The hashtag #parrot has more than four million posts On Instagram. Likewise, its search in Spanish reflects more than 394,000 images.

If you want to discover the funniest parrot images on Instagram, take a look at the following gallery. Without a doubt, they are some of the most unique birds.

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Major League Baseball announces MLB Draft League

Operation Christmas Drop, long-running DoD operation, to take off with socially distanced teams Arizona certifies Biden’s victory over Trump as president continues to push baseless claims of fraud Major League Baseball announces MLB Draft League

Major League Baseball on Monday announced that it has teamed with Prep Baseball Report to form the MLB Draft League — a new summer league that will allow the nation’s top draft-eligible players to compete in a 68-game season beginning next year. The league will be headed up by former MLB scout Kerrick Jackson, who resigned from his post as the head coach at Southern University to take this newly created position.

© Eric Bolte-USA TODAY Sports

Five teams, all of them former minor league affiliates, have been brought aboard as the founding five clubs in the league: the Mahoning Valley Scrappers, the State College Spikes, the Trenton Thunder, the West Virginia Black Bears and the Williamsport Crosscutters. Talks with a sixth team are in the works, per the league’s press release, with an announcement hopefully coming in the near future.

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The Draft League is made possible by MLB’s previous decision to push the annual amateur draft back from early June to instead coincide with the MLB All-Star break in mid-July. Per Monday’s announcement, the 68-game schedule will include an annual All-Star break centered around the MLB Draft, so it seems as though the idea is for play to continue once these players have been drafted. That, conceivably, could help to offset some the elimination of short-season Class-A leagues. Big league scouts will be able to watch the league in person, and the MLB adds that they’ll also be able to evaluate participants via “state-of-the-art scouting technology.”

Jackson appeared on MLB Network Monday morning to discuss the league and clarify some of the timing and scheduling aspects (video link). The league will commence in early June and run into August. MLB’s goal will be to attract as much top draft-eligible talent as possible, though Jackson acknowledged that some programs that qualify for postseason play will push back against sending their players to participate in the Draft League.

There are some murky areas that have yet to be defined in full. It’s not clear, for instance, whether every MLB team will want its draft signees to continue playing in the league, although that ostensibly could help to offset the loss of some short-season Class-A leagues. Jackson alludes to the fact that the league expects some players to pull out of the league after being drafted, noting that “after the draft, we’ll be able to take some kids — some of the seniors and some other guys looking to get those free-agent opportunities and put them in that mix.”

The initial hope is for a six-team league with 30-man rosters, per Jackson, creating 180 roster spots in the league’s first iteration. Depending on how things progress down the line, MLB may look to eventually install additional teams in the league. For the time being, it doesn’t appear as though there will be separation of college and high school talent.

Suffice it to say there are some logistics that need to be sorted out or at least clarified, but the broader takeaway is that the inception of the Draft League will ideally give teams and fans a new level of access to prospects in the days and weeks leading up to the draft. Doing so should create greater marketing opportunities and, hopefully for MLB, draw some extra eyes and attention for the draft itself. The Major League Baseball Draft has never been seen as an event on par with the NBA or NFL drafts, after all. However, there’s no getting around the fundamental difference that prospects selected in those other sports’ drafts will frequently jump directly onto the active roster of their new clubs, while virtually every player selected in the MLB Draft is at least a couple of years from MLB readiness.

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Related slideshow: Who has the most home runs in a season for every MLB franchise? (Provided by Yardbarker)

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Full screen 1/31 SLIDES © Bettmann/Getty Images Who has the most home runs in a season for every MLB franchise? Has the home run been diminished by the fact the ball seems to fly out of the park these days? Perhaps a little, but we still love the long ball. We know who has the greatest home run seasons in MLB history, but every franchise has a single-season record for homers as well. That’s just math. Who is the slugger with the most dingers in a year for every team? Here they are, in alphabetical order based on team city. 2/31 SLIDES © Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images Arizona Diamondbacks: Luis Gonzalez 2001 was a magical year for the Diamondbacks. Not only did they win the World Series over the Yankees, but Gonzalez also had a career season. Shockingly, the 33-year-old hit 57 homers after never hitting more than 31 in any of his other campaigns. Of course since this was 2001, some are skeptical in hindsight. We’re not here to pass judgment. 3/31 SLIDES © Brian Bahr/Getty Images Atlanta Braves: Andruw Jones Jones should be a Hall of Famer. He made his MLB debut as a teenager and quickly became the best center fielder in baseball. Eventually he would bulk up a bit and become a slugger as well. Jones hit 51 homers in 2005. When you can do that one year and win a Gold Glove the next, you should be knocking on the door of Cooperstown. 4/31 SLIDES © Will Newton/Getty Images Baltimore Orioles: Chris Davis How quickly things can change. In 2013, Davis hit 53 homers to lead the majors. He did it again with 47 in 2015. Now? He’s arguably the worst hitter in baseball. Davis batted a combined .172 between the 2018 and 2019 seasons, and even set a record for consecutive at-bats without a hit. Slideshow continues on the next slide 5/31 SLIDES © Ron Vesely/MLB via Getty Images Boston Red Sox: David Ortiz There’s a reason Big Papi is loved in Boston. After the Twins gave up on him, the Red Sox picked up Ortiz, and he turned himself into maybe the best designated hitter in baseball history (give or take an Edgar Martinez). His peak came in 2006 when he hit 54 homers to lead the American League. Unsurprisingly, he also led the league in RBI that year. 6/31 SLIDES © Focus on Sport/Getty Images Chicago Cubs: Sammy Sosa Oh, to put up 66 homers in a season and be an afterthought. That’s what happened to Sosa in 1998. Only two men have ever hit more home runs than Sosa in a year, but one of those guys did it the same year the Cubs slugger hit his 66 jacks. Well, at least he still has the single-season record for a storied franchise. 7/31 SLIDES © Focus on Sport/Getty Images Chicago White Sox: Albert Belle We get to the first team without a 50-homer season in its history. Pick up the slack, White Sox! Funnily enough, it was also 1998 when Belle set the "other" Chicago team’s franchise record. He couldn’t quite hit 66 homers though, settling for “only” 49. 8/31 SLIDES © Focus on Sport/Getty Images Cincinnati Reds: George Foster Who? You may not recognize the name, on account of the fact he isn’t a particularly famous player and also because he retired in 1986. It was in 1977 that Foster not only hit 52 home runs but also won the NL MVP. Alas, he was overshadowed by a few of his teammates on Cincinnati’s Big Red Machine. 9/31 SLIDES © Focus on Sport/Getty Images Cleveland Indians: Jim Thome Thome had a reputation for being “country strong.” Maybe that’s because he wasn’t cut or muscular but instead seemed like a big slab of man. Despite not being the pinnacle of fitness, you can’t deny the power in Thome’s bat. He racked up a ton of homers in his career, including 52 in 2002. Slideshow continues on the next slide 10/31 SLIDES © Rich Pilling/MLB via Getty Images Colorado Rockies: Larry Walker and Todd Helton Yes, we have a tie in Colorado. In fact, it’s the only tie among MLB’s 30 franchises. Walker hit 49 homers in 1997. Helton did it in 2001. Yes, despite the thin air at Coors Field, no Rockie has a 50-homer season. 11/31 SLIDES © Mark Rucker/Transcendental Graphics, Getty Images Detroit Tigers: Hank Greenberg We’re kicking it old-school here! Greenberg was a slugger at a time when guys who could mash the ball were few and far between. The Hall of Famer had a somewhat brief career, as he missed three seasons for military service. However, he still managed to lead the American League in homers four times, including in 1938 when he hit a whopping 58. That’s a ton even now. 12/31 SLIDES © Ronald Martinez/Getty Images Houston Astros: Jeff Bagwell Apparently sign stealing didn’t help any Astros set a new franchise record for homers. Instead, famed Houston slugger Bagwell, forever remembered for his funky stance, has held the record since way back in 2000. He hit 47 dingers in the heyday of the “Killer B’s.” 13/31 SLIDES © Denny Medley/USA TODAY Sports Kansas City Royals: Jorge Soler Soler was considered one of the best prospects in baseball out of Cuba, but he couldn't stay healthy with the Cubs. Prior to 2019, he had never played more than 101 games in a season. In 2019, he played a full 162 game season and hit 48 homers. 14/31 SLIDES © Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty Images Los Angeles Angels: Troy Glaus Nope, it’s not Mike Trout. It isn’t even Vlad Guerrero. Instead, it’s the largely forgotten Glaus who has the record for the Angels. In 2000 Glaus smacked 47 homers for Anaheim. Given the era, some may view that with skepticism. Well we have news for you. A lot of these records were set between 1998 and 2002. Slideshow continues on the next slide 15/31 SLIDES © Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images Los Angeles Dodgers: Shawn Green So many great players have worn Dodger blue, but it’s Green who hit more homers in a season than any of them. Not that Green was a slouch as a player. He had a solid career, but he made only two All-Star Games. Weirdly that doesn’t include 2001 when he set a Dodgers record with 49 homers. 16/31 SLIDES © Steve Mitchell/USA TODAY Sports Miami Marlins: Giancarlo Stanton So many great players have spent parts of their careers in Miami, but they all end up moving on. Stanton is one of them. He hit 59 homers in 2017 and won the NL MVP. That offseason he was traded to the Yankees. And they wonder why there are attendance problems in Miami. 17/31 SLIDES © Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images Milwaukee Brewers: Prince Fielder His father, Cecil, was quite the slugger, but Prince may have been even better at his peak. In only his second full season in the league, 2007, Fielder hit 50 homers, which ended up being a personal best. Unfortunately injuries ended Prince’s career early, as he last played in the majors when he was only 32. 18/31 SLIDES © Focus on Sport via Getty Images Minnesota Twins: Harmon Killebrew The Twins set a new record for most home runs as a team in 2019, but no individual player hit more than Killebrew. The man rumored to be the source of the silhouette in the MLB logo was a tremendous slugger, leading the AL in homers six times. He hit 49 home runs twice in his career, so he in a way is tied with himself for the record in Minnesota. Killebrew did it the first time in 1964 and then again in 1969. 19/31 SLIDES © Brad Penner/USA TODAY Sports New York Mets: Pete Alonso You know in what season this happened. After all, Alonso was a rookie in 2019. Yes, he stepped into the majors and immediately hit 53 homers. Naturally, he won Rookie of the Year. He hit more homers than any other rookie in baseball history. Of course he did. 20/31 SLIDES © Focus on Sport/Getty Images New York Yankees: Roger Maris While Maris’ 61 homers have been passed a few times now, his 1961 season is still the stuff of legend. For years, Babe Ruth, a fellow Yankee, had the record with 60 homers. Then, Maris bested it to set a new major league record. Since he played in more games, though, some wanted to put an asterisk on Maris’ 61 homers. Then there are those who still say he has the record, but we aren’t going to debate. 21/31 SLIDES © MLB via Getty Images Oakland Athletics: Jimmie Foxx This is the oldest season on the list. In fact, it was so long ago the Athletics were still in Philadelphia. Foxx was one of the original true sluggers in baseball. When he hit 58 homers for the A’s in 1932, it was almost unheard of at the time. Heck, it’s still almost unheard of. 22/31 SLIDES © Scott Kane/Getty Images Philadelphia Phillies: Ryan Howard From Philly’s old team to the current one. Howard’s one skill was slugging, but he could do that with aplomb at his peak. He was certainly at the prime of his powers in 2006 when he hit a whopping 58 dingers. Yes, that’s the same number Foxx hit in the same city over 70 years prior. Maybe it’s a Philadelphia thing. 23/31 SLIDES © Sporting News via Getty Images via Getty Images Pittsburgh Pirates: Ralph Kiner Kiner made the Hall of Fame despite playing in only 10 seasons. He got a lot of bang for his buck though. Kiner led the National League in home runs seven straight seasons to start his career. That includes the 1949 campaign when he went yard 54 times. 24/31 SLIDES © Otto Greule Jr./Allsport San Diego Padres: Greg Vaughn This was before the Padres moved to the spacious confines of Petco Park, which has suppressed homers quite a bit. Vaughn is one of the lesser-known names on this list, as he bounced around the majors and never led the league in homers. Vaughn did hit 50 homers in 1998, though. Of course, that year he wasn’t close to sniffing the lead in the NL. 25/31 SLIDES © Doug Pensinger/Allsport Seattle Mariners: Ken Griffey Jr. There are complicated feelings about Alex Rodriguez, and maybe even Randy Johnson, in Seattle. That doesn’t feel like it’s the case with Griffey. The Kid made himself a star in Seattle before heading to Cincinnati where his father played. Griffey hit 56 homers in back-to-back campaigns, first in 1997 and then again in 1998. That first year he also led the majors in RBI, which helped him win his only MVP. 26/31 SLIDES © Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images San Francisco Giants: Barry Bonds Remember this guy? We’re sure you do. Bonds is one of the most polarizing players ever, and to some, he’s the face of the steroid era. Say what you will, but the man was an incredible hitter. In addition to having the most career home runs in MLB history, he also had the best individual season ever. In 2001, he hit a staggering 73 homers. Nobody is ever going to do that again. 27/31 SLIDES © Bill Stover/MLB Photos via Getty Images St. Louis Cardinals: Mark McGwire That 1998 season? The one where Greg Vaughn hit 50 and Sammy Sosa hit 66? In the end, that year belonged to Big Mac. He and Sosa were racing to beat Maris’ record. They both did it, but in the end McGwire got the upper hand. He was the first player to ever hit 70 home runs in a season and one of only two guys to do it. 28/31 SLIDES © Mike Stobe/Getty Images Tampa Bay Rays: Carlos Pena The Rays and the Diamondbacks are the two most recent teams to join the majors. Arizona has that one crazy season from Luis Gonzalez. Tampa doesn’t have that. Pena set the franchise mark in 2007 with 46 homers. That’s tied with the fewest homers to be a team record. 29/31 SLIDES © Brian Bahr/Getty Images Texas Rangers: Alex Rodriguez Rodriguez got a lot of guff when he left the Mariners to join the Rangers. Signing a truly insane contract didn’t help. People wanted him to fail. He didn’t win a ring in Texas, but you can’t blame Rodriguez for that. A-Rod won the MVP in his final season with the Rangers, but it’s the year before, 2002, when he hit 57 homers. 30/31 SLIDES © Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images Toronto Blue Jays: Jose Bautista It took a while for Bautista to get his career going. Heading into 2010, he had 59 home runs in his career. Joey Bats was 29 and seemed like a journeyman. Then suddenly, he exploded for 54 homers. It wasn’t a total fluke either, and more a sign of him being a late bloomer. Bautista made six All-Star Games in a row and added two more 40-homer seasons in his career. 31/31 SLIDES © Mitchell Layton/Getty Images Washington Nationals: Alfonso Soriano This includes when the Nationals were known as the Expos, but evidently none of Montreal’s sluggers ever hit that many homers. After all, Soriano’s record, which he set in 2006, is only 46. That means he is the guy tied with Pena for the most meager home run record. How long will the record be safe? Well, now that Bryce Harper and Anthony Rendon are gone, it may be a bit safer. 31/31 SLIDES

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