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Tiger Woods was on his way to play golf with NFL stars Drew Brees and Justin Herbert when he was involved in a one-car accident Tuesday that saw the golf legend hospitalized with leg injuries.

The 45-year-old Woods also was expected to take part in a photoshoot with the two quarterbacks, according to multiple reports.

Woods was conscious and alert as he was pulled through the windshield of his damaged SUV in Rancho Palos Verdes, outside of Los Angeles.

A Fire Department spokesperson told The Post they used an axe and another hand tool to pry the windshield out and extricate him. 

Woods’ injuries, which include a compound fracture, according to the New York Times, were not considered life-threatening.

Woods was the only person in the car, officials said.

He was in Los Angeles for last weekend’s Genesis Invitational and on Sunday handed the trophy to winner Max Homa.

Woods also was in the midst of a two-day content shoot with Golf Digest and GOLFTV.

A day before the accident, Woods gave on-course golf lessons to celebrities at Rolling Hills Country Club, including ex-NBA star Dwyane Wade and actor David Spade.

Drew Brees, Tiger Woods, Justin HerbertGetty Images (3)

The 15-time major-winner underwent a fifth back surgery in December and his status for The Masters in April was up in the air.

Brees, the 42-year-old New Orleans Saints legend, is expected to retire this offseason.

Woods was the lone occupant in the car.Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag

The 22-year-old Herbert is a rising star after a productive rookie season with the Los Angeles Chargers.

News Source: newsbrig.com

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Rose Parade to return in 2022, organizers say

As coronavirus cases drop and vaccinations increase, Los Angeles County is beginning to see the light at the end of the COVID-19 tunnel and planning for the return of numerous events, including the Rose Parade.

Organizers say they are actively planning for the parade’s return in 2022, after the pandemic forced the cancellation of this year’s annual New Year’s Day spectacle for the first time in 75 years.

“The evolving nature of the pandemic requires flexibility, ongoing adjustments and mitigation measures to be incorporated into our planned activities,” said Bob Miller, president of the Tournament of Roses Assn. “We expect to announce more specific details on the Rose Parade and associated events as they become available.”

1/39 “Rise Up,” by the city of Burbank.   (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times) 2/39 Benjamin Davenport holds a large rose as his family enjoys the Rose Parade on Wednesday.  (Jason Armond / Los Angeles Times) 3/39 A float by Kiwanis International.  (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times) 4/39 A close-up of the city of Pasadena’s float entry, “Pasadena celebrates 2020.”  (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times) 5/39 A Chinese American Heritage float.  (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times) 6/39 A member of a troupe of stilt walkers.  (Mark Boster / For the Times) 7/39 The opening performance for 131st Rose Parade on Wednesday morning.   (Mark Boster / For the Times) 8/39 The Cowboy Channel’s float.  (Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times) 9/39 The UPS Store float, “Stories Change Our World.”   (Mark Boster / For The Times) 10/39 Amazon Studios’ “Troop Zero” float.  (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times) 11/39 The Northwestern Mutual float.  (Mark Boster / For The Times) 12/39 Spectators follow the parade route on Colorado Boulevard after the end of the Rose Parade.   (Mark Boster / For The Times) 13/39 Bernie Sanders supporters march along the parade route.   (Jason Armond / Los Angeles Times) 14/39 The Southern University and A&M College marching band performs during the parade.   (Jason Armond / Los Angeles Times) 15/39 The Southern University and A&M College marching band.  (Mark Boster/For the Times) 16/39 Dancers from Costa Rica’s Banda Municipal de Zarcero.  (Mark Boster / For the Times) 17/39 The American Honda float.  (Mark Boster / For The Times) 18/39 Co-Grand Marshal Rita Moreno waves to the crowd on the parade route.   (Mark Boster / For The Times) 19/39 The city of Pasadena’s float entry, “Pasadena Celebrates 2020.”   (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times) 20/39 A view down Colorado Boulevard during the 2020 Rose Parade in Pasadena.  (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times) 21/39 The Japan Honor Green Band performs.  (Mark Boster / For The Times) 22/39 The city of Burbank’s float, “Rise Up,” paid homage to those affected by California’s wildfires.  (Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times) 23/39 Camille Kennedy, the 102nd Rose Parade queen, waves from the Royal Court float.  (Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times) 24/39 The University of Wisconsin marching band.  (Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times) 25/39 The city of Pasadena’s entry focused on the 100th-year celebration of the passage of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote.  (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times) 26/39 The Rancho Verde Crimson Regiment from Moreno Valley performs.  (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times) 27/39 The UPS Store entry, “Stories Change Our World,” rolls down Colorado Boulevard during the 2020 Rose Parade in Pasadena.  (Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times) 28/39 The Pride of Pearland Marching Band, from Pearland, Texas.  (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times) 29/39 Northwestern Mutual’s entry, “Spend Your Life Living.”   (Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times) 30/39 A dancer with Banda Municipal de Zarcero from Costa Rica.  (Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times) 31/39 A U.S. Air Force B-2 stealth bomber passes the Goodyear blimp during a flyover at the Rose Parade.   (Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times) 32/39 The 2020 Rose Parade gets underway in Pasadena. This year’s theme is “The Power of Hope.”  (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times) 33/39 The U.S. Marine Corps West Coast Composite Band marches.  (Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times) 34/39 Honda’s float is “Our Hope for the Future.”  (Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times) 35/39 Spectators take a selfie in front of a display along Orange Grove Boulevard before the start of the 2020 Rose Parade in Pasadena.  (Mark Boster / For The Times) 36/39 Parade marshals wait on their scooters near the start of the Rose Parade.  (Mark Boster / For The Times) 37/39 From left, Delores Jaso, Jinney Arreola and Linda Betts wait for the Rose Parade to begin.  (Jason Armond / Los Angeles Times) 38/39 Karina Sosa, left, and her sister Brenda Sosa with a Salvadoran flag before the start of the 2020 Rose Parade in Pasadena.  (Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times) 39/39 Lorena Jara and nephew Noe Jara, 6 months, try to keep warm before the start of the Rose Parade.  (Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times)

The Rose Bowl is also expected to return to Pasadena next year. This year’s College Football Playoff semifinal was moved to AT&T Stadium in Texas, home of the Dallas Cowboys, because of virus restrictions in California.

The Tournament of Roses had hoped to keep the bowl game in Pasadena, but college football officials wanted to allow players’ families to attend the game. After California health officials rebuffed appeals to allow 400 to 500 spectators in the Rose Bowl — a 95,000-seat stadium that includes more than 50 suites — the game was moved to Texas.

Planning for this year’s parade was plagued by the pandemic.

Volunteers who typically begin building floats as early as March for the Jan. 1 parade were unable to get started because of state-mandated stay-at-home orders. Dozens of high school bands scheduled to participate were unable to practice because of school closures. And a handful of international marching bands invited to participate could not travel to California because of restrictions, organizers previously said.

Officials announced in July that the parade, which would have been the 132nd, would not go on.

Previously, the last time the parade was last canceled was between 1942 and 1945, during World War II.

Organizers plan to reuse this year’s theme: “Dream. Believe. Achieve.” But, instead of focusing on education, the theme will be expanded to celebrate the perseverance of essential workers and healthcare professionals during the pandemic, organizers said.

The bowl game’s move from Pasadena to Texas led to a legal conflict between the Tournament of Roses Assn. and the city of Pasadena. The association filed a lawsuit against the city in February to protect the ownership of the Rose Bowl Game and Rose Bowl trademarks.

Times staff writers J. Brady McCollough, Sam Farmer and Alejandra Reyes-Velarde contributed to this report.

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