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    “He was speaking to say nothing,” Republican Senator John Cornyn told .. “I heard a lot of lawyers plead and it was not one of the best,” he said again. His colleague, Senator Lisa Murkowski, she said “appalled”: “I do not see where he was going”. Bruce Castor, 59, was for a long time a Pennsylvania county prosecutor, and joined the defense of the former president at the last minute after the resignation of five lawyers. On Tuesday, he spoke first in defense of Donald Trump, but multiplied the digressions on senators “extraordinary people” who “arouse the pride” of their constituents and the cryptic metaphors (“the floodgates open”, “the pendulum Politics”…) At the exit of the hemicycle, the Democrats did not hesitate to ironize. “I will reread the transcript to see if I can find a coherent passage,” said Senator Richard Blumenthal. “The defense arguments were weak and convoluted,...
    By LISA MASCARO, ERIC TUCKER, MARY CLARE JALONICK and JILL COLVIN, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Opening arguments will begin in Donald Trump's impeachment trial after an emotional first day ended with the Senate voting to hear the case for convicting the former president of inciting the riot at the U.S. Capitol even though he is no longer in office. On Wednesday, House Democrats prosecuting the case and the former president’s attorneys will lay out their opposing arguments before the senators, who are serving as jurors. The defense lost the vote seeking to halt the trial on constitutional grounds, 56-44, leaving Trump fuming over his lawyers' performance and allies questioning the defense strategy. Some called for yet another shakeup to his legal team. House prosecutors on Tuesday wrenched senators and the nation back to the deadly attack on Congress, showing a graphic video of the Jan. 6 mob violence that...
    By MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats will begin two days of arguments in Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial, trying to convince skeptical Republicans that the former president alone was responsible for inciting his mob of supporters who broke into the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 and interrupted the presidential electoral count. The arguments Wednesday from the nine Democratic impeachment managers for the House, which impeached Trump last month, will come a day after the Senate voted to move ahead with the trial even though Republicans and Trump’s lawyers argued that it was unconstitutional because Trump had already left office. All Democrats and six Republicans disagreed, arguing that there is legal precedent for the trial and that there should be no exceptions for impeachable behavior in a president’s last months in office. While Democrats won Tuesday’s vote, it also signaled that they will not likely have...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Opening arguments will begin in Donald Trump’s impeachment trial after an emotional first day ended with the Senate voting to hear the case for convicting the former president of inciting the riot at the U.S. Capitol even though he is no longer in office. On Wednesday, House Democrats prosecuting the case and the former president’s attorneys will lay out their opposing arguments before the senators, who are serving as jurors. The defense lost the vote seeking to halt the trial on constitutional grounds, 56-44, leaving Trump fuming over his lawyers’ performance and allies questioning the defense strategy. Some called for yet another shakeup to his legal team. House prosecutors on Tuesday wrenched senators and the nation back to the deadly attack on Congress, showing a graphic video of the Jan. 6 mob violence that stunned the the world as hundreds of rioters ransacked the building to try...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats will begin two days of arguments in Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial, trying to convince skeptical Republicans that the former president alone was responsible for inciting his mob of supporters who broke into the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 and interrupted the presidential electoral count. The arguments Wednesday from the nine Democratic impeachment managers for the House, which impeached Trump last month, will come a day after the Senate voted to move ahead with the trial even though Republicans and Trump’s lawyers argued that it was unconstitutional because Trump had already left office. All Democrats and six Republicans disagreed, arguing that there is legal precedent for the trial and that there should be no exceptions for impeachable behavior in a president’s last months in office. While Democrats won Tuesday’s vote, it also signaled that they will not likely have the votes for an eventual...
    Fox News host Sean Hannity joined the conservative pile-on over the Trump impeachment team’s widely panned performance on Tuesday, gently dragging Bruce Castor over his “meandering” presentation while pressing fellow Trump lawyer David Schoen to potentially replace Castor. Following the House Democrats’ powerful and highly prepared opening arguments during Tuesday’s Senate impeachment trial, which drew praise from many Senate Republicans and even Castor himself, Castor delivered a rambling, nonsensical, and free-form performance that was roundly mocked and left former President Donald Trump furious. With conservatives and Trump allies blasting the Trump defense attorney, going so far as to say they “have no idea what he’s doing,” Hannity spent much of his show Tuesday night criticizing Castor before welcoming Schoen on for an interview. Having already complained to Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) that he felt Castor was “a little lackluster” and needed a “little more focus,” the pro-Trump host introduced Schoen...
    Fox News’ Sean Hannity spoke with Trump lawyer David Schoen Tuesday night and gently tried to address some of the criticism of the other major Trump lawyer who spoke at the impeachment trial. Bruce Castor’s performance was just incredibly meandering and all over the place, and not only was he roundly panned, but report after report has made it beyond clear that Donald Trump himself was furious. Hannity started off the interview by telling Schoen he loved his performance, but said, “I thought it started a little meandering. Sort of like a lot of free associating in the beginning.” “And I’m not attacking your partner, I don’t know him at all, but I like focused arguments,” Hannity said as he went back to praising Schoen’s presentation. But towards the end of the segment, Hannity once again raised the issue, noting all the criticism of Castor and saying, “Seemed to be...
    (CNN)The first day of President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial was nominally about the constitutionality of holding an impeachment trial for a former president.What we expect today The second impeachment trial of former President Trump begins in the Senate. The trial kicks off with a four-hour debate on the constitutionality of the proceeding, followed by a vote to affirm the proceedings' constitutionality. Here's a refresher on Trump's first impeachment trial and what's different this time. But the arguments made by House impeachment managers and Trump's defense team were much larger in scope. They included the emotional testimony of Maryland Rep. Jamie Raskin, the lead House impeachment manager, who recounted his fear for himself and his children, who were in the Capitol building on January 6 when the mob incited by Trump interrupted the counting of electoral votes. Raskin was joined by Reps. David Cicilline of Rhode Island and Joe...
    Even Republican senators who voted against proceeding with the impeachment trial against former President Donald Trump were baffled by the opening argument from impeachment defense lawyer Bruce Castor. "I thought I knew where I was going, and I really didn't know where he was going," South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham said Tuesday about Castor's performance. "It took a long time to get to where I think the meat of the question is," Graham said. "The defense guys were accusing every Democrat of just hating Trump, and I'm not so sure either one of them are going to win the day." Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, when asked about Castor, had a long pause before saying: "I don't think the lawyers did the most effective job." Castor, former solicitor general of Pennsylvania, gave a long, meandering statement that included little to support Republican arguments that the impeachment...
    Arguments made by House Democratic impeachment managers and attorneys for former President Donald Trump affected just one Republican's thinking at Trump's Senate trial Tuesday. Louisiana Republican Sen. Bill Cassidy said he was unimpressed with Trump’s lawyers’ presentation at the start of the trial. Cassidy was one of six Republicans to vote to proceed with the trial, joining with Democrats to defeat the argument that the trial is unconstitutional because Trump is no longer in office. The other Republicans were Sens. Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska, and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania. All the other Republican senators had voted in January to affirm the trial is constitutional. “I always said, I'm gonna be an impartial juror. Anyone who listened to those arguments would recognize that the House managers were focused, relied upon and trusted upon the opinion of legal scholars,”...
    Photo credit: Drew Angerer, Getty Images Donald Trump’s impeachment defense got off to a “pretty rocky” and “inappropriate” start on the first day of his trial for inciting insurrection — and to give a sense of how bad things were for the former president, many of those dismal reviews came from Senate Republicans. Most notable among the critics was Louisiana Senator Bill Cassidy (R), who was so put off by the Trump’s team’s “disorganized” and “random” opening arguments that he switched his vote on the constitutionality of the Senate trial. But Cassidy was far from alone. Even die-hard Trump supporter Sen. Ted Cruz, who votedagainst the Electoral College certification of Joe Biden’s victory after the Capitol insurrection, publicly conceded that. Cruz acknowledged that he didn’t think that Trump lawyers Bruce Castor and David Schoen  “did the most effective job” compared to lead House Impeachment Manager Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD). “I don’t think the lawyers did the most effective job,” said Sen. Ted Cruz to @karoun when...
    Former President Trump is reportedly displeased with his legal representation, just one day into his impeachment trial. Trump expressed frustration with his defense's strategy right out of the gate Tuesday, according to a report in Politico. "President Trump was not happy with the performance of his legal team in action," a person familiar with Trump's evaluation of the day told the outlet. CNN reported that Trump and his team were confused by his team's last-minute change in speaking order, and that the former president was "borderline screaming" as attorney Bruce Castor delivered his opening argument, which was criticized by people on both sides of the aisle as rambling. Castor also said during his comments that he was impressed with what the Democratic representation had presented, a remark unlikely to make the former president happy. "I'll be quite frank with you, we changed what we were going to do on account that we thought...
    (CNN)A wide array of Senate Republicans harshly criticized former President Donald Trump's defense team on the opening day of his second impeachment trial, arguing that Trump attorney Bruce Castor had delivered a rambling and unfocused argument in making the case that the proceedings are unconstitutional."I thought the President's lawyer, the first lawyer, just rambled on and on and on," John Cornyn of Texas, a member of Senate GOP leadership, said of Castor, adding that the lawyer "didn't really address the constitutional argument. Finally the second lawyer got around to it, and, I thought, did an effective job."Trump unhappy with his impeachment attorneys performance, sources sayCastor opened Trump's defense with a meandering presentation and warned that a second impeachment trial in 13 months would "open the floodgates" to future impeachments, even making the rhetorically unfounded suggestion that former Obama administration Attorney General Eric Holder could be impeached.Prominent Republicans argued on Tuesday...
    Madison Summers February 9, 2021 0 Comments Six Republican senators voted “yes” to proceed with the Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump. Some of them are speaking out following the first day of the trial. Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) was among the six Republican lawmakers who voted on Tuesday that the impeachment trial is constitutional. “I was perplexed by the first attorney, who did not seem to make any arguments at all, which was an unusual approach to take,” Collins said. She was pointed to Trump lawyer Bruce Castor, who named a few Republican senators in his remarks. The Maine senator also said it was “inappropriate” for Castor to call out Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.) and Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Penn.). Republican Sen. Susan Collins says she was "perplexed" by Trumps lawyer Bruce Castor "who did not seem to make any arguments at all, which was an...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 6:35 p.m. Senate Republicans had sharp criticism for former President Donald Trump’s lawyers after the opening of his second impeachment trial. Many said they didn’t understand Trump’s lawyers’ arguments as they sought to persuade the Senate to dismiss the trial on constitutional grounds. Trump was impeached by the House for inciting the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol. Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy, who voted with Democrats to move forward with the trial after voting against them in a similar vote two weeks ago, said Trump’s team did a “terrible job” and was “disorganized,” “random” and “did everything they could but to talk about the question at hand.” Maine Sen. Susan Collins, who also voted with Democrats, said she was “perplexed” by lead Trump lawyer Bruce Castor, “who did not seem to make any...
    Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD) was seemingly emotional — appearing to almost cry — while he recalled being with his youngest daughter Tabitha at the Capitol on January 6 as he presented arguments supporting the Democrat-led push to impeach former President Donald Trump on Tuesday. Raskin, the lead impeachment manager, noted the recent death of his son, Tommy, during his remarks in the Senate impeachment trial of Trump. Raskin’s son took his own life on December 31 at the age of 25. The Maryland Democrat recalled his two daughters, Hannah and Tabitha, being with him in the Capitol during what he described as an “insurrection” and “coup”: My youngest daughter Tabitha was there with me on Wednesday, January 6. It was the day after we buried her brother, our son, Tommy. The saddest day of our lives.  Also, there was my son-in-law Hank, who is married to our oldest daughter, Hannah,...
    A group of six Republicans voted that the impeachment trial against former President Donald Trump is constitutional Tuesday, moving the trial forward. The Senate held a vote Tuesday night after several hours of arguments from both sides which would rule if the trial was constitutional. The vote to proceed with the trial and that it is constitutional was 56-44. Republican Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy was the only Republican to change his stance after Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and a majority of Republicans voted in favor of Republican Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul’s motion to dismiss the impeachment trial against Trump, saying it was unconstitutional. Cassidy changed his tune after Tuesday’s arguments, slamming Trump’s impeachment lawyers and voting with a majority of Democrats, saying the trial to impeach Trump is constitutional. Cassidy told CNN after the vote that the House impeachment managers had a “very good opening” and made “very good arguments.” He also said:...
    Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy unexpectedly switched his position on the constitutionality of the Senate impeachment trial of Donald Trump, and he explained his new position by calling out the dreadful nature of the former president’s impeachment defense counsel. After a long day of opening arguments by the House Impeachment Managers and Trump defense lawyers Bruce Castor and David Schoen, the Senate voted on a procedural motion to dismiss from Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul (R), who claimed the trial of the now-former president was unconstitutional. The measure fell short of a majority, with 56 Senators voting against it, including six Republicans. Tuesday’s roll call very closely tracked a similar vote in two weeks ago that failed 45 – 55 — but this time Cassidy joined the majority of Democrats in backing the trial’s legitimacy. After the House Democrats’ compelling video montage of the violence perpetrated against the Capitol, and how Trump’s rhetoric fed into it, both Castor...
    Mediaite founder and ABC chief legal analyst Dan Abrams suggested Tuesday that former President Donald Trump had reason to be dissatisfied with his legal team’s performance on the first day of his Senate impeachment trial. “The president can’t be happy, in my view, with Bruce Castor’s presentation,” Abrams said, referencing one of the president’s attorneys. “Not just because it was meandering and a bit of a disaster as a presentation, but because he said again and again that Donald Trump was removed by the voters, that the people picked a new administration. That belies everything Donald Trump has been saying and what got him into this mess in the first place. It’s not just that they’re not arguing voter fraud. They’re clearly arguing that the election was valid and it’s over.” He subsequently took aim at David Schoen, the second attorney who presented on Trump’s behalf. “With regard to Schoen, it was...
    A number of Republican senators criticized Trump’s legal team Tuesday for lacking focus and making “weaker” arguments than the House impeachment managers on the first day of former President TrumpDonald TrumpDOJ to seek resignations of most Trump-appointed US attorneys: report Trump attorney withdraws request to not hold impeachment trial on Saturday Kinzinger in op-ed calls on GOP senators to convict Trump in impeachment trial MORE’s impeachment trial. “Anyone who listened to those arguments would recognize that the House managers were focused, relied upon and trusted upon the opinion of legal scholars,” said Sen. Bill CassidyBill CassidyGOP senator compares Trump impeachment proceedings to Soviet 'show trial' GOP senator: Administration officials showing 'they don't care if they have to work with us' Sunday shows preview: Budget resolution clears path for .9 trillion stimulus; Senate gears up for impeachment trial MORE (R-La.) after joining with five other Republican senators in voting that the trial was...
    After the Trump defense lawyers made their case in the Senate impeachment trial Tuesday, CNN’s Jake Tapper called out one of the notable arguments they made. Tapper noted how one of the various arguments they’ve used is that Democrats are “trying to disenfranchise the 74 million people who voted for Donald Trump” because they want him convicted and then get the Senate to vote on barring him from running for office in the future. He called that argument “intriguing” because “this is a theatrical discussion of disenfranchisement when Donald Trump and his allies, including some in that chamber, such as Hawley of Missouri and Cruz of Texas, literally tried to disenfranchise Biden voters, literally tried to have it so that states that went for Biden wouldn’t count at all.” Abby Phillip also noted how one of the arguments was to acknowledge Trump lost the election legitimately, something the former president...
    Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyGovernment used Patriot Act to gather website visitor logs in 2019 Appeals court rules NSA's bulk phone data collection illegal Dunford withdraws from consideration to chair coronavirus oversight panel MORE (R-Pa.), who is considered a swing Republican vote in former President TrumpDonald TrumpDOJ to seek resignations of most Trump-appointed US attorneys: report Trump attorney withdraws request to not hold impeachment trial on Saturday Kinzinger in op-ed calls on GOP senators to convict Trump in impeachment trial MORE’s second impeachment trial, on Tuesday said the opening arguments by House Democrats were “very strong” and “well-grounded in the constitution and precedent.” Toomey made his comments after voting with six Republican senators on a motion to proceed with Trump’s trial as a constitutional exercise. “I thought the House impeachment managers made very strong arguments. It was persuasive and well-grounded in the Constitution and precedent,” Toomey told reporters. The...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 5:20 p.m. Senators in Donald Trump’s historic second impeachment trial have agreed to consider the case, rejecting an attempt by the former president’s defense team and some Republican allies to halt the trial because he is no longer in office. The vote was 56-44 on Tuesday on the question of whether the Senate has jurisdiction and could proceed. It came after four hours of arguments from Trump’s lawyers and the Democratic impeachment managers, who are arguing that the former president incited the Jan. 6 Capitol riots. The impeachment managers managed to pick up one additional vote from Republicans — Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy. Two weeks ago, he voted in favor of an effort to dismiss, but on Tuesday he voted with Democrats to move forward. Cassidy joined Republican Sens. Susan Collins of Maine,...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 5:20 p.m. Senators in Donald Trump’s historic second impeachment trial have agreed to consider the case, rejecting an attempt by the former president’s defense team and some Republican allies to halt the trial because he is no longer in office. The vote was 56-44 on Tuesday on the question of whether the Senate has jurisdiction and could proceed. Trump is facing a charge of incitement of insurrection for his role in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot. ___ HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT FORMER PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP’S SECOND SENATE IMPEACHMENT TRIAL: Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial has opened, an undertaking like no other in U.S. history. The defeated former president stands charged by the House with inciting the deadly mob attack on the Capitol to overturn the election in what prosecutors argue...
    In the moments after House impeachment managers wrapped up their opening arguments on Tuesday, Fox News anchors were briefly forced to concede that the connection between President Trump inciteful actions and the violent insurrection is hard to dispute. “When we saw that video,” John Roberts said, referring to the comprehensive montage of footage from the Jan. 6 riots presented by Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD), “we saw some of the people who were at the tip of the spear breaching the Capitol, repeating what Trump had said in his rally, ‘We will stop the steal.’” He also highlighted the moment when one of the rioters confronted a Capitol police officer by saying, “We are listening to Trump, your boss.” “So there would seem to be at least some degree of linkage,” Roberts admitted. Bret Baier concurred, referencing interviews with those who have been charged in the insurrection and “point back to...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 4:30 p.m. A lawyer for Donald Trump is arguing that the former president’s impeachment trial should be dismissed, both because it is unconstitutional and because it will “tear this country apart.” David Schoen said Tuesday that Democrats are fueled by a “hatred” of Trump and fear that they will lose power. He says if the trial moves forward, it will make “everyone” look bad and other countries that wish the U.S. harm will watch with “glee.” Trump was impeached on a count of incitement of insurrection over the Jan. 6 Capitol riot by a mob of his supporters. Both sides were debating the trial’s constitutionality on Tuesday, and the debate will be followed by a vote to dismiss the case, which is expected to fail. Trump’s team is arguing that the trial is...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 4:20 p.m. One of the lawyers heading former President Donald Trump’s defense at his second impeachment trial is conceding that Trump lost the election to Joe Biden, a fact that Trump himself has refused to acknowledge. In opening remarks Tuesday, lawyer Bruce Castor said: “The American people are smart enough to pick a new administration if they don’t like the old one. And they just did.” Later, Castor referred to Trump, saying: “He was removed by the voters.” Trump has repeatedly disputed the results of the election, falsely claiming he won in a “landside.” He kept up the baseless claim during a speech before the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol, which set in motion his trial on a charge of incitement of insurrection. There was no widespread fraud in the election, as...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 3:05 p.m. Rep. Jamie Raskin, the lead House impeachment manager, grew emotional as he concluded the Democrats’ first round of arguments in former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial. Raskin spoke about his personal experience in the Capitol on Jan. 6. He had been joined by family members that day — the day after he had buried his son, who took his own life in December. His daughter and son-in-law were in an office in the Capitol and hid under a desk, where they sent what they thought were their final texts. He says, “They thought they were going to die.” Separated from them in the House chamber, Raskin described people around him calling to say goodbye to their families, members removing their congressional pins to try to evade detection. And he said...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 2:35 p.m. Democrats are using various arguments to make their case for why the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump is constitutional. During arguments Tuesday, they said there is historical precedent for former officials to be tried before the Senate. They said the framers of the Constitution would not have intended for presidents to be let off the hook for conduct committed in their final weeks in office. And they say the Senate should not give in to Trump’s efforts to deprive them of the power to try the president. The impeachment managers are also invoking the public statements of leading conservative legal scholars who in recent days have come forward to support the idea that the trial is constitutional and that the Senate has jurisdiction. ___ HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 2:15 p.m. Donald Trump’s historic second impeachment trial has opened with dramatic video that includes his words to rioters who descended on the U.S. Capitol and the chaos and violence that ensued. Rep. Jamie Raskin, the lead House impeachment manager presenting the case against Trump, introduced the more than 10-minute-long video timeline of the day. It began with Trump’s speech at a Jan. 6 rally by the White House in which he tells the crowd, “We’re going to walk down to the Capitol,” and it included the crowd marching to the building. That video was juxtaposed with what was happening inside the building as lawmakers were preparing to certify Joe Biden’s victory. The footage included some of the more well-known pieces of video from the day: Trump saying “We will stop the steal,”...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 1:40 p.m. President Joe Biden is planning to largely ignore the impeachment trial of his predecessor and plans to focus on the nation’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. White House press secretary Jen Psaki on Tuesday said Biden would not be watching the trial of former President Donald Trump and would not “opine on back and forth arguments” taking place during the proceedings. Biden, and Psaki on his behalf, have for weeks steadfastly refused to address much of the trial, saying they believed the process had to be done but have avoided weighing in on the particulars. The White House has also made clear that it intends to focus on the business of government while the trial continues. Pushing for the passage of his COVID-19 relief package, Biden was to meet with Treasury...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 1 p.m. Donald Trump’s historic second impeachment trial has opened in the Senate, with Democrats arguing that the former president should be convicted for inciting a violent mob of his supporters to attack the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Tuesday is the first day of arguments in the trial, which is expected to last around a week or more. Senators, sitting at their desks and in other locations around the chamber, will listen to arguments from Trump’s lawyers that the trial is unconstitutional because Trump is no longer president. Democrats will dispute that claim, pointing to legal experts and historical precedent. Each side has two hours to make its case on Tuesday, after which the Senate is expected to vote and reject the GOP efforts to dismiss the trial. Opening arguments from the...
    The second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump begins today. Trump was charged with incitement of insurrection by the House after the attack on the Capitol last month. House impeachment managers and Trump’s legal team will debate the constitutionality of the case today. After a Senate vote, which will likely pass, both sides will begin opening arguments on Wednesday. What time does the impeachment start? The first day of the trial begins at 1PM ET. There will be four hours for both sides to present arguments. The House has already voted to bring an article of impeachment against Trump, so the Senate arguments will be over whether the misconduct is sufficient to justify penalties, including potentially barring Trump from holding federal office in the future. How long will the trial last? After the Senate vote passes, both sides will have 16 hours over two days to make their...
    Democrats on Tuesday amplified their charges that Donald Trump incited the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, accusing the former president of exploiting an angry mob to do his political dirty work — and then blaming them for heeding his own request. In a 33-page legal filing, the nine Democrats prosecuting Trump's latest impeachment trial ticked through the various defense arguments advanced by Trump's attorneys in their own brief released a day earlier, then sought to pick them apart one by one. "His brief — in which he refuses to accept responsibility for his actions — highlights the danger he continues to pose to the Nation he betrayed," wrote the impeachment managers, a group led by Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinDemocrats say Trump impeachment defense 'wholly without merit' Sunday shows preview: Budget resolution clears path for .9 trillion stimulus; Senate gears up for impeachment trial READ: Trump attorneys deny...
    (CNN)Ahead of Tuesday's opening arguments, House impeachment managers filed their final pretrial legal brief that rebutted the filing by President Donald Trump's team on Monday, in what amounts to a preview of the arguments that will play out in the Senate in the coming days.Read that legal brief below:
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump's second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 10:40 a.m. House impeachment managers plan to lay out a “devastating” case that is similar to a criminal prosecution in former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial. That's according to senior aides familiar with the managers' arguments. The managers are nine House Democrats chosen by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to argue the case. The aides say the managers will lay out a succinct story that shows Trump’s “singular” responsibility for the deadly Jan. 6 riot, starting with his false claims about election fraud and culminating with the assault on the Capitol. They say the managers will use videos and personal stories to argue that Trump is guilty of inciting the riot, including evidence that hasn’t been seen before. The aides work on the impeachment managers’ team and were granted anonymity to discuss...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 10:40 a.m. House impeachment managers plan to lay out a “devastating” case that is similar to a criminal prosecution in former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial. That’s according to senior aides familiar with the managers’ arguments. The managers are nine House Democrats chosen by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to argue the case. The aides say the managers will lay out a succinct story that shows Trump’s “singular” responsibility for the deadly Jan. 6 riot, starting with his false claims about election fraud and culminating with the assault on the Capitol. They say the managers will use videos and personal stories to argue that Trump is guilty of inciting the riot, including evidence that hasn’t been seen before. The aides work on the impeachment managers’ team and were granted anonymity...
    As the Senate trial of former President Donald Trump begins on Tuesday, it will begin with a debate over the constitutionality of prosecuting a former president, as reported by the Associated Press. According to the report, this argument could prove to be influential on Republicans who are likely to vote for the former president’s acquittal but have concerns about appearing to condone his behavior that lead to his impeachment. Trump is facing a charge of “incitement of insurrection” for his role in the attack at the U.S. Capitol on January 6 in an effort to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election. Trump’s defense team will launch their efforts by arguing that since Trump is no longer the president, he is not constitutionally eligible to be impeached. The argument has been echoed by Republican lawmakers including Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, who forced a vote on the issue in January....
    Donald Trump's impeachment trial begins on Tuesday, with his legal team setting out to argue both that the trial is unconstitutional and the former president blameless for the Capitol riot, and the prosecution painting a picture of a man whose words incited a mob to attack the seat of government in an insurrection that cost five people their lives. The nine Democratic impeachment managers for the House, which impeached Trump last month, argue that he alone was responsible for inciting the mob who interrupted the presidential electoral count. 'The evidence of President Trump's conduct is overwhelming,' the nine managers, who will serve as prosecutors, wrote in a brief. 'He has no valid excuse or defense for his actions.' Donald Trump is the first president in U.S. history to have been impeached twice by the House Trump's lawyers argue his January 6 speech is protected under the First Amendment...
    By ERIC TUCKER, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Donald Trump stands trial before the Senate this week on an impeachment charge that accuses him of inciting the deadly Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. His lawyers in a 78-page memorandum on Monday detailed a range of legal and factual arguments that they intend to make at trial. Some of the highlights: ___ ARGUMENT: TRUMP DID NOT INCITE THE INSURRECTION Defense lawyers are adamant that Trump did not incite the riot when he addressed a huge crowd of supporters at a rally that preceded it. They accuse House impeachment managers of cherry-picking Trump’s statements from an hourlong speech by highlighting only those that Democrats see as helpful to their case, pointing out repeatedly that he had told his supporters to “peacefully and patriotically make your voices heard." They argue that even the statement that has attracted the most...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Donald Trump stands trial before the Senate this week on an impeachment charge that accuses him of inciting the deadly Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. His lawyers in a 78-page memorandum on Monday detailed a range of legal and factual arguments that they intend to make at trial. Some of the highlights: ___ ARGUMENT: TRUMP DID NOT INCITE THE INSURRECTION Defense lawyers are adamant that Trump did not incite the riot when he addressed a huge crowd of supporters at a rally that preceded it. They accuse House impeachment managers of cherry-picking Trump’s statements from an hourlong speech by highlighting only those that Democrats see as helpful to their case, pointing out repeatedly that he had told his supporters to “peacefully and patriotically make your voices heard.” They argue that even the statement that has attracted the most notoriety — “If you don’t...
    February 8, 2021 11:47 PM | With information from EFE 15 minutes. The leaders of the United States Senate reached an agreement on Monday on the schedule and structure of the impeachment trial that will start this Tuesday against former President Donald Trump and that, they promised, will be “fair.” “We agreed to a bipartisan resolution to govern the structure and timing of the impending trial,” Democratic Majority Leader Chuck Schumer declared about the agreement with his Republican colleague Mitch McConnell, who heads the minority of conservatives in the Upper House. Schumer stressed that the agreed structure guarantees a “fair and honest impeachment” of the former president, the first to face an “impeachment” after leaving power. In the same sense, McConnell expressed himself, who reiterated that the agreement will allow a “fair process.” McConnell noted that the structure of the process was approved by the Trump defense and by the...
    MSNBC’s Chris Hayes opened his show Monday night previewing the Trump impeachment trial and calling Republicans cowards for “hiding behind process arguments.” Many Republicans have railed against the trial process itself and said it’s unconstitutional to have a trial for a former president in the first place. As Hayes reviewed Trump’s actions from 2016 to just last month, he said the former president has clearly tried to “cheat at democracy” and that he “does not believe in free and fair elections,” bringing up, among other things, the first Trump impeachment trial over Ukraine. Hayes recalled how just last year Republicans argued against the impeachment saying the voters should decide. He played a clip of Adam Schiff arguing then that Trump would “continue to try to cheat” in the election before not up how the voters decided, and then Trump “seditiously plot[ted] to overturn” the will of the people. And after...
    The second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump will begin on Tuesday and although it is not yet clear how long it may take, representatives of both parties have made it clear that they want a process as quickly as possible. Miamimundo / Univision The Senate will vote on the regulations agreed between the two sides and the impeachment trial will begin with a debate on the constitutionality of the process, followed by a vote on the matter. Republican senators, Democrats, lower house administrators or prosecutors and Trump’s legal team agreed on the regulations Monday, according to Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. These are the most important regulations of the process: Trump’s impeachment managers and attorneys will have up to 16 hours to present their arguments to the Senate. Both sides will also have the option to call for a debate and vote to bring witnesses...
    By Zachary B. Wolf | CNN When former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial kicks off Tuesday afternoon, Americans will relive — through the eyes of the senators sitting in judgment of his actions — the assault on the Capitol we all witnessed in real time just a little more than a month ago. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer offered his assessment of why the trial is necessary late Monday as he laid out the rules of engagement both sides have agreed on to conduct the proceedings. “Following the despicable attack on January 6, there must, there must be truth and accountability if we are going to move forward, heal and bring our country together once again,” he said on the Senate floor. “Sweeping something as momentous as this under the rug brings no healing whatsoever.” Here’s what we know about the trial The trial starts Tuesday. There will be...
    (CNN)When former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial kicks off Tuesday afternoon, Americans will relive -- through the eyes of the senators sitting in judgment of his actions -- the assault on the Capitol we all witnessed in real time just a little more than a month ago. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer offered his assessment of why the trial is necessary late Monday as he laid out the rules of engagement both sides have agreed on to conduct the proceedings."Following the despicable attack on January 6, there must, there must be truth and accountability if we are going to move forward, heal and bring our country together once again," he said on the Senate floor. "Sweeping something as momentous as this under the rug brings no healing whatsoever." Here's what we know about the trialThe trial starts Tuesday. There will be up to four hours of debate and then...
    Former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial will begin Tuesday afternoon with arguments on its constitutionality — then almost certainly stretch into next week, under a deal hammered out by Democratic and Republican Senate leaders. Tuesday’s arguments will last for up to four hours, equally divided between Democratic impeachment managers from the House of Representatives and Trump’s lawyers, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) said. A simple-majority decision will follow, with the outcome likely to mirror the 55-45 vote spurred last month by Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), who argued, “Private citizens don’t get impeached; impeachment is for removal from office. And the accused here has already left office.” That prior tally also suggests Trump is likely to be acquitted for allegedly inciting the deadly Jan. 6 Capitol riot by his supporters because conviction requires a two-thirds majority, which means at least a dozen more Republican senators would have to...
    More On: impeachment Biden refuses to comment on Trump impeachment trial Trump’s lawyers call Senate impeachment trial act of ‘political theater’ What to expect as the Senate begins Trump impeachment trial this week Rep. Waters denies calling for violence against Republicans Former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial will begin Tuesday afternoon with arguments on its constitutionality — then almost certainly stretch into next week, under a deal hammered out by Democratic and Republican Senate leaders. Tuesday’s arguments will last for up to four hours, equally divided between Democratic impeachment managers from the House of Representatives and Trump’s lawyers, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) said. A simple-majority decision will follow, with the outcome likely to mirror the 55-45 vote spurred last month by Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), who argued, “Private citizens don’t get impeached; impeachment is for removal from office. And the accused here has already left office.”...
    It doesn’t matter how you frame the GOAT conversation.   Tom Brady — who led Tampa Bay to a 31-9 victory against Kansas City in Super Bowl 55 for his seventh championship on Sunday — belongs in every one of those all-time arguments. The five-time Super Bowl MVP will always be a part of those debates no matter how much you try do deny it.  There is a lot of that going on right now. The Brady hater’s contrarian playbook aims to diminish those accomplishments, even after Brady won his latest championship at 43 years old. Countless social media users are scrambling for alternatives — any alternative — to knock Brady down a peg in those GOAT talks with tweets ranging from Ronaldo to Ric Flair.  Well, almost everybody. Los Angeles Lakers star LeBron James, no stranger to these conversations, tweeted his appreciation for Brady after Super Bowl 55.   MORE: Tom Brady’s seventh ring puts him out of reach...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said he has reached a deal with Republicans in setting the terms of former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial that would give each side 16 hours to present their case and a possible vote on summoning witnesses. “All parties have agreed to a structure that will ensure a fair and honest Senate impeachment trial of the former president,” Schumer, a New York Democrat, said Monday. Trump’s trial will begin Tuesday with a debate and vote on whether the proceedings are unconstitutional. Republicans contend Trump cannot be put on trial in the Senate because he is now a private citizen. Trump left office on Jan. 20. The House impeached Trump on Jan. 13 on one charge of inciting an insurrection ahead of the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. “Each side will have ample time to make their arguments,” Schumer said. After the Senate...
    Democrats are having a public fight over something that really matters: how much assistance hurting people are going to get from them in survival checks. It's a stupid fight, summed up best by Sen. Bernie Sanders: xUnbelievable. There are some Dems who want to lower the income eligibility for direct payments from $75,000 to $50,000 for individuals, and $150,000 to $100,000 for couples. In other words, working class people who got checks from Trump would not get them from Biden. Brilliant!— Bernie Sanders (@BernieSanders) February 7, 2021 He's not alone in this with powerful support from Oregon Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden, the new chair of the Finance Committee. The other side is being spearheaded by Sen. Joe Manchin, with back-up from Mitch McConnell's favorite "bipartisan" water carrier, Sen. Susan Collins. They're trying to keep payments from what they call "high-earning" families. Campaign Action Look at how Manchin explains this: "An individual of...
    Lawyers for Donald Trump on Monday denounced the former president’s trial as “pure political theater” and accused Democrats of trying to use the trauma of the Capitol robbery to gain partisan advantage. The judicial file introduced by the defense of the ex-president constitutes a broad attack against the accusations that support the process undertaken in the House of Representatives, and heralds the arguments that will be used in the Senate. The scathing tone of the document, where the Democrats are accused of using “obviously absurd” arguments and trying to “silence a political rival” reveals that Trump’s defense will try to cast doubt on the constitutionality of the process and on the culpability of the Ex leader. “Democrats never want to waste a good crisis and are unable to understand that it is not all the fault of their political adversaries, no matter how much they wish to seize every moment...
    House Democrats in a legal brief on Monday rejected the argument advanced by former President TrumpDonald TrumpDominion spokesman: MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell 'is begging to be sued' DC officers who defended Capitol, family of Sicknick honored at Super Bowl US will rejoin UN Human Rights Council: report MORE's defense team, dismissing claims that he bears no responsibility for the deadly attack on the U.S. Capitol. The nine Democratic impeachment managers instead contend that Trump incited the mob of his supporters that carried out the attack and that Congress has every right to convict the former president to prevent him from holding high office again. Read their brief below. Read House Democrats' legal brief by kballuck1 on Scribd Tags Donald Trump Impeachment Trump impeachment trial Capitol breach Senate trial
    "The First Amendment does not apply in impeachment proceedings." If there is a single line that sums up the sense of legal impunity in the second Trump impeachment, it is that line from a letter sent by law professors to deny any basis for the former president to challenge his impeachment on free speech grounds. The scholars call any such arguments "legally frivolous" but only after misstating the argument and frankly employing a degree of circular logic. The scholars start by stating the obvious: that there is no First Amendment "defense" that bars the impeachment or conviction of a president. Since there is not even a requirement that a high crime and misdemeanor be an actual crime, few argue that there is a categorical bar on the use of speech for the basis of impeachment under the First Amendment. The scholars go to great lengths to contest an argument not...
    Attorneys for former President Donald TrumpDonald TrumpDominion spokesman: MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell 'is begging to be sued' DC officers who defended Capitol, family of Sicknick honored at Super Bowl US will rejoin UN Human Rights Council: report MORE on Monday argued in a new brief that the Senate should quickly dismiss the impeachment article filed against him by the House when his trial begins this week. David Schoen and Bruce Castor argue in the 78-page document that Trump's post-presidency trial is unconstitutional, and that even if senators disagreed, Trump's speech ahead of the Jan. 6 riots at the Capitol was protected by the First Amendment and did not meet the threshold of an impeachable offense. Read Schoen and Castor's brief below.     Read Trump lawyers' brief by kballuck1 on Scribd Tags Donald Trump Trump impeachment Impeachment
    WASHINGTON - Three paragraphs into the introduction to the brief submitted by Democrats in the House of Representatives is a window into their strategy for the U.S. Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump. In accusing the then-president of inciting a “violent mob to attack the United States Capitol,” the brief portrays the attackers as “insurrectionists [who] assaulted police officers with weapons and chemical agents,” taking control of the major parts of the Capitol. “Members and their staffs were trapped and terrorized. … Hundreds of people were injured in the assault. Five people — including a Capitol Police officer — died,” the brief reads. “It was clear to me that the Democratic side were really trying to make this an issue of safety,” said Jennifer Mercieca, a Texas A&M communications professor who specializes in American political rhetoric. “They are trying to make the case that Trump is a clear and present...
    Political partisans are abusing their constitutional scholarship and violating the Constitution in this impeachment "show trial" of former President Donald Trump, according to legal expert Alan Dershowitz on Newsmax TV. "Everything about this case is showmanship," Dershowitz told "Saturday Report." "The president made the right decision. You dont walk into a perjury trap when you have people you know are going to be hostile to you. The best arguments he can make, and he will make, are the constitutional ones, namely the Senate had no jurisdiction over a former president and the speech was covered by the First Amendment." Dershowitz rejected the legal opinion of "so-called constitutional scholars" that are saying making the First Amendment argument is "frivolous." "Lawyers, listen to me," Dershowitz told host Carl Higbie, "Im an expert on legal ethics and Im also an expert on the Constitution. Im telling you: Make those arguments; dont listen to the 144...
    February 5, 2021 7:44 AM | With information from EFE 15 minutes. The former president of the United States (USA), Donald Trump, announced this Thursday that he will not testify in the impeachment he faces under the accusation of “inciting insurrection” during the assault on the Capitol on January 6. He called the procedure “unconstitutional”. “The president will not testify in an unconstitutional proceeding“This was stated by his spokesman, Jason Miller, in a statement released by the newspaper The Washington Post. The defense of the ex-governor described the process of “maneuver of public relations” of the democrats. Trump, who left the White House on January 20, responded in this way to a formal request made by Democratic legislator Jamie Raskin, chief of the impeachment “prosecutors.” Specifically, to testify under oath before or during the Senate process. Raskin made the request in a letter, posted on his website. He sent it...
    Actress Olivia Wilde has an interesting policy for the movies that she directs. Wilde claimed she doesn’t deal with a**holes on set during Thursday’s appearance on Variety’s “Directors On Directors.” In her #DirectorsOnDirectors conversation with Emerald Fennell, @oliviawilde elaborates on her “No Assholes” policy https://t.co/cRTyKeinOO pic.twitter.com/vjfERT5IjE — Variety (@Variety) February 5, 2021 “Someone, who’s a very established actor and director in this industry, gave me really terrible advice that was helpful, because I just knew I had to do the opposite,” Wilde said, the outlet reported. (RELATED: Photos Surface Of Olivia Wilde And Harry Styles Sparking Romance Rumors) “They said, ‘Listen, the way to get respect on a set, you have to have three arguments a day. Three big arguments that reinstate your power, remind everyone who’s in charge, be the predator.’ That is the opposite of my process,” she revealed. “And I want none of that.” Wilde likes...
    Olivia Wilde is being wildly clear on the rules of her realm: “No a–holes” allowed.  In the wake of Shia LaBeouf’s abrupt exit from her sophomore directorial endeavor, “Don’t Worry Darling,” Wilde, 36, implemented a “no a–holes policy” on the set of her forthcoming film in order to cancel out pesky pecking order problems during production.  “Someone, who’s a very established actor and director in this industry, gave me really terrible advice that was helpful, because I just knew I had to do the opposite,” the Emmy-winning actress-turned-filmmaker explained to director Emerald Fennell for Variety’s Directors on Directors.  “They said, ‘Listen, the way to get respect on a set, you have to have three arguments a day,’” Wilde recalled. “‘Three big arguments that reinstate your power, remind everyone who’s in charge, be the predator.’ That is the opposite of my process. And I want none of that.” She went on...
    It’s deja vu all over again: The second impeachment trial, the second national reckoning over the awful Capitol siege, the latest Trump melodrama. Now that the opposing sides have filed their legal briefs, the reality of next week’s trial is hitting home--a largely academic exercise in which everyone in America knows the former president will be acquitted. I’ve said that Donald Trump is actually being tried in the court of public opinion, but there may be higher stakes here than just one man’s reputation. First, the legal arguments. The House impeachment managers told the Senate that Trump was "singularly responsible" for the death and destruction caused by his supporters: "He summoned a mob to Washington, exhorted them into a frenzy, and aimed them like a loaded cannon down Pennsylvania Avenue." If that isn’t an impeachable offense, the 80-page brief said, "it is hard to imagine what would be." Trump’s new...
    Washington — The Supreme Court on Wednesday canceled arguments planned for the coming weeks in two immigration disputes over policies enacted by former President Donald Trump designed to curb illegal immigration into the United States. The court granted a request from the new Biden administration to remove the legal battles from its argument calendar and delay additional filings in light of President Biden's immigration directives unwinding his predecessor's policies. The justices were poised to hear oral arguments in the cases during the last week of February and the first week of March. The first dispute, set to be argued February 22, involved Mr. Trump's efforts to redirect $2.5 billion in military funds to pay for construction of more than 100 miles of barriers along the U.S.-Mexico border.  The second case, scheduled for March 1, challenged the Trump administration's Migrant Protection Protocols, also known as the "Remain in Mexico" policy....
    (CNN)Rep. Jamie Raskin, the lead impeachment manager, told House Democrats on Wednesday that former President Donald Trump's legal filing responding to the House's impeachment amounted to "absurd constitutional arguments being offered by the President," according to a source on the call.The Maryland Democrat's comments on a caucus call Wednesday offered a preview of how the House impeachment managers plan to poke holes in the former president's defense during next week's trial, while they also make their case that Trump was responsible for inciting the deadly riot at the Capitol on January 6.Both the House impeachment managers and Trump's legal team submitted pretrial legal briefs on Tuesday ahead of the trial that begins on February 9. Both sides are expected to submit one more round of pretrial briefs on Monday before the trial begins the following day.Trump's lawyers argued Tuesday that it was unconstitutional for the Senate to hold an impeachment...
    The Supreme Court on Wednesday agreed to a request by the Biden administration to remove two immigration-related cases from its upcoming calendar because they were no longer necessary due to policy changes by the new administration. In a brief order, the high court agreed to the request to remove the cases from its upcoming oral argument calendar. BIDEN SIGNS THREE IMMIGRATION ORDERS IN LATEST MOVE TO REVERSE KEY TRUMP POLICIES  "The motions to hold further briefing in abeyance and to remove the cases from the February 2021 argument calendar are granted," the order said. The first case, Biden v. Sierra Club, concerns the construction of the wall at the southern border and whether the Trump administration had the authority to transfer $2.5 billion in military funds to fund the project on the basis of a "national emergency" declaration. Approximately 450 miles of wall was constructed under President Donald Trump, with about another...
    WASHINGTON, D.C. (CBSDFW.COM/AP) — They are significant cases pertaining to the previous administration’s U.S.-Mexico border wall and asylum policy, but Justices in Washington won’t be taking them on anytime soon. Wednesday, the Supreme Court agreed to requests from  President Joe Biden’s Justice Department to put off arguments in two cases. The granted delay comes as the President Biden works to change Trump administration policies that had been challenged in court. The justices issued a brief order canceling arguments that had been set for the coming weeks. Border fencing stands in the border city of Tijuana on January 17, 2019 in Tijuana, Mexico. (credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images) The court was scheduled  to hear arguments on Feb. 22 in a case over former President Trump’s decision to divert billions of dollars in taxpayer money to construction of portions of a wall along the border with Mexico. Mr. Biden ordered a pause in construction...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Wednesday agreed to requests from the Biden administration to put off arguments in two cases involving the U.S.-Mexico border wall and asylum-seekers because President Joe Biden has taken steps to change Trump administration policies that had been challenged in court. The justices issued a brief order canceling arguments that had been set for the coming weeks. The court had been scheduled to hear arguments on Feb. 22 in a case over President Donald Trump’s decision to divert billions of dollars in taxpayer money to construction of portions of a wall along the border with Mexico. Biden ordered a pause in construction and rescinded the national emergency that Trump declared to facilitate the transfer of money to the border. The court also put off arguments that were to take place on March 1 over the Trump policy that forced asylum-seekers to wait in...
    U.S. Supreme Court. The Justice Department on Monday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to remove from its schedule upcoming oral arguments around two of the previous administration’s anti-immigrant and anti-asylum policies, SCOTUSblog reports. The justices were set to hear arguments around lawsuits over the previous administration’s wall and anti-asylum Remain in Mexico policy beginning this month, but the new administration is now asking for those hearings to be axed, “citing changes in policy that President Joe Biden announced on his first day in office,” SCOTUSblog said. The most concrete of those changes was Biden issuing an executive order on Day One ending the so-called “national emergency” his predecessor declared as an excuse to build a racist border wall that Mexico never paid for (in a surprise to absolutely no one). Biden further ordered a halt to construction within seven days (an order that private contractors initially appeared to defy) while the new administration reassesses the legality of the...
    Reuters February 1, 2021 0 Comments President Joe Biden’s administration on Monday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to cancel upcoming oral arguments and delay further action in two pending appeals that were filed by his Republican predecessor Donald Trump over U.S.-Mexico border wall funding and the so-called “remain in Mexico” asylum policy.  The court is scheduled to hear arguments in the two cases on Feb. 22 and March 1, respectively. The Biden administration has already announced plans to discontinue construction of the border wall and suspend the asylum program, potentially making the cases moot. Acting U.S. Solicitor General Elizabeth Prelogar asked the justices to postpone further legal filings in the cases and to remove them from their oral argument calendar in light of the actions taken by the administration relating to the two policies. Biden issued a proclamation on Jan. 20, his first day in office, ordering a freeze...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration has asked the Supreme Court to put off arguments over two controversial Trump administration policies that have been challenged in court now that President Joe Biden has taken steps to unwind them. The Justice Department asked the justices Monday to cancel arguments on Feb. 22 in a case over President Donald Trump's decision to divert billions of dollars in taxpayer money to construction of portions of a wall along the border with Mexico. The new administration made a similar request for arguments set for a week later over the Trump policy that forced asylum-seekers to wait in Mexico for U.S. court hearings. In his first days as president, Biden rescinded the national emergency Trump declared on the southern border and ordered a pause in wall construction. He also suspended the so-called remain in Mexico policy for new arrivals. The American Civil Liberties Union, which...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration has asked the Supreme Court to put off arguments over two controversial Trump administration policies that have been challenged in court now that President Joe Biden has taken steps to unwind them. The Justice Department asked the justices Monday to cancel arguments on Feb. 22 in a case over President Donald Trump’s decision to divert billions of dollars in taxpayer money to construction of portions of a wall along the border with Mexico. The new administration made a similar request for arguments set for a week later over the Trump policy that forced asylum-seekers to wait in Mexico for U.S. court hearings. In his first days as president, Biden rescinded the national emergency Trump declared on the southern border and ordered a pause in wall construction. He also suspended the so-called remain in Mexico policy for new arrivals. The American Civil Liberties Union,...
    (CNN)President Joe Biden's Justice Department asked the Supreme Court on Monday to postpone oral arguments in significant cases regarding former President Donald Trump's border wall and a controversial asylum rule. The Justice Department said Biden has directed a "pause in construction" so that the administration can undertake an assessment "of the legality of the funding and contracting methods used to construct the wall."Only hours into his presidency, Biden took an immediate shot at one of his predecessor's key legacies when he signed a proclamation calling for border wall construction to an end. The administration's filing Monday shows how the Biden Justice Department is moving to bring building to a halt, as it reviews the former administration's actions. In a separate case, DOJ is asking to suspend oral arguments in a case on the Trump-era policy requiring non-Mexican migrants to remain in Mexico until their next court dates in the United...
    CNN’s Brianna Keilar walked through 20 separate arguments Republicans have made against the impeachment trial of Donald Trump and ripped each of them, including calls to “move on,” labeling it “cancel culture,” and even what she deemed “the Marty McFly defense.” On the idea it’s unconstitutional, Keilar noted that “most legal scholars say it is constitutional” and that if it was not allowed to conduct proceedings like these for former officials, it would incentivize presidents to engage in impeachable offenses shortly before they leave office without consequence. She called out the idea that this is about “revenge” when “the crime scene at the Capitol is very much warm.” Keilar called out Nikki Haley in particular joining the argument to “‘thank u, next’ a failed coup attempt” and for saying, “Give the man a break.” She recalled how Haley used to publicly call Trump in blistering terms during the 2016 campaign,...
    President Biden is among those who believe that raising the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour is what's needed to bring the lowest-paid Americans out of poverty. "No one in America should work 40 hours a week making below the poverty line," he said Friday. "Fifteen dollars gets people above the poverty line." It's a platform he ran on in 2020 and it's part of his American Rescue Plan to tackle the pandemic and resuscitate the economy. But the provision is already encountering resistance, with lawmakers disagreeing about how to address the pandemic's worst economic effects. Critics argue that raising the minimum wage wouldn't help the economic recovery. When Mr. Biden's plan was released, Florida Senator Rick Scott, a Republican, declared that a $15 minimum wage would "kill our small businesses." The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which praised the plan overall, also took issue with the wage boost. ...
    President Biden is among those who believe that raising the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour is what's needed to bring the lowest-paid Americans out of poverty. "No one in America should work 40 hours a week making below the poverty line," he said Friday. "Fifteen dollars gets people above the poverty line." It's a platform he ran on in 2020 and it's part of his American Rescue Plan to tackle the pandemic and resuscitate the economy. But the provision is already encountering resistance, with lawmakers disagreeing about how to address the pandemic's worst economic effects. Critics argue that raising the minimum wage wouldn't help the economic recovery. When Mr. Biden's plan was released, Florida Senator Rick Scott, a Republican, declared that a $15 minimum wage would "kill our small businesses." The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which praised the plan overall, also took issue with the wage boost. ...
    Have fun with this, Mitch. On Monday evening the House will transmit to the Senate the article of impeachment to prevent Donald Trump from ever being in a position to destroy democracy again. Senate leaders have reached an agreement to begin the hearings on February 8. Most Republicans there are not so sure that inciting a violent insurrection against the very body in which they sit is such an impeachable thing. Not that they want to argue about Trump, because they actually did live through that terror that left five people dead, but they need a straw to cling to to avoid dealing with him. And his supporters. So they've made up a new thing: it's unconstitutional to impeach him. Never mind that there is precedent for impeaching a former federal officer, and that the weight of scholarship on the issue supports it, even though the Framers did not make it explicit...
    AN American TikToker claimed McDonald's tastes 'so much better' in the UK – and her followers argued over which is better. User @hadenwalker99 posted a review of her first McDonald's meal after going overseas. 5A TikToker sparked arguments among her followers after declaring McDonalds tastes 'so much better' in the UKCredit: TikTok 5'Your fries are basically the same as the states,' she saidCredit: TikTok "Your fries are basically the same as the states," she said to her TikTok followers. "However, the burger tastes so much better," she declared. Haden added the caption "taste healthier??" on the video. Also, I love your water bottles because I can recycle. She said she's upset that the UK doesn't carry McGriddles – a breakfast sandwich with contains bacon, egg, and cheese or sausage. 5She thinks the burger tastes 'healthier'Credit: TikTok 5She said she's upset that the UK doesn't have McGriddlesCredit: TikTok She said the UK McDonald's...
    Sen. Joni Ernst (R-IA) said Tuesday that Democrats only want to “further divide the nation” by impeaching President Donald Trump so close to the end of his administration. Ernst told reporters she does not think it would be constitutional for Democrats to impeach the 45th president after he leaves office Wednesday. She asked rhetorically, “My overall question is: Why are we doing this when the president is out of office tomorrow?” Ernst told reporters in the Capitol. Ernst then said she does not believe it would be constitutional to impeach the president. The Iowa Republican urged President-elect Joe Biden to move forward and warned Democrats only want to divide the nation further. “I’ve read arguments on both sides, but he’s not our president after tomorrow. So the only reason I can see is that Democrats want to further divide the nation. And [I’m] asking President-elect Joe Biden, ‘Please, let’s move...
    NBA : HOME • ES (Spanish) • ACB • Follow the draw for the Copa del Rey LIVE from 11:30 a.m. 2021-01-17T22: 32: 11 + 00: 00 2021-01-17T22: 32: 11 + 00: 00 2021-01-17T22: 32: 11 + 00: 00. Alex Madrid 17 / Ene / 21 22:32 Eurohoops.net Alex Madrid Follow the draw for the Copa del Rey in Madrid live. Eurohoops team / info@eurohoops.net He WiZink Center Madrid, which will host the Copa del Rey from 2021 (to be held from February 11 to 14), also hosts the competition draw this Monday, January 18 from 11:30 a.m. Real Madrid, Barça, Iberostar Tenerife and TD Systems Baskonia, top seeds, will face Hereda San Pablo Burgos, Valencia Basket, Club Joventut Badalona or Unicaja in the quarterfinals. You can follow the full draw here: ACB Photo ...
    ONE look at the dishes in the sink and the junk-food dinner my husband Pi had made our kids Raffi, 10, and Amber, six, and I felt my blood begin to boil. The red mist descending, I started to rant. Why couldn’t he clean up after himself and was it really so hard to boil some broccoli? Before long, we were embroiled in a full-blown shouting match. 3Why rowing with your other half is good for your relationship Pi, 36, stormed out and I spent the next few hours sniffling. Of course, 2020 tested relationships to the max, with many couples spending a previously unimaginable amount of time together. But not George and Amal Clooney. Oh, no. “You know, everybody’s been slammed together because of coronavirus and a lot of friends’ relationships have been tested. "For us, it’s been easy,” George bragged last month. “We haven’t ever had an argument.”...
    WHEN snaps of Harry Styles getting close to Olivia Wilde came to light this month, the duo instantly became one of the hottest A-list pairings on the planet. The former One Direction hunk’s legion of admirers erupted in excitement, while fashionistas declared the couple a perfect match, thanks to their striking looks and arty credentials. 11It is understood that Olivia told Harry she was already single when they metCredit: Rex Features But behind the scenes, a complex love triangle which wouldn’t have looked out of place on The Jeremy Kyle Show was quietly brewing — as tensions between actress and director Olivia and her former partner, fellow Hollywood star Jason Sudeikis, began to emerge. Sources close to him raced to tell a different story, with allegations of “crossover” between her relationships. It now threatens to spark an embarrassing public fallout, and an increasingly desperate round of “he-said, she-said” between Olivia...
    Senate Republicans are finding a loophole to navigate the political dynamics of President Trump's impeachment: Raise objections about the process. It's one way to approach impeachment and possible conviction of a former president without saying that Trump did nothing wrong in regards to his speech and conduct before last week's siege on the U.S. Capitol. By using objections to process as a basis for voting against impeachment or conviction, Republicans are finding a political middle ground. They avoid the potential political consequences of voting in favor of it, such as loss of support from the Trump-supporting voter base or public condemnation from other Republicans, while also avoiding being labeled by Democrats as apologists or enablers of Trump and the mob. Republican Sens. Tom Cotton of Arkansas and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina each said Wednesday that it is unconstitutional to convict a former president on impeachment charges....
    YouTube Rodney Alcala defending himself at a murder trial. Rodney Alcala chose to defend himself at his murder trial, and took the unusual step of cross-examining himself while serving as his own attorney. Video shows Alcala presenting closing arguments in the case of 12-year-old Robin Samsoe. The little girl, a ballet dancer, was kidnapped and murdered in 1979 in California. Alcala’s story is being featured tonight on ABC 20/20 in a new episode, “The Dating Game Killer,” which airs at 9 p.m. Eastern time Friday, January 8, 2021. Read on to learn more about the strange trial and see video of his closing arguments. Here’s what you need to know:The Bizarre Trial Was the Third Alcala Faced in the Murder of Samsoe Rodney Alcala, the infamous serial killer whose spree of murders ended after he won on 'The Dating Game,' is the focus of Friday’s '20/20' https://t.co/bO50XCKeLV pic.twitter.com/bnlXnFs95q...
    PHOTO VIA RICK SCOTT/FACEBOOKFlorida Sen. Rick Scott signaled he will likely vote against certifying Pennsylvania’s slate of electors. The Republican and close ally of President Donald Trump issued a lengthy statement ahead of certification of the Electoral College, which Democrat Joe Biden won with 306 electoral votes to Trump’s 232. Scott signaled sympathy to many criticisms leveled by Trump against election officials in the swing states won by the Democrat. “During today’s proceedings, I will listen to any and all objections that are raised,” he said. “I will pay careful attention to the evidence and arguments presented by both sides.” But he made clear he walks in with skepticism about at least one state requiring legitimacy of the election. “The situation in Pennsylvania is of particular concern to me, and I will likely vote to sustain the objection to their slate of electors,” Scott said. “The actions of the Governor’s Administration and the courts in Pennsylvania...
    (CNN)President-elect Joe Biden is poised to make a final decision in the coming days on his pick for attorney general, a choice that suddenly comes amid a growing sense of optimism from Democrats that their party will control the Senate and will be able to easily confirm the incoming president's Cabinet nominations.A person familiar with the deliberations tells CNN that Biden will now decide among three final contenders, including federal Judge Merrick Garland, former Alabama Sen. Doug Jones and former acting attorney general Sally Yates, whose name returned to the top tier with the prospect of Democrats winning Senate control after results of both Georgia run-off races become clear.CNN projected early Wednesday that Rev. Raphael Warnock, a Democrat, will win one of those races, with control of the US Senate dependent on the outcome of the contest between Democrat Jon Ossoff and Republican David Perdue, which Ossoff was narrowly leading.Yates...
    TALLAHASSEE — From a gun law passed after the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, to medical marijuana licenses, courts are grappling with numerous major Florida legal issues. Here are five cases to watch in 2021: — GUN LAW: In a case that started after the 2018 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, the National Rifle Association is challenging a Florida law that prevents people under age 21 from buying guns. Shortly after the Parkland school shooting, state lawmakers and then-Gov. Rick Scott approved a wide-ranging measure that includes the ban on gun purchases by people under 21. The NRA quickly challenged the ban and contends that the law violates Second Amendment and equal-protection rights. Federal law prevents licensed firearm dealers from selling handguns to people under age 21, but the Florida law went further by banning purchases of rifles and other long guns by people...
    Gina Miller admits defeat on Brexit as she calls for arguments to stop as divided nations do not prosper
    LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — The Nebraska Supreme Court cleared the way Thursday for a new Costco-affiliated poultry farm just outside of Lincoln, despite opposition from neighbors, environmental groups and others. The court rejected an appeal that sought to overturn the approval of the proposed farm in southwestern Lancaster County. The court said it agreed with a district court judge's ruling that opponents who challenged it in court lacked legal standing and the Lancaster County Board acted properly in 2018 with its 3-2 vote to issue a permit. The poultry operation would include four large barns that would raise approximately 190,000 broiler chickens every few months for the Costco processing plant in Fremont. The lawsuit filed by E. Jane Egan and Janis Howlett argued that the board's decision failed to consider potential pollution and losses in property values for nearby homes. It also argued that the site's owner, Randy Essink, didn't...
    RAPID CITY, S.D. (AP) — More arguments are being filed in a lawsuit seeking to overturn a citizen-approved constitutional amendment legalizing marijuana in the state. Pennington County Sheriff Kevin Thom and South Dakota Highway Patrol Superintendent Rick Miller filed a lawsuit last month challenging the constitutionality of the amendment, which legalized the cultivation, transport, possession and sale of marijuana in in the state. The Rapid City Journal reports plaintiffs are arguing in court filings that the amendment legalizing marijuana violates the South Dakota Constitution in harmful ways, while the defendants say it doesn’t and that the lawsuit was filed too late. South Dakota in November became the first state to legalize recreational and medical pot on the same ballot, after supporters of the two measures joined forces and promoted them as a package deal. The lawsuit claims the amendment violates the state constitution by not following the “one-subject rule” and...
    MADISON, Wis. -- A federal appeals court on Thursday upheld a decision dismissing a lawsuit seeking to declare President Donald Trump won swing state Wisconsin.Democrat Joe Biden defeated Trump by 0.6 points in Wisconsin in the Nov. 3 election, a key victory that helped propel Biden to the White House.Trump filed the lawsuit in the Eastern District of Wisconsin on Dec. 2 against the state elections commission, arguing the court should order the state's Republican-controlled Legislature to declare he had won the state. U.S. District Judge Brett Ludwig, a Trump appointee, refused, ruling on Dec. 12 that Trump's arguments "fail as a matter of law and fact." He said that ruling in Trump's favor would amount to the "most remarkable ruling in the history of this court or the federal judiciary."RELATED: COVID relief hangs in balance as unemployment benefits expire for millions of AmericansTrump then turned to the 7th U.S....
    MADISON, Wis. (AP) — A federal appeals court on Thursday upheld a decision dismissing a lawsuit seeking to declare President Donald Trump won swing state Wisconsin. Democrat Joe Biden defeated Trump by 0.6 points in Wisconsin in the Nov. 3 election, a key victory that helped propel Biden to the White House. Trump filed the lawsuit in the Eastern District of Wisconsin on Dec. 2 against the state elections commission, arguing the court should order the state’s Republican-controlled Legislature to declare he had won the state. U.S. District Judge Brett Ludwig, a Trump appointee, refused, ruling on Dec. 12 that Trump’s arguments “fail as a matter of law and fact.” He said that ruling in Trump’s favor would amount to the “most remarkable ruling in the history of this court or the federal judiciary.” Trump then turned to the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. A three-judge panel from that...
    MADISON, Wis. (AP) — A federal appeals court on Thursday upheld a decision dismissing a lawsuit seeking to declare President Donald Trump won swing state Wisconsin. Democrat Joe Biden defeated Trump by 0.6 points in Wisconsin in the Nov. 6 election, a key victory that helped propel Biden to the White House. Trump filed the lawsuit in the Eastern District of Wisconsin on Dec. 2 against the state elections commission, arguing the court should order the state's Republican-controlled Legislature to declare he had won the state. U.S. District Judge Brett Ludwig, a Trump appointee, refused, ruling on Dec. 12 that Trump's arguments “fail as a matter of law and fact.” He said that ruling in Trump's favor would amount to the "most remarkable ruling in the history of this court or the federal judiciary.” Trump then turned to the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. A three-judge panel from that...
    MADISON, Wis. (AP) — A federal appeals court on Thursday upheld a decision dismissing a lawsuit seeking to declare President Donald Trump won swing state Wisconsin. Democrat Joe Biden defeated Trump by 0.6 points in Wisconsin in the Nov. 6 election, a key victory that helped propel Biden to the White House. Trump filed the lawsuit in the Eastern District of Wisconsin on Dec. 2 against the state elections commission, arguing the court should order the state’s Republican-controlled Legislature to declare he had won the state. U.S. District Judge Brett Ludwig, a Trump appointee, refused, ruling on Dec. 12 that Trump’s arguments “fail as a matter of law and fact.” He said that ruling in Trump’s favor would amount to the “most remarkable ruling in the history of this court or the federal judiciary.” Trump then turned to the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. A three-judge panel from...
    A group of militiamen, including members of the Wolverine Watchmen, managed to shut down the state House in Lansing, Michigan, this April while attempting to invade its chambers. The men who plotted to invade the state Capitol in Lansing, Michigan, and murder state officials this year were members of a militia group. Those “III Percenters” who have been showing up to urban street demonstrations in camo body armor and toting AR-15s organize themselves into militias. One of the major far-right “Patriot” groups pushing hard for a Trump military coup and an American civil war, the Oath Keepers, urges all of its members to organize local militias. In each instance, there is a very clear need to use the term militias to describe both the nature of the group and the dynamic around which they organize it. Telling people not to use it—as a number of people have recently been advising me...
    A Texas-led coalition of nine states urged a federal judge on Tuesday to invalidate a program that grants hundreds of thousands of immigrants brought to the United States as children the ability to live and work in the country. During a court hearing in Houston that lasted more than three hours, the states argued that the program, known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), was not created lawfully by former President Barack Obama in 2012. The case could upend the lives of the nearly 650,000 people, often called "Dreamers," who are beneficiaries of the program. It protects them from deportation, allows them to work, grants access to drivers licenses, and in some cases improves access to financial aid for education. The program has withstood a number of challenges since its creation, including a move by Republican President Donald Trump in 2017 to end it. The U.S. Supreme Court in...
     WRITER Emily Cope, 29, finds the festive season one of the most stressful times of year. Here she explains why she’s looking forward to a socially distanced holiday. 4Emily is happy because she won't have to fake a smile this Christmas 4The average UK family have five arguments on Christmas Day "My mouth hurts from fake smiling, I’ve drunk so much mulled wine over the past month my liver is slowly starting to pickle, and if I hear Mariah Carey playing one more time I might scream. All I can think about is swapping my party dress for cosy pyjamas and snuggling up on the sofa. But if I don’t jam-pack my diary with tonnes of social events, constantly have a drink in my hand and splash hundreds of pounds on presents every December, I’ll be called a Scrooge. Why? Because… it’s Christmaaas. Every year it’s the same,...
    MADISON, Wis. -- The Wisconsin Department of Health Services on Saturday reported 4,399 new coronavirus cases and 84 deaths.In total, the state has seen 451,676 COVID-19 cases and 4,399 deaths related to the virus, since the pandemic began.Wisconsin's death count is the 23rd highest in the country overall.Its seven-day percent positive by test is 9.6%.Wisconsin Supreme Court to hear arguments on capacity limitsThe Wisconsin Supreme Court is set to hear the latest challenge to a move made by Gov. Tony Evers' to slow the spread of the coronavirus.The court on Thursday will hear arguments in a challenge to an order limiting how many people can gather in bars and restaurants.The on-again, off-again order that expired in November is one of a series that the Democratic governor has issued in response to the coronavirus pandemic, all of which have been challenged by conservatives.The court last month heard arguments in a case...