This news has been received from: thehill.com

All trademarks, copyrights, videos, photos and logos are owned by respective news sources. News stories, videos and live streams are from trusted sources.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin TrudeauJustin Pierre James TrudeauCanada calls China's treatment of Uighurs 'genocide' over Trudeau's objections The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - COVID-19 rescue bill a unity test for Dems Biden to meet virtually with Canada's Trudeau on Tuesday MORE on Tuesday swiped at former President TrumpDonald TrumpFauci: U.

S. political divide over masks led to half a million COVID-19 deaths Georgia bishop says state GOP's elections bill is an 'attempt to suppress the Black vote' Trump closer to legal jeopardy after court ruling on tax returns MORE during his first bilateral meeting with President BidenJoe BidenTikTok users spread conspiracy that Texas snow was manufactured by the government The problem with a one-size-fits-all federal minimum wage hike Throwing money at Central America will not curb illegal migration MORE, praising the current administration for its early commitment to addressing climate change.

"Thank you again for stepping up in such a big way on tacking climate change," Trudeau said in opening remarks of the meeting, which took place over video due to the coronavirus pandemic.

"U.S. leadership has been sorely missed over the... past years," he continued. "And I have to say, as we are preparing the joint rollout and communiqué from this one, it's nice when the Americans aren't pulling out all references to climate change and instead adding them in. So we're really excited to be working with you on that."

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau appeared to take a shot at Donald Trump during his meeting with Joe Biden, telling the current president that U.S. leadership had been "sorely missed."#cdnpoli #uspoli pic.twitter.com/2jgbEIyq56

— CTV News (@CTVNews) February 23, 2021

The comments were a clear shot at Biden's predecessor, who rolled back environmental regulations and left the Paris Climate Accords. Trump also rankled allies during diplomatic meetings on multiple occasions with his views on climate change.

In August 2019 the former president skipped a session at the Group of Seven (G-7) summit in France focused on climate, biodiversity and oceans. The heads of government of the other six nations that comprise the G-7 were all at the session.

Group of 20 diplomats said at the end of last February's summit that the U.S. opposed including climate change as an economic risk in a final joint communiqué.

Biden has made reversing many of Trump's decisions around climate change a key part of his first weeks in office. He rejoined the Paris climate agreement, re-established the Presidential Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and announced he would host a climate summit with world leaders on Earth Day.

Biden also revoked the permit for the Keystone XL pipeline, a win for environmental groups that frustrated Trudeau given the potential economic fallout.

Biden and Trudeau are expected on Tuesday to detail "The U.S.-Canada Partnership Roadmap," which will outline how the two countries plan to collaborate on combatting the pandemic, national security issues, climate and the economy.

The two sides are expected to announce the formation of a climate ministerial, as well as other initiatives, such as reaching net-zero carbon emissions by 2050.

Tags Justin Trudeau Donald Trump Joe Biden Climate change Paris Climate Accords Paris climate agreement G7 G20

News Source: thehill.com

Tags: prime minister justin trudeau climate agreement former president former president climate change climate change paris climate are expected donald trump meeting the current

Right-wing misinformation on Facebook is more engaging than its left-wing counterpart, research finds

Next News:

Senate Democrats still finishing their Covid relief bill as time runs out this week

(CNN)Senate Democrats are down to the wire.

In a furious last-minute push, Democrats are scrambling to put their final touches on a $1.9 trillion Covid-19 relief bill that the entire caucus will have to support, a task that has proven difficult in the final hours of negotiations and revealed the uphill climb the party will have in moving Biden's agenda in the future.Where things stand
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer -- in coordination with key committee chairs -- has been working around the clock to finalize the bill text. As of Wednesday morning, it still is not finished. Progressives and moderates are still trying to extract concessions and make changes to the bill that passed, and leadership was still waiting as of late Tuesday night for some smaller rulings from the Senate's parliamentarian, according to sources. As a result, legislative counsel has been drafting multiple iterations of the bill so that Democrats will be ready to go when decisions are finally made. If it feels a little rushed, a little last minute -- welcome to Congress.Read MoreA timing noteIt's possible this goes into the weekend if leadership gets delayed in bringing a bill to the floor Wednesday. It's important to remember that whatever Schumer lays down on the floor can still be changed, and CNN reports that is certainly something that is possible. But it's also an option to wait to begin debate until the final product is ready to go to the floor. If they wait, it delays the 20 hours of debate and the eventual vote-a-rama we expected to begin Thursday night.The sticking pointsModerate Democrats, in their meeting with Biden on Monday, made it clear they wanted a few things in this final package. They wanted more money for broadband, an extension of some small business tax credits and money for rural hospitals. They also wanted to make the $1,400 stimulus payments more targeted and lower the weekly federal unemployment benefits to $300 instead of $400. Pelosis office says 2 controversial projects will be pulled from Covid billBiden signaled an openness to some changes on the funding side, but he also made it known that lawmakers needed to work this out with their leadership. He wasn't going to get involved. That's been precisely what has been going on the last 24 hours. It's also why Biden didn't get into details of what he would or wouldn't support in Tuesday's call rallying Democrats to stay united in the vote-a-rama ahead. White House legislative affairs has been instrumental in this working through last-minute sticking points with leadership and playing go between with member offices. The President himself has been letting the caucus legislate and staying focused on the bigger picture: actually passing something at the end of the week."Joe is put in a hard position because he's got people beating up on him all across the board," Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia said Tuesday when asked about Biden's role. "He is more inclined to let the process work and I appreciate that."Aides close to the process tell CNN that it's not entirely finished yet, but the expectation is that there will be additional funding for broadband infrastructure in the bill. Talks about unemployment insurance are still ongoing. One of the challenges of increasing any funding streams is that every single committee only has so much money they can spend under the reconciliation instructions. If you go over, you lose your ability to pass this bill with 51 votes. It's part of why even simple adds take time here.The progressive factorA lot of attention over the last four weeks has been paid to moderates and what they want in this bill, but it's important to keep in mind that progressives' votes matter just as much here, especially in the House of Representatives, where Pelosi has just a three-vote margin right now. Everything that is changed in the Senate bill will again face scrutiny in the House when it comes up for a vote there next week and there are certain levers that you could pull in the Senate that wouldn't be able to land in the House. Were leaving it open: Progressives weigh withholding vote on Covid relief over minimum wageRather than ping ponging this bill back and forth, leadership in the House and Senate are checking in regularly to ensure nothing that is changed in the Senate will ultimately disrupt the bill's ability to pass in the House.CNN reported Tuesday on how progressives are still angry over the removal of the minimum wage hike. In addition, progressives are also watching very carefully what happens with unemployment insurance in the Senate. Lowering the threshold from $400 to $300 is a nonstarter for many of them, and it's why it's a conundrum for Senate leaders here. While they may not be making the kinds of last-minute asks that moderates are, progressives have worked very hard behind the scenes in the Senate to try and keep the House bill intact as it's moved through the Senate and major changes on the unemployment benefit of relief check side will spell trouble for many of them.The vote-a-rama factorBiden's message Tuesday was clear. As CNN's Manu Raju reported, Biden urged unity on the series of poison pill amendments slated to come to the floor as part of the budget vote-a-rama, and CNN has been told that Schumer has urged the same. But that is going to be torturous for a handful of moderates who are going to be facing a series of messaging votes on everything from whether undocumented immigrants should be eligible for stimulus checks to whether they support allowing the Keystone XL pipeline to move forward. Republicans' strategy here is to make the next 48 hours as difficult politically as they possible can for Democrats. And while Schumer has urged Democrats not to vote for a single GOP amendment, it's not clear Democrats are going to be able to abide by that request.
      The Sanders' minimum wage amendment is causing heartacheMultiple Democratic aides have lamented in recent days that Senate Budget Committee Chairman Bernie Sanders' minimum wage amendment is flying in the face of the unity that leadership is urging. The vote Democrats are going to have to take on whether they support raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour puts members in a difficult position for a few reasons. First, it forces moderates to decide whether they want a provision the Senate parliamentarian already ruled wasn't compliant in the bill. Second, it's a tough vote that isn't coming from a Republican trying to run campaign ads against you -- it's coming from Sanders, who caucuses with the Democrats and aides argued is supposed to be on their team.

      Other News

      • ‘Dead’ man comes ‘back to life’ moments before he was due to be CUT OPEN in autopsy after docs missed his pulse
      • Pacers aim to slow Nuggets Nikola Jokic
      • US-China Tensions Threaten Global Climate Change Efforts
      • US-China tensions threaten global climate change efforts
      • Nets Star James Harden Takes Shot at Critics After Win in Return to Houston
      • LaVines 36 points lift Bulls past Pelicans 128-124
      • Mavs star Doncic ruled out against Thunder with back issue
      • Kentucky woman claims hospital missed her cancer, then covered it up
      • Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella: Saying 'my team is great and everyone else sucks' is not leadership
      • Pelosi, Democratic Leadership Endorse Potential OMB Nominee
      • Canada will invest $ 410 million in indigenous research, covid-19 and sustainable development – Latest News, Breaking News, Top News Headlines
      • Leicester held by Burnley, Villa shocked by Sheffield United
      • What Can We Learn About Leadership and Accountability From MLB’s Mickey Callaway Debacle? – Latest News, Breaking News, Top News Headlines
      • Duke basketball: Whens the last time Blue Devils missed NCAA Tournament?
      • Blinken: Only China Can Seriously Challenge Americas Global Leadership
      • Michigan State basketball: When’s the last time Spartans missed NCAA Tournament?
      • Change Ad Consent Do not sell my data Forest Scientists Worried About the Impact of Climate Change on California Trees
      • Senate Democrats still finishing their COVID relief bill with 3rd stimulus check
      • Skint Inter Milan ‘MISS Lukaku payment and must hand Man Utd full £43m transfer fee NOW or give player as compensation’