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executive action:

    Congressional Republicans and prominent conservatives are pushing back against President Trump’s payroll tax cut executive action, saying it’s mistargeted, unlikely to be effective, and an unconstitutional power grab. Trump's executive action would allow employers to defer paying payroll taxes through the end of the year for employees who make less than $100,000. Payroll taxes fund Social Security and Medicare. The payroll tax cut was one of four executive actions Trump signed on Saturday after Congress failed to pass another coronavirus relief bill. “Republicans in Congress are rolling their eyes at the payroll tax cut,” said Brian Riedl, an economist at the conservative Manhattan Institute. Historically, tax cuts have been a popular Republican response to economic weakness, and it’s typically easy to sell tax cuts to families and the conservative base. Yet, many Republicans feel a tax cut is not the right solution for the coronavirus-induced recession. “It’s...
    Donald Trump bashed Ben Sasse on Monday as a 'rogue' Republican after the Nebraska senator called the president's flurry of executive orders 'unconstitutional slop.' 'RINO Ben Sasse, who needed my support and endorsement in order to get the Republican nomination for Senate from the GREAT State of Nebraska, has, now that he's got it (Thank you President T), gone rogue, again,' Trump charged of Sasse in a tweet Monday morning. 'This foolishness plays right into the hands of the Radical Left Dems!' the president continued. Sasse spoke out against the president signing four executive orders on Saturday to provide relief in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic after negotiations on Capitol Hill collapsed last week. 'Then pen-and-phone theory of executive lawmaking is unconstitutional slop,' Republican Senator Sasse wrote in a statement Saturday. 'President Trump does not have the power to unilaterally rewrite the payroll tax law,' the Nebraska senator insisted...
    On top of serious questions about the directive’s legality and workability, experts are warning that President Donald Trump’s executive action to extend the federal boost to unemployment benefits at $400-per-week—using $44 billion in funds meant for disaster relief—leaves out the poorest Americans by design. The language of Trump’s unemployment memorandum issued over the weekend defines “eligible claimants” as those receiving “at least $100 per week” in state unemployment benefits—meaning that laid-off workers currently receiving less than $100 per week in aid will not see a dollar in federal relief unless states agree to increase their benefits. As the Washington Post reported late Sunday: Even if state governments sign onto the program, the jobless benefits might be out of reach for Americans in greatest need: Only out-of-work Americans receiving more than $100 a week in state unemployment insurance are eligible for the federal aid.   That means those at the bottom of the income distribution—particularly workers who...
    President Donald Trump on Sunday indicated he was open to restarting negotiations with the Democrats after his advisers spent the day defending the questions that surrounded his executive orders designed to bring coronavirus relief.  'I've been involved personally through my representatives,' he told DailyMail.com about his role in the talks with congressional Democrats.  But he said it ‘works better’ than the negotiations were being done by Chief of Staff Mark Meadows and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin as opposed to him taking a more direct role. ‘I think it actually works better if we do the way we're doing. We've got much of what we wanted, without having to give up anything,’ he said in response to a question from DailyMail.com. ‘You can’t beat the deal we made.’  A senior congressional Democratic aide told DailyMail.com there has been no contact made with Speaker Nancy Pelosi or Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer. ...
    Chris Wallace, host of "Fox News Sunday," grilled House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Sunday, not letting her forget that Democrats are responsible for President Donald Trump taking action to provide Americans with coronavirus-related economic relief. What's the background?After two weeks of negotiations, the White House and Democrats failed to agree on a second COVID-related economic relief bill. The president responded on Saturday by signing executive orders providing Americans with temporary relief. The executive action included a $400 supplemental unemployment stipend, deferred payroll taxes for certain Americas, extended the federal eviction moratorium, and further deferred student loans payments. As TheBlaze reported, Democrats responded by threatening to take legal action against the president, who said he only acted because Democrats had brought unreasonable demands to the negotiation table.What happened on Fox News?During a lengthy interview with Wallace, Pelosi claimed that Trump's action merely provides the "illusion" of assistance. But Wallace called...
    President Donald Trump’s Constitution-bending attempt to circumvent Congress and use executive action sounded good when he talked about it. He was able to flip the script on Democrats and accuse them of obstructing expanded unemployment benefits rather than explain his own administration’s unwillingness to allow a more generous extension. But the actual details of what he did — and questions about how many people it would help — left even Republican governors unwilling to sign on right away and created some odd moments Sunday as his economic advisers struggled big time to explain it all. Related: Breaking down Trump’s coronavirus executive actions CNN’s review of the text of the actions identified red tape and strings attached that could slow the unemployment measure. What was billed by Trump as help for renters facing eviction, translated in the executive action as something for his Cabinet to consider. And while Trump described a...
    (CNN)President Donald Trump's Constitution-bending attempt to circumvent Congress and use executive action sounded good when he talked about.He was able to flip the script on Democrats and accuse them of obstructing expanded unemployment benefits rather than explain his own administration's unwillingness to allow a more generous extension.But the actual details of what he did -- and questions about how many people it would help -- left even Republican governors unwilling to sign on right away and created some odd moments Sunday as his economic advisers struggled big time to explain it all. Related: Breaking down Trump's coronavirus executive actionsCNN's review of the text of the actions identified red tape and strings attached that could slow the unemployment measure. What was billed by Trump as help for renters facing eviction, translated in the executive action as something for his Cabinet to consider.Read MoreAnd while Trump described a payroll tax deferral as...
    Sen. Ben Sasse blasted President Trump for taking executive action on providing economic relief after Congress ended last week without a deal on a federal coronavirus aid package. The Nebraska Republican released a statement on Saturday asserting that the president exceeded his constitutional powers by signing a series of executive actions that implement a payroll tax holiday, defer some student loans, protect renters from evictions, and provide other financial relief. “The pen-and-phone theory of executive lawmaking is unconstitutional slop. President Obama did not have the power to unilaterally rewrite immigration law with DACA, and President Trump does not have the power to unilaterally rewrite the payroll tax law," Sasse said. "Under the Constitution, that power belongs to the American people acting through their members of Congress.” During an appearance on CNN Sunday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she agreed with the sentiment of Sasse's statement but added that...
    If Chris Wallace was trying to prove to Fox News viewers that he could grill Democratic leaders just as hard as President Donald Trump and his biggest sycophants, it may have worked. Vice President Joe Biden has thus far declined to appear on Fox News Sunday, but this week Wallace sat down with the highest ranking Democrat in the Congress, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.  Referring to the proposed executive action of the president, Wallace asked, “Won’t millions of Americans now get some extended federal unemployment relief and some protections for evictions—get that now rather than nothing at all?”  “No,” Pelosi replied, agreeing with Republican Senator Ben Sasse, who called the action “unconstitutional slop.”  After she broke down everything that won’t get addressed by Trump’s executive orders, Wallace came back with, “But, Speaker, I understand the president’s executive action doesn’t do all the things you want. But having no bill at...
    White House trade adviser Peter Navarro continued his reputation for saying outrageous things on Sunday, claiming “the Lord” created executive orders to cut through partisanship and calling Donald Trump the “hardest-working president in history” when confronted on Trump’s latest golf weekend. Amid stalled coronavirus relief negotiations between Democrats, Republicans, and the White House, the president issued a series of executive actions and memos from his New Jersey golf club this weekend. The potentially illegal orders Trump signed reduces the unemployment benefit bonus to $400 a week, requires states to fund 25 percent, provinces a payroll tax holiday, and calls for a continued eviction moratorium. Appearing on NBC News’ Meet the Press to defend the president’s orders, Navarro was asked by host Chuck Todd whether he’s confident that the orders will stand up to legal scrutiny since Congress is the branch tasked with budgetary powers. “Well, one of the things I...
    Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin suggested on Sunday that Americans will have to pay the government back for any payroll tax reduction unless President Donald Trump is reelected. In an interview on FOX, host Chris Wallace noted that the president’s latest executive action on COVID-19 financial relief is “not a tax cut.” “It’s a payroll tax suspension,” Wallace explained. “Isn’t there a danger that a lot of businesses won’t pass these saving through to workers because they’re going to hold on to the money because at some point, according to this executive action by the end of the year, those payroll taxes are going to be have to be paid anyway?” “Well, the president wanted to do a payroll tax cut,” Mnuchin replied. “We could do the payroll tax deferral. He’s going to go to the American people and tell them that when he’s reelected, he will push through legislation to...
    Washington (CNN)The White House's top economic adviser on Sunday defended a series of executive actions President Donald Trump signed a day earlier to provide economic relief amid the coronavirus pandemic, attempting to explain how states will be able to work with the federal government to provide assistance to Americans impacted by the crisis. Larry Kudlow told CNN's Dana Bash on "State of the Union" that the administration expects states to be able to cover the portion of enhanced unemployment benefits that Trump ordered through executive action on Saturday. If states don't agree to participate and meet the financial requirement of paying 25% of the as much as $400 amount, people receiving benefits in those states will not receive any of the extra assistance.Kudlow also acknowledged that some people may not receive the full enhanced benefit depending on where they live. "We're talking about averages here," he said. "Our estimates from...
    President Trump showed once again Saturday that he places America and the American people first when he signed executive orders to provide much-needed coronavirus economic relief to struggling families. The president wisely rejected efforts by Democrats to play politics and use coronavirus legislation as a cover to enact their unrelated radical demands. Trump clearly understands that COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, has hurt millions of Americans since it arrived here from China. The pandemic has derailed the booming economy the president created with his policies of tax cuts and eliminating unnecessary and harmful government regulations, just as it has derailed economies in virtually every country in the world. Trump approaches the disease as a problem to be solved — both on the medical front with Operation Warp Speed to rapidly discover and produce a COVID-19 vaccine and treatments, and on the economic front with the executive orders he...
    President Trump gained the "upper hand" Saturday and helped his reelection chances by signing four executive orders aimed at delivering relief to Americans struggling with the economic fallout of the coronavirus, according to the Washington Examiner's chief congressional correspondent. "He definitely helped his cause by doing this, because what he's doing is two things," Susan Ferrechio said on "America's Election HQ." "He's taking away a talking point from Democrats who keep talking about the Republicans as being unwilling to help people." DESPITE POLLS AND PANDEMIC, TRUMP CAMPAIGN ARGUES CANDIDATE BETTER POSITIONED THAN IN 2016 The correspondent elaborated that the move directly contradicts the opposing party's message that "the president doesn't want to help people, doesn't want to help children, renters, the unemployed." "He's saying, look, here I am taking action because Congress won't help me," Ferrechio added. "So I'm going around them." Trump announced a $400-per-week supplemental unemployment payment to out-of-work...
    Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamThe Hill's Campaign Report: Trump's visit to battleground Ohio overshadowed by coronavirus New polls show tight races for Graham, McConnell Yates spars with GOP at testy hearing MORE (R-S.C.) said Saturday that though he appreciates President TrumpDonald John TrumpJoe Arpaio loses bid for his old position as sheriff Trump brushes off view that Russia denigrating Biden: 'Nobody's been tougher on Russia than I have' Trump tees up executive orders on economy but won't sign yet MORE’s round of orders he signed to mitigate the economic fallout from the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, he “would much prefer a congressional agreement.”  At his private club in Bedminster, N.J., Trump signed orders that would extend unemployment benefits, suspend payroll taxes, and offer federal eviction and student loan relief as negotiations for the next stimulus package remain at a stalemate.  The President’s executive orders, which he had teased for days, effectively...
    Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images President Donald Trump said he would take matters into his own hands on Saturday by signing four executive orders to extend relief to Americans suffering from the economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic. Trump announced the action during a news conference at his golf resort in Bedminster, New Jersey. The decision comes after negotiations between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer, White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin failed to come to an agreement on Friday. The first executive order will be a “payroll tax holiday to Americans earning less than $100,000 a year.” Trump added, “in a few moments I will sign a directive instructing the Treasury Department to allow employers to defer payments of the employee portion of certain payroll taxes from September 1 and we are going to be making that.” Pres signs the four Executive Order providing relief measures. pic.twitter.com/kvQjBfDkiH —...
      President TrumpDonald John TrumpJoe Arpaio loses bid for his old position as sheriff Trump brushes off view that Russia denigrating Biden: 'Nobody's been tougher on Russia than I have' Trump tees up executive orders on economy but won't sign yet MORE on Saturday signed executive orders to extend unemployment benefits, suspend payroll taxes, and offer federal eviction and student loan relief, taking unilateral action that is on shaky legal ground amid stalled negotiations in Congress to provide economic relief for Americans amid the coronavirus pandemic. The president announced the slew of executive action from his private club in Bedminster, New Jersey, where he is spending the weekend after lawmakers on Capitol Hill were unable to reach an agreement with White House negotiators. The president was not physically present for any of the talks over the last few weeks, but has said he received regular updates from his staff. One...
            by Chris White  TikTok threatened to sue President Donald Trump Friday for signing an executive order prohibiting individuals from communicating with the Chinese social media app’s parent company over the next 45 days. The executive order, which also impacts Chinese app WeChat, was issued Thursday night “without any due process,” TikTok said in a press statement. “For nearly a year, we have sought to engage with the U.S. government in good faith to provide a constructive solution to the concerns that have been expressed,” the statement said. Trump has “paid no attention to facts” and his administration has instead “tried to insert itself into negotiations between private businesses,” TikTok said. “We will pursue all remedies available to us in order to ensure that the rule of law is not discarded and that our company and our users are treated fairly — if not by the Administration,...
    After covid relief negotiations fell through Friday afternoon, President Donald Trump said at a surprise news conference he will take executive action if necessary. “If Democrats continue to hold this critical relief hostage,” he said, “I will act under my authority as president to get Americans the relief they need.” He said that includes deferring payroll tax until the end of the year and be “retroactive to July 1st.” He also talked about “enhanc[ing] unemployment benefits through the end of the year,” as well as deferring student loans and extending eviction moratoriums. You can watch above, via Fox News. Have a tip we should know? [email protected]
    VIDEO2:1002:10President Trump again threatens executive action if no stimulus deal is reachedPolitics After coronavirus aid talks between Democratic leaders and the Trump administration ground to a halt Friday, President Donald Trump threatened to take executive action if the sides fail to reach a deal. Negotiators emerged from a 90-minute meeting in the Capitol on Friday appearing to have made minimal progress toward bridging a gulf over spending to combat a once-in-a-lifetime pandemic. Both Democrats and White House officials pointed to fundamental disagreements over how to address the crisis, making it unclear when they could agree on legislation that could pass both chambers of Congress.  Speaking to a ballroom packed with members of his New Jersey country club on Friday evening, Trump said he would "act under [his] authority as president to get Americans the relief they need" if Congress fails to strike an agreement with his administration. He said his...
    U.S. President Donald Trump said Friday he is ready to take executive action after congressional lawmakers failed again to reach agreement on a relief package for the tens of millions of Americans who have lost their jobs following the COVID-19 pandemic. Trump told a news conference that executive orders are being prepared to enhance unemployment benefits until the end of the year, defer student loan payments and forgive interest on the loans, and extend a moratorium on evictions. He said an executive order is also being prepared to defer payroll taxes until the end of the year. It was not immediately clear if he has the legal authority to take the executive actions he has proposed. It was also not immediately clear how the actions, if implemented, would work. For example, if payroll taxes are deferred, it is not clear whether workers would then have to pay them retroactively at...
    Bradley Cortright August 6, 2020 0 Comments President Donald Trump has signaled that if Congressional Democrats do not reach an agreement on the next coronavirus relief bill, he may resort to executive action to help Americans suffering financially due to the coronavirus shutdowns. During a press conference Thursday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) was asked how Congressional leaders would react if Trump began re-allocating federal funds to fund coronavirus relief measures without authorization from Capitol Hill. “I don’t think they know what they’re talking about,” Pelosi said. “The one thing the president can do is to extend the moratorium [on evictions], and that would be a good thing if there’s money to go with it, and that’s what we keep telling them.” Pelosi continued, “What’s the use of a moratorium if you’re going to have eight months of rent to pay at the end of the moratorium? And B, what does that mean...
    President TrumpDonald John TrumpLincoln Project ad dubs Jared Kushner the 'Secretary of Failure' Pence: Chief Justice Roberts 'has been a disappointment to conservatives' Twitter bans Trump campaign until it deletes tweet with COVID-19 misinformation MORE is leaning hard on an expanded view of executive power in the lead-up to the 2020 election, using a flurry of executive orders and presidential memos to implement parts of his agenda before November. The effort is intended to pile up Trump’s list of accomplishments as he seeks reelection against the backdrop of the coronavirus pandemic and a fractured economy. The president in recent weeks has taken executive action on drug pricing and immigration and used an executive order to crack down on vandalism of monuments. He mused this week that he could bust through stalled negotiations on coronavirus relief with unilateral action to suspend evictions and the payroll tax and reinstate expanded federal unemployment...
    President Donald Trump on Wednesday said that he was exploring executive action to offer Americans some level of relief from the coronavirus pandemic. “If Democrats put partisan demands aside, we would reach an agreement very quickly,” Trump said at the White House during a press conference on Wednesday evening. Trump noted that Republicans were ready to negotiate “in good faith,” but Democrats were demanding a trillion-dollar bailout for “poorly run” Democrat cities. “We can’t go along with the bailout money, we’re not going to go along with that, especially since it is not Covid-related,” Trump said. The president floated the idea of a “term-limited suspension of the payroll tax” using his executive power and also previewed an executive order to stop home evictions. Economist Steven Moore illustrated in a Wall Street Journal op-ed on Sunday how Trump could order the Treasury Department to refrain from withholding payroll taxes from a...
    Savannah Rychcik August 5, 2020 0 Comments If Democrats will not make a deal on the next coronavirus relief package with Republicans in the near future, President Donald Trump is prepared to take action. Trump is considering taking executive action to extend a moratorium on evictions and enhanced unemployment benefits. The official end date to these unemployment benefits was on Friday. “My administration’s exploring executive actions to provide protections against eviction. Eviction’s a big problem, very unfair to a lot of people. It wasn’t their fault that this virus came from a faraway land,” Trump said. He added, “As well as additional relief to those who are unemployed as a result of the virus. Very importantly, I’m also looking at a term-limited suspension of the payroll tax.”Watch his comments below: If Democrats will not make a deal, President @realDonaldTrump will pursue executive action in order to extend economic relief for...
    Washington (CNN)White House chief of staff Mark Meadows said Wednesday that President Donald Trump is prepared to take executive action on eviction protection and extending enhanced unemployment benefits if Congress isn't close to a coronavirus recovery package by Friday. Speaking to CNN's Wolf Blitzer on "The Situation Room," Meadows explained, "What I am saying is by Friday, if we haven't made significant progress and we are just too far apart, the President is prepared to take executive action on those, the two items you are talking about. Making sure eviction protection is done, he will do that through executive action. Making sure enhanced unemployment payments -- that stopped because Democrats refused to say 'yes' just a few days ago.""He will do executive actions and take executive actions to actually address those two areas to make sure that at least what he can do is take action because Congress won't," he...
    President Trump said he was optimistic that negotiations on Capitol Hill over another massive coronavirus stimulus bill are going well, but added that he wouldn’t hesitate to take executive action if talks come to a stalemate. Specifically mentioning a continuation of the moratorium on evictions, a possible extension of unemployment benefits and a pay roll tax suspension, the president said his administration is looking at measures it can do to bypass Congress to provide economic relief for Americans suffering amid the pandemic. “We’re looking at it,” Trump said during his daily press briefing when asked about unemployment benefits. “We are looking at various other things I’m allowed to do under the system.” TRUMP WITHHOLDS PRAISE FOR JOHN LEWIS, NOTES HE 'DIDN'T COME TO MY INAUGURATION' Trump added that progress in the negotiations on Capitol Hill is going “very well” and he is hopeful that he will not have to...
    Savannah Rychcik August 4, 2020 0 Comments Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows are painting a bleak picture of negotiations between Democrats and Republicans over the next coronavirus relief package. Prior to their meeting with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), Mnuchin and Meadows were met with reporters questioning them about the progress being made toward an agreement. A reporter asked Mnuchin if he is considering taking executive action if no progress is made. “Absolutely,” Mnuchin said. When asked when they will take executive action, Meadows said, “Hopefully, we’ll make progress today and not have to do that.”Watch their comments below: Mnuchin & Meadows emerge from lunch w/ Republican Senators on their way to meet with Pelosi & Schumer.Mnuchin now says the admin will “absolutely” consider executive action if a deal isn’t reached. “Hopefully we’ll make progress today and not have to do...
    President TrumpDonald John TrumpOklahoma City Thunder players kneel during anthem despite threat from GOP state lawmaker Microsoft moving forward with talks to buy TikTok after conversation with Trump Controversial Trump nominee placed in senior role after nomination hearing canceled MORE said Monday that he is considering taking executive action to halt evictions and suspend payroll tax collection, as coronavirus relief talks see slow progress on Capitol Hill. “I could do that if I want and I want to do that. I don’t want people to be evicted,” Trump told reporters at a press conference Monday evening when asked about his suggestion earlier in the day that he could act unilaterally to suspend evictions. Trump noted that individuals who are evicted often go to shelters, where the coronavirus can easily spread easily because of crowding. “They’re thrown out viciously. It’s not their fault. It’s not their fault, it’s China’s fault,” Trump...
    President Trump has resumed talk of a long-sought payroll tax holiday, which outside advisers say could occur with executive action. "We're putting it back on the table," said Stephen Moore, an outside economic adviser to the president and a member of his economic recovery task force, speaking to the Washington Examiner on Monday. Moore has called previously for the measure and has said that without it, "There’s no point in having a Phase Four." "I don't think Trump's given up on it," Moore said. Trump is also considering unilateral action to extend enhanced unemployment benefits and eviction protection if a coronavirus deal cannot be reached in Congress. With negotiations stalled, the president said on Monday that he is looking to address the impact of an eviction moratorium and a $600-per-week supplement to unemployment for some 30 million people that expired at the end of July. "A lot of...
              President Donald Trump said he will take action as soon as Saturday to ban TikTok, a popular Chinese-owned video app that has been a source of national security and censorship concerns. Trump said he could use emergency economic powers or an executive order to enforce action on TikTok. “As far as TikTok is concerned, we’re banning them from the United States,” the president told reporters Friday on Air Force One as he returned from Florida. Reports by Bloomberg News and the Wall Street Journal citing anonymous sources said the administration could soon announce a decision ordering ByteDance to divest its ownership in TikTok. Tech giant Microsoft is in talks to buy the app. The purchase would be a major win for the company, giving it a foothold in the ever popular social media market. Analysts have said the social media giant’s presence in the US is worth...
    U.S. President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with leadership from the National Association of Police Organizations in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., on Friday, July 31, 2020.Anna Moneymaker | The New York Times | Bloomberg | Getty Images President Donald Trump on Friday told reporters he will act as soon as Saturday to ban Chinese-owned video app TikTok from the United States, NBC News reported. Trump made the comments while chatting with reporters on Air Force One. "As far as TikTok is concerned we're banning them from the United States," Trump said.  Trump did not specify whether he will act through an executive order, or another method such as a designation."Well, I have that authority. I can do it with an executive order or that," Trump said. Trump's comments come as it was reported Friday that Microsoft has held talks to buy the TikTok video-sharing mobile app...
    Greg Williams was fourth person to hold job since 2014 The board of the nonprofit Hudson River Sloop Clearwater said it voted on Monday (July 20) to remove its executive director — the fourth person to hold the position in the past six years. Greg Williams Greg Williams, who lives in Cold Spring, was hired by the Beacon-based nonprofit in 2018. A native of Croton, he returned to the Hudson Valley from Seattle to take the job, which had been filled by two interim directors following the department in 2016 of Peter Gross, who served 18 months before resigning. The environmental organization was founded in 1969 by folk singer Pete Seeger. It has struggled financially in recent years and was hard-hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, which forced the cancellation this year of its primary fundraiser, a two-day summer music festival, which was held instead online. In a statement, the...
    Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms (D) announced Friday she’s rolling back her city’s reopening, citing concerns over an increase in coronavirus cases in Georgia. Bottoms said in a statement that she’s bringing Atlanta back to the reopening’s first phase, mandating people to wear masks in public and urging them to frequently wash hands and stay home except for essential trips. It also recommends businesses continue teleworking and conduct frequent cleanings of public and “high touch” areas. Non-essential city facilities will remain closed. “Based upon the surge of COVID-19 cases and other data trends, pursuant to the recommendations of our Reopening Advisory Committee, Atlanta will return to Phase I of our reopening plan,” said Bottoms. “Georgia reopened in a reckless manner and the people of our city and state are suffering the consequences.” The rollback comes as Georgia sees an alarming spike in COVID-19 cases, setting a record of nearly 5,000...
    Donald Trump is looking to target China for its human rights violations in Hong Kong with a round of financial and trade-related executive orders, including banning Chinese-created social media app TikTok. One executive order being floated by the administration would end special exceptions for Chinese businesses operating within the U.S. Another would specifically target trade with Hong Kong as China continues to fight back against the city's most recent push to declare autonomy and Beijing issued harsh new security rules on the region. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that the administration is also 'looking into' banning TikTok, a popular short-video platform, amid concerns the social media app poses a threat to U.S. national security. The app is owned and operated by Chinese technology giant ByteDance Inc., which announced Tuesday morning that it is pulling TikTok from the Google and Apple stores in Hong Kong within a week due to...
    White House chief of staff Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsAtlanta airport checkpoint closed after worker tests positive for coronavirus House Republicans urge White House to support TSA giving travelers temperature checks The Hill's Morning Report - Republicans shift, urge people to wear masks MORE on Monday teased forthcoming executive action from President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump second-term plans remain a mystery to GOP Trump to hold outdoor rally in New Hampshire on Saturday Eighty-eight years of debt pieties MORE targeting immigration, China and prescription drug pricing. "Starting this week, you’ll see executive orders, you’ll see business that actually goes forward from the Oval Office when Congress doesn’t act," Meadows told "Fox & Friends." Meadows, who was giving his first televised interview since taking the job in March, offered few specifics on each of the orders or when they would be signed. The president would be looking to address the United States' manufacturing relationship with...
    Texas – Gov. Greg Abbott issued an executive action Friday morning that requires all rafting and tubing businesses to close, just ahead of the Fourth of July weekend. The announcement comes just one day after San Marcos River parks closed. “As I said from the start, if the positivity rate rose above 10%, the State of Texas would take further action to mitigate the spread of COVID-19,” Abbott said Friday. Texas has seen a major increase in positive coronavirus cases recently, including a record-high of 5,551 new cases on Wednesday. Gov. Greg Abbott says bars must close by noon, restaurants to scale back capacity Abbott’s executive action also requires bars to close back down, read more on that here. “The actions in this executive order are essential to our mission to swiftly contain this virus and protect public health. We want this to be as limited in duration as possible,”...
    AUSTIN – Governor Greg Abbott today issued an executive order limiting certain businesses and services as part of the state’s effort to contain the spread of COVID-19. The decision comes as the number of people testing positive for COVID-19 and the number of hospitalizations have increased and the positivity rate in Texas increased above 10%, which the Governor previously stated would lead to further preventative action. The targeted, measured directives in the executive order are based on links between certain types of businesses and services and the recent rise in positive cases throughout the state. “As I said from the start, if the positivity rate rose above 10%, the State of Texas would take further action to mitigate the spread of COVID-19,” said Governor Abbott. “At this time, it is clear that the rise in cases is largely driven by certain types of activities, including Texans congregating in bars. The...
    Madison Summers June 26, 2020 0 Comments If 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden were president now amid the coronavirus pandemic, he would make sure Americans had to wear masks in public, he says. Biden was asked if he “became president tomorrow” what he would do differently regarding the pandemic and trying to combat the growing number of cases during Thursday’s interview with KDKA, the CBS affiliate in Pittsburgh. He said that he would ensure that everyone wore a mask in public as well as stockpiling the necessary personal protective equipment. “The one thing we do know is these masks make a gigantic difference,” Biden said. “I would insist that everybody out in public be wearing that mask. Anyone to reopen would have to make sure that they walked into a business that had masks.” Asked if he could use executive action to mandate Americans to wear masks in...
    Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images President Donald Trump issued multiple tweets to expand upon his promise to take action against those who’ve defaced statues and monuments amid the ongoing social unrest throughout the country. “I have authorized the Federal Government to arrest anyone who vandalizes or destroys any monument, statue or other such Federal property in the U.S. with up to 10 years in prison, per the Veteran’s Memorial Preservation Act, or such other laws that may be pertinent,” Trump announced. “This action is taken effective immediately, but may also be used retroactively for destruction or vandalism already caused. There will be no exceptions!” …..This action is taken effective immediately, but may also be used retroactively for destruction or vandalism already caused. There will be no exceptions! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 23, 2020 Trump’s statement on Tuesday follows a tweet from last night where he condemned the “disgraceful vandalism”...
    Chief Justice John Roberts strikes again. In a 5–4 judgment in Department of Homeland Security v. Regents of the University of California, the Supreme Court held that the Trump administration’s rollback of the Obama administration’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program is arbitrary and capricious under the Administrative Procedure Act (APA), the statute that sets the standard of review for federal agency action. Put aside for a moment the dubious notion that the APA even governs this case. If something seems fishy about why a court would block an incumbent administration’s executive action on immigration that simply rescinds similar action on the same issue by a prior administration, you’re on to what is in fact a brazen double standard. STEVE LEVY: DACA DECISION – SUPREME COURT'S BLOW TO COMMON SENSE AND THE RULE OF LAW Recall that President Obama had implemented DACA by executive action, disregarding the law governing hundreds of thousands...
    Former vice president Joe Biden Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden marked the 8th anniversary of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program’s announcement by recommitting to using “the full extent” of his executive powers to protect young immigrants from deportation as he works on permanent legislation should he be elected president in November. “Dreamers deserve to be able to plan their lives with confidence, as do the 11 million undocumented individuals who are living in and enriching our country every day,” he said in a Medium post on Monday. “On my first day as President, I’ll be sending to Congress a bill outlining a clear roadmap to citizenship. And, as we work to pass a permanent, legislative reform through Congress, I’ll use the full extent of my executive authority to protect Dreamers and keep their families together.” Biden also made the recommitment (he had previously said he would use executive action to...
    (CNN)The White House has begun initial stages of preparing an executive order on police reform, though it remains unclear which specific provisions it may include as President Donald Trump continues to weigh his options amid national outcry over police brutality, officials said on Wednesday.As Trump weighs endorsing some type of police reform measures, including those being debated on Capitol Hill or others he could implement more directly through executive action, top aides -- including chief of staff Mark Meadows -- are expected to present options to the President as early as Wednesday.White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany suggested executive action was possible in an interview earlier Wednesday."We do believe that we will have proactive policy prescriptions, whether that means legislation or an executive order," she said on Fox News. Trump eyes police reforms while ignoring systemic racismSome aides have eyed Trump's Thursday visit to Dallas as a potential venue for...
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