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    Most of the Affordable Care Act appeared likely to survive yet another legal challenge as five justices indicated that they were not inclined to strike down the law. The court heard Texas v. California, a suit brought by multiple Republican attorneys general which argues that the individual mandate, a signature part of the health care law, is unconstitutional and that the entire law must be struck down as a result. At least five justices, however, seemingly said that even if the mandate is found to be unconstitutional it can likely be separated from the rest of the law. “It does seem fairly clear that the proper remedy would be to sever the mandate provision and leave the rest of the law in place,” said Justice Brett Kavanaugh Tuesday. Though the mandate originally imposed a fine on those who opted out of receiving insurance, the fine was lowered to zero in...
    Nine U.S. Supreme Court justices have the fate of health insurance coverage for approximately 20 million Americans in their hands. Tuesday morning marked oral arguments in a Supreme Court case challenging the Affordable Care Act. The Trump administration and 18 Republican-leaning states argue the whole law must go. After federal lawmakers in 2017 zeroed out the individual mandate’s penalty for lacking health insurance, the entire Affordable Care Act (ACA) must fall with it, they contend. There’s no reason the whole law has to collapse and deprive an estimated 20 million people of health insurance, say more than 20 Democrat-leaning states and the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives. Now it’s a question of which side can convince at least five members of the high court that they have the better arguments, an issue that has new resonance as the coronavirus pandemic continues to surge. More than 10.1 million Americans had contracted...
    This is when we had to go through all this in 2015. Because time is a flat circle. You will be forgiven if you'd forgotten that open enrollment in Affordable Care Act (ACA) individual policies opened up on Nov. 1. An awful lot has happened in the last 10 days. But it did, and as HealthCareInsider analyzes, it's in good shape. Despite the epidemic, premium costs are steady and even Trump's Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) reports that the average monthly premiums for the benchmark plans (the second-lowest-cost silver plan) dropped by 2% from last year. They'll be $1,486 for a typical family of four in 2021, before subsidies. So that's all good and you should definitely check out Healthcare.gov or your state's exchange if you’re in the market for health insurance. That's particularly important this year with the U.S. Supreme Court set to hear the extremely weak but highly...
    Texas, leading a coalition of Republican states, heads to the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday morning to argue that the Affordable Care Act is unconstitutional and should be struck down in its entirety. On Texas’ side: the Trump administration. On the other side: A coalition of Democratic states led by California.What’s at stake?Health insurance and popular benefits for millions of Americans, including some 1 million in Texas who have subsidized health insurance plans under the law. The sprawling health law touches nearly every facet of the American health care system — from popular protections for individuals with preexisting conditions to no-cost benefits for certain health services to allowing young adults to stay on their parents’ insurance through age 26. Experts say it’s almost impossible to imagine the chaos that would come from ending the law without a replacement, particularly during the worsening coronavirus pandemic. Texas already has the nation’s highest uninsured...
    By Joan Biskupic | CNN The Supreme Court’s new review of the Affordable Care Act presents a test for the three justices appointed by President Donald Trump, as health insurance for millions of Americans is at risk and the court’s legitimacy remains under attack. None of Trump’s three appointees has previously ruled on the merits of a challenge to the law known as Obamacare. Now the law’s fate likely rests with at least one of them. Last month’s Senate confirmation hearings for Justice Amy Coney Barrett focused on how she might rule, although she consistently declined to discuss the case. The dispute to be heard on Tuesday also offers a first for Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh. The Supreme Court previously upheld Obamacare, in 2012 and 2015, but only four of the justices from those majorities remain on the nine-member bench. The newest lawsuit against the ACA is the...
    LOGAN SQUARE — Friends of Frank Robb, the Florida gator trapper who famously caught Chance the Snapper last year, have launched an online fundraiser after Robb learned he needs heart surgery. Reached by phone Friday, Robb said he went to the cardiologist in October after feeling unwell for a couple of weeks. He said the cardiologist told him one of the valves in his heart needs to be immediately repaired or replaced, which will require surgery. “I’ve been doing a lot of praying about it,” Robb said. “Just focusing on the good, thinking about how much better it’s going to be when [the surgery] is done.” Robb’s friends launched a GoFundMe on Friday to help Robb pay for the costly procedure — estimated to cost upwards of $200,000 — and help him bounce back after what will likely be a long recovery during which he won’t be able to work. The...
    Shawn Barnes, 28, has been charged with insurance fraud after he allegedly deliberately sank his car  A Florida man who reported his car stolen three years ago has been charged with insurance fraud after it was found in a canal with a large rock by the accelerator and the steering wheel tied.  Shawn Barnes, 28, is accused of deliberately sinking his 2015 Fiat 500 and filing a stolen vehicle complaint with police in Bunnell, Flagler County, in 2017 so he could make a false claim on his insurance.  Barnes was arrested Wednesday following a tip-off from someone who said they were with the suspect when he intentionally launched the car into the water.  The missing Fiat 500 was dredged from the bottom of the canal by authorities last month.  The Flagler County Sheriff's Office said Barnes called deputies on December 30 2017 to report his car had been stolen overnight...
    This article is reprinted by permission from NerdWallet. Travel insurance can safeguard your nonrefundable reservations and reimburse you for any unexpected emergency medical costs that you incur while traveling. However, the travel insurance needs of those taking several short vacations a year will vary from those of digital nomads, who may spend significant portions of the year living and working from abroad. Digital nomads may also return home less often, travel with equipment (e.g., laptop, camera, etc.), participate in adventurous activities and be less concerned with health care coverage if they are traveling to a country with inexpensive medical costs. Given the prevalence of remote work and increasing options to live and work from abroad, here you’ll find some of the most popular travel insurance options for digital nomads.World Nomads World Nomads is a travel insurance provider that offers coverage for residents of many countries and allows you to extend your coverage...
    Tara Kirk, pictured with her husband, found out she has a gene mutation that puts her at higher risk for several cancers.Source: Tara Kirk Tara Kirk was 6 years old when her mother died of lung cancer. Almost three decades later, at the age of 34, Kirk found out she had a gene mutation that increases her risk of developing a number of diseases, most notably colon and endometrial cancers. "I was in denial that I could have had it," said Kirk, now 36 and living in Houston with her husband and son. When people think of gene mutations, the breast cancer (BRCA) genes often come to mind. Actress Angelina Jolie famously laid out her decision to have a preventive double mastectomy after her BRCA1 diagnosis back in 2013. The lifetime risk of breast cancer is increased by 20% to 49% for women with moderate-risk gene mutations and 50% or...
    Hi, I started working when I was 19 and have been saving half of my salary since my mid-20s. Now at 52, I am tired of both the rat race and workplace politics. With the virus, it feels even worse. I have saved about $800,000 in trading, $800,000 in my 401(k) and $300,000 in a house. I also have six months worth of emergency funds. I don’t have any debt and I own my vehicles, too. I can easily live on a $60,000 budget (including taxes) but often it is less than that. No one in my family has ever survived beyond 80 years old. Thinking of the remaining days, I wonder should I just retire, do some one-off gig work or learn a language that I always wanted to learn? I just wonder if it is prudent to do so. Or should I keep on slogging another 10 years?...
    Teens, tweens volunteer for vaccine trials while opponents call the move absurd, crazy Chain restaurants closing locations this year Billie Jean King on Health Care, Climate Change, and the Coronavirus Pandemic © Getty / Noam Galai / Stringer Legendary tennis champion Billie Jean King knows how devastating this year has been—especially for people with chronic health conditions. King, 76, who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2007, wasn’t able to attend much of the U.S. Open this year due to safety protocols. “Remember, this year more than ever: Champions Adjust,” she wrote on Twitter at the time. Just a few months earlier, the tennis center named after King was turned into a temporary hospital for COVID-19 patients. Like many people, King also says the pandemic impacted her medical care. Although she normally has to go in for blood tests every six months, King tells SELF that her doctor...
    Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/AP For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.Artist and prop-maker Dara Williamson visited the gynecologist for the first time when she was 25, after realizing that her health coverage on her mother’s high-quality insurance plan was set to expire on her 26th birthday. Williamson, now 34, says that an ultrasound that day in 2012 revealed “two giant cysts where my ovaries should have been”—so large that her doctor feared she could suffer ovarian torsion, in which the ovaries painfully twist around on themselves. A team of doctors decided that she needed a laparoscopic cystectomy, and she had the surgery just days before her insurance lapsed. Williamson was able to stay on her mother’s plan as long as she did in part because she lived in Illinois, which had passed a law in 2008 requiring insurance companies to...
    I sure have missed Barack Obama. As much as I’ve come to appreciate the talents and charms of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris, it is great to see the 44th president out there again talking to voters, and even having some fun, for example, slamming Trump’s heretofore unknown Chinese bank account. The “Beijing Barry” line was epic. But when it comes to health care, and the Republican push to overturn the Affordable Care Act in the middle of a pandemic with no plan to replace its protections for people with preexisting conditions, Obama turned serious. Voting alone is not enough. Can you get 10 friends that live in battleground states to commit to vote for Joe Biden? Sign up to become a vote mobilizer on MoveOn’s Mobilize to Win campaign, and use your personal network to help fuel a big blue wave of record-breaking turnout. In Miami on Saturday,...
    Praised by TIME for being your “best bet to compare car insurance rates across companies,” The Zebra is your one-stop resource for researching car insurance plans that more accurately match your budget and needs, and all you have to do is enter your ZIP code in order to see a comprehensive list of competitive plans available in your area. It’s a sad truth that Americans overpay on car insurance by an estimated $21 billion every year, but you can avoid being a part of this miserable statistic by using The Zebra’s powerful search algorithms in order to lock in a better rate. Ideal for car owners who have recently moved to a new state or experienced another major life change such as changing jobs or getting married, The Zebra delivers unbiased and independent policy results from hundreds of insurance providers across the country. And unlike most insurance comparison sites that...
    Victoria Knight October 24, 2020 3:49PM (UTC) This article originally appeared on Kaiser Health News. During the final presidential debate, President Donald Trump claimed that 180 million people would lose their private health insurance to socialized medicine if the Democratic presidential nominee, former Vice President Joe Biden, is elected president. "They have 180 million people, families under what he wants to do, which will basically be socialized medicine — you won't even have a choice — they want to terminate 180 million plans," said Trump. : Trump has repeated this claim throughout the week, and we thought the linkage of Biden's proposed health care plan with socialism was something we needed to check out. Especially since Biden opposed "Medicare for All," the proposal by Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) that would have created a single-payer health system run completely by the federal government, and has long been attacked by Republicans...
    The Supreme Court probably is not going to nullify ObamaCare. Congress should — one piece at a time. Democrats opposed to the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court were very worried — or at least pretended to be worried — about the upcoming case challenging the constitutionality of the so-called Affordable Care Act. The case is based on a legal theory considered pretty shaky on both sides of the aisle — many conservative legal analysts who would like to see the ACA repealed believe that the Court is extremely unlikely to throw it out. Some have gone as far as to predict a 9-0 ruling against the challenge. But, in one meaningful sense, the ACA already has been nullified — the law never has been fully implemented as it was designed, and it is almost certain at this point that it never will be. Republicans opposed some...
    Every American president cares about their image, but Donald Trump’s instincts for self-promoting propaganda are rather more unusual than most. So perhaps we should not be too surprised that, according to reports, the President planned to wear a Superman T-shirt under his business suit when he emerged from his three-day hospital stay earlier this month. The pudgy 74-year-old repeatedly told aides that, like Clark Kent, he wanted to rip off his shirt and tie to display the T-shirt to mark his triumph over coronavirus, claimed the New York Times. Trump was persuaded to abandon the idea. But the extraordinary claim shows just how desperate this beleaguered President has become to reignite the fervour that once surrounded him. When his presidency ends, so does his automatic immunity from trial on criminal charges. A grand jury in Manhattan has already been investigating Trump on suspicion of bank, insurance and tax fraud...
    Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden told a brazen lie about Obamacare Thursday evening during the final presidential debate in Nashville, Tennessee, claiming that no one lost their private health insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act. President Donald Trump attacked Biden's health care plan, accusing the Democratic nominee's plan of being "socialized medicine" that would terminate "180 million" private insurance plans. In response, Biden said that if the Supreme Court declares Obamacare unconstitutional he will pass new health care legislation "with a public option." He declared his support for private health insurance, arguing that a public option would increase competition by giving private health insurance plans something to compete against. Then he told a whopper. "The reason why I had such a fight with 20 candidates for the nomination was I support private insurance," Biden said. "Not one single person...
    Adobe I have one job that keeps me financially safe and provides healthcare, but every morning I feel a pit of despair in my stomach on the way to work. My other job gives me joy and freedom, and would allow me to return to school and dive deeper into my passions, but puts my health and financial security at risk. I want to start working at the second job regularly, but I don't feel ready to take the leap. How can I prepare myself for this transition? —Not ready for change Cards: King of Swords, Page of swords, high priestess, chariot.  I should start this off with a warning: I cannot in good conscience tell you to chuck your insurance in the middle of a pandemic without some deep preparations first. I know a bad job can be soul-sucking, but I can’t say “quit tomorrow!” though I’d love to. ...
    (CNN)My son Rob is 23 years old. He follows politics, enjoys sips of whiskey, and loves baseball. He also has a rare form of dystonia, a feeding tube, and a tracheostomy, among other pre-existing medical conditions. He uses a speech-generating computerized device to communicate with us. If the Affordable Care Act (ACA) were struck down by the Supreme Court after the addition of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, a mother of a disabled child herself, Rob would be uninsurable, like so many of his disabled peers.On October 12, 2018, I rolled my son Rob in his wheelchair to the U.S. Supreme Court for a tour. The sky that day was as bright blue as the cape he wore. I have a photo of him posing at the bottom of the famous icy white marble steps, smiling because we believed the court would continue to protect his right to health care —...
    Katrina Wittkamp | Getty Images About three weeks into Medicare's annual fall open enrollment, voters will choose who's going to occupy the White House starting in January. While President Donald Trump has taken some steps to ease certain costs for Medicare beneficiaries and has proposed other changes, Democrat challenger Joe Biden has some ideas of his own for the healthcare program. Regardless of who wins the election , challenges are at play. More from Personal Finance:Here’s how to pay for long-term careHow Trump and Biden would handle student loan crisisBeware of snags during Medicare open enrollment For starters, Medicare funding is under pressure due to reduced revenue coming in during the pandemic-induced economic downturn. Basically, the trust fund that supports Medicare Part A (hospital coverage) could be insolvent — i.e., its revenue would not be enough to cover expenses — several years earlier than 2026 as last projected, experts say. ...
    As the presidential election quickly approaches, the health of the United States and its rural communities is on the ballot, and the stakes have never been higher. Health care costs are already a heavy burden on personal finances, and high rates of unemployment have made health coverage and payments even more challenging for working-class Americans. President Barack Obama and congressional Democrats did the right thing by passing the Affordable Care Act in 2010. Its many benefits have become even more obvious during the Covid-19 pandemic. However, President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell have spent years trying and failing to dismantle the ACA, which would inflate costs and destroy coverage for people with pre-existing conditions. More from Invest in You:Covid-19 stress is driving the most vulnerable Americans to the brinkSuze Orman: An emergency fund is the key to your personal investment portfolioLost your job and health insurance? Here is...
    Mobile phones aren’t really mobile phones anymore. Sure, they technically make calls, but by any historical standard, we’re all walking around with expensive supercomputers in our pockets. Protecting those investments, especially when it comes to brand new hardware like the iPhone 12 and 12 Pro, is important. iPhone insurance isn’t just to protect your phone. You’re protecting access to your entire being, in most cases. Your photos, your social connections, your finances, your data.  Hide But finding the best iPhone warranty isn’t as simple as signing up for AppleCare+. Depending on how you use or tend to damage your phone, AppleCare+ might not be the most affordable option.  Hide AppleCare+ isn’t the best warranty for every iPhone 12 owner Apple unleashed its latest wave of phones with the introduction of the iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro. These cutting-edge devices feature 5G, brand new A14 Bionic chips, a LiDAR Scanner,...
              Live from Virginia Thursday morning on The John Fredericks Show –  weekdays on WNTW AM 820/ FM 92.7 – Richmond, WJFN FM 100.5 – Central Virginia, WMPH AM 1010 / FM 100.1 / FM 96.9 (7-9 PM) Hampton Roads, WBRG AM 1050 / FM 105.1 – Lynchburg/Roanoke and Weekdays 6-10 am and 24/7 Stream –  host Fredericks welcomed YourChoice Direct Care’s Dr. Chad Savage to the show to further examine the Affordable Care Act and the need for a competitive healthcare marketplace. Fredericks: Joining us now, Dr. Chad Savage. He had a big op-ed the other day on CSNBC and he says Vice President Biden doesn’t take away our healthcare choice. Of course, what Biden wants to do is eliminate choice in your health care. And he is with us now. Dr. Chad Savage. Hey, doc great to have you with us man. Dr. Savage: Good...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators examining Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination to the Supreme Court heard a wildly inaccurate statement from one of their own Wednesday about how much health insurance premiums have risen since the inception of “Obamacare.” Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas scrambled the statistics on premium costs and took an errant swing at insurance company profits as he inveighed against the “catastrophic failure of Obamacare.” Republicans are on defense over the Affordable Care Act — or Obamacare — because the Trump administration is asking the Supreme Court to overturn the 2010 law in its entirety. Obamacare provides coverage to more than 20 million people and protects those with preexisting medical conditions from being denied an individual policy, or charged more. From the Senate Judiciary Committee hearings on Barrett’s nomination: CRUZ: “Obamacare has doubled the profits of the big health insurance companies, doubled them. Obamacare has been great...
    Bob Cesca October 13, 2020 12:00PM (UTC) Donald Trump and his henchmen keep promising to protect health insurance coverage for Americans with pre-existing conditions. They're lying to you, probably because it's what they do best and also because the president has no idea how to spell "ACA," much less describe what's in the law.  The truth is that Trump's entire agenda circulates around re-election and erasing the Obama legacy because he's all about revenge — petty, self-serving Mafia-cosplay — and he doesn't really care if his own supporters aren't able to buy affordable health insurance due to his nincompoopery. This is why the president and his sidekick, Attorney General Bill Barr, are refusing to defend the ACA in court after a ludicrous ruling by a Trump-supporting Texas judge who also doesn't understand how the law works. : That 2018 decision by Judge Reed O'Connor found that the individual mandate, which required everyone to buy health insurance...
    This article is reprinted by permission from NerdWallet. When house hunting, the price of homeowners insurance probably isn’t top of mind. But homes with hidden risks can make getting coverage difficult, expensive or both. Learning how to identify them could save you a bundle. This could be a particularly important concern for first-time home buyers and those moving from cities to suburban or rural areas who may not be aware of common hazards, says Jennifer Naughton, risk consulting officer for North America for Chubb, an insurance company. Three out of 10 city dwellers told a Chubb survey in early August that they were considering moving out of the city because of the coronavirus outbreak. Meanwhile, the number of first-time home buyers in the first half of 2020 rose 4% compared with a year earlier as lower interest rates made mortgages more affordable, according to Genworth Mortgage Insurance.Where’s the nearest fire...
    Former Vice President Joe Biden is calling for major changes in America’s health care system. That may sound appealing to many Americans at first glance but would lead to bankrupting Medicare and ultimately forcing most or all of us onto a substandard system of single-payer government health care. In a major flaw, the plan being pitched by Democratic presidential nominee Biden and his running mate — Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif. — does nothing to deal with the soaring costs of health care. In sharp contrast, President Trump has an effective plan to improve health care. But his administration and campaign have not effectively communicated it. The Trump administration has been focused on the universal reduction of the cost of medical services and prescription drug prices. This is vital because health care costs have been skyrocketing out of control for years. DR. NICOLE SAPHIER: BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH SHOULD NOT BE EXPLOITED,...
    Photo via AdobeIt's disappointing news on the children's health insurance front. Despite a booming economy (until the pandemic hit the state), 7.6 percent of Florida children, or 343,000 youngsters, were uninsured in 2019, a new report released Friday by the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families shows. Approximately 55,000 Florida children under the age of 19 lost health insurance coverage between 2016 and 2019, according to the report's authors, Joan Alker and Alexandra Corcoran.   The report is based on pre-pandemic data. Florida has the second-largest number of uninsured children in the nation, lagging only behind Texas, which has an estimated 995,000 uninsured children. Combined, Texas and Florida account for 41 percent of the nation's 4.375 million uninsured children. Coverage losses were widespread across income, age, and race/ethnicity, but were largest among white and Hispanic children, who can be of any race. Nationally, 9.2 percent of Hispanic children were uninsured in 2019;...
    Getty House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (R) and President Donald Trump disagree on economic relief bills. President Trump said on Sunday that the White House is “ready to go” on the next stimulus bill, but “we can’t get Nancy Pelosi to sign the document.” According to Forbes, Trump was most likely referring to the $1.8 trillion stimulus package set forth by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, which Pelosi has said, “does not include acceptable measures for testing and tracing and lacks adequate funding for state and local governments, federal unemployment insurance, and childcare.” In a statement on Sunday, Pelosi said, “This past week, the President demonstrated very clearly that he has not taken the war against the virus seriously, personally or nationally… This attitude is reflected in the grossly inadequate response we finally received from the Administration on Saturday.” According to the Washington Post, many GOP senators denounced the bill...
    In this screengrab, Rebecca Cokley participates in Supercharge: Women All In, a virtual day of action hosted by Supermajority, on September 26, 2020.  As the president continues his treatment for COVID-19 with the benefit of the best medicines and care that taxpayer funding can buy, he has called for “his representatives” to focus solely on confirming his Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett, shelving discussions of additional COVID-19 relief. Coupled with his administration’s continued support for repeal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the president continues to neglect a basic duty of care to the public at large in the face of an ongoing crisis. With the future of the ACA on the line as the Supreme Court is scheduled to hear oral arguments the week after the election, advocates are stressing the need for the nomination process to be slowed down if not stopped outright. A 2017 maneuver by the current...
    OAKLAND, Calif. (KGO) -- Landon Vivian, Managing Attorney, The Barnes Firm, based in Oakland, shares practical tips on what to do after a car accident."The details that occur at the time of the accident are critical down the road," says Landon.1. Make sure you're okay - if you're significantly injured, call for help.2. Document as much information as you can - if you have a mobile phone, take pictures.3. Find out if there are any witnesses - get their contact information.4. Get a copy of the police report.The Barnes Firm lawyers work with their client's insurance company and the insurance company of the person who was at fault.For their own clients, they sort out some of the issues like uninsured motorist coverage or underinsured.As soon as the other party's insurance company finds out your information, they'll begin trying to contact you. Landon advises, "Before you talk to that other person's...
    (CNN)More coverage for virtual doctors' visits. Expanded mental health benefits. Access to on-site health clinics.As employees sign up for job-based coverage for 2021, they'll find the coronavirus pandemic has changed some of the benefits that their companies are providing, experts said.And they'll also see their premiums and out-of-pocket costs increase about 5%, which is more than wages and inflation have been rising, according to the Business Group on Health, which surveys large employers.This bump comes on top of a 4% increase in premiums this year, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation's annual employer health benefits survey. In 2020, the average annual premiums hit nearly $7,500 for single coverage and $21,500 for family coverage. Deductibles stayed roughly the same at about $1,650 for a single person.One of the biggest changes for 2021 will be a growth in the number and types of virtual care options, said Steve Wojcik, the group's vice...
    While the politicization of insurance coverage and access to health care rages on, numbers across the country continue to decline when it comes to the percentage of people who have health insurance. According to data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the national uninsured rate reached 9.2 percent in 2019, compared to 8.9 percent in 2018. Personal financial website WalletHub recently examined the post-Obamacare uninsured rates in each of the 50 states, including indicators for race and income level. Dr. Alan Sager, Professor of Health Law, Policy, and Management and  Director of the Health Reform Program at Boston University School of Public Health, had this to say: The $4 trillion being spent on health care in the U.S. this year is enough to finance the care that works for the people who need it. How to use the vast sums we already spend to protect people...
    With ample job losses since the start of 2020, more Americans are uninsured than in recent memory. Being without health insurance takes on new meaning during the coronavirus pandemic, leaving many Americans more vulnerable than before. According to a report by WalletHub, a personal finance website, nine of the top 10 cities with the highest rates of uninsured residents are in Texas. [ READ: How Previous Pandemics Have Improved American Cities ]The study compared overall insurance rates of 548 U.S. cities from 2019 census data, measuring within the "city proper," and excluding greater metro areas. Health insurance rates by age, ethnicity and income were also measured. Washington, D.C., ranked first for large cities with the lowest uninsured rates, with less than 4% of adults being uninsured, followed by Seattle, San Francisco, Boston and Honolulu. Houston topped the other end of the list for highest uninsured rates among large cities, with an...
    (CNN)California Sen. Kamala Harris could be forced into the uncomfortable position on Wednesday night of explaining her past support of "Medicare for All," a proposal the Trump campaign has described as a socialized takeover of American health care -- and Harris' running mate, Democratic nominee Joe Biden, has long opposed. Biden's attempt to talk through his own plan, which would shore up the Affordable Care Act and add a public insurance option to the mix, set off one of the most contentious exchanges of last week's historically ill-tempered presidential debate.5 things to look for in tonights vice presidential debatePresident Donald Trump, interrupting repeatedly, insisted that the Democratic nominee backed Sen. Bernie Sanders' Medicare for All bill, which would create a national health insurance system -- a false claim that Biden frustratedly rejected over and over.Vice President Mike Pence is widely expected to push a similar line against Harris in their...
    National Exercise Program Fast Facts Chopped judge Marcus Samuelsson: Failure to pass restaurant aid would cost millions of jobs How the FDIC protects your money Given the economic damage caused by the coronavirus pandemic, it’s understandable that you might have concerns about the safety of your cash parked at the bank. The good news is that if your cash is deposited at a federally insured bank, it is protected by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. © Jer123/Shutterstock FDIC building in Washington DC "An FDIC-insured account is the safest place for consumers to keep their money," the FDIC said in a press statement to reassure depositors after the coronavirus lockdowns began. Load Error What is FDIC insurance?The FDIC was created in 1933 to protect consumers when financial institutions fail and are forced to close their doors. The FDIC insures up to $250,000 per depositor, per FDIC-insured bank, per...
    According to new Voya Employee Benefits research, to help protect their families during these uncertain times more than 70% of American workers plan to spend more time reviewing their workplace benefits ahead of open enrollment this fall, and more than half (53%) plan on making changes. Given these insights, consider updating your “to-do” list this fall to include taking a close look at your workplace benefits. Here’s a few suggestions to help you rethink and re-evaluate potentially untapped benefits offered by your employer so you’re ready when open enrollment begins: 1. Don’t procrastinate: Industry research shows employees spend just 17 minutes electing their benefits, while Netflix users spend an average of 18 minutes deciding what to watch. Certainly, trying to make sense of all your benefit options during open enrollment is like “cramming for a final exam” — it’s a lot of information and can be overwhelming. As a...
    First crack appears in Kipchoges armour of invincibility Do Blow-Dryers *Really* Ruin Your Hair? Here’s What Stylists Want You To Know Most Americans don't know these lucrative Social Security "secrets" Ad Microsoft Incredible Blanket Puts Humans In A Deep Sleep, Melting Stress Away Ad Microsoft 23 Gadgets That Could Sell Out Before the Holidays Ad Microsoft ...
    Health insurance isn't getting any cheaper. In fact, it's getting a lot more expensive.  Insurance costs have increased 740% since 1984, according to data company Clever. And employers are already reporting a 3% to 4.5% rise in premiums for 2021 due to the Covid-19 crisis.  With such an expensive commodity, it is important to take advantage of any savings you can get.  While the inner workings of health insurance can get complicated, the basics are pretty simple: You pay money every month so that when you have an accident or get sick, your medical costs aren't so expensive that they bankrupt you. Two of the most important terms in health insurance are "premiums" and "deductibles." Check out this video to see how the two work and to learn how you can use them to get the most out of your insurance.  More from Invest in You: What your FICO score...
    More than six months into the pandemic, layoffs show no sign of abating any time soon.undrey | iStock | Getty Images American Airlines. United Airlines. Goldman Sachs. Shell. Disney.  The start of October has brought a wave of announcements by companies that they're either laying off or furloughing employees. Unemployment claims remain stubbornly high.  Losing a job can be among one of the worst experiences in someone's life and can trigger all sorts of existential and financial dilemmas. Yet there are steps you can take to help make sure you don't spiral into despair as well as up your odds of a positive next chapter. 1. Apply for unemployment You should file for unemployment as soon as possible, experts say. Amid the pandemic, wait times for your benefits can be longer than usual and you want to avoid a period where you don't have any money coming in.  After the $600 federal unemployment checks came to an...
    Even this hasn't convinced them Trump doesn't care if they live or die. Even the usually stellar health reporters at The New York Times, Sarah Kliff and Margot Sanger-Katz, are subject to the editorial mandate that every single Trump voter in the nation be found and interviewed. That effort reveals that Trumpies remain idiotic sheep who love being lied to. And the rest of us are going to have to save their sorry asses yet again in this election. "I think people should be able to have insurance even if they have pre-existing conditions," Pamela Jean Locke, 59, in Jacksonville, Florida. "I've heard from him that he would continue with pre-existing conditions so that people would not lose their health insurance," she said. The woman is a children's museum director, so she has enough brain cells to direct something, but apparently not enough to follow the actual news and realize...
    Brenda Pickens lost her husband, Howard, to Covid-19 in March.Source: Brenda Pickens Brenda Pickens' life changed dramatically this past spring, when her 63-year-old husband, Howard, died from Covid-19 complications.  His death, which occurred a month after the couple's 28th wedding anniversary, was something they never really planned for.  "We didn't think either one of us would be alone so early in our lives," said Pickens, 62, who also contracted the virus and spent months recovering.  With only a small life insurance policy payout and some retirement savings, she contemplated selling her home in Waveland, Mississippi, and her husband's barbershop, Fade 1, in nearby Bay St. Louis. Pickens was also furloughed from her job at a naval base barbershop.  More from Invest in You:Are you prepared? This is the financial first-aid kit you need to stockHome-rich but cash-poor? What to know about reverse mortgagesHow pandemic has upended the financial lives of...
    “The Constitution is not neutral. It was designed to take the government off the backs of the people.” -- Justice William O. Douglas (1898-1980) With President Donald Trump’s nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court on Saturday, the Affordable Care Act -- ObamaCare -- is back in the news. Barrett expressed constitutional misgivings about ObamaCare 10 years ago when she was a professor at Notre Dame Law School, and some folks who oppose her nomination have argued that should she be confirmed in the next month, she should not hear the Nov. 10 arguments on ObamaCare. Wait a minute. Didn’t the Supreme Court already uphold ObamaCare in 2012? Yes, it did. So why is the constitutionality of this legislation back before the Supreme Court? Here is the backstory. MATT GORMAN: TRUMP HAS A NEW RUNNING MATE NOW The ACA of 2010 marked the complete federal takeover of...
    NFL MVP odds: Still value on Wilson after stellar Week 3 Grocery Chains That Have Filed for Bankruptcy Most Americans don't know these lucrative Social Security "secrets" Ad Microsoft Incredible Blanket Puts Humans In A Deep Sleep, Melting Stress Away Ad Microsoft 23 Gadgets That Could Sell Out Before the Holidays Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/16 SLIDES © fizkes / Shutterstock.com 15 States Where the Most People Have Health Insurance More than 9 in 10 people in the U.S. had some type of health insurance coverage in 2019, according to the latest data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Nationwide, 9.2% of Americans went uninsured. However, the rates of coverage can...
    Mladenovic collapses again but blames umpire, Djokovic wins The History of Inflight Dining Most Americans don't know these lucrative Social Security "secrets" Ad Microsoft Incredible Blanket Puts Humans In A Deep Sleep, Melting Stress Away Ad Microsoft 23 Gadgets That Could Sell Out Before the Holidays Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/16 SLIDES © fizkes / Shutterstock.com 14 States Where the Most People Have Health Insurance More than 9 in 10 people in the U.S. had some type of health insurance coverage in 2019, according to the latest data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Nationwide, 9.2% of Americans went uninsured. However, the rates of coverage can vary widely from state to...
    This article is reprinted by permission from NerdWallet. Traveling now carries with it more uncertainty than ever before. If you plan on traveling anytime soon, one thing you can do to protect yourself is get a trip insurance policy that includes coronavirus coverage. Previously, many insurers excluded COVID-related claims due to the virus’ status as a foreseen event/pandemic. But now, some insurers are changing their tune. Here’s what you need to know about how to find travel insurance providers that offer coronavirus-related coverage, as well as what is and isn’t covered. What is covered Coronavirus coverage falls into several categories: Trip cancellation: You need to cancel a trip prior to departure because you, a covered travel companion or possibly someone you need to care for contracted COVID-19. Trip delay: Your trip is delayed due to changing COVID-related guidelines. Travel medical coverage: You (or a covered travel companion)...
    DEAR READERS: Many of you wrote in about the man who was afraid to get a colonoscopy. I am sharing a few of your comments here. Harriette Cole  Thank you all for your caring and thoughtful comments. DEAR HARRIETTE: I read your column today in the Bay Area News Group paper. Thank you for addressing the need for people over 50 to get colon cancer screenings and for your compassionate response. A family member of mine waited too long to get tested. When that person finally did — keeping in mind that one or two colon polyps can be of concern and definitely should be removed and tested for cancer — they discovered a veritable forest of them. This person had to stay in surgery much longer than expected to try to save their life, go back again three months later to remove more, then again six months later, and...
              Live from Virginia Friday morning on The John Fredericks Show –  weekdays on WNTW AM 820/ FM 92.7 – Richmond, WJFN FM 100.5 – Central Virginia, WMPH AM 1010 / FM 100.1 / FM 96.9 (7-9 PM) Hampton Roads, WBRG AM 1050 / FM 105.1 – Lynchburg/Roanoke and Weekdays 6-10 am and 24/7 Stream –  host Fredericks welcomed the Administrator for Medicare and Medicaid Service, Seema Verma to the show to discuss President Trump’s healthcare executive order and it’s focus on transparency and pre-existing conditions. Fredericks: Joining us now from The White House. So good to have her on is Seema Verma. She is the administrator for Medicare and Medicaid services, and she’s been there and been with us from the beginning, and now becoming a regular on the John Frederick Show. Seema, great to have you, Verma: Hey, it’s great to be with you, John....
    The U.S. Supreme Court.Phil Roeder | Moment | Getty Images The Supreme Court may soon erase the Affordable Care Act from existence — an outcome that could have far-reaching consequences for American health care. The high court is expected to hear oral arguments in a case seeking to overturn the law, also known as Obamacare, in November after the presidential election. It may be easier to secure a vote against the decade-old law if President Donald Trump can quickly install a sixth conservative justice to replace justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died last Friday. She was among the liberal ranks of the nine-member court. "Virtually the entire law is at stake," said Cynthia Cox, vice president at the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, where she does economic and policy research on the Affordable Care Act. Millions of Americans could lose  their health insurance as a result. They would likely face cost...
    The death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has cast fresh uncertainty on the fate of the Affordable Care Act as the Supreme Court prepares to hear arguments in a case challenging the constitutionality of the landmark health care law. Ginsburg, who died Friday at the age of 87, voted to uphold the Obama-era law in 2012 alongside the three other liberal justices and Chief Justice John Roberts. She was widely expected to do so again when the high court reviews the ACA for the third time, with oral arguments scheduled to begin the week after the November presidential election. But now the latest case — California v. Texas, which is based on an earlier lawsuit brought by 21 Republican state attorneys general and endorsed by the Trump administration — will be heard without Ginsburg, a stalwart of the court’s liberal bloc. Another coalition of Democratic attorneys general is trying to...
    President Donald Trump’s chance to fill Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat could shape the Supreme Court’s jurisprudence for years to come, but a newly-appointed judge could affect 20 million Americans’ health care — and how much they pay for it — a lot sooner. One week after Election Day, the high court is scheduled to hear arguments Nov. 10 on whether the Affordable Care Act (ACA), also known as “Obamacare,” is null and void. The Trump administration and 18 Republican-leaning states argue the whole law must go. After federal lawmakers in 2017 zeroed out the individual mandate’s penalty for lacking health insurance, the entire Affordable Care Act must fall with it, they contend. There’s no reason the whole law has to collapse and deprive an estimated 20 million people of health insurance, say more than 20 Democrat-leaning states and the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives. Even before Ginsburg’s...
    In an article entitled “Navigating blockchain opportunities in Insurance” recently translated into French on the Blockchain Partner blog, Laurent Benichou analyzes the mistakes that the insurance sector could avoid and the opportunities it should seize to take full advantage of the new lands unknowns discovered by Bitcoin and explored since by so many other projects. Extracts: Bitcoin was created to exchange value without a centralizing third party. Bitcoin’s very goal was to create a digital asset to enable its incensurable exchange. We can therefore in principle doubt that “blockchain technology” is the best answer to objectives too far removed from the principle of decentralized exchange of digital value. When faced with a blockchain project without a token, the added value of the blockchain is most of the time at least subject to debate, and often ends with a technical examination of the differences between a private...
    The rioting, looting, and arson that was seen in some 20 states in the days and weeks following the May 25 police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis could cost the insurance industry up to $2billion in claims, it has been reported. The previous record for the costliest period of civil unrest in insurance history was set in 1992, when Los Angeles was engulfed in violence for a week after the acquittal of four police officers filmed in the beating of Rodney King. The Los Angeles riots resulted in $775million in insurance claims being paid out. When taking inflation into account, that would amount to $1.42billion, according to Axios. Other costly instances of civil unrest include the 1965 Watts riots in Los Angeles ($44million); the 1967 riots in Detroit ($42million); and the rioting and looting that took place during the 1977 blackout in New York City ($28million). People walk...
    The domestic terrorists in Antifa and Black Lives Matter have accomplished one thing: the most costly riots in the history of our country, reports the far-left Axios. Property Claim Services, a company that tracks insurance claims filed due to riots and the like, found that the left-wing riots that occurred between May 26 and June 8 of this year could reach $2 billion in insurance claims. Obviously, because the left’s domestic terrorism extended well beyond June 8 and is still ongoing, the company acknowledges “this is still happening, so the losses could be significantly more.” Most importantly, these estimates are all being compared based on 2020 dollars. Meaning, previous riots, like the 1992 Rodney King Riots in Los Angeles, cost $775 million in 1992 dollars. That adds up to $1.42 billion today, which is still lower than the $2 billion Black Lives Matter Riots estimate — which again only covers...
    Percy Alban/Zuma For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.The number of uninsured Americans rose by one million in 2019, according to a Census Bureau report released Tuesday, reversing a trend of lowering uninsured rates ushered in by the Affordable Care Act. The number of people without insurance in the United States rose from 28.6 million, or 8.9 percent of the population, in 2018 to 29.6 million, or 9.2 percent of people, in 2019, according to the report. The uninsured rate among the non-elderly population started falling in 2010 after the Affordable Care Act was enacted, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation, but it started to tick back up in 2016. The increased uninsurance rates correlate with President Trump’s promotion of short-term “junk insurance” plans and the repeal of the individual mandate, which required people to pay a penalty if...
    By MIKE SCHNEIDER, Associated Press ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — In 2019, before the coronavirus pandemic hit and the U.S. economy crashed, median household income was the highest ever on record, but the number of U.S. residents without health insurance also increased, the U.S. Census Bureau reported Tuesday. Median household income in 2019 was $68,703, an increase of 6.8% from the previous year. That figure surpassed past boom-before-the bust years in 2007, when it was $62,090 in 2019 dollars and in 1999, when it was $62,641 in 2019 dollars, according to the Census Bureau. The poverty rate in 2019 was 10.5%, a decrease from 11.8% in 2018. It was the fifth consecutive annual decline in the national poverty rate, according to the Census Bureau. The number of people without health insurance increased last year to 29.6 million residents, or about 9.2% of the U.S. population from 28.6 million residents, or about...
    By LIZ WESTON of NerdWallet About 1 in 3 people 65 and older in the U.S. enroll in Medicare Advantage, the private insurance alternative to traditional Medicare. It’s not hard to see why: Medicare Advantage plans often cover stuff that Medicare doesn’t, and most people don’t pay extra for it. But Medicare Advantage can be more expensive if you get sick because copays and other costs can be higher, says Katy Votava, president of Goodcare.com, a health care consultant for financial advisors and consumers. Unhappy customers who want to switch back to traditional Medicare may find they no longer qualify for the supplemental policies to help pay their medical bills, or that they would face prohibitively high premiums. “These are complicated products,” says Votava, author of “Making the Most of Medicare.” “They’re like nothing else, no other insurance that people encounter anywhere until they get to Medicare.” MEDICARE’S ALPHABET SOUP...
    About 1 in 3 people 65 and older in the U.S. enroll in Medicare Advantage, the private insurance alternative to traditional Medicare. It’s not hard to see why: Medicare Advantage plans often cover stuff that Medicare doesn’t, and most people don’t pay extra for it. But Medicare Advantage can be more expensive if you get sick because copays and other costs can be higher, says Katy Votava, president of Goodcare.com, a health care consultant for financial advisors and consumers. Unhappy customers who want to switch back to traditional Medicare may find they no longer qualify for the supplemental policies to help pay their medical bills, or that they would face prohibitively high premiums. “These are complicated products,” says Votava, author of “Making the Most of Medicare.” “They’re like nothing else, no other insurance that people encounter anywhere until they get to Medicare.” MEDICARE’S ALPHABET SOUP The first hurdle...
    Americas Got Talent Season 15 Finalists The Typical Retiree’s Income Is Shockingly Low Patrick Mahomes record-breaking $503 million contract is so big the Kansas City Chiefs have taken out insurance in case it all goes wrong © Charlie Riedel/AP Images Patrick Mahomes. Charlie Riedel/AP Images The Kansas City Chiefs have added an insurance policy to Patrick Mahomes record breaking $503 million contract. According to ESPN, the policy protects the Chiefs in the event that Mahomes suffers a serious injury and is unable to play, while also providing salary-cap credit for any missed time. Mahomes signed the most lucrative contract in NFL history in July, penning a 10-year extension with the Chiefs that will keep him with the team through the 2031 season. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The Kansas City Chiefs have added an insurance policy to Patrick Mahomes record breaking $503 million contract. Mahomes signed the most lucrative...
    Patrick Mahomes. Charlie Riedel/AP Images The Kansas City Chiefs have added an insurance policy to Patrick Mahomes record breaking $503 million contract. According to ESPN, the policy protects the Chiefs in the event that Mahomes suffers a serious injury and is unable to play, while also providing salary-cap credit for any missed time. Mahomes signed the most lucrative contract in NFL history in July, penning a 10-year extension with the Chiefs that will keep him with the team through the 2031 season. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The Kansas City Chiefs have added an insurance policy to Patrick Mahomes record breaking $503 million contract. Mahomes signed the most lucrative contract in NFL history in July, penning a 10-year extension with the Chiefs that will keep him with the team through the 2031 season. According to ESPN, the policy protects the Chiefs in the event that Mahomes suffers a serious injury and...
    Rochester police chief to retire amid Daniel Prude death protests Virtual Kitchen, founded by ex-Uber execs to help restaurants with delivery, raises $20 million Savvy Americans do this to earn an extra $1,394 per month in retirement Ad Microsoft New Car Gadget Magically Removes Scratches & Dents Ad Microsoft 23 Gadgets That Could Sell Out Before the Holidays Ad Microsoft ...
    The husband of missing mom Suzanne Morphew is hitting back after it was revealed he spent the night before his wife was reported missing in a cheap hotel room that reeked of chlorine.  In an interview with Fox 21 on Friday, Barry Morphew denied any wrongdoing inside his suite at the Holiday Inn in Broomfield, Colorado, following sensational claims his co-worker, Jeff Puckett, made earlier this week.  Puckett exclusively told DailyMail.com on Wednesday that he arrived at the hotel room on May 10 to find it scattered with wet towels and mail belonging to Barry.  The same day, police started a frantic search for Suzanne, 49, who failed to return to the family home in Maysville, Colorado.   On Friday, more almost four month's after his wife's disappearance, Barry defiantly stated: ' I did nothing wrong in the hotel. There's cameras all over the hotel, I did nothing wrong.' Barry Morphew,...
    The view from the Six Senses Kocatas Mansions. Talal Al Rashed In August, I flew from New York to Turkey. It's one of the few countries inviting American travelers, and its relatively strong coronavirus response makes it an attractive destination. The country offers cheap travel insurance to cover medical costs if you get the virus, businesses take precautions by wrapping everything in plastic, and there are hand-sanitizing stations everywhere you look. The country's beauty and optimistic vibe stood in stark contrast with New York. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. In early August, I did something that many friends and family thought was completely crazy — I went to New York's JFK Airport, boarded a Turkish Airlines flight, and made my way to Istanbul for a 12-day adventure in Turkey. Yes, I understood that we were in the middle of a global pandemic and, sure, I realized...
    Fantasy: Can Fournette thrive in Bucs loaded lineup? (Early projections) Dangerous roads you should never drive in an RV The pandemic is giving the US a chance to fix its embarrassing unemployment benefits. Top economists tell us what the future of this crucial system could look like. © David McNew/Getty Images Accessing unemployment insurance might drastically transform after the coronavirus pandemic, experts say. David McNew/Getty Images Before 2020, US unemployment claims have never been filed in such high numbers — or had such outsized importance. The process has been slow and cumbersome, with many Americans claiming that they struggled to get access to benefits due to outdated and underfunded systems, and one survey estimating that 4 million claims have gone unfiled. Business Insider talked to 4 experts who predicted the future of unemployment benefits in the US, along with some of the many applicants who tried and failed...
    New York (CNN Business)First-time claims for unemployment benefits fell below a million again last week, the Labor Department reported Thursday. This happened before -- in early August -- before claims reversed course and bounced higher.Another 881,000 Americans filed initial claims for benefits last week on a seasonally adjusted basis.Continued jobless claims, which count people filing for benefits for at least two weeks in a row, stood at a sesaonally adjusted 13.3 million, more than 1 million lower than last week.A wonky aspect in the report: The Labor Department changed its methodology for seasonal adjustments starting with this report. Usually, seasonal adjustments are designed to smooth the data and make it more easily comparable. But during the pandemic's unprecedented effect on the labor market they have added some noise to the data.On an unadjusted basis, unemployment insurance claims rose to more than 833,000, an increase of about 7,500.Read MoreStill, the trend...
    The Dominican Republic is hoping to entice tourists back to its beaches. ullstein bild / Getty Images The Dominican Republic is hoping to entice tourists back to its sandy beaches by scrapping the requirement of a negative COVID-19 test. Instead, visitors will be offered a free travel assistance plan until December 2020, according to a statement.  From September 15, mass testing at airports will be replaced by random checks as part of the country's Responsible Tourism Recovery Plan. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.   With many Caribbean nations competing for the economic boost of much-needed tourism dollars, the Dominican Republic made some policy changes to make visiting the island a bit easier. As part of its newly announced Responsible Tourism Recovery Plan, visitors will no longer be required to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test in order to enter the country, starting September 15. Additionally,...
    “I’d like to be the face of healthcare reform for the Republican Party,” said Madison Cawthorn, the Republican nominee for North Carolina’s 11th Congressional District, in an interview on Wednesday’s edition of SiriusXM’s Breitbart News Daily with host Alex Marlow. Madison Cawthorn called for improving health care by increasing free-market competition. “I’ll use a simplified analogy, but I want our insurance and — our health care — to be a lot like ordering a pizza,” said Cawthorn. “In my house here in Henderson County, I have five different companies that would deliver a pizza to me at any time. That means that they’re all competing for my dollars, so they’re going to try and give me the best pizza for the lowest price as quick as they can, and that’s what I think our insurance should be like. You should be able to shop around for what you want. You should be...
    The husband of missing Colorado mom Suzanne Morphew spent the night before she vanished at a budget hotel in Denver – and left the room reeking of chlorine, a co-worker has claimed exclusively to DailyMail.com. Suzanne, 49, was reported missing on Mother’s Day, May 10,  by neighbor Jeanne Ritter, 70, after her two daughters Mallory and Macy were unable to reach her on the phone. Her bike was found the same day by a bridge close to her luxury $1.5 million Salida, Colorado home and she had not been heard from since May 8. At the time, her husband Barry was 150 miles away in Broomfield, Colorado - just outside of Denver - working on a landscaping job for transport company RTD-Denver. But the couple's home quickly became the focus of the police investigation, with CSI specialists seen carrying evidence bags into the property in photos taken by DailyMail.com two days...
    Frank Gore is nearing Walter Paytons rushing mark, and Payton’s son couldn’t be happier for his ex-teammate 25 Interior Designers of the Past Whose Names You Should Know Whats the Difference Between a Deed and Title? As you approach closing day for your home purchase, you’re going to hear a lot of discussion about the deed and title of your property. Both are an important part of owning real estate, but it can be hard to distinguish between the two. Here’s what you need to know about the differences between the deed and title in real estate. Load Error What Is a Deed? A deed is a document that shows a change in ownership has occurred in a sale. It’s “the physical representation of the transfer of ownership,” says Kendall Bonner, a licensed Florida attorney and broker and owner of Re/Max Capital Realty in Lutz, Florida. The deed...
    Hi there, MarketWatchers. Don’t miss these top stories: Personal FinanceLosing the extra $600 unemployment benefit may not have stopped Americans from spending money, J.P. Morgan credit card data shows ‘We see little sign that the benefit expiration has marked a major turning point for the overall economy,’ one J.P. Morgan economist said. What’s an SOS advance directive? What medical ethics experts think and who is using them Not since the 1918 pandemic has this country contemplated rationing vital medical resources on a wide scale. As Louisiana recovers from Hurricane Laura, here’s what homeowners should know about the fine print in their insurance policies Standard homeowner’s insurance doesn’t cover damage from some types of natural disasters. Is this the bottle that will finally convince Americans to drink a classic Chinese spirit? The Ming River brand hopes to find new fans for baijiu, a decidedly funky sip. More than 30 states are...
    As residents of Louisiana begin to assess the damage wrought by Hurricane Laura, some homeowners may be disappointed to learn that their insurance won’t cover all of their losses. An early estimate from property data firm CoreLogic CLGX, +0.29% suggests that Hurricane Laura caused between $8 billion and $12 billion in insured losses for residential and commercial properties in Louisiana and Texas. Hurricane Laura made landfall in Louisiana on Thursday as a Category 4 storm — the 10th strongest tropical storm to ever hit the United States. While the magnitude of the damage is stunning, it’s far less than other storms that have battered those states, including Hurricanes Katrina and Harvey. And luckily for many residents, forecasters’ fears of an “unsurvivable” storm surge didn’t fully come to fruition. Only $500 million of the estimated insured losses was due to storm surge, according to CoreLogic. But as homeowners will soon discover,...
    Kyle Rittenhouse: Kenosha shooting suspect was in youth police cadet program, police say Amazon Opens Its First Full-Size Grocery Store It Just Got Harder to Get a Mortgage — Here’s How to Skirt the Rules It's now a lot harder to get the feds to back your mortgage than it was a few months ago. © fizkes / Shutterstock Frustrated couple The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) has made it more difficult to get mortgage default insurance from the agency by reducing borrowing limits, demanding higher credit scores and putting restrictions on the sources of down payments. Mortgage default insurance is mandatory for buyers that plan to put less than 20% down on a home, making a so-called "high-ratio" purchase. The tighter lending rules are making it difficult for some Canadians to borrow and take advantage of record-low mortgage rates, but mortgage pros say there’s a “secret” way...
    Osaka changes mind and agrees to play semi-final - report Inside the luxury tour bus celebs and rock stars use to hit the road Dont overlook the little things Welcome to Personal Finance Insider, a bimonthly newsletter that connects you with the stories, strategies, and tips you need to be better with money. You can sign up here. © iStock; Alyssa Powell/Business Insider iStock; Alyssa Powell/Business Insider Here's what: It's the little thingsI moved into a new apartment earlier this month — what a breath of fresh air! My partner and I are very grateful for our steady jobs, but like many other people in our work-from-home situation we were quick to spot the flaws in our Los Angeles abode. When COVID-19 stay-at-home orders kept us inside around the clock, our lack of a washer/dryer, natural light, and outdoor space became achingly apparent. Load Error According to the...
    Day 2 of the Biggest Actuality Present on Earth didn’t disappoint. From begin to end, Donald Trump’s conference crew as soon as once more unveiled a wise program that skillfully stitched collectively folks, insurance policies and politics. Each good conference wants to inform a narrative and the Trumpers know what their story is and the way they need to inform it. They’ve segued easily from offense to protection, utilizing each the president’s file and even his rough-around-the-edges character to nice impact. The script is guided by an upbeat, optimistic, America-First spirit. There are many mentions of religion in God and patriotism and frequent broadsides towards Joe Biden, his occasion and insurance policies. Though the conclusion of the story is inevitable — that Trump’s insurance policies are the appropriate insurance policies and that he’s the appropriate man for these troubled occasions — it’s the way you get there that makes...
    Verily's Jessica Mega speaks during a diabetes gala fundraiser on May 14, 2016, in Beverly Hills, California.Todd Williamson | Getty Images Verily, the health unit of Google parent Alphabet, is creating a subsidiary to apply technology to a kind of employer-sponsored insurance known as "stop-loss."  The new Coefficient Insurance Co. will be backed by the insurance giant Swiss Re via a minority investment. The companies did not disclose the size of the financing, which is still subject to regulatory approvals.   Stop-loss provides protection for employers against catastrophic and unexpected losses. Self-funded employers tend to purchase it from outside insurers to avoid liability and huge losses. The market is already valued at about $20 billion, according to the research firm S&P Global Intelligence. The space is crowded, but Verily and Swiss Re said the new service will be differentiated because it uses tech-based underwriting to determine potential areas of cost volatility, and to cover...
    Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA), running mate of Democrat presidential nominee Joe Biden, suggested during an ABC News interview that aired on Sunday that eliminating private health insurance was one of the “great ideas” to fix problems in the health care system. Harris also blatantly lied about her past support for government-run health care. “And you know I ask you this because you have pressure from the Left, you have pressure from the center, you’re trying to appeal to Republicans, and so on sort of the evolution on the issues when you talk about health care that you see eye to eye—do you see a day where private insurance would go away as you once proposed?” ABC News host David Muir asked. “No, and in fact that my plan, when I was running, was that we would not eliminate private insurance,” Harris falsely claimed. “And Joe and I—” “Even though you...
    FAMILY time is something we always want more of – but it isn’t always easy. That’s why, when you get to indulge in that quality time, it’s so important to make the most of it. 11 These 10 top companies can help you do that… Foot loose and crease free… 11 You feel your best when you look your best – but no one wants to spend hours and hours ironing all of the family’s clothes. Luckily, Lenor has a product to make it easier. Lenor Crease Releasers are the perfect combination of removing creases without the hassle of ironing with the charming Lenor fragrance. Right now, you can buy a refill pack at Home Bargains – so not only are they kind on your clothes, they’re kind on the environment too! Each refill pack sold saves 26g of plastic – which is approximately 50 tonnes a year! There’s no...
    Dow futures slip as stock market fights to end the week higher Is the Toyota RAV4 Safe? A Look at our Long-Termers Safety Credentials Transfer VHS Tapes, Film, and Photos to Digital Ad Microsoft Motley Fool Issues Rare “All In” Buy Alert Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/11 SLIDES © ersinkisacik/istockphoto The Cost of COVID-19 Uncertainty and fear have been the backdrop of daily life for most of 2020 — and with an unprecedented health care crisis comes unprecedented upheaval in the health insurance industry. The full cost of the coronavirus is not yet quantifiable, nor is an exact calculation of how regular people will be affected by changes to their health care policies. One thing is certain, however: Millions of Americans have...
    (CNN)For many of the nearly 28 million Americans without health insurance, complying with the CDC guidelines to stay home and in touch with a doctor when Covid-19 symptoms are present is an impossibility. Richard BesserAs acting director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) during the H1N1 pandemic in 2009, I learned that the agency's guidelines were only as effective as the public's ability to follow them. Today, millions of Americans lack the means to do so because of housing and economic insecurity, a lack of sick leave or family medical leave, or no transportation to drive to a clinic or testing site. But the inability of many people to afford health insurance -- particularly people of color or those in low-wage jobs -- is one of our nation's clearest vulnerabilities during this pandemic. There will be a reckoning and a reassessment of American priorities after the pandemic...
    Shares of ride-hail giant Lyft plummeted more than 6.5 percent after it announced it will suspend service in California at the end of the day Thursday following a judge’s ruling that it misclassified its drivers. The rideshare company is bowing out of its largest market after a judge ruled it had violated the state’s Assembly Bill 5, which requires companies to classify their workers as employees if they control how workers do their jobs. Lyft, along with larger rival Uber, have argued that they are not employers, but instead tech providers that simply connect drivers with riders. Uber and Lyft prefer using that classification for drivers because treating them as employees would require benefits such as minimum wage, paid sick and family leave, unemployment insurance and worker’s compensation insurance. In a 34-page decision last week, Judge Ethan Schulman of the San Francisco Superior Court slammed the companies’ “prolonged and brazen...
    If you are facing financial difficulties during the pandemic, Beatriz Hartman of Consolidated Credit says there are ways to ease that financial stress. “In order to clarify our financial finances, or be aware of our financial finances, there is a method that is highly recommended to use which is the 50-30-20,” says Hartman. She recommends that 50% of your income be used for living expenses such as a mortgage, food, and cars. Then 30% for less-than-necessary expenses like dining out or subscriptions, and 20% for paying off debt and saving. “Another thing is to watch our expenses,” adds Hartman. Beatriz says that by reviewing your financial statements in detail, you might find that you are spending more than 30% of your income on things that are not so necessary. “Those are the things that unless I look at my financial statement in detail I am not going...
    Medicare for All activist Ady Barkan, left paralyzed and unable to speak by ALS, delivered a powerful indictment of the “fundamentally broken” for-profit U.S. healthcare system in his remarks at the Democratic National Convention Tuesday night, decrying a status quo that saddles Americans with massive costs while providing inadequate treatment. Using a voice-generating device attached to his wheelchair, Barkan relayed his experiences navigating America’s fragmented and dysfunctional insurance system since his diagnosis in 2016 and said the Covid-19 crisis has shined a spotlight on “the tragic consequences” of the nation’s failure to guarantee healthcare to all as a right. “In the midst of a pandemic, nearly 100 million Americans do not have sufficient health insurance,” said Barkan. “And even good insurance does not cover essential needs like long-term care. Our loved ones are dying in unsafe nursing homes, our nurses are overwhelmed and unprotected, and our essential workers are treated as dispensable.”...
    After months of continuous protests in Portland, which have finally been declared a riot, the chickens are coming home to roost. Unfortunately for the so-called "City of Roses," businesses are fleeing the city because, as it turns out, nightly riots do not cultivate a productive business environment. In fact, between the coronavirus-related forced shutdowns and the violent demonstrations, businesses in Portland's downtown area are hemorrhaging millions of dollars between lost revenue and damage caused by protesters. Andrew Hoan, CEO of the Portland Business Alliance, said the actual figure of business losses is mind-boggling. "The financial consequences to the downtown corridor are a running calculation that is almost impossible to wrap your mind around. The financial impacts of physical damage is one thing, and that continues to increase," Hoan told KATU-TV. "Then the ongoing loss of revenue to the business community who cannot operate their places of businesses is...
    Albin Lohr-Jones/Pacific Press/Zuma For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters.The Supreme Court will hear Texas v. United States, the case that threatens to undo Obamacare and leave 23 million Americans uninsured, on November 10—exactly one week after the presidential election. The lawsuit, brought by Republican attorneys general, argues that the lack of a financial penalty tied to the  individual mandate, which the GOP’s 2017 tax bill set to zero, invalidates the entirety of the Affordable Care Act. The Trump administration has helped boost the lawsuit, which, beyond ending the insurance mandate, could erase popular consumer protections such as bans on insurers discriminating against people with preexisting conditions or the ability for children to remain on their parents’ insurance until they turn 26. Democrats have been pushing for the case to be heard before November 3 to keep the president’s opposition to the ACA in voters’ minds...
    A Romanian family shares what's inside their fridge. Courtesy of Admiral Home Insurance Admiral Home Insurance asked 20 people from 20 countries to photograph their fridges and reveal more about what's inside. Some fridges are organized, while others describe theirs as "controlled chaos." People's favorite treats include fruit, dulce de leche, jalapeños, and almond butter. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The kitchen is often called "the heart of the home" because it's where people gather to cook and eat meals together. Refrigerators are a central part of kitchens around the world, and what people keep inside them can tell you a lot about their culture and household. Admiral Home Insurance asked 20 people from around the world to open their fridge, take a photo, and describe what's inside. Here's what people from 20 different countries like to eat.
    Ady Barkan, a health care activist who was diagnosed with the terminal neurodegenerative disease ALS four years ago, gave one of the most moving speeches of the second night of the Democratic National Convention. After Barkan’s diagnosis in 2016, President Donald Trump signed a tax bill that threatened Barkan’s health insurance. Barkan traveled to Washington, DC, to advocate for single-payer health care. Though former Vice President Joe Biden has opposed Medicare for All, this evening Barkan made an impassioned plea to vote for him, as Trump’s administration asks the Supreme Court to invalidate Obamacare. “Even during this terrible crisis, Donald Trump and Republican politicians are trying to take away millions of people’s health insurance,” Barkan said, speaking with help from a computer voice due to paralysis from the disease. “With the existential threat of another four years of this president, we all have a profound obligation to act, not only...
    The city of Minneapolis is demanding that businesses devastated by the rioters and looters this summer have to pay all their 2020 property taxes to the city before they can remove the debris from their suites and rebuild with the aid of a demolition permit. “Most small businesses don’t have insurance, and most insurance policies only cover risks that can be modeled (such as fires, natural disasters, etc), not riots. Even in a best case scenario where a business does have insurance and is fully able to recoup the dollar value of everything stolen, the business still suffers a loss during the weeks or months they spend waiting to be paid out by insurance,” writer Matt Palumbo noted. “Most property owners must pay $35,000 to $100,000 to clear their sites of debris, with larger tracts — such as strip shopping centers — costing as much as $400,000, according to property...
    Depending on your health coverage, you could see a rebate from your insurer in the coming months. While such paybacks are issued yearly, the 2020 aggregate amount is anticipated to be $2 billion — about twice what it was last year, said Karen Pollitz, a senior fellow with the Kaiser Family Foundation. "Insurer profitability has been on the rise and as a result it's expected that 2019 rebates could set a record this fall," Pollitz said.A patient at Walmart HealthSource: WalmartGenerally, you're more likely to see a rebate if you have an individual policy (including through a state health exchange or the federal one) or participate in a small- or large-group plan. Many of the biggest U.S. employers choose to self-insure, which means their plans don't have to adhere to certain requirements placed on insurance companies. Different rules also apply to Medicare and Medicaid coverage. The average rebate in 2019...
    9/11 museum cancels twin towers light tribute due to coronavirus 22 Companies That Have Actually Benefited From the Pandemic How homeowners can beat the new mortgage refinancing fee As rates on home loans have slumped to all-time lows this year, hordes of homeowners have cut their monthly mortgage payments by refinancing. But that process is about to get more expensive. © rSnapshotPhotos / Shutterstock How to beat the new mortgage refinancing fee The two huge government-sponsored mortgage companies that buy or back most U.S. home loans say they'll need to start charging an "adverse market refinance fee" equal to 0.5% of the loan amount, beginning Sept. 1. Mortgage lenders are livid and say the charge will cost the average borrower an extra $1,400. That's enough to make some people think twice about whether a refi is worth it. But don't rule out getting a new loan, because you might...
    Senator Kamala Harris, a former presidential candidate, brings a history of votes and positions as she campaigns to become the first woman of color vice president.  Harris, a former prosecutor, has established a voting record as one of the most liberal members of the U.S. Senate, according to GovTrack, an independent nonpartisan website that tracks legislative records. Her record, already scrutinized when she ran for president, is sure to be under the microscope once again as she adds her name to the Democratic ticket.  Health careHarris was a co-sponsor of Senator Bernie Sanders' Medicare for All act. In January 2019, Harris said she wanted to eliminate private insurance. Later, she clarified that she wanted to get rid of the "waste" and "bureaucracy" in private insurance, but questions continued about her position on private health insurance. Harris has said she would be against any policy that would deny a person health...
    A group of Kansas and Missouri hair salon and restaurant owners can proceed with a lawsuit trying to make their insurance company pay for the income they missed out on during COVID-19 government shutdown orders, a judge ruled Wednesday. The businesses adequately alleged — for now at least — that they ought to be covered by their “all-risk” insurance policies, Western District of Missouri Judge Stephen Bough ruled after combing through insurance policy wording. The ruling could have broad implications as more businesses sue their insurance carriers for denying similar claims, observers say. Business interruption insurance replaces lost income when a business has to temporarily close its doors. The policies kick in when there’s “direct physical loss or damage.” That typically applies to events including burst pipes, fires or damage from a nasty storm. So does it kick in when businesses close their doors under government orders...
    Perdue, a first-term senator facing a tough reelection race in November against Democrat Jon Ossoff, voted in 2017 to repeal Obamacare, including its mandate the people with preexisting conditions must be covered by insurance policies. In January 2019, Perdue said that "of course" he wanted a GOP-spearheaded lawsuit aimed at striking down the health care law to succeed. In April 2019, he joined other Republicans in supporting the "Protect Act," a bill he claimed "protects Americans with preexisting conditions." Shortly after it was introduced, analysts noted that, while its sponsors say that the act "guarantees coverage for pre-existing conditions and prohibits insurance companies from excluding coverage of treatments for a patient's pre-existing condition," other provisions of the Protect Act undercut that guarantee. Sarah Lueck, a senior analyst with the nonpartisan Center on Budget Policies and Priorities, noted that the Protect Act would allow insurance companies to exclude coverage...
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