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    National Review Why Six Senate Republicans Voted against the COVID Relief Bill Congress on Monday night passed a $900 billion coronavirus relief package after months of political gridlock, with the Senate nearly unanimously voting in favor of the measure, save for six Republican senators.The 5,593-page bill handily passed in the House 359-53 before being approved by the Senate 92-6. The six votes against the measure came from Republican Senators Marsha Blackburn (Tenn.), Rand Paul (Ky.) Rick Scott (Fla.), Ron Johnson (Wisc.), Mike Lee (Utah) and Ted Cruz (Texas).The six senators were mostly critical of the financial and physical scale of the bill.Paul called the bill a “spending monstrosity” saying “so-called conservatives” who vote for the measure would be no better than socialist Democrats.”When you vote to pass out free money, you lose your soul and you abandon forever any semblance of moral or fiscal integrity,” he said.He instead supported opening...
    The just-passed federal government spending bill and coronavirus relief package was a vehicle for seemingly every policy priority under the Capitol dome. It included landmark legislation on climate change, a long-desired deal to end surprise medical billing, and billions of dollars for everything from Amtrak to vaccine distribution and coronavirus-related funeral expense relief. But despite coming in at 6,000 pages and $2.3 trillion in taxpayer dollars—$900 billion of which was for COVID relief—a conspicuous item was left on the cutting room floor. At the last minute, legislation that would have set aside a mere $3 million in funding for a program to address the dramatically worsening rates of burnout and mental illness among frontline health care workers—who are under unprecedented strain because of the pandemic—was dropped from the text. And now each side is blaming the other. The bill is titled The Dr. Lorna Breen Health Care Provider Protection Act....
    "Congress has a choice to make," "Hannity" guest host Jason Chaffetz said Wednesday after President Trump sharply criticized the $908 billion COVID relief bill passed by the House and Senate earlier this week. "Will they deliver needed aid to Americans struggling [in] the pandemic, or will they retreat to the old ways of Washington, where pork-packed projects, foreign nations, and the special interests take priority over the forgotten men and women of the United States of America?" asked the former House Oversight Committee chairman. TRUMP VETOES DEFENSE BILL DAYS BEFORE CHRISTMAS  Trump slammed the aid package as a "disgrace" on Tuesday evening, urging Congress to amend the bill and increase the amount of money paid directly to Americans. The president followed that up Wednesday by vetoing the National Defense Authorization Act, which he called a "gift" to U.S. adversaries and Big Tech companies who benefit from liability protections despite Trump's repeated calls to roll them back. Chaffetz described the omnibus spending legislation of which the COVID relief bill was a part as "an appropriations...
    Socialists are evidently displeased with Vice President-elect Kamala Harris’ curious silence on much-needed economic relief to Americans during the pandemic. The issue was raised Thursday on the socialist website Jacobin, with an article titled: "Where in the World is Kamala Harris?" Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, accompanied by her husband Doug Emhoff, talks to the media after dropping off Toys for Tots items at a District of Columbia Fire House, Tuesday, Dec. 22, 2020, in Washington.  (AP) The entry comes just days after Congress passed $900 billion in COVID relief. Individuals making up to $75,000 a year will receive a direct cash payment of $600 – half the amount that was provided in the previous coronavirus legislation.   The article chastised Harris for not being more vocal in demanding a higher amount for Americans hard-hit by the pandemic. Jacobin noted that earlier in the pandemic – months before...
    President TrumpDonald TrumpGeorgia Senate candidate Ossoff backs Trump's call for K checks White House wishes Birx well after she announces retirement Pelosi responds to Trump: Let's push for K checks 'this week' MORE has left Washington in limbo after signaling opposition to the massive coronavirus relief and government funding package passed with bipartisan support this week, threatening a government shutdown in his final days in office. Trump, who left Washington for his Mar-a-Lago resort on Palm Beach on Wednesday, did not definitively say he would veto the $2.3 trillion package, but his opposition left members of both parties shaking their heads and wondering if he’d come around to sign the legislation before funding is set to run out on Dec. 29. Congress would have limited options and time should Trump veto the package. The most plausible move may be for Congress to pass a weeks-long continuing resolution to fund the...
    House Republicans vented during a conference call held Wednesday over President TrumpDonald TrumpGeorgia Senate candidate Ossoff backs Trump's call for K checks White House wishes Birx well after she announces retirement Pelosi responds to Trump: Let's push for K checks 'this week' MORE’s threat to veto the sweeping coronavirus relief and omnibus spending package, which could potentially tee up an end-of-the-year government shutdown. Trump in a video post to Twitter on Tuesday complained that the $600 direct payments included in the bill were too small, and called for them to be $2,000.  Democrats, who have backed larger payments, are seeking to turn that against the GOP with a unanimous consent request on Thursday to agree to stand-along legislation that would make the checks $2,000.  During the call, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthySlim majority of Democrats in new poll say Pelosi should retain Speakership Growing number of lawmakers decline...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO/CBS News) — Sen. Amy Klobuchar is among the senators who intend to vote to overturn President Donald Trump’s veto of the defense spending bill. Trump pledged to veto the legislation when it did not include the nixing of Section 230, a provision protecting internet companies from being liable for what third parties post on their platforms. “No one has worked harder, or approved more money for the military, than I have — over $2 trillion,” Mr. Trump said as he explained his veto to Congress. “During my four years, with the support of many others, we have almost entirely rebuilt the United States military, which was totally depleted when I took office. Your failure to terminate the very dangerous national security risk of Section 230 will make our intelligence virtually impossible to conduct without everyone knowing what we are doing at every step.” Klobuchar responded to the veto...
    President Trump vetoed the defense spending bill Wednesday, after previously tweeting threats to do just that. Wednesday marked the deadline to veto the National Defense Authorization Act before it became law.  The president is scheduled to leave for his Christmas getaway at Mar-a-Lago Wednesday afternoon.  Mr. Trump, who insists he is one of the most pro-military presidents, pledged to veto the legislation when it did not include the nixing of Section 230, a provision protecting internet companies from being liable for what third parties post on their platforms.  "No one has worked harder, or approved more money for the military, than I have — over $2 trillion," Mr. Trump said as he explained his veto to Congress. "During my four years, with the support of many others, we have almost entirely rebuilt the United States military, which was totally depleted when I took office. Your failure to terminate the...
    The coronavirus was only one factor in a chain of events that consumed college sports in 2020, and is poised to do more of the same in 2021 and beyond. The virus, combined with the harsh spotlight that shined on racial inequality in the United States, further exposed the exploitative side of a system that relies heavily on Black football and basketball players to bring in the bucks. Against that backdrop, dueling tranches of legislation and litigation landed in the highest reaches of Washington — in Congress and the Supreme Court — fueling a growing sense that the status quo is about to be upended. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM "I don’t know if it’s immediate, or five years down the road, but I’m pretty confident that something’s going to fundamentally change," said Victoria Jackson, a sports history professor at Arizona State. It would mean changes to an industry that generates...
    Trump’s $2,000 stimulus checks can be agreed in 24 HOURS to give Americans huge Christmas boost, Pelosi says. The House Speaker urged the president to act in a Twitter statement after Trump indicated that jhe would veto the deal. She wrote: "Mr. President, sign the bill to keep government open! Urge McConnell and McCarthy to agree with the Democratic unanimous consent request for $2,000 direct payments! This can be done by noon on Christmas Eve!" Trump hinted that he would veto the $900billion stimulus relief bill, which included $600 payment, in a blistering Twitter address on Tuesday, a day after it was agreed. 9Donald Trump could veto the bill after saying the stimulus checks were too smallCredit: Getty Images - Getty 9House Speaker called his bluff after Republican Party push-back on spendingCredit: EPA 9The deal followed months of talks between Pelosi Treasury Secretary Steve MnuchinCredit: AFP 9Senate Majority...
    President Trump on Tuesday blasted the bipartisan omnibus spending bill passed by Congress that wrapped up COVID relief in it, calling for larger stimulus checks and arguing no one in Congress had read the bill. The face-off is reminiscent of 2018, when Trump threatened to veto an omnibus bill "nobody read." He ultimately ended up not vetoing but promised at the time never to sign such legislation again.  In 2018, he said he signed the legislation for the military and national security. "It's not right and it's very bad for our country," he said. "There are a lot of things that I’m unhappy about in this bill. There are a lot of things that we shouldn’t have had in this bill, but we were, in a sense, forced -- if we want to build our military -- we were forced to have. There are some things that we should have in the bill," Trump...
    Trump could stall a new spending bill — and the attached coronavirus relief package — over foreign aid money he himself asked for. In his Tuesday night video announcing he is thinking of vetoing the government funding bill that included more than $900 billion in coronavirus relief, Donald Trump cited the bill's inclusion of foreign aid to countries like Cambodia, Burma, and Egypt, among other countries as one of the reasons he opposes the legislation. "It is called the Covid relief bill, but it has almost nothing to do with Covid," Trump said in the video. Of course, the reason the bill had funding for things other than coronavirus relief was because this was the government funding bill for the entire 2021 fiscal year. Lawmakers just tacked the coronavirus relief onto the bill. If Trump vetoes the legislation, the entire federal...
    WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump has threatened to torpedo Congress' massive COVID-19 relief and year-end package, upending a hard-fought compromise in the midst of a raging pandemic and deep economic uncertainty by demanding changes fellow Republicans have opposed.Trump assailed the bipartisan $900 billion bill and broader government funding package in a video he tweeted out Tuesday night and suggested he may not sign the legislation. That revives threats of a federal government shutdown. He called on lawmakers to increase direct payments for most Americans from $600 to $2,000 for individuals and $4,000 for couples.House Speaker Nancy Pelosi urged Trump in a Wednesday tweet to "sign the bill to keep government open!"Pelosi wrote in a letter to colleagues "the entire country knows that it is urgent for the President to sign this bill."WATCH: In Twitter video, Trump suggests he won't sign COVID relief billEMBED More News Videos Trump tells lawmakers to...
    WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump has threatened to torpedo Congress' massive COVID-19 relief package in the midst of a raging pandemic and deep economic uncertainty, suddenly demanding changes fellow Republicans have opposed.Trump assailed the bipartisan $900 billion package in a video he tweeted out Tuesday night and suggested he may not sign the legislation. He called on lawmakers to increase direct payments for most Americans from $600 to $2,000 for individuals and $4,000 for couples.Railing against a range of provisions in the bill, including for foreign aid, he told lawmakers to "get rid of the wasteful and unnecessary items from this legislation and to send me a suitable bill."WATCH: In Twitter video, Trump suggests he won't sign COVID relief billEMBED More News Videos Trump tells lawmakers to amend COVID-19 relief bill, suggests he may not sign $900 billion legislation. Trump did not specifically vow to veto the bill, and there...
    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Congress has passed a long-awaited bill that would address water availability issues for residents living on the Navajo Nation in Utah who lack access to running water — a problem exacerbated by the pandemic. The Utah Navajo Water Rights Settlement Act was passed on Monday as part of a massive $2.3 trillion spending bill that includes $900 billion in coronavirus relief and a $1.4 trillion omnibus spending package, The Salt Lake Tribune reported. The legislation will next head to President Donald Trump for his signature. “This is truly a historic milestone for the Navajo people and the state of Utah,” Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez said in a statement Monday. “For years, Navajo leaders have advocated for the passage of the Navajo Utah Water Rights Settlement Act to provide clean water for our people that reside in the Utah portion of the Navajo Nation. The...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has threatened to torpedo Congress’ massive COVID-19 relief package in the midst of a raging pandemic and deep economic uncertainty, suddenly demanding changes fellow Republicans have opposed. Trump assailed the bipartisan $900 billion package in a video he tweeted out Tuesday night and suggested he may not sign the legislation. He called on lawmakers to increase direct payments for most Americans from $600 to $2,000 for individuals and $4,000 for couples. Railing against a range of provisions in the bill, including for foreign aid, he told lawmakers to “get rid of the wasteful and unnecessary items from this legislation and to send me a suitable bill.” Trump did not specifically vow to veto the bill, and there may be enough support for the legislation in Congress to override him if he does. But if Trump were to upend the sprawling legislation, the consequences...
    BOSTON (AP) — The Massachusetts House has approved a revised version of a police accountability bill and sent it back to the desk of Gov. Charlie Baker who has indicated he would sign it. The Republican governor sent the original bill approved this month back to lawmakers for revisions, included loosening proposed limits on the use of facial recognition technology. The governor said he opposed the bill’s moratorium on facial recognition technology, pointing out that it helped convict a child rapist and an accomplice to a double murder in recent years. The bill would also create a civilian-led commission to standardize the certification, training and decertification of police officers in the state. Baker did not want the board to have the authority to approve training regulations, and the amendment that cleared both chambers instead keeps training oversight within a committee under the Executive Office of Public Safety. The Senate approved...
    DONALD Trump and Nancy Pelosi are pushing a coronavirus stimulus check increase, which "could send $5,200 to families." Trump hinted that he would veto the $900billion stimulus relief bill, which included $600 payment, in a blistering Twitter address on Tuesday, a day after it was agreed. 9Donald Trump could veto the bill after saying the stimulus checks were too smallCredit: Getty Images - Getty 9House Speaker called his bluff after Republican Party push-back on spendingCredit: EPA 9The deal followed months of talks between Pelosi Treasury Secretary Steve MnuchinCredit: AFP 9Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell touted the deal on TwitterCredit: Getty Images - Getty The president complained that the current deal announced by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Sunday was a "disgrace," decrying that it had "taken forever" to reach a deal. Pelosi appeared to call Trump's bluff, saying "let’s do it!" after months of talks with Treasury...
    Donald Trump is leaving for Mar-a-Lago Wednesday for his Christmas vacation after threatening Tuesday night, seemingly out of the blue, to veto the coronavirus relief package because he wants larger direct checks for Americans. The president posted a four-minute video to Twitter where, in part, he slammed Congress for only including $600 payments for most Americans. Trump says he wants the amount tripled to $2,000 instead – much larger than any other number floated by Republicans during negotiations. For the duration of the video, which threw avoiding a government shut down into chaos Tuesday night, Trump decried the compromise reached by Republicans and Democrats this week. Lawmakers were hoping to kill two birds with one stone by lumping in the $900 billion COVID-19 aid bill with the annual government funding legislation. Trump has five days to sign the package or else the government will shut down, which is what lawmakers...
    Minnesota Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar said President Trump's calls to amend the COVID-19 relief bill Congress passed on Monday an "attack on every American." The president in a video posted to Twitter on Tuesday said the bill should be amended to include $2,000 in direct payments to all Americans instead of $600, which is what the legislation currently offers. "This is an attack on every American – people who are struggling to get by right now, out of work. ... Unemployment is basically going to end the day after Christmas if this doesn't pass," Klobuchar said Tuesday on MSNBC's "The Rachel Maddow Show." She said the legislation includes $30 billion for vaccine distribution and more than $300 billion for small business relief, adding that the president's calls to amend the legislation are "literally undermining our entire effort on testing and vaccine distribution," and "small businesses can't take it anymore." "Democrats are pushing for more funds for the individual payments,...
    While Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine continues to hold a bill that would remove the requirement that Ohioans retreat from an encounter before using deadly force, he is getting encouragement from state prosecutors to veto the bill. DeWine, who said he plans to speak about the bill at some point this week, has spent the past two weeks signaling his opposition to the legislation that eliminates the responsibility of a citizen to retreat before using deadly force to defend life or property. The Ohio Prosecuting Attorneys Association said an opportunity to retreat is more than reasonable and opposes the bill. “Our association has opposed and continues to oppose the repeal of the duty to retreat in Ohio,” Louis Tobin, executive director of the Ohio Prosecuting Attorneys Association, said. “This is a wholly unnecessary change to the law that is a solution in search of a problem. The current...
    MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russia's lower house of parliament voted on Wednesday to pass legislation allowing authorities to block or restrict websites like YouTube if they "discriminate" against Russian media on their sites. The authors of the legislation cited complaints from Russian media outlets RT and the RIA news agency about what they described as the "censorship" of their accounts on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube. (Reporting by Nadezhda Tsydenova; writing by Tom Balmforth; editing by Katya Golubkova) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: Russia, United States, Asia, Europe
    By KEVIN FREKING, ANDREW TAYLOR and LISA MASCARO, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has threatened to torpedo Congress’ massive COVID-19 relief package in the midst of a raging pandemic and deep economic uncertainty, suddenly demanding changes fellow Republicans have opposed. Trump assailed the bipartisan $900 billion package in a video he tweeted out Tuesday night and suggested he may not sign the legislation. He called on lawmakers to increase direct payments for most Americans from $600 to $2,000 for individuals and $4,000 for couples. Railing against a range of provisions in the bill, including for foreign aid, he told lawmakers to "get rid of the wasteful and unnecessary items from this legislation and to send me a suitable bill.” Trump did not specifically vow to veto the bill, and there may be enough support for the legislation in Congress to override him if he does. But if...
    Three French police officers were fatally shot Wednesday as they attempted to rescue a woman during a domestic violence call, the AFP reported. The reported shooting occurred in Puy-de-Dome, which is in central France, according to the report. The gunman was described as a 48-year-old man. Another officer was reportedly injured. UK TRAVEL BANS STRAND MORE THAN 1,500 FRANCE-BOUND TRUCKS French President Emmanuel Macron has found himself in the middle of growing tension between police in the country and the citizens they protect. Protests have erupted in Paris over proposed legislation that puts restrictions on images that citizens can post of police officers online. An article in the new security legislation that would make it illegal to publish images of officers with intent to cause them harm drew sharp criticism over fear it could hurt press freedoms and make it more difficult for citizens to decry police brutality. GET THE...
    Loading the player... President Donald Trump late Tuesday threatened to torpedo Congress’ massive COVID-19 relief package in the midst of a raging pandemic and deep economic uncertainty, suddenly demanding changes fellow Republicans have opposed. Trump assailed the bipartisan $900 billion package in a video he tweeted out Tuesday night and suggested he may not sign the legislation. He called on lawmakers to increase direct payments for most Americans from $600 to $2,000 for individuals and $4,000 for couples. Read More: Congress approves $900B COVID relief bill, sending to Trump Railing against a range of provisions in the bill, including for foreign aid, he told lawmakers to “get rid of the wasteful and unnecessary items from this legislation and to send me a suitable bill.” Trump said he wants Congress to amend the coronavirus relief bill to raise the amount of stimulus checks to $2,000 and eliminate certain items, throwing...
    By KEVIN FREKING, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is blasting the bipartisan $900 billion pandemic relief package that Congress just passed and is suggesting that he may not sign it. Trump complained in a video that he tweeted out Tuesday night that the bill delivered too much money to foreign countries, but not enough to Americans. The bill provides for a $600 payment to most Americans, but Trump said he is asking Congress to amend the bill and “increase the ridiculously low $600 to $2,000, or $4,000 for a couple. I am also asking Congress to get rid of the wasteful and unnecessary items from this legislation and to send me a suitable bill.” Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Associated Press, legislation, infectious diseases, public health, health, coronavirus, lung disease
    President Trump indicated Tuesday night that he would not sign the massive COVID-19 economic relief package, bringing new risk to the effort to provide financial aid to millions of Americans struggling during the pandemic. The bill passed in Congress less than 24 hours before, and Mr. Trump's Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin was part of the negotiations. Mr. Trump has to sign the bill before it becomes law. If he doesn't sign it within 10 days and Congress will have to reconvene to overturn it. Without warning and without much public input on the legislation before it passed, Mr. Trump released a video on Twitter that urged Congress to go back to the drawing board and increase the $600 stimulus checks to $2,000 per adult.  It's unclear how serious the president's threat is or whether he would actually veto the legislation negotiated and agreed to by his own administration. After weeks of...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Trump tells lawmakers to amend COVID-19 relief bill, suggests he may not sign $900 billion legislation. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    President Donald Trump seemed to threaten Tuesday to veto the COVID-19 stimulus package that Congress passed almost 24 hours earlier, telling lawmakers to boost checks for Americans to $2,000 and make other modifications after sitting out talks for months. Trump said 'it's taken forever' to get a package and the bill passed 'is much different than anticipated.' 'It really is a disgrace,' he added. 'Send me a suitable bill or else the next administration will have to deliver a COVID relief package and maybe that administration will be me and we will get it done,' Trump also said, as he continues to refuse to concede the election to President-elect Joe Biden. 'It's a disgrace.' Trump tweeted an address from the White House to rail against a bill passed by both parties in both chambers with overwhelming support Both houses easily had passed the bill but Senator Rand Paul had...
    New York Gov. Andrew CuomoAndrew CuomoWashington governor to require 14-day quarantine for travelers arriving from UK, South Africa White House mulls requiring UK travelers to provide negative coronavirus test: report Overnight Health Care: Congress to pass deal with 0 stimulus checks | House panel subpoenas for Azar, Redfield CDC documents | Fauci, Azar to receive COVID-19 vaccine Tuesday MORE (D) signed legislation Tuesday pausing the use of facial recognition technology at K-12 schools in the state for two years. The moratorium, approved by the state legislature this summer, follows an attempt by a school district in upstate New York to install the controversial technology at its schools. Lockport City School District installed cameras in 2019 but turned them off after pushback from locals and civil rights groups. As part of the agreement to sign the bill, the New York state legislature will pass a bill next session to study facial recognition...
    VLADIMIR Putin has signed a bill granting himself lifetime immunity from prosecution once he leaves office.  The legislation, published online today, outlaws the prosecution of all former Russian presidents and their families.  2Vladimir Putin has signed a bill granting himself lifetime immunity from prosecution once he leaves officeCredit: Reuters 2The strongman is seen in hockey training yesterday Credit: @kremlin.ru/Newsflash Former leaders will also be exempt from questioning by police or investigators, as well as searches or arrests. Prior to the current law, Presidents were only granted immunity for crimes committed while in office.  The new legislation also allows leaders to become senators for life in the upper house of the Kremlin once they leave the presidency.  It also makes it harder to revoke a former president's immunity. While a former President can have their immunity stripped if accused of treason or other grave crimes, these must be confirmed by the...
    Congress’s $900 billion stimulus bill includes some unexpected climate provisions, including new restrictions that will change the way Americans cool their homes and refrigerate their groceries. The new measures will phase out hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) used in air conditioning and refrigeration, “super” greenhouse gases that are thousands of times more potent than carbon dioxide in their climate impact. The goal of the provision is to cut the production and import of HFCs by 85 percent by 2035. Under the new provision, that goal will be federal policy and the EPA will have the power to implement new restrictions on manufacturers and importers in order to meet it. Those measures will bring the US in line with an important climate agreement that it had previously refused to ratify, the Kigali amendment to the Montreal Protocol. With the US on board, the phasing out of HFCs is expected to help the world...
    As Congress rushed to pass its year-end spending omnibus legislation and a coronavirus stimulus bill in one fell swoop Monday night, many objected to the process which essentially attached the crucial pandemic aid to a bevy of other priorities totaling $2.3 trillion.  Among the most controversial provisions were related to foreign aid and railed against by people ranging from conservative members of Congress to left-leaning journalists. "It throws billions at foreign aid, including gender programs in Pakistan to the tune of $10 million," Rep. Chip Roy, R-Texas, said in a scathing statement. Intercept co-founder Glenn Greenwald, meanwhile, objected to $500 million that was allocated for joint programs between the U.S. and Israel.  WHY THE HOUSE SPLIT THE CORONAVIRUS AND OMNIBUS PACKAGE INTO TWO VOTES, AND WHAT IT MAY MEAN FOR NEXT CONGRESS "Israel has universal health care while Americans - transferring yet more of your money to that foreign country - do...
    By MATTHEW DALY, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — A bill to ban race-day doping of horses and set national medication and track-safety standards for the horse-racing industry is nearing the finish line. Lawmakers gave final approval to the bill late Monday as part of the massive legislation on spending and pandemic relief. President Donald Trump is expected to sign the bill in the next few days. Passage of the Horseracing Integrity and Safety Act comes after a series of doping scandals and a rash of horse fatalities in recent years. More than two dozen people were charged last March in what authorities described as a widespread international scheme to drug horses to make them run faster. The House approved the bill by voice vote in September, sending it to the Senate, where Majority Leader Mitch McConnell co-sponsored similar legislation. The measure was eventually folded into the larger spending package. McConnell’s...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — A bill to ban race-day doping of horses and set national medication and track-safety standards for the horse-racing industry is nearing the finish line. Lawmakers gave final approval to the bill late Monday as part of the massive legislation on spending and pandemic relief. President Donald Trump is expected to sign the bill in the next few days. Passage of the Horseracing Integrity and Safety Act comes after a series of doping scandals and a rash of horse fatalities in recent years. More than two dozen people were charged last March in what authorities described as a widespread international scheme to drug horses to make them run faster. The House approved the bill by voice vote in September, sending it to the Senate, where Majority Leader Mitch McConnell co-sponsored similar legislation. The measure was eventually folded into the larger spending package. McConnell’s home state of...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress passed a $900 billion pandemic relief package Monday night that would finally deliver long-sought cash to businesses and individuals and resources to vaccinate a nation confronting a frightening surge in COVID-19 cases and deaths. Lawmakers tacked on a $1.4 trillion catchall spending bill and thousands of pages of other end-of-session business in a massive bundle of bipartisan legislation as Capitol Hill prepared to close the books on the year. The bill goes to President Donald Trump for his signature, which is expected in the coming days. The relief package, unveiled Monday afternoon, sped through the House and Senate in a matter of hours. The Senate cleared the massive package by a 92-6 vote after the House approved the COVID-19 package by another lopsided vote, 359-53. The tallies were a bipartisan coda to months of partisanship and politicking as lawmakers wrangled over the relief question, a logjam...
    After months of stalled negotiations, Congress finally passed a new $900 billion coronavirus relief package late Monday night with overwhelming support in the Senate, but six Republicans stood firmly against it. Sens. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., Ted Cruz, R-Texas, Ron Johnson, R-Wis., Mike Lee, R-Utah, Rand Paul, R-Ky., and Rick Scott, R-Fla., all stood firmly against the bill, which had been bundled with a $1.4 trillion spending bill to avoid a government shutdown. Their criticisms largely focused on the size of the legislation, both in terms of the dollar amount and the bill's page count. WHAT'S IN THE NEW $900B CORONAVIRUS RELIEF PACKAGE? Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky. "To so-called conservatives who are quick to identify the socialism of Democrats: If you vote for this spending monstrosity, you are no better," Paul said on the Senate floor. "When you vote to pass out free money, you lose your soul and you abandon forever...
    New York (CNN Business)Tucked away in the more than 5,000-page long Covid-19 stimulus bill is a new law that severely punishes streamers that pirate large amounts of copyrighted content. You probably have nothing to worry about: The "Protecting Lawful Streaming Act," which was introduced earlier this month by Senator Thom Tillis, a Republican from North Carolina, doesn't target casual internet users. The law specifies that it doesn't apply to people who use illegal streaming services or "individuals who access pirated streams or unwittingly stream unauthorized copies of copyrighted works." Rather, it's focused on "commercial, for-profit streaming piracy services" that make money from illegally streaming copyrighted material.Tillis said that this practice costs the US economy nearly $30 billion yearly. The Senate races in Georgia will shape the economic recovery"This commonsense legislation was drafted with the input of creators, user groups, and technology companies and is narrowly targeted so that only criminal...
    The omnibus spending bill Congress passed Dec. 21 includes provisions that would make profiting from hosting illegally streamed unlicensed media a felony punishable by up to three years in prison. The latest iteration of the copyright legislation was introduced by Republican North Carolina Sen. Thom Tillis. A press release from Tillis’ office explained that his bill only punishes the hosts of illegal streams, and not their internet consumers. Tillis originally introduced his legislation as a standalone bill, the Protect Lawful Streaming Act, alongside five Democrat and four Republican cosponsors. The original bill and rider do not target individual consumers of illegally-streamed content. The bill “is narrowly targeted so that only criminal organizations are punished and that no individual streamer has to worry about the fear of prosecution,” Tillis said according to the statement. Tillis’ bill cracking down on online streaming was ultimately added as a rider to the year-end funding...
    After days of frenzied negotiations, Congress late Monday night passed a massive eleventh-hour bill that combined $900 billion in COVID-19 relief with a $1.4 trillion omnibus government spending measure. In addition to reviving a federal unemployment boost for millions of out-of-work Americans and sending a second $600 stimulus check to individuals including children, the $2.3 trillion catchall package, which will fund the government for the remainder of the fiscal year, addresses a spate of legislation on taxes, energy, education and health care. But the mammoth 5,593-page bill – part of an omnibus appropriations package that wraps 12 spending measures into one – also contains a raft of unexpected items that are not directly related to government funding or pandemic relief efforts, such as establishing two new branches of the Smithsonian museum near the National Mall, creating national standards for the horse-racing industry and making illegal to stream a felony.  CONGRESS HAD SIX HOURS TO READ A 6,000 PAGE BILL, AOC...
    MOSCOW (Reuters) - President Vladimir Putin signed legislation on Tuesday that allows former presidents to become lawmakers for life in Russia's upper house of parliament once they leave the Kremlin, a government website showed. The legislation follows sweeping changes to the Russian political system initiated by Putin this year that, among other things, allow him to run for two more six-year terms in the Kremlin if he chooses. He had been due to step down in 2024. The reforms are being closely parsed for clues as to what Putin may do at the end of his current presidential term, his second consecutive and fourth overall. Tuesday's legislation would allow presidents to name up to 30 senators to the Federation Council, Russia's upper house, and also to become a senator themselves once they have left office. Other legislation that is yet to be signed into law, but has already been backed...
    By Laura Davison | Bloomberg Tucked in among more than 5,000 pages of legislative text, the congressional bill providing Covid-19 relief and 2021 government funding includes dozens of tax breaks for beneficiaries ranging from downtown restaurants and the film industry to motor-sports racetracks. And many of the benefits will stick around long after the pandemic is over. Besides granting temporary tax credits to help businesses cover the cost of payroll, the bill gives benefits for wind and solar projects and creates a permanent tax break for beer brewers, winemakers and liquor distillers. Also included is a favorite of President Donald Trump: a write-off for wining and dining business clients. The inclusion of nearly 80 tax-related provisions in the bill represents an age-old strategy in Washington for many lawmakers and the lobbyists who try to influence them: Attach your favorite tax break to a large, must-pass bill where a couple of extra...
    Highlights of $900 billion COVID-19 relief, wrapup bills WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress passed a $900 billion pandemic relief package that would finally deliver long-sought cash to businesses and individuals and resources to vaccinate a nation confronting a frightening surge in COVID-19 cases and deaths. Lawmakers tacked on a $1.4 trillion catchall spending bill and thousands of pages of other end-of-session business in a massive bundle of bipartisan legislation as Capitol Hill prepared to close the books on the year. The bill approved Monday night went to President Donald Trump for his signature, which was expected in the coming days. The relief package, unveiled Monday afternoon, sped through the House and Senate in a matter of hours. The Senate cleared the massive package by a 92-6 vote after the House approved the COVID-19 package by another lopsided vote, 359-53. The tallies were a bipartisan coda to...
    By SAMY MAGDY, Associated Press CAIRO (AP) — Sudan's Justice Ministry said Tuesday the U.S. Congress has moved forward on Washington's promise to end the African country's pariah status, passing legislation that grants Sudan some immunity from legal action by Americans against its involvement in militant attacks. The legislation, part of a massive relief package that Congress approved Monday, restored to Sudan what is known as sovereign immunity, a measure that would effectively stop future compensation claims from being filed against it in U.S. courts. It did not grant Sudan immunity from being sued by the 9/11 victims’ families over the country's alleged role in the attacks, the ministry said in a statement. The step by Congress capped efforts by President Donald Trump’s administration to remove Sudan from the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism. The designation dates back to the 1990s, when Sudan briefly hosted al-Qaida leader Osama...
    The massive, year-end catchall bill Congress passed combines $900 billion in COVID-19 aid with a $1.4 trillion omnibus spending bill and reams of other unfinished legislation on taxes, energy, education and health care. It awaits President Donald Trump’s signature. Highlights of the measure with overall funding amounts and specific amounts for some but not necessarily all initiatives. COVID-19 RELIEF Unemployment insurance ($120 billion). Revives supplemental federal pandemic unemployment benefits but at $300 per week — through March 14 — instead of the $600 per week benefit that expired in July. Extends special pandemic benefits for “gig” workers and extends the maximum period for state-paid jobless benefits to 50 weeks. Direct payments ($166 billion). Provides $600 direct payments to individuals making up to $75,000 per year and couples making up to $150,000 per year — with payments phased out for higher incomes —- with $600 additional payments per dependent child. Paycheck...
    By ANDREW TAYLOR, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress passed a $900 billion pandemic relief package that would finally deliver long-sought cash to businesses and individuals and resources to vaccinate a nation confronting a frightening surge in COVID-19 cases and deaths. Lawmakers tacked on a $1.4 trillion catchall spending bill and thousands of pages of other end-of-session business in a massive bundle of bipartisan legislation as Capitol Hill prepared to close the books on the year. The bill approved Monday night went to President Donald Trump for his signature, which was expected in the coming days. The relief package, unveiled Monday afternoon, sped through the House and Senate in a matter of hours. The Senate cleared the massive package by a 92-6 vote after the House approved the COVID-19 package by another lopsided vote, 359-53. The tallies were a bipartisan coda to months of partisanship and politicking as lawmakers wrangled...
    By The Associated Press The massive, year-end catchall bill Congress passed combines $900 billion in COVID-19 aid with a $1.4 trillion omnibus spending bill and reams of other unfinished legislation on taxes, energy, education and health care. It awaits President Donald Trump's signature. Highlights of the measure with overall funding amounts and specific amounts for some but not necessarily all initiatives. COVID-19 RELIEF Unemployment insurance ($120 billion). Revives supplemental federal pandemic unemployment benefits but at $300 per week — through March 14 — instead of the $600 per week benefit that expired in July. Extends special pandemic benefits for “gig” workers and extends the maximum period for state-paid jobless benefits to 50 weeks. Direct payments ($166 billion). Provides $600 direct payments to individuals making up to $75,000 per year and couples making up to $150,000 per year — with payments phased out for higher incomes —- with $600 additional payments...
            by J.D. Davidson  If Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine signs a new bill into law, Ohioans will no longer be required to retreat first before using deadly force to defend themselves. Where they can defend themselves with deadly force would also expand. DeWine, who has repeatedly over the past year asked the legislature to pass several pieces of his gun legislation, has not indicted if he would sign the bill. State Rep. Kyle Koehler (R-Springfield), who introduced the legislation, said the bill is straight forward and lawmakers must defend the Constitution. “Ohioans should be able to use necessary force to defend themselves where they reasonably conclude that deadly force is being used against them,” Koehler said. “We have a duty to defend the United States Constitution, and people who utilize their Second Amendment rights. This straight-forward legislation will help us protect our constitutional right and the...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress passed a $900 billion pandemic relief package Monday night that would finally deliver long-sought cash to businesses and individuals and resources to vaccinate a nation confronting a frightening surge in COVID-19 cases and deaths. Lawmakers tacked on a $1.4 trillion catchall spending bill and thousands of pages of other end-of-session business in a massive bundle of bipartisan legislation as Capitol Hill prepared to close the books on the year. The bill goes to President Donald Trump for his signature, which is expected in the coming days. The relief package, unveiled Monday afternoon, sped through the House and Senate in a matter of hours. The Senate cleared the massive package by a 92-6 vote after the House approved the COVID-19 package by another lopsided vote, 359-53. The tallies were a bipartisan coda to months of partisanship and politicking as lawmakers wrangled over the relief question, a logjam...
    The House of Representatives voted Monday to approve a $2.3 trillion package that includes $600 COVID-19 stimulus checks for most Americans. The nearly 5,593-page bill was published on Monday and now goes to the Senate, which is expected to also approve the legislation and send it to President Trump for his signature. The legislation authorizes $600 stimulus checks for people who earn less than $75,000 per year and an extra $600 payment per child. The bill contains a $300 weekly unemployment insurance supplement and authorizes $284.4 billion in Paycheck Protection Program forgivable loans for small businesses.
    The House easily passed a $900 billion pandemic relief package Monday night that would finally deliver long-sought cash to businesses and individuals and resources to vaccinate a nation confronting a frightening surge in COVID-19 cases and deaths. Lawmakers tacked on a $1.4 trillion catchall spending bill and thousands of pages of other end-of-session business in a massive bundle of bipartisan legislation as Capitol Hill prepared to close the books on the year. The lopsided 359-53 vote was a bipartisan coda to months of partisanship and politicking as lawmakers wrangled over the relief question. The relief package, unveiled Monday afternoon, sped through the House in a matter of hours. A Senate vote that would send the bill to President Donald Trump appeared likely to follow Monday night. The bill combines coronavirus-fighting funds with financial relief for individuals and businesses. It would establish a temporary $300 per week supplemental jobless benefit and...
    The U.S. House of Representatives passed a massive $900 billion coronavirus relief and stimulus bill on Monday evening, mere hours after the nearly 6,000-page legislation was released. It was unlikely any members read the entire legislation. The bill, which included $1.4 trillion in stopgap spending to prevent a government shutdown, was ostensibly the result of bipartisan negotiations that reached an agreement less than 24 hours before. It includes $600 stimulus checks for American households and a temporary expansion of federal unemployment benefits by $300, half the amounts paid earlier this year. But the legislation also includes many hidden provisions completely unrelated to coronavirus, many of which appear to be the work of individual legislators, acting at the behest of specific lobbyists and interest groups who seized the opportunity. The bill includes tax benefits for racehorse owners; hundreds of millions of dollars in economic aid to the Palestinians; and a congressional...
    Loading the player... The House easily passed a $900 billion pandemic relief package Monday night that would finally deliver long-sought cash to businesses and individuals and resources to vaccinate a nation confronting a frightening surge in COVID-19 cases and deaths. Lawmakers tacked on a $1.4 trillion catchall spending bill and thousands of pages of other end-of-session business in a massive bundle of bipartisan legislation as Capitol Hill prepared to close the books on the year. The lopsided 359-53 vote was a bipartisan coda to months of partisanship, politicking as lawmakers wrangled over the relief question, a logjam that broke after President-elect Joe Biden urged his party to accept a compromise with top Republicans that is smaller than many Democrats would have liked. Read More: Disbursement of stimulus checks to begin next week: Mnuchin United States Capitol (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) The relief package, unveiled Monday afternoon, sped through...
    By Andrew Taylor | Associated Press WASHINGTON — The House easily passed a $900 billion pandemic relief package Monday night that would finally deliver long-sought cash to businesses and individuals and resources to vaccinate a nation confronting a frightening surge in COVID-19 cases and deaths. Lawmakers tacked on a $1.4 trillion catchall spending bill and thousands of pages of other end-of-session business in a massive bundle of bipartisan legislation as Capitol Hill prepared to close the books on the year. The lopsided 359-53 vote was a bipartisan coda to months of partisanship, politicking as lawmakers wrangled over the relief question, a logjam that broke after President-elect Joe Biden urged his party to accept a compromise with top Republicans that is smaller than many Democrats would have liked. The relief package, unveiled Monday afternoon, sped through the House in a matter of hours. A Senate vote that would send the...
    Congress is poised to repeal the ban on prison inmates receiving Pell Grants for higher education if the coronavirus relief package becomes law. On Monday, both the United States House of Representatives and the Senate agreed to a broad $2.4 trillion spending deal, which includes more than $900 billion in relief for individuals and businesses impacted by the novel coronavirus pandemic. While the bill does provide essential relief for those impacted by the pandemic, most notably through $325 billion in small business funding, the legislation also has a bevy of non-public-health-related inclusions tucked within its 5,593 pages. One such inclusion is language repealing the ban on incarcerated individuals receiving Pell Grants, federal tax subsidies provided to low-income students pursuing a bachelor’s degree. The ban was first implemented through the 1994 crime bill largely written by then-senator, now-President-elect Joe Biden. Individuals previously convicted of a drug crime are also set to benefit from...
    More On: Coronavirus Holiday fear: NYC’s uber-rich are dragging nannies to COVID hot spots for Christmas vacation Anti-lockdown protestors kick in door at Oregon statehouse New tool tells you when you may be able to get COVID-19 vaccine How face masks can disrupt facial recognition — and daily life The House of Representatives voted Monday to approve a $2.3 trillion package that includes $600 COVID-19 stimulus checks for most Americans. The nearly 5,593-page bill was published on Monday and now goes to the Senate, which is expected to also approve the legislation and send it to President Trump for his signature. The legislation authorizes $600 stimulus checks for people who earn less than $75,000 per year and an extra $600 payment per child. The bill contains a $300 weekly unemployment insurance supplement and authorizes $284.4 billion in Paycheck Protection Program forgivable loans for small businesses. Filed under congress ,  Coronavirus , ...
    Wealthy Southern California patients seeking coronavirus vaccine Biden poised to nominate Connecticut education chief Miguel Cardona as education secretary Beer, Restaurants and Nascar Win Tax Breaks in Virus-Relief Bill (Bloomberg) -- Tucked in among more than 5,000 pages of legislative text, the congressional bill providing Covid-19 relief and 2021 government funding includes dozens of tax breaks for beneficiaries ranging from downtown restaurants and the film industry to motor-sports racetracks. Load Error And many of the benefits will stick around long after the pandemic is over. Besides granting temporary tax credits to help businesses cover the cost of payroll, the bill gives benefits for wind and solar projects and creates a permanent tax break for beer brewers, wine makers and liquor distillers. Also included is a favorite of President Donald Trump: a write-off for wining and dining business clients. The inclusion of nearly 80 tax-related provisions in the bill...
    By MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — The $900 billion pandemic relief package being rushed through Congress Monday created a familiar year-end conundrum for lawmakers: It was a bill too big to fail, and also too big to read. Delivering virus aid to the country required a leap of faith for lawmakers as they were casting their votes, practically sight unseen, for a sprawling, 5,593-page bill that linked the pandemic aid with a $1.4 trillion annual spending bill to fund the government. The Senate Historical Office says it's the longest bill ever passed by Congress. “I think if we provide everyone a paper copy we would have to destroy an entire forest,” joked House Rules Committee Chairman James McGovern, responding to a Republican request for a hard copy of the legislation. The bill was released at 2 p.m., just hours before the House and Senate were expected to...
    The Philippines is about to move forward with a legislative bill to raise the sexual consent age from 12 to 16. The country currently allows children as young as 12 to legally have sex with adults so long as they agree. While the current law criminalizes sex with children under 18, it only does so if there is no consent present or if the act involves threats, force, or intimidation, CNN Philippines reported. The proposed bill also seeks to expand the definition of rape if the victim is 16 years of age or older and has a disability that renders the victim unable to give consent. Children’s rights activists have worked for decades to challenge lawmakers to increase the age — which has been part of the country’s penal code since 1930 — but faced resistance from what they say is a patriarchal society where abortion and divorce are illegal. Activists say...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The $900 billion pandemic relief package being rushed through Congress Monday created a familiar year-end conundrum for lawmakers: It was a bill too big to fail, and also too big to read. Delivering virus aid to the country required a leap of faith for lawmakers as they were casting their votes, practically sight unseen, for a sprawling, 5,593-page bill that linked the pandemic aid with a $1.4 trillion annual spending bill to fund the government. The Senate Historical Office says it’s the longest bill ever passed by Congress. “I think if we provide everyone a paper copy we would have to destroy an entire forest,” joked House Rules Committee Chairman James McGovern, responding to a Republican request for a hard copy of the legislation. The bill was released at 2 p.m., just hours before the House and Senate were expected to vote on it. Also...
    The massive $2.5 trillion coronavirus relief and omnibus bill package includes a wide swath of measures beyond normal government spending and matters relating to the pandemic, including authorizations for new museums, creation of a national park, tax tweaks, vaping regulation, and foreign policy changes. House lawmakers are set to vote Monday on the 5,593-page bill just hours after the bill's text became public. In what has become a typical practice for Congress close to the end of a session, the legislation is a massive compilation of various policy measures packaged together into one bill. Tacking measures onto critical spending and aid legislation close to a deadline is often how many measures, such as bills that were previously passed by the House but never received a vote in the Senate, get pushed through a sharply divided Congress — a process that peeved some lawmakers. Measures include: ...
    Horse racing somehow found its way into the latest $900 billion COVID relief bill agreed upon by Congress and likely to pass, which would give many Americans a morsel of help before 2020 ends. The Horseracing Integrity and Safety Act was tied into the massive 5,593-page bill. Should it get passed, the legislation would allow the Horseracing Integrity and Safety Authority to come up with and implement horse and racetrack safety standards at a national level. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM Horses involved in racing would be barred from receiving pain killers. The measures would be overseen by the Federal Trade Commission and enforced by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. The bill, sponsored by Democratic New York Rep. Paul Tonko and Republican Kentucky Rep. Andy Barr, was passed in the House in September. Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., and Martha McSally, R-Ariz., also sponsored the bill. HORSE RACING HOPES...
    The long-awaited coronavirus relief bill, purportedly aimed to help Americans and their small businesses as the Chinese coronavirus continues to grip the nation, would make illegal streaming a felony — a special interest gift to the entertainment industry. The $900 billion piece, combined with a $1.4 trillion government spending bill for a total of $2.3 trillion, extends a hand to Hollywood by making streaming for commercial profit a felony, carrying a punishment of up to ten years in prison. The addition has been attributed to Republican Sen. Thom Tillis (R-NC), who earlier this month released the text of legislation, the Protecting Lawful Streaming Act, which would “punish large-scale criminal streaming services that willfully and for commercial advantage or private financial gain offer to the public illicit services dedicated to illegally streaming copyrighted material.” His original proposal would apply to commercial, for-profit services and would not impact individuals who “access pirated streams or unwittingly...
    Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) on Monday announced draft legislation to place Austin's police department under state control, several months after the city government reduced the department's funding. Abbott vowed in a tweet that his administration would "pass a law to keep Austin safe" in response to the August cuts that totaled more than $21 million, according to the Austin Statesman, and have the potential to be expanded by millions more in the future. Just in time for Christmas:The Legislative Council has sent draft language for a proposed law that would transfer control of the Austin Police Department to the Texas Department of Public Safety.One way or another we will pass a law to keep Austin safe.— Greg Abbott (@GregAbbott_TX) December 21, 2020 The legislation will be sent to the Republican state legislature for consideration. Abbott threatened earlier this year to push for legislation that would allow the state to freeze property...
    More On: Coronavirus Joe and Jill Biden getting COVID-19 vaccine on live television Over 550K COVID-19 vaccines have been given out, with 40K in New York Brooklyn man allegedly spent COVID-19 relief funds on luxury cars Virus-weary Americans less festive this year, poll finds Congressional leaders on Monday released the text of a 5,593-page COVID-19 stimulus package hours before a midnight government funding deadline. The massive legislation is one of the longest bills ever considered, but is expected to pass swiftly over back-bench grumbles. The bill contains $600 stimulus checks for most Americans with another $600 per child, a $300 weekly unemployment supplement and $284.4 billion in forgivable small-business Paycheck Protection Program loans. The stimulus checks are means-tested, with people earning more than $75,000 — or $150,000 per married couple filing jointly — getting less money, and people earning over $95,000 getting nothing. The $600 child stimulus check is...
    By MIKE CATALINI, Associated Press New Jersey lawmakers are set to vote Monday on legislation authorizing more than $14 billion in tax breaks for businesses. The legislation is designed to give an incentive to companies to rehabilitate historical properties, clean up brownfield sites, attract grocery stores to areas without them, invest in innovative projects and more. New Jersey has been without a business tax incentive program since July 2019 when the previous legislation signed under Republican Chris Christie in 2013 expired. The legislation comes after lawmakers and Democratic Gov. Phil Murphy had stalemated over incentives, but it follows months of tough economic news stemming from COVID-19. The state's unemployment rate is at 10.2% and businesses shuttered because of the governor's coronavirus public health orders are struggling. The legislation is massive, at 249 pages, with more than 100 pages of amendment introduced late last week. It's also moving at lightning speed,...
    Loading the player... Legislation to protect Americans from getting “surprise” medical bills has been included in the year-end deal that is expected to pass Congress today.  The legislation is key amid the coronavirus pandemic. It will protect patients who go to emergency rooms and get treatment from a doctor who may not be in their care network.  Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer speak after a press conference on Capitol Hill Sunday in Washington, D.C. Republicans and Democrats in the Senate finally came to an agreement on the coronavirus relief bill. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images) The bipartisan legislation had identified those expenses as a problem for Americans for months. However, lobbyists who represent doctors, large health care groups, hospitals and insurers successfully pushed to temper the costs that insurance companies would have to pay.  The No Surprises Act will require insurers and...
    Ting Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images Unemployed workers would get an extra 11 weeks of jobless benefits and a $300 weekly enhancement to aid payments as part of a Covid relief deal Congress reached Sunday. Certain self-employed and gig workers would also get an extra $100 a week, according to a document summarizing the legislation. Zoom In IconArrows pointing outwards The 11-week timeline is less than the amount offered by a bipartisan package released earlier this month. That bill would have paid extended and enhanced benefits for 16 weeks, to mid-April. In all, the $900 billion compromise package, the result of frenzied negotiations ahead of a year-end benefits cliff for millions of workers, offers $120 billion in additional unemployment benefits. There are more than 20 million Americans collecting unemployment benefits, according to the Labor Department.$300 weekly enhancementThe $300 boost is available to all workers receiving unemployment benefits, like the prior $600...
    WASHINGTON -- Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said that congressional Republican and Democratic leaders have finalized a deal on the almost $1 trillion stimulus package.House Democratic Leader Steny Hoyer also informed the caucus Sunday that a vote on the COVID-19 relief bill will take place Monday.This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.Top negotiators appear on the brink Sunday of agreeing to long-delayed legislation to deliver a new round of aid to pandemic-slammed businesses, $300 bonus jobless benefits and a $600 direct payment to most Americans, an aid package that is smaller than Democrats and President-elect Joe Biden would like.The must-pass measure, coming in at more than $900 billion, is expected to be released late Sunday and would be brought immediately to the House floor for a vote. It includes tens of billions of dollars to pay for distributing vaccines, help schools reopen, and bail...
    WASHINGTON -- Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said that congressional Republican and Democratic leaders have finalized a deal on the almost $1 trillion stimulus package.This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.Top negotiators appear on the brink Sunday of agreeing to long-delayed legislation to deliver a new round of aid to pandemic-slammed businesses, $300 bonus jobless benefits and a $600 direct payment to most Americans, an aid package that is smaller than Democrats and President-elect Joe Biden would like.The must-pass measure, coming in at more than $900 billion, is expected to be released late Sunday and would be brought immediately to the House floor for a vote. It includes tens of billions of dollars to pay for distributing vaccines, help schools reopen, and bail out struggling transit systems and the Postal Service.Propelling optimism on Sunday was a Saturday night agreement on the last major obstacle...
    WASHINGTON -- Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said this afternoon projected optimism that a deal on COVID-19 relief package could be reached Sunday during floor remarks."I believe I can speak for all sides when I say I hope and expect to have a final agreement nailed down in a matter of hours," McConnell said.This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.Top Washington negotiators, propelled by a late-night agreement on the last major obstacle to a COVID-19 economic relief package, said a Sunday agreement is all but inevitable to deliver long-overdue pandemic aid of almost $1 trillion."I am very hopeful that we get this done today," House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., told Fox News Channel's "Sunday Morning Futures."The breakthrough involved a fight over Federal Reserve emergency powers that was resolved by the Senate's top Democrat and a senior conservative Republican. Aides to lawmakers in both...
    WASHINGTON - Top Washington negotiators, propelled by a late-night agreement on the last major obstacle to a COVID-19 economic relief package, said a Sunday agreement is all but inevitable to deliver long-overdue pandemic aid of almost $1 trillion.  "I am very hopeful that we get this done today," House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., told Fox News Channel's "Sunday Morning Futures."  The breakthrough involved a fight over Federal Reserve emergency powers that was resolved by the Senate's top Democrat and a senior conservative Republican. Aides to lawmakers in both parties said the compromise sparked a final round of negotiations on a handful of remaining issues.   An aide to a key GOP lawmaker said it would likely require all of Sunday to finalize and draft the final agreement, which is already guaranteed to be the largest spending measure yet, combining COVID-19 relief with a $1.4 trillion omnibus spending bill...
    WASHINGTON - Top Washington negotiators, propelled by a late-night agreement on the last major obstacle to a COVID-19 economic relief package, said a Sunday agreement is all but inevitable to deliver long-overdue pandemic aid of almost $1 trillion.  "I am very hopeful that we get this done today," House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., told Fox News Channel's "Sunday Morning Futures."  The breakthrough involved a fight over Federal Reserve emergency powers that was resolved by the Senate's top Democrat and a senior conservative Republican. Aides to lawmakers in both parties said the compromise sparked a final round of negotiations on a handful of remaining issues.   An aide to a key GOP lawmaker said it would likely require all of Sunday to finalize and draft the final agreement, which is already guaranteed to be the largest spending measure yet, combining COVID-19 relief with a $1.4 trillion omnibus spending bill...
    The Irish government has proposed making it a crime to share ‘hate’ comments on social media platforms even if someone else wrote of them. Ireland’s Justice Minister, Helen McEntee, announced the new proposals this week, which could see retweeting or reposting ‘hate’ speech comments a criminal offence. According to a report from the Irish Times, the new legislation will repeal the Prohibition of Incitement to Hatred Act 1989 which previously dealt with hate crimes but has been deemed to not be robust enough. The paper adds that the new bill will also expand the language under the hate crime laws to include those who target transgender and disabled people. Previous legislation had covered hatred against religious and ethnic minorities, migrants, and homosexuals. Exclusive: Tiny Irish Town Taking Hundreds of Migrants Had No Say, Locals Fear Being Called Racist https://t.co/CzJMCsp8dn — Breitbart London (@BreitbartLondon) March 7, 2018 The new proposed legislation will...
    Congress returned to work Saturday in a rare weekend session to try to pass coronavirus relief legislation in time for Christmas.  Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he's been in productive discussions with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer, House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, but they still have not reached a final agreement.  "The American people cannot feed their families, or pay their bills with Congress' good faith discussion," McConnell said Saturday morning on the Senate floor. "They need us to act. We need to conclude our talks, draft legislation and land this plane." If congressional leaders strike a deal Saturday on the final sticking points of the $900 billion COVID-19 legislation, then Capitol Hill staff will work quickly through the night to put the massive piece of legislation together on paper.  House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., said Friday the earliest the...
    Democratic leaders in the U.S. House of Representatives are still reeling from disappointing November election results as they now attempt to figure out how they will legislate while the Senate majority remains unknown. If Democrats win the Senate majority -- depending on the outcome of January's runoffs in Georgia -- there will be little negotiating needed with GOP congressmen in order to get legislation passed. But if the GOP maintains their majority  -standing, then legislating in the House will become an interesting political arena – a game-changer that Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D- N.Y., has already noted. DEMOCRATIC CONGRESSWOMAN BACKS AOC'S CALL FOR 'NEW LEADERSHIP' "The slimmer margin, it cuts both ways," Ocasio-Cortez told the conservative magazine, The Dispatch. "It’s tough because we have to make sure that we cobble together a winning majority, but also it’s solid because we’re able to push a little bit more." The New York progressive,...
    Sens. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., and Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., introduced legislation that would impose a long list of new hurdles to clear for anyone seeking to upload pornographic content to the internet. Released on Friday, the legislation was just the latest of Congressional actions in response to concerns about sex trafficking victims being exploited through sites like Pornhub. After The New York Times published an expose on the issue, Pornhub implemented new reforms that included blocking any unverified content from their platform. Sasse's and Merkley's bill, titled the Stop Internet Sexual Exploitation Act, would impose this restriction on all platforms and require consent forms to be uploaded for every individual appearing in the video. It would also mandate that sites hosting pornographic content prohibit video downloads, set up a 24-hour hotline for people to video removals, and require the removal of the videos within two hours of victims flagging them. SEN....