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    (CNN)Five Republicans voted with Democrats on Saturday in favor of allowing witnesses during former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial, a move that now means it is unclear when the trial will conclude. The final vote tally in the Senate was 55-45.The vote signals a major twist in the trial. Prior to Saturday morning's proceedings, the Senate had appeared to be on track for a vote on whether to convict or acquit the former President later in the day. But that changed when the House impeachment managers announced Saturday morning that they wanted to seek witnesses.The trial is now likely to extend beyond Saturday, though senators must still vote to approve any witnesses or subpoenas.Here are the Republican senators who voted "yes":Susan Collins of MaineRead MoreLisa Murkowski of Alaska Mitt Romney of Utah Ben Sasse of Nebraska Lindsey Graham of South Carolina.Before the vote was final, Graham said he was...
    Five Senate Republicans voted with Democrats to allow for witnesses in former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE's impeachment trial, a curveball that has thrown the timeline for the proceeding into limbo. In a surprise move, the Senate voted 55-45 on Saturday to allow for debates and votes on calling specific witnesses after Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinTrump lawyers center defense around attacks on Democrats Democrats dismiss claims they misrepresented evidence during impeachment trial Democrats warn of 'whataboutism' ahead of Trump defense MORE (D-Md.), the lead impeachment manager, said that House Democrats wanted to call Rep. Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerTrump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report Here are the...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell confirmed his continued fealty to Donald Trump on Saturday morning, as he revealed plans to let the disgraced dictator off the hook for the Jan. 6 insurrection. McConnell, like 45 other Senate Republicans, continues to hide behind the fake “constitutionality” defense, which hinges on whether or not an impeachment trial can be held after the subject has left public office. McConnell, of course, also famously refused to hold the impeachment trial while Trump was still in office, and thus made this ridiculous non-defense copout possible.  The announcement comes even as Colorado Rep. Jaime Herrera Butler and other Republicans came out to confirm that Trump knew Pence was in danger and did not care, most vividly illustrated by a nasty call with a frantic Kevin McCarthy, where the one-term tyrant mocked the House Minority Leader’s distress. This revelation also comes even as multiple senators—Sheldon Whitehouse, Jeff Merkley, and...
    Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call/AP Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.Mitch McConnell refused to hold an impeachment trial while Donald Trump was in office. And on Saturday morning, he told his colleagues he would acquit Trump because the trial is unconstitutional since Trump is no longer in office. “While a close call, I am persuaded that impeachments are a tool primarily of removal and we therefore lack jurisdiction,” McConnell wrote to Senate Republicans. (He joined 44 Senate Republicans earlier in the week in voting that the trial was unconstitutional.)   McConnell helped created the very timeline he’s now claims is forcing his hand. Of course, McConnell helped created the very timeline he’s now claims is forcing his hand. A week after Trump incited a violent insurrection at the US Capitol, Democratic leader Chuck...
    Team Trump is defending this Following the latest bombshell news about Kevin McCarthy’s screaming match with Donald Trump on January 6, will House Managers request witnesses, or will today be the final day of the second impeachment trial for Trump? We’ll find out soon.  The impeachment trial is being aired on major television news networks and streamed on their websites. Daily Kos will have continuing coverage.
    A Republican congresswoman intervened in the last hours of Donald Trump's impeachment trial to plead with 'patriots' who were around him on January 6 to go public on his actions. Jaime Herrera Beutler, who voted for Trump's impeachment, made the plea with hours before a likely vote on Trump's fate after revealing how he had rejected GOP minority leader Kevin McCarthy's plea to call off the mob. 'To the patriots who were standing next to the former president as these conversations were happening, or even to the former vice president: if you have something to add here, now would be the time,' she said. Her dramatic revelation of the call was seized on by one Democratic senator as a reason to demand witnesses. 'When McCarthy finally reached the president on January 6 and asked him to publicly and forcefully call off the riot, the president initially repeated the falsehood that...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump's second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 8:45 a.m. A little over a month ago, rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol as Congress was voting to affirm Joe Biden's election as the 46th president. On Saturday, the Senate is set to meet in a rare weekend session for closing arguments in Donald Trump's second impeachment trial. And the evenly-divided Senate is poised to vote on whether the former president will be held accountable for inciting the Jan. 6 siege. It seems unlikely that the 100-member Senate will be able to mount the two-thirds vote needed to convict Trump. Acquittal could heavily influence not only Trump’s political future but that of the senators sworn to deliver impartial justice as jurors. Trump is the only president to be twice impeached and the first to face trial after leaving office. House prosecutors have argued...
    Members of Congress stand to applaud Capitol Police officer Eugene Goodman You know what the Senate is doing next week? Nothing. They’re not in session next week. You know what they could be doing? Listening to witnesses. House impeachment managers could call witnesses in Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, and it wouldn’t take away one minute of productive time. They could call former chief of staff Mark Meadows and ask him to detail Trump’s actions on the afternoon of Jan. 6. They could call Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger and have him discuss calls from both Trump and Lindsey Graham. There’s absolutely no reason they could not call Mike Pence and have him confirm that he, not Trump, finally authorized the use of the National Guard. They could call every member of the Trump White House who resigned following Jan. 6 and ask them a simple question: “Why?” And, based on a...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 8:45 a.m. A little over a month ago, rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol as Congress was voting to affirm Joe Biden’s election as the 46th president. On Saturday, the Senate is set to meet in a rare weekend session for closing arguments in Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial. And the evenly-divided Senate is poised to vote on whether the former president will be held accountable for inciting the Jan. 6 siege. It seems unlikely that the 100-member Senate will be able to mount the two-thirds vote needed to convict Trump. Acquittal could heavily influence not only Trump’s political future but that of the senators sworn to deliver impartial justice as jurors. Trump is the only president to be twice impeached and the first to face trial after leaving office. House prosecutors have...
    The House impeachment managers have left a strong impression on their fellow Democrats in what is as much an audition for bigger leadership roles down the line as a trial of former President Donald Trump. "The star of the trial has been Rep. Jaime Raskin of Maryland,” said Democratic strategist Brad Bannon. “He has made a powerful constitutional case against Trump and infused his legal brief with a heavy dose of humanity.” Raskin and his team prosecuting the case against Trump, who is charged with inciting an insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6, have elevated themselves in a way the last group of impeachment managers, led by Reps. Adam Schiff and Jerry Nadler, did not — even as their influence on Republican senators remains to be seen. The trial comes at a time when the House Democratic leadership team is aging, and some positions are sure to...
    The former Republican president is accused of “incitement to insurrection” for the seizure of the Capitol by his supporters on January 6. US Senators vote Trump impeachment is constitutional But, according to the lawyer, the summons had to be a peaceful act. “Make no mistake about it, the vast majority of those who participated were peaceful,” Van Der Veen said. The lawyer noted that “like other politically motivated witch hunts that the left has undertaken in recent years, this impeachment is absolutely divorced from the facts.” “The Senate should vote quickly and decisively to reject it,” urged the defense. Other of Trump’s lawyers David Schoen had advanced that the defense team would take “three or four hours” on Friday to present their arguments against the conviction for inciting the January 6 riots, which caused the death of five people, including a policeman. In total,...
    The defense of the former Security Director at Iberdrola, Antonio Asenjo, charged in piece 17 of the macrocause ‘Tándem’, has submitted a letter to the National Court to denounce that the meal they celebrated last January the State Attorney General, Dolores Delgado, with the president of ACS, Florentino Pérez, and others, violates your client’s right to a fair trial and their right to a fair trial. In the brief, the lawyer concludes that Florentino Pérez, who is personified as injured in this piece “and whose companies are under criminal investigation in other proceedings” he used a friend to sit down to eat with the Attorney General of the State. Regarding that meal, the lawyer cites the media that echoed it to emphasize that it was paid for by Pérez, so this “implies that the state attorney general accepted a gift whose value far exceeds the maximum amount of what the...
    Impeachment proceedings against former President Donald Trump neared their conclusion Friday as his lawyers delivered their closing arguments in his defense. The fourth day of the trial also featured a question-and-answer segment, where Senate lawmakers were permitted to ask both legal teams for clarification on facts relevant to the case. A Senate vote on whether to convict Trump on a single count of incitement of insurrection could happen as early as Saturday. Here are seven key moments that occurred during the final day of arguments. Trump defense team accuses Democrats of showing ‘selectively edited’ video, other evidence Trump attorney David Schoen openly accused House impeachment managers of doctoring evidence displayed during the trial. The Trump team argued that clips from the former president’s Jan. 6, including his call for supporters to "fight like hell," were edited to remove context. "You get more due process than this when you fight a parking...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 8 p.m. Republican Sen. Tommy Tuberville of Alabama is standing by his account that he told then-President Donald Trump that Vice President Mike Pence was being evacuated from the Senate during the Capitol riot. The conversation is of interest to Democrats because Trump sent a tweet at 2:24 p.m. on Jan. 6 saying that Pence didn’t have “the courage” to challenge the election results. If Tuberville’s account is correct, then Trump would likely have known before sending the tweet that Pence had been evacuated and was in danger. At the time, the insurrectionists had already broken into the Capitol, some of them calling for Pence’s death. Tuberville recounted the phone conversation to reporters on Friday, saying, “I said, ‘Mr. President, they’ve taken the vice president out. They want me to get off the...
    His harangues to his followers have been dissected. His videos and calls to the Fox channel have been reproduced. His Twitter account dominates the news again, his letters are read aloud in the Senate compound. Three weeks after leaving the White House, Donald Trump’s voice resounds in the capital, but the conditions are not his preference. Stripped of his megaphone on social networks, the former president has watched the initial days of his historic second political trial on television without having his usual tools to respond. He must now rely on a hastily trained team of lawyers – whose opening statement sparked a fit of fury – to defend himself against the charges of the Democrats. “Frankly, the only situation I remember where he found himself in such a weak position and unable to change history was the bankruptcies of the early 1990s,” said Sam Nunberg, a former adviser. Still,...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 7:05 p.m. The Senate has voted to give the Congressional Gold Medal to Eugene Goodman, a Capitol Police officer who led a violent mob away from the Senate doors on Jan. 6 as they hunted for lawmakers during the presidential electoral count. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called the vote at the end of the day’s impeachment proceedings, noting Goodman’s “foresight in the midst of chaos, and his willingness to make himself a target of the mob’s rage so that others might reach safety.” The Senate voted to award Goodman the medal — the highest honor Congress can bestow — by unanimous consent, meaning there were no objections. Goodman was in the Senate chamber as Schumer spoke, and the entire Senate stood and turned toward him, giving him a standing ovation. He put...
    Republican senators are facing a historic choice after both sides in the impeachment trial of former President TrumpDonald TrumpNRCC finance chair: Republicans who voted for Trump impeachment will not be penalized Blinken, UN head share first call after US rejoins Climate Accords, WHO GOP senators met with Trump's impeachment team to talk strategy MORE rested their case Friday. No-one expects the number of Republicans who defy Trump to reach the total required for conviction — 17, assuming all Democrats vote the same way. But the final vote, expected Saturday or Sunday at the latest, will be a key test of the mood in a divided party. Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyThe Memo: Punish Trump or risk a repeat, warn Democrats FBI asks for help in identifying rioter amid impeachment trial The Hill's 12:30 Report: Republicans privately discuss trial votes MORE (R-Utah) became the only senator ever to vote to...
    (CNN)Former President Donald Trump's lawyers showed the Senate multiple videos of Democratic politicians saying they would "fight" to argue that Trump's rhetoric on January 6 did not incite the rioters who attacked the Capitol afterward.But the public could not see how the lawmakers reacted.The TV cameras are controlled by the Senate itself and are focused on the person speaking, and at times show the full dais or chamber during a break. So only those in the chamber can see how the impeachment jury responds to attorneys and evidence.Artist Bill Hennessy is in the Senate chamber, delivering scenes from what the cameras won't or can't show. Here are some sketches from Friday:Questions from senators are read during the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump on February 12, 2021.Democratic senators watch as Trump attorney David Schoen plays a video during the impeachment trial on February 12, 2021.Democratic senators watch as Trump...
    During the fourth day of Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, attorneys for the former president went on the offensive by playing clips of Madonna, Johnny Depp, and several prominent Democrats including Joe Biden and Kamala Harris promoting physical violence. David Schoen, one of the attorneys representing Trump, introduced the montage during the Senate trial Friday. He said that some of the Democrats accusing Trump of inciting violence are hypocrites. “We need to show you some of their own words,” he said. The video included a clip of Madonna giving a speech at the Women’s March on Washington in 2017, during which she said, “I have thought an awful lot about blowing up the White House.” In another clip, Johnny Depp pondered out loud, “When was the last time an actor assassinated a president?” Depp made the comment during an appearance at the Glastonbury Festival in England in 2017. Watch below: Schoen’s montage...
    (CNN)More than a month after the violent insurrection at the US Capitol, the Senate's impeachment trial got underway. Meanwhile, legislators worked to confirm Biden Cabinet nominees and election officials certified the final unresolved House race of the 2020 election. Monday Security at US Capitol on high alert for Trump impeachment trial Georgia secretary of state's office launches investigation into Trump's phone call New York certifies Claudia Tenney's victory in last unresolved House race of 2020 THE POINT -- NOW ON YOUTUBE! In each episode of his weekly YouTube show, Chris Cillizza will delve a little deeper into the surreal world of politics. Click to subscribe! Tuesday Michigan state Senate leader apologizes for calling Capitol riot a hoax Merrick Garland, Biden's pick for attorney general, has confirmation hearing set for February 22 Trump unhappy with his impeachment attorney's performance, sources say Read MoreWednesday GOP senators signal they...
    New York : The House of Representatives accused the former president Donald trump in january for “Incitement to insurrection” regarding the assault on the Capitol that occurred on January 6, which resulted in five deaths and multiple injuries. Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial began Tuesday in the Senate. Trump is accused of inciting his supporters to march on the U.S. Capitol, where they proceeded to besiege the building and tried to go after lawmakers, in an effort to stop Congress from certifying the president’s 2020 election victory. Joe biden. Trump has been claiming that the election result was fraudulent, for several months. Impeachment managers serving as prosecutors argued this week that Trump intentionally incited the violent attack on Capitol Hill on Jan.6. Recently released footage showed the attack on the Capitol, including security camera clips showing members of Congress fleeing from people wielding firearms, baseball bats and riot shields...
    By BRIAN SLODYSKO, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — In a whirlwind defense, Donald Trump's impeachment attorneys aired a litany of grievances Friday, arguing the former president bore no responsibility for the deadly attack on the U.S. Capitol while accusing Democrats of “hatred” and “hypocrisy.” The defense team, which wrapped up its arguments in just over three hours, said Trump was engaged in “constitutionally protected speech” when he spoke at a rally that immediately preceded the violence on Jan. 6 that left five dead. Echoing themes often heard in conservative media, they called the impeachment trial a “witch hunt” and accused Democrats of elevating a destructive “cancel culture” to the halls of Congress. They also suggested Democrats were hypocrites for impeaching Trump after some had previously voiced support for racial justice marches last summer, some of which turned violent. “It has become very clear that House Democrats hate Donald Trump,” said...
    More On: Trump impeachment hearings Trump team trolls Democrats with clips of repeated vows to ‘fight’ Trump defense shows clips of House Dems objecting to 2016 results Mitt Romney praises Capitol cop for ushering him to safety during riot Wyoming GOP censures Liz Cheney over Trump impeachment vote Legal take: ‘Tanking’ the Impeachment Trial Democrats’ bid to impeach President Donald Trump, observes law prof Jonathan Turley at USA Today, resembles “NFL tanking” — i.e., when a team tries to lose to secure a better draft pick. The trial, after all, seems “designed more to enrage than convict”: First the House staged a “snap impeachment,” with no hearing, investigation, witnesses or chance for Trump to respond. Democrats impeached him for “incitement of insurrection,” not reckless or negligent conduct leading to the riot — making a conviction “highly unlikely.” They then waited weeks, without calling witnesses. In the Senate, they laid...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 5:40 p.m. The lead House prosecutor in Donald Trump’s impeachment trial appears to have had enough of the defense argument that the former president wasn’t responsible for inciting the deadly Capitol siege. “Get real,” said Rep. Jamie Raskin of Maryland. The defense lawyers have been arguing that Trump didn’t mean it when he told a rally to go to Congress and “fight like hell” for his presidency as lawmakers were certifying Joe Biden’s election. “How gullible do you think we are?” Raskin said Friday. “We saw this happen.” The defense has tried to compare his words to those used by other Democratic politicians fighting for health care or other priorities. The argument is drawing eyerolls from the senators on the Democratic side of the aisle. Senators are posing questions to the lawyer as...
    Former President TrumpDonald TrumpNRCC finance chair: Republicans who voted for Trump impeachment will not be penalized Blinken, UN head share first call after US rejoins Climate Accords, WHO GOP senators met with Trump's impeachment team to talk strategy MORE's defense team on Friday denied that Trump knew his then-vice president, Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceThe Memo: Punish Trump or risk a repeat, warn Democrats Impeachment managers wrap case with new warning on Trump Democrats argue Trump will incite violence again MORE, was in danger during the Capitol attack on Jan. 6."The answer is no," Michael van der Veen said flatly on the Senate floor. "At no point was the president informed the vice president was in any danger." The remarks came in response to a question from two Republican senators, Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyThe Memo: Punish Trump or risk a repeat, warn Democrats FBI asks for help in identifying rioter...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — In a whirlwind defense, Donald Trump’s impeachment attorneys aired a litany of grievances Friday, arguing the former president bore no responsibility for the deadly attack on the U.S. Capitol while accusing Democrats of “hatred” and “hypocrisy.” The defense team, which wrapped up its arguments in just over three hours, said Trump was engaged in “constitutionally protected speech” when he spoke at a rally that immediately preceded the violence on Jan. 6 that left five dead. Echoing themes often heard in conservative media, they called the impeachment trial a “witch hunt” and accused Democrats of elevating a destructive “cancel culture” to the halls of Congress. They also suggested Democrats were hypocrites for impeaching Trump after some had previously voiced support for racial justice marches last summer, some of which turned violent. “It has become very clear that House Democrats hate Donald Trump,” said Michael van der...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 5 p.m. A House impeachment manager says she questions why lawyers for former President Donald Trump played multiple video clips of people of color or women talking about fighting in a political context. Del. Stacey Plaskett of the U.S. Virgin Islands told senators Friday that she noted a particular focus in the lawyers’ presentation on “Black women like myself who are sick and tired of being sick and tired for our children, your children, our children.” Trump’s lawyers have argued that his words exhorting his supporters to fight the election are protected by the First Amendment. They repeatedly showed clips on Friday of Rep. Maxine Waters of California, who is Black. Democratic impeachment managers say Trump’s Jan. 6 speech was the culmination of a monthslong campaign to sow doubt about his election loss...
    The second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump reaches its conclusion amid debate over how best to turn the page on the ubiquitous and polarizing figure who occupied the White House for the last four years. For Democrats, the answer is obvious: convict Trump for inciting an insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6 and disqualify him from ever running for office ever again. Otherwise, Trump may repeat his claims of stolen elections, or some future political figure may try to turn their supporters on Congress, the counters of the Electoral College votes, after losing a close race. Some Republicans agree. But many others see impeachment as keeping Trump in the headlines after he has already left office, at the expense of other more pressing legislative business. “Trump is gone,” said a GOP strategist. “Let’s move on.” “Move on” was the battle cry of Democratic opponents of then-President Bill...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 4:30 p.m. Senators are submitting written questions to the prosecution and the defense in the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump. One of the first questions came from Republican Sens. Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, who have been critical of Trump’s actions. They asked Trump’s lawyers to lay out in detail what Trump did to stop the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, and when Trump first learned the building had been breached. Trump lawyer Michael van der Veen did not answer directly, instead accusing Democrats of denying Trump due process during the impeachment process. “The House managers did zero investigation and the American people deserve a lot better than that,” he said. Trump’s defense wrapped up their opening arguments earlier Friday, telling senators the impeachment...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 4:30 p.m. Senators are submitting written questions to the prosecution and the defense in the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump. One of the first questions came from Republican Sens. Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, who have been critical of Trump’s actions. They asked Trump’s lawyers to lay out in detail what Trump did to stop the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, and when Trump first learned the building had been breached. Trump lawyer Michael van der Veen did not answer directly, instead accusing Democrats of denying Trump due process during the impeachment process. “The House managers did zero investigation and the American people deserve a lot better than that,” he said. Trump’s defense wrapped up their opening arguments earlier Friday, telling senators the impeachment...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 3:20 p.m. The defense attorneys for Donald Trump have wrapped up their presentation in the former president’s impeachment trial. Lawyers argued for three hours Friday that Trump didn’t incite the Jan. 6 rally crowd to riot at the U.S. Capitol and that his words were merely figures of speech. They say the case against Trump was a political witch hunt by Democrats and was not valid because he is no longer in office. Their truncated defense barely used the full time allotted, 16 hours over two days. Many senators minds appear already made up. Trump is accused of incitement of insurrection in the mob siege at the Capitol. Five people died. Senators will next be able to ask the lawyers questions when the trial resumes. ___ HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 3:20 p.m. The defense attorneys for Donald Trump have wrapped up their presentation in the former president’s impeachment trial. Lawyers argued for three hours Friday that Trump didn’t incite the Jan. 6 rally crowd to riot at the U.S. Capitol and that his words were merely figures of speech. They say the case against Trump was a political witch hunt by Democrats and was not valid because he is no longer in office. Their truncated defense barely used the full time allotted, 16 hours over two days. Many senators minds appear already made up. Trump is accused of incitement of insurrection in the mob siege at the Capitol. Five people died. Senators will next be able to ask the lawyers questions when the trial resumes. ___ HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 3 p.m. Democrats in the Senate chamber chuckled and whispered among themselves as Donald Trump’s defense team played videos of them saying “fight” over and over again at the former president’s impeachment trial — an effort to counter Trump’s call to his supporters to “fight like hell” before they laid siege on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Arguing that Trump did not incite the insurrection, as the House has charged, the lawyers played videos of Democrats saying the word “fight” without any context, calling for protests after Black men and women were killed by police officers and challenging the results of the presidential elections that Republicans won. At a break in the proceedings, Democrats said it was a distraction and a “false equivalence” with their own behavior. “Donald Trump was warned, if...
    Former President Trump's legal team tried to put Democrats on trial Friday by repeatedly playing clips of their past hot rhetoric and accusing liberals of setting a new "dangerous double standard" when it comes to Trump. Trump's attorneys said the former president's speech before the Jan. 6 Capitol riot where he told backers to "fight like hell" was in no way an incitement to violence and they called out each of the House impeachment managers and each Democratic senator for making similar statements. "Every single one of you, and every one of you," David Schoen, a Trump attorney, bellowed at Democrats in the chamber at the end of an 11-minute video featuring clips of each of them saying "fight."   "That's okay. You didn't do anything wrong. It's a word people use, but please stop the hypocrisy." Lawyer David Schoen speaks during Trump impeachment trial on Friday, Feb. 12. Friday...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 1:15 p.m. Donald Trump’s lawyers are arguing that his words to his supporters who attacked the U.S. Capitol – to “fight like hell” – are common political rhetoric, using a video montage to show almost every single Senate Democrat using the word “fight” in political speeches. The lengthy video featured Vice President Kamala Harris, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer and countless other Democrats using the word “fight,” without context. The video also featured most of the Democratic impeachment managers who are prosecuting the case that Trump incited the violent insurrection. Once the video finished, lawyer David Schoen pointed at both the senators and the impeachment managers and told them to “stop the hypocrisy.” The Democratic prosecutors have argued that Trump’s supporters were primed for violence on Jan. 6, the...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 12:40 p.m. Donald Trump’s lawyers have opened their arguments in the former president’s impeachment trial with a direct attack on Democrats. Arguing that Trump did not incite the Jan. 6 insurrection of his supporters at the U.S. Capitol, lawyer Michael van der Veen said that the trial is “constitutional cancel culture” by Democrats trying to retain power. He played a video of Democrats calling for protests after Black men and women were killed by police officers and objecting to Trump’s election in 2017. Trump’s supporters violently attacked the Capitol last month after he falsely claimed the presidential election was stolen from him for months and then told them to “fight like hell” as Congress counted the votes. The lawyers are arguing that the trial is unconstitutional, that Trump is protected by freedom of...
    To view past editions of The Hill's 12:30 Report, click here: http://bit.ly/1M1mIfw To receive The Hill's 12:30 Report in your inbox, please sign up here: http://bit.ly/1Tt4hqN  --> A midday take on what's happening in politics and how to have a sense of humor about it.* *Ha. Haha. Hahah. Sniff. Haha. Sniff. Ha--breaks down crying hysterically.    The Hill’s 12:30 Report: Trump’s lawyers begin oral arguments, hoping for a reset | Biden ‘anxious’ to see how Republicans vote | Acquittal may still mean end for Trump’s shot at future office | Trial sights and sounds | Pence's 'nuclear football' in danger on Jan. 6 | Nikki HaleyNikki HaleyBiden takes cautious tack on China as tensions simmer The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by TikTok - Senate trial will have drama, but no surprise ending Biden administration announces plans to rejoin UN human rights council MORE regrets ‘following’ Trump | Says ‘he let us down’ | Bidens decorate White House lawn with giant...
    Nuclear commanders had no idea how close Vice President Mike Pence's nuclear 'football' got to being taken by the MAGA mob until they saw the dramatic security footage shared at President Donald Trump's impeachment trial.  CNN reported Thursday night US Strategic Command became aware of the gravity of the incident after seeing the surveillance video played Wednesday during a presentation by impeachment manager, Rep. Stacey Plaskett.  The vice president always carries a backup 'football' that includes the nuclear launch codes in case the president is incapacitated.  The video showed Vice President Mike Pence, his wife Karen and his daughter Charlotte being rushed out surrounded by security during the January 6 MAGA riot  On January 6, Trump was safely at the White House during the Capitol insurrection, while Pence was in the building because he was presiding over the Electoral College vote count.  'As the rioters reached the top of the...
    WASHINGTON -- After a prosecution case rooted in emotive, violent images from the Capitol siege, Donald Trump's impeachment trial shifts on Friday to defense lawyers prepared to make a fundamental concession: The violence was every bit as traumatic, unacceptable and illegal as Democrats say.But, they will say, Trump did not order it.Acknowledging the horrors of the January day is meant to blunt the visceral impact of the House Democrats' case and quickly pivot to what Trump's defenders see as the core - and more winnable - issue of the trial: Whether Trump can be held responsible for inciting the deadly Jan. 6 riot.The argument is likely to appeal to Republican senators who want to be seen as condemning the violence but without convicting the president.EMBED More News Videos Democrats rested their case against Donald Trump after two days of presenting evidence they say shows he incited the Jan. 6 riot...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 12:05 p.m. Defense lawyers have begun their opening arguments in the impeachment trial of Donald Trump as the case speeds to an expected conclusion this weekend. The Trump legal team is expected to argue that the former president did not incite the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol and that his speech was protected by the First Amendment. The lawyers have also raised questions about the trial’s constitutionality because Trump is no longer in office. Trump’s lawyers are not expected to use anywhere close to their allotted time and will wrap up their arguments later Friday. After that, senators who are serving as jurors will have an opportunity to ask questions of lawyers for both sides, followed by closing arguments. The case is likely to conclude as soon as Saturday. ___ HERE’S...
    By ERIC TUCKER, LISA MASCARO, MARY CLARE JALONICK and JILL COLVIN WASHINGTON (AP) — After a prosecution case rooted in emotive, violent images from the Capitol siege, Donald Trump’s impeachment trial shifts on Friday to defense lawyers prepared to make a fundamental concession: The violence was every bit as traumatic, unacceptable and illegal as Democrats say. But, they will say, Trump did not order it. Acknowledging the horrors of the January day is meant to blunt the visceral impact of the House Democrats’ case and quickly pivot to what Trump’s defenders see as the core — and more winnable — issue of the trial: Whether Trump can be held responsible for inciting the deadly Jan. 6 riot. The argument is likely to appeal to Republican senators who want to be seen as condemning the violence but without convicting the president. “They haven’t in any way tied it to Trump,” David...
    Reuters February 12, 2021 0 Comments Donald Trump’s defense lawyers will make their case on Friday why the former president is not guilty of inciting last month’s deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol, as the Senate races toward a final vote in his impeachment trial as soon as Saturday. Trump’s lawyer David Schoen said the defense team would take “three to four hours” on Friday to lay out its arguments against convicting Trump for inciting the Jan. 6 riot, which sent lawmakers scrambling for safety and resulted in the deaths of five people, including a police officer. Schoen did not discuss the defense strategy, but Trump’s lawyers have argued his rhetoric was protected by the First Amendment’s guarantee of free speech and that prosecutors had not directly connected the actions of the rioters to Trump. Democratic prosecutors on Thursday wrapped up two days of arguments for Trump’s conviction, saying...
    REUTERS/Jason ReedEdinan Andy Slavitt is now the senior COVID adviser to Biden, one of several Minnesotans in the administration.Welcome to the D.C. Memo. This week: Trump’s second impeachment trial gets underway; the parties do battle over pandemic proposals; and some Minnesotans gain influential posts. Here we go. Trump Impeachment II: This time, it’s personal The second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, who is accused of inciting the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol, got underway this week with some previously unaired video taking center stage. Presented by House managers (the prosecutors), the video, the Associated Press reported, includes rioters “searching menacingly” for House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Vice President Mike Pence and engaging in hand-to-hand combat with Capitol police. The AP’s takeaway: The images “underscored how dangerously close the rioters came to the nation’s leaders, shifting the focus of the trial from an academic debate about the Constitution...
    Mother Jones illustration; Michael Brochstein/Sipa/AP; Getty Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.Happy Friday and welcome back to Mother Jones’ live coverage of Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial. The former president’s lawyers, who are set to deliver their defense today, are expected to largely stick to the claim that the Senate trial is unconstitutional because Trump is no longer in office. As my colleague Pema Levy noted, that’s a pretty weak argument, and most constitutional scholars have rejected it. Still, Republicans hellbent on acquitting Trump have made this dubious contention the basis of their opposition to Trump’s impeachment trial. As for the prosecution, House impeachment managers have been widely hailed—even by some Republicans—for their exceptionally sharp presentation over the past three days. Their case for conviction featured never-before-seen video footage that underscored,...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump's second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 8:35 a.m. Now it's the Trump team's time. House prosecutors at former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial relied on emotion and violent images on video to make their case in arguments over the past two days. The Senate trial is shifting to Trump's defense lawyers on Friday, and they're prepared to acknowledge that the violence at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 was every bit as traumatic, unacceptable and illegal as Democrats say. But Trump's lawyers plan to say Trump had nothing to do with it. They want to pivot to what they see as the core and more winnable issue of the trial: whether Trump can be held responsible for inciting the deadly riot. The argument is likely to appeal to Republican senators who themselves want to be seen as condemning...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 8:35 a.m. Now it’s the Trump team’s time. House prosecutors at former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial relied on emotion and violent images on video to make their case in arguments over the past two days. The Senate trial is shifting to Trump’s defense lawyers on Friday, and they’re prepared to acknowledge that the violence at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 was every bit as traumatic, unacceptable and illegal as Democrats say. But Trump’s lawyers plan to say Trump had nothing to do with it. They want to pivot to what they see as the core and more winnable issue of the trial: whether Trump can be held responsible for inciting the deadly riot. The argument is likely to appeal to Republican senators who themselves want to be seen as condemning...
    Britney Spears’ father loses guardianship of the singer at trial | INSTAGRAM Britney Spears’ battle to remove her father’s guardianship over her estate continued Thursday when a judge denied her father’s objections about how her guardianship will be delegated and has made a breakthrough in negotiations. Recall that Britney Spears filed a petition with court last year for dismiss his father And placing a financial institution as the sole curator of her estate, her attorney, Samuel D. Ingham III, argued last year that the singer feared James “Jamie” Spears and preferred that a professional financial institution take over her estate. . However, the judge of the Los Angeles Superior Court, Brenda penny, denied the singer’s request last year, but named the Bessemer Trust as co-curator along with James Spears. You may also be interested: Documentary “Framing Britney Spears” premieres, tells her secrets The objections raised by the attorney for...
    By Susan Cornwell and Makini Brice WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Donald Trump's defense lawyers will make their case on Friday why the former president is not guilty of inciting last month's deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol, as the Senate races toward a final vote in his impeachment trial as soon as Saturday. Trump's lawyer David Schoen said the defense team would take "three to four hours" on Friday to lay out its arguments against convicting Trump for inciting the Jan. 6 riot, which sent lawmakers scrambling for safety and resulted in the deaths of five people, including a police officer. Schoen did not discuss the defense strategy, but Trump's lawyers have argued his rhetoric was protected by the First Amendment's guarantee of free speech and that prosecutors had not directly connected the actions of the rioters to Trump. Democratic prosecutors on Thursday wrapped up two days of arguments for Trump's...
     Presented by TikTok    Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. You have made it to another Friday! We get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver are the co-creators. Readers can find us on Twitter @asimendinger and @alweaver22. Please recommend the Morning Report to friends and let us know what you think. CLICK HERE to subscribe! Total U.S. coronavirus deaths reported each morning this week: Monday, 463,477; Tuesday, 465,072; Wednesday, 468,203; Thursday, 471,567; Friday, 475,444. Former President TrumpDonald TrumpNRCC finance chair: Republicans who voted for Trump impeachment will not be penalized Blinken, UN head share first call after US rejoins Climate Accords, WHO GOP senators met with Trump's impeachment team to talk strategy MORE’s lawyers today will defend their client against an impeachment charge using arguments designed to give cover to Republican senators who plan...
    The defense will speak on Friday in the Senate, hoping for a quick acquittal of the former president, accused of “incitement to insurgency” in the assault on the Capitol. AT From noon (7 Belgian time), the lawyers of the 45th President of the United States will try to dismantle the arguments of the Democratic prosecutors who, for two days, returned to the bloody attack of January 6 in a relentless statement, riddled with shock videos. “The president is very optimistic,” one of his lawyers, David Schoen, said Thursday on Fox News, promising a short presentation, less than four hours, before the hundred senators, judges, jurors, and witnesses of this trial historical. “As I said from the beginning of this thing, this trial should never have happened and if it were to happen, it should be as short as possible, given the total lack of evidence,” he said. assaulted....
    (CNN)Former President Donald Trump's legal team gets its turn at the Senate impeachment trial Friday, as Trump's lawyers prepare to argue that the trial of a former president is unconstitutional and Trump's speech on January 6 did not incite the rioters who attacked the US Capitol.After two days of House impeachment managers presenting a case arguing that Trump incited the insurrectionists and failed to act to stop the riot as it unfolded -- using new and disturbing images of the attack to drive home their message -- Trump's team is expected to respond that the Democrats' presentation glorified violence and that Trump's speech urging his supporters to "fight" was figurative and protected by the First Amendment."When you use the word 'fight' most of the times during the case, it's clear he's talking about legislators fighting for our rights, people fighting to advocate, and you know everyone likes to overlook the...
    (CNN Business)A version of this article first appeared in the "Reliable Sources" newsletter. You can sign up for free right here.Those empty seats in the Senate chamber on Thursday? They are emblematic of the public's reaction to the second Trump impeachment trial.If you've been glued to every minute of the trial, or even just half-watching the proceedings, then you're part of a special club. You're learning the full story of the crimes that were committed at the Capitol on January 6. But you are much more plugged-in than the average American adult.The Nielsen TV ratings for the first two days of trial coverage show that only a sliver of the public is watching at any given time. The ratings for CNN and MSNBC are way up -- and the ratings for Fox News are much weaker. Some people are also watching coverage via the broadcast networks, but not in huge...
    CNN’s Anderson Cooper called out the three Republican senators who met with Donald Trump’s defense attorneys on Thursday, despite being jurors of the trial, noting that “the fix is likely in.” CNN’s Manu Raju reported that after House Democrats presented their third day of arguments that Trump should be impeached for inciting the violent Jan. 6 insurrection, Senators Ted Cruz (R-TX), Lindsey Graham (R-SC), and Mike Lee (R-UT) huddled with the former president’s impeachment defense team: Several GOP senators just met with Trump’s defense attorneys, including Cruz and Graham. Lee also spotted going in. Graham refused to talk about it after. “See you tomorrow,” he told me. Schoen told us there’s nothing inappropriate about meeting with jurors in impeachment trial — Manu Raju (@mkraju) February 11, 2021 Commenting on the meeting, Cooper noted that Trump’s lawyers were meant to present their case on Friday, adding, “Those arguments to senators appear to have already begun, at least behind closed doors.”...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- For President Joe Biden's first 100 days in office, Eyewitness News will have a special election edition of "The Countdown" to get you caught up with all of the day's political and campaign news.You can watch it online, on the ABC7NY app or on our Connected TV apps for Fire, Roku, Apple TV and Android TV. Click here to learn more.Thursday, Feb. 11Dems end opening arguments in Trump trialHouse Democrats prosecuting President Donald Trump's impeachment have wrapped up their opening arguments.Rep. Jamie Raskin implored senators in his closing speech to exercise "common sense about what just took place in our country" and find Trump guilty of inciting an insurrection. Raskin is the lead prosecutor for the House.He said senators have the power under the Constitution to find Trump guilty of having betrayed the oath of office the nation's founders wrote into the Constitution.Another impeachment manager warned...
    Bradley Cortright February 11, 2021 0 Comments Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.) says he is holding off on making a judgment call as to whether former President Donald Trump incited the riot at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Speaking to reporters on Thursday, Cassidy was asked if he has a doubt that Trump bears responsibility for the violence. He said, “Ask me after I hear the defense arguments.” “You don’t make a decision as a juror until you hear both sides. Period, end of story,” he added. He stressed that he would not make a decision on how he plans to vote until he hears arguments from Trump’s legal team to refute the charge that he incited the riot. Cassidy said the House impeachment managers have done “very well” in the arguments. He noted that they laid out a timeline “in which you see the events unfold” and “the...
    The first half of the Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump has concluded. Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD) and his team of House impeachment managers won a vote to declare the trial of a former official to be constitutional, though the fact that 44 Senators disagreed means it is extremely unlikely that Trump will be convicted. The Democrats then made their case over the next two days. Here are the main points — the highlights, and the lowlights — thus far. 1. Democrats cannot prove incitement. Democrats cannot prove what the Article of Impeachment actually alleges — that Trump gave a speech that incited a crowd to storm the Capitol. They cannot overcome the fact that Trump told supporters to protest “peacefully and patriotically,” which would defeat any attempt to prosecute Trump for the crime of incitement in a court of law. So they have redefined “incitement” as really...
    Democrats closed their case against former President TrumpDonald TrumpHillary Clinton: Trump acquittal 'will be because the jury includes his co-conspirators' Former Republican officials in talks to form center-right anti-Trump party: report Gaetz hits back at Kinzinger PAC targeting 'Trumpism' MORE Thursday by pleading with their Republican colleagues to convict him or risk more political violence in the future. Lead impeachment manager Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinImpeachment trial descends into chaos over Lee objection Stacey Plaskett becomes first non-voting delegate in history to serve as impeachment manager GOP senators call Capitol riot videos 'disturbing,' 'powerful,' 'graphic' MORE (D-Md.) argued that “any president could provoke insurrectionary violence again” if Trump were to be acquitted. His colleague Rep. Joe NeguseJoseph (Joe) NeguseGOP senators draw criticism for appearing to pay half-hearted attention to impeachment trial What can we learn from America's first impeachment? LIVE COVERAGE: Democrats focus on Trump remarks before attack on...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer left invoking the 14th Amendment to ban former President Donald Trump from office if he is not convicted in the Senate impeachment trial on the table Thursday. Schumer did not say he was against the idea when he was asked if he would introduce legislation to ban Trump from running from office again during a Thursday press conference, but he did say he is currently focused on getting him convicted in the ongoing Senate trial. “We’re first going to finish the impeachment trial and then Democrats will get together and discuss where we go next,” Schumer said, Fox News reported. Flanked by (L-R) Sen. Raphael Warnock (D-GA) and Sen. Jon Ossoff (D-GA), Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol on February 11, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) In early February, Schumer said that...
    (CNN)The energy level in the Senate was reserved Thursday as the House managers wrapped up their second full day of arguments in the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump.As the TV cameras are controlled by the Senate and are focused on the person speaking, viewers are unable to see how lawmakers react to the presentations.LIVE UPDATES: Trump's second impeachment trial - Day 3Artist Bill Hennessy is in the Senate chamber, delivering scenes from what the cameras won't or can't show. Here are some sketches from Thursday:Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., during day three of the Senate impeachment trial, February 11, 2021.Sen. Tex Cruz, R-Texas, in a room next to the Senate chamber during day three of the impeachment trial, February 11, 2021.Empty desks in the Senate chamber during day three of the impeachment trial, February 11, 2021.Inside the Senate: Sketches from Day 2 of the impeachment trialInside the Senate chamber:...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 4:30 p.m. House Democrats prosecuting President Donald Trump’s impeachment have wrapped up their opening arguments. Rep. Jamie Raskin implored senators in his closing speech to exercise “common sense about what just took place in our country” and find Trump guilty of inciting an insurrection. Raskin is the lead prosecutor for the House. He said senators have the power under the Constitution to find Trump guilty of having betrayed the oath of office the nation’s founders wrote into the Constitution. Another impeachment manager warned senators that acquitting Trump could have lasting consequences for the country. Rep. Joe Neguse said that “if we pretend this didn’t happen, or worse, if we let it go unanswered, who’s to say it won’t happen again.” Trump’s lawyers will begin their arguments when the trial resumes at noon Friday....
    CNN’s Wolf Blitzer found it odd that Donald Trump’s lawyer David Schoen gave an interview to Fox News in the middle of the Senate impeachment trial against his client. As Democrats continued to present their evidence of Trump’s incitement of insurrection, Schoen was outside the Senate, slamming Democrats on Fox News for their “entertainment package” of video presentations. During a break in the trial, Blitzer’s CNN colleague John King brought up Schoen’s Fox hit and explained that he’s “preaching to the choir because they’re just trying to keep things as they are” before the impeachment vote. After CNN aired a portion of the Schoen interview, Blitzer turned to Pamela Brown and shared his surprise that Fox News — which has mostly stuck with the trial since it began on Tuesday, but has broken away on occasion to televise opinion programming such as The Five and Fox News Primetime — would...
    The St. Louis Post-Dispatch blasted GOP Missouri Sens. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntGOP senators say Trump impeachment trial could wrap this weekend LIVE COVERAGE: Democrats focus on Trump remarks before attack on Capitol GOP senators send clear signal: Trump's getting acquitted MORE and Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyLincoln Project drops ad mid-impeachment trial targeting Republicans over Capitol riot The Memo: New riot footage stuns Trump trial GOP senators draw criticism for appearing to pay half-hearted attention to impeachment trial MORE Thursday over their handling of former President TrumpDonald TrumpHillary Clinton: Trump acquittal 'will be because the jury includes his co-conspirators' Former Republican officials in talks to form center-right anti-Trump party: report Gaetz hits back at Kinzinger PAC targeting 'Trumpism' MORE’s impeachment trial, calling it an “embarrassment to the state.” In an editorial, the Post-Dispatch lambasted the two for voting against allowing the trial to take place and Hawley specifically for what it said was...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): One of Donald Trump’s lawyers is calling the presentation by House impeachment managers “offensive.” David Schoen told reporters on Thursday that Democrats were “making a movie” and had yet to tie the Jan. 6 siege at the U.S. Capitol to the former president. He contended that the use of chilling video of the riot shown repeatedly by House Democrats during Wednesday’s arguments was impeding efforts to bring unity. Democratic House impeachment prosecutors have used their time to air searing video footage of the attack on the Capitol building and to build their case that Trump was responsible for the rioters’ conduct that day. Trump’s legal team is expected to present opening arguments on Friday. ___ HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT FORMER PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP’S SECOND SENATE IMPEACHMENT TRIAL: Chilling security video...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 2 p.m. Lawyers for former president Donald Trump are planning to begin and wrap up their defense in his impeachment trial in less than a day, using far fewer than their allotted argument hours. That’s according to his senior adviser Jason Miller, who said there could even be enough time left over for planned questioning to begin. The rules for the trial gave both sides two days for arguments, lasting up to eight hours each day. Democratic House impeachment prosecutors have used their time to air searing video footage of the January 6 attack on the Capitol building and to build their case that Trump was responsible for the rioters’ conduct that day. Friday is the day Trump’s lawyers are set to begin. It remains unclear when the final vote will take place,...
    Both Pfizer Inc and Moderna Inc say they expect to have data on how well their coronavirus vaccines work in teenagers later this year. Currently, immunizations against COVID-19 are only recommended in Americans aged 16 and up for Pfizer and ages 18 and up for Moderna.   However, Pfizer says it has completed enrollment of 2,259 participants in its study of 12-to-15 years old and believes it will have data in 'the early part of 2021,' a spokeswoman told DailyMail.com  'From there we will plan to finalize our study in 5-11 year olds,' she added.  Meanwhile, Moderna is still recruiting children for its trial of 3,000 participants of those between ages 12 and 18 and said it is 'on track to provide updated data around mid-year 2021,' according to a statement provided to ProPublica. It comes as Dr Anthony Fauci says he believes children as young as first graders may be able to...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump's second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 12:20 p.m. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says she'll sponsor legislation awarding the Congressional Gold Medal to the U.S. Capitol Police and other law enforcement officers who protected the Capitol as it was overrun by supporters of former President Donald Trump. Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick died after the Jan. 6 attack, one of five people to be killed. More than 70 officers with the U.S. Capitol Police were injured. Many are struggling with the emotional trauma they experienced that day. Pelosi's office was ransacked by rioters during the attack. Pelosi said Thursday, “We will never forget." Congress has commissioned gold medals as its highest expression of national appreciation for distinguished achievements and contributions. The first recipient was George Washington. Over the years, the medal has been presented to military leaders, authors, athletes and...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 1:30 p.m. House Democratic prosecutors began their second day of arguments in former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial by offering multiple examples of how Trump had cheered on or promoted acts of violence among his supporters in the years leading up to the Capitol insurrection on Jan. 6. Lead impeachment manager Jamie Raskin said that the litany of examples showed “obvious intent” as Trump told his supporters to come to Washington, and then to “fight like hell” just before they laid siege to the U.S. Capitol. Raskin showed clips of Trump encouraging violence and also sanctioning violence afterward – including his telling a crowd to “knock the crap out of” a protester at one of his speeches. He told the crowd that he would pay their legal fees if they did. Another clip...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 1:15 p.m. The White House press secretary says President Joe Biden wasn’t offering a “projection or a prediction” on the outcome of Donald Trump’s impeachment trial when Biden weighed in on the proceedings earlier Thursday. Biden had said that “some minds may be changed” after graphic videos of the Jan. 6 siege of the Capitol were played during the Senate trial. Spokeswoman Jen Psaki says that comment reflected “how the president felt” when he watched some of the news coverage of the trial. She says the president was “impacted by the video as a human being.” Biden and his aides generally have avoided weighing in on the trial and whether the former president should be convicted. Psaki was pressed during her briefing Thursday about whether Biden has an obligation to weigh in. She...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 12:20 p.m. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says she’ll sponsor legislation awarding the Congressional Gold Medal to the U.S. Capitol Police and other law enforcement officers who protected the Capitol as it was overrun by supporters of former President Donald Trump. Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick died after the Jan. 6 attack, one of five people to be killed. More than 70 officers with the U.S. Capitol Police were injured. Many are struggling with the emotional trauma they experienced that day. Pelosi’s office was ransacked by rioters during the attack. Pelosi said Thursday, “We will never forget.” Congress has commissioned gold medals as its highest expression of national appreciation for distinguished achievements and contributions. The first recipient was George Washington. Over the years, the medal has been presented to military leaders, authors, athletes and...
    Donald Trump's impeachment trial could end on Saturday as Democrats wrap up their case against the former president, arguing he has lit the fuse on violence for years. 'January 6th was a culmination of the president's actions, not an aberration from them. The insurrection was the most violent and dangerous episode so far in Donald Trump's continuing pattern and practice of inciting violence,' Lead House impeachment manager Jamie Raskin said Thursday. 'Trump knew exactly what he was doing and inciting the January 6 mob. Exactly,' Raskin said. 'He had just seen how easily his words and actions inspire violence in Michigan. He sent a clear message to his supporters. He encouraged planning and conspiracies to take over capitol buildings on threaten public officials who refused to bow down to his political will.'  Democrats will finish making the case for Trump's impeachment on Thursday and Trump's team isn't expected to take...
    President Joe Biden said Thursday that some Republicans senators may change their minds on Donald Trump's impeachment after seeing new video footage of what happened in the Capitol on the day of the MAGA riot.  The president said he 'didn't watch any of the hearing live' but saw news coverage of Democratic impeachment managers making their case against Trump. 'I think the Senate has a very important job to complete and, I think, my guess is some minds may have been changed but I don’t know,' Biden told reporters in the Oval Office.  Dramatic footage from the Capitol on January 6th showed Secret Service agents rushing Vice President Mike Pence out of his hiding place near the Senate chamber while Speaker Nancy Pelosi had to be taken from the complex entirely as the MAGA rioters threatened to kill them. President Joe Biden said some Republicans senators may change their minds...
    To view past editions of The Hill's 12:30 Report, click here: http://bit.ly/1M1mIfw  To receive The Hill's 12:30 Report in your inbox, please sign up here: http://bit.ly/1Tt4hqN --> A midday take on what's happening in politics and how to have a sense of humor about it.* *Ha. Haha. Hahah. Sniff. Haha. Sniff. Ha--breaks down crying hysterically.   The Hill’s 12:30 Report: Republicans privately discuss trial votes | McConnell hasn’t pressured GOP to acquit | Senators visibly shaken after yesterday’s trial proceedings | Romney stoically watches footage of officer redirecting him from mob | Says it was ‘overwhelmingly distressing and emotional’ | Trial sights and sounds | Pence evacuated 2 minutes after Trump tweet | Riot had already been declared | CDC: Fully vaccinated people don’t have to quarantine | Tom Brady throws trophy from boat | Hi-C returns to McDonald’s   HAPPENING NOW Hey, you do you!:     Via The Hill’s Jordain Carney, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) hasn’t been pressuring his Republican caucus to vote to...
    The Duke and Duchess of Sussex at Trooping the Colour. Chris Jackson/Getty Images Meghan Markle won a privacy claim against the Mail on Sunday, a judge ruled Thursday. The British newspaper published parts of a letter the duchess wrote to her father. The judge also said that the Mail breached copyright rules by publishing the letter. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Meghan Markle has criticized the British Mail on Sunday newspaper for its "illegal and dehumanizing practices" after winning a legal battle the publication. The Duchess of Sussex is sued the publication, claiming that it misued her private information, infringed her copyright, and misused her personal data by publishing excerpts of a letter she wrote to her father. On Thursday, a judge at the High Court in London sided with Markle. Mr Justice Warby issued a "summary judgement" that the Mail misued her private information, which means...
    Republican Senators advanced a bill through two committees on Wednesday and Thursday that aims to make the city of Minneapolis pay for law enforcement help from around the state during the March trial of Derek Chauvin — the former police officer who faces second-degree murder charges in the killing of George Floyd. Gov. Tim Walz wants the state to fund an extensive police presence that officials hope will prevent crime and arson, though many in the GOP said it was unfair to make taxpayers across Minnesota pay to backstop a city that has cut its police budget and is short hundreds of officers. A hearing on the Republican legislation Wednesday, however, revolved as much around another city and another incident: the mass shooting in Buffalo. When a gunman killed one person and injured four others at a health clinic in the small city Tuesday, police from around the Twin Cities...
    Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO) accused Senate Democrats on Thursday of overseeing a “kangaroo court” aimed at convicting former President Donald Trump on impeachment charges. “I think what we’re watching is a total kangaroo court,” Hawley said in an interview with Fox News’ Harris Faulkner. “It is an illegitimate proceeding, it is unconstitutional. If you want to see the proof of that, just look at what happened last night when Sen. Mike Lee [R-UT] pointed out that house managers had blatantly misquoted him. He tried to get it stricken from the record, and what ensued was chaos on the senate floor as Sen. [Patrick] Leahy [D-VT] first ordered a vote, stopped the vote in the middle because [Senate Majority Leader] Chuck Schumer [D-NY] intervened to ask him wait a minute, don’t do the vote.” Hawley was referencing an incident that resulted from Rep. David Cicilline’s (D-RI) characterization of a call between Lee and...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 11:10 a.m. President Joe Biden says he believes “some minds may be changed” in former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial after the display of searing, graphic videos of the assault on the U.S. Capitol. Biden told reporters in the Oval Office on Thursday that he didn’t watch any of the previous day’s proceedings live but later saw news coverage. The Democratic House impeachment managers used security video as part of their case, and the violent images of the riot shook senators and TV viewers alike. Biden has steadfastly refused to weigh in on the trial and again on Thursday said his focus was on fulfilling his campaign promise to battle the coronavirus pandemic. Biden says the nation has “to move on.” Aides have said Biden will address the proceedings after a verdict is...
    Bradley Cortright February 11, 2021 0 Comments Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) says the House impeachment managers have spent time “convincing” senators of facts about the level of violence at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 that they already knew. During an appearance on “Fox & Friends” on Thursday, Rubio addressed the Democrats’ arguments in the impeachment trial, “They spent a lot of time yesterday convincing us what I already knew and believed.” “And that is that the attack on Jan. 6 was outrageous, criminal, deadly, it could have been far worse, I knew that as well,” he continued. However, he said the issue being debated is whether the impeachment and conviction of former President Donald Trump is the proper response to the violence at the Capitol. “My answer to that is no,” he said. Watch the video below: Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) on Fox & Friends seems to...
    WASHINGTON, D.C. (CBS4) – Colorado Congressman Joe Neguse laid out the prosecution’s case as the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump got underway Wednesday. Neguse methodically walked senators through the evidence and made the case that Trump deliberately, and over the course of months, primed his supporters for an uprising and then ordered the attack. RELATED: Denver Weather: Frigid Weekend Ahead With Snow Likely In The Metro Area Joe Neguse (credit: CBS) “That mob was summoned, assembled and incited by the former President of the United States,” Neguse said. He says the attack on the Capitol was foreseeable and predictable, and Trump began laying the groundwork months before the election with what he calls “The Big Lie.” “That the election was stolen, full of fraud rigged. You will hear him over and over using that lie to urge his supporters to never concede and stop the steal.” Trump also...
    In an incitement case, the issue is what the accused says, not how the mob hears it. Indeed, that is always the First Amendment analysis. If what a person says is constitutionally protected expression, we protect the speech and we don’t give the heckler – or the rioter – a veto. Rep. Madeleine Dean, D-Pa., one of the House impeachment managers, noted on Wednesday afternoon that, 15 minutes into his Jan. 6 Ellipse speech, then-President Trump asserted that he knew the crowd was about to march peacefully on the Capitol. She grudgingly conceded that this was "one of his defenses" to the incitement charge. In point of fact, it would be a complete defense to an incitement charge if a prosecutor brought one in a real court, which would be inexplicable on the evidence the House managers are presenting. VideoObviously aware of this inconvenient problem, Congresswoman Dean instantly pivoted from...
    (CNN)Minutes after the second day of former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial concluded Wednesday night, South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham tweeted this:"The 'Not Guilty' vote is growing after today. I think most Republicans found the presentation by the House Managers offensive and absurd."Really?What part, exactly, was offensive and absurd? The 13-minute video that, in remarkable detail, laid out how Trump's speech was received by the thousands who attended the January 6 "Stop the Steal" rally and then violently overran the US Capitol? The months of knowing lies from Trump that convinced his supporters that the election had been stolen? The harrowing footage that showed just how close the rioters came to finding then-Vice President Mike Pence and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, among others? The gallows that these rioters had set up in front of the Capitol?If Graham's conclusion was that the House impeachment managers' case was "offensive" and "absurd,"...
    Wednesday on FNC’s “Hannity,” conservative talker Mark Levin slammed the impeachment trial underway in the U.S. Senate by calling it “one of the stupidest events” in American history. Levin highlighted some of the abnormal circumstances surrounding the January 6 Capitol Hill riot and argued the proceedings were unconstitutional act by a “rogue” Congress. Transcript as follows: LEVIN: First of all, we are watching one of the stupidest events by some of the stupidest people in American history, and history will fix this. We have a man who slept with a Chinese spy as one of the House Democrat managers. We have a man in Raskin, who was one of the most-loud opponents in one of the recent past elections of certifying the electors. We have a political party that cheered on Antifa and Black Lives Matter and called federal law enforcement storm troopers, and here they are bringing this Soviet-style...
    (CNN)Before former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial, many Capitol Hill Republicans had argued it was futile to force them to relive the January 6 insurrection because they were already witnesses who knew the facts.But by weaving together riveting snippets of video, body camera footage and never-before seen surveillance tapes, Democratic impeachment managers proved Wednesday that it is only by seeing the events of that day from every dimension that one can truly understand the horror of the Capitol attack and the former President's failure to stop it.The managers constructed a powerful case against Trump by creating what amounted to a virtual reality of the January 6 events that each senator in the chamber was forced to experience. They sat as jurors at the very same desks that rioters rifled through, in a building that was desecrated. But this time, they watched the events unfold on video from the overlaying perspectives...
    Hillary Clinton weighed in on former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial this week, suggesting in a tweet that if the Senate ultimately votes to acquit him, it will only be because "the jury includes his co-conspirators."  "If Senate Republicans fail to convict Donald Trump, it won't be because the facts were with him or his lawyers mounted a competent defense," Clinton, the former secretary of state, tweeted Wednesday morning. "It will be because the jury includes his co-conspirators." THE 5 BIGGEST MOMENTS FROM THE SECOND DAY OF TRUMP'S IMPEACHMENT TRIAL Her tweet came before the second day of Trump's impeachment trial, during which Democratic impeachment managers played never-before-seen footage showing how close rioters came to lawmakers during the deadly Jan. 6 Capitol attack.  The impeachment managers are trying to tie Trump's actions, including his refusal to accept the results of the November election, directly to the actions by a mob of his supporters who ransacked the Capitol...
    Senators say as many as a half-dozen GOP lawmakers could vote with Democrats to convict former President TrumpDonald TrumpHillary Clinton: Trump acquittal 'will be because the jury includes his co-conspirators' Former Republican officials in talks to form center-right anti-Trump party: report Gaetz hits back at Kinzinger PAC targeting 'Trumpism' MORE for inciting an insurrection on Jan. 6 after the powerful presentations by impeachment managers, including chilling footage of the attack on the Capitol. That would not be enough to secure a conviction of Trump, something that would require at least 17 Republican votes assuming every Democrat in the chamber votes to impeach. But it would be the largest bipartisan Senate majority in history for a presidential impeachment vote. Here’s a look at the six GOP votes seen as being in play. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyHillary Clinton: Trump acquittal 'will be because the jury includes his co-conspirators' Romney thanks officer...
    On the second day of the former president’s “incitement to insurgency” trial, Democratic prosecutors unveiled unseen CCTV footage. The trial resumes this Thursday at noon. VS’is a startling document that Democratic prosecutors released this Wednesday during the second day of the trial for “incitement to insurgency” which targets former US President Donald Trump following the riots that plagued the Capitol on January 6. A 13-minute montage, mixing images shot by pro-Trump rioters, excerpts from speeches by the Republican billionaire and footage from unpublished video surveillance. These last sequences, which capture the events from inside the Capitol, reveal the danger incurred by elected officials. And no longer leave any doubt, according to Democratic prosecutors, on the responsibility of Donald Trump, whose words endangered his own camp.
                              Presented by TikTok     Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. It is Thursday! We get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver are the co-creators. Readers can find us on Twitter @asimendinger and @alweaver22. Please recommend the Morning Report to friends and let us know what you think. CLICK HERE to subscribe! Total U.S. coronavirus deaths reported each morning this week: Monday, 463,477; Tuesday, 465,072; Wednesday, 468,203; Thursday, 471,567.   More Americans have died from COVID-19 in the last year than were killed during World War II and the Vietnam War combined. “Pretty damning,” was how Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiGOP senators call Capitol riot videos 'disturbing,' 'powerful,' 'graphic' Murkowski: I don't know how Trump could be elected again...
    EFE videos Democrats call Trump a “chief inciter” in the assault on Capitol Hill Washington, Feb 10 (EFE) .- The Democratic “prosecutors” of Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial on Wednesday profiled the former president of the United States as the “chief inciter” of the mob that stormed the Capitol, and accused him of “encouraging deliberately “violence to try to stay in power. On the second day of the impeachment trial against Trump, the Democrats exhibited unpublished images of the attack on the Capitol on January 6, and made a forceful allegation against the former president, accused of “inciting an insurrection” of his followers who left five dead. “The evidence will show that Donald Trump abdicated his role as commander-in-chief and became the inciter-in-chief of a dangerous insurrection,” said the chief “prosecutor” of the “impeachment,” Democratic lawmaker Jamie Raskin. “He told (his supporters) to fight like hell, and that day they...
    It turns out the star witness for the Democrats was Donald Trump. On the impeachment trial’s second day, the former president’s words and tweets took center stage as the House managers argued that his constant efforts to "stop the steal" led directly to the Capitol riot. In a sense, they were attempting to prove their case yesterday with material that has been out there in public view, simply by pulling it all together. And they capped the presentation with previous unseen security footage of the riot, and police radio communications, that were absolutely chilling because they prove how close the country came to a massacre under the dome. So the Democrats won the day on optics, but not necessarily on the law or the Constitution. Of course, Trump mounted a relentless crusade after Nov. 3 to prove, without evidence that could convince any court or his own Justice Department, that...
              Live from Music Row Wednesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Michael Patrick Leahy outlines the unconstitutionality of the impeachment trial of private citizen Donald Trump by defining the meaning of impeachment as interpreted in the United States Constitution. Michael Patrick Leahy: (Senator John Kennedy clip plays) That was Senator John Kennedy of Louisiana who was among the 44 who voted correctly that a private citizen even a former president cannot be impeached under the Constitution. Now, there’s been a lot of talking back and forth about what’s constitutional and what’s not.The Democrats on the left and everybody on the left is making up stuff frankly. And let’s go to the Constitution. Let’s see what the Constitution actually says. So let’s begin actually...
    The Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump is "one of the stupidest events by some of the stupidest people in American history," Mark Levin told "Hannity" Wednesday.  "We have a man who slept with a Chinese spy as one of the House Democrat managers," said the "Life, Liberty & Levin" host, referring to Rep. Eric Swallwell, D-Calif. "We have a man in [Rep. Jamie] Raskin [D-Md.] who was one of the most loud opponents in one of the recent past elections of certifying electors. "We have a political party that cheered on Antifa and Black Lives Matter and called federal law enforcement storm troopers," Levin continued. "And here they are bringing this Soviet-style case against the president of the United States. Have there ever been this many stupid members of Congress in your life?" According to Levin, the arguments raised by Democratic House impeachment managers so far is "inadmissible in any court...
    Former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTanden seeks to defuse GOP tensions over tweets Google expands election security aid for federal, state campaigns What I learned in 19 weeks of working with progressive Democrats MORE suggested in a tweet Wednesday that an acquittal in former President TrumpDonald TrumpSchoen says Trump team will be 'very well prepared' after criticism Iowa Republicans seek to cut funding for schools with 1619 Project in curriculum Capitol rioter seen smoking in Rotunda arrested MORE’s impeachment trial would only come as a result of “the jury includ[ing] his co-conspirators.” “If Senate Republicans fail to convict Donald Trump, it won't be because the facts were with him or his lawyers mounted a competent defense. It will be because the jury includes his co-conspirators,” Clinton tweeted Wednesday. If Senate Republicans fail to convict Donald Trump, it won't be because the facts were with him or...