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    By Dan Williams JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Israel will next month halt its cellphone tracking of coronavirus cases except for carriers who refuse epidemiological questioning or in the event of a surge in contagions, a government ministry said. Used on and off since March in efforts to curb COVID-19, the Shin Bet counter-terrorism agency's surveillance technology checks confirmed carriers' locations against other cellphones nearby to determine with whom they came into contact. The method has faced challenges in courts and parliament because of privacy concerns and questions about its efficacy. Some Israelis avoid using listed cellphones in public in the hope of not being contact-traced and ordered into quarantine. A cabinet panel that reviewed the tracking decided it would not be extended beyond Jan. 20, when a law allowing its use expires, the Intelligence Ministry said. "The tool will serve as a safety net, to be applied regarding coronavirus carriers who...
    Negotiations over a $900 billion coronavirus relief bill are running into 11th-hour snags, threatening to push Congress into a rare weekend session.  Lawmakers had hoped to clinch a sweeping deal, which would also fund the government through Oct. 1, on Wednesday after the top four congressional leaders signaled that they were closing in on an agreement after months of stalemate.  But instead lawmakers and staff warned that – while they still thought they would get the agreement – the final stages of the talks are moving slowly as they continue to haggle over the details and field requests for changes.  “It’s still a ways off, I think. They’ve still got some things they’re negotiating. ...It’s been a slow roll so far,” said Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneOvernight Defense: Military reports second active-duty death due to COVID-19 | Pentagon, State Department among agencies hit by cyberattack Pentagon, State Department among agencies hacked: report McConnell urges...
    European Executive Vice-President Margrethe Vestager.JOHANNA GERON | AFP | Getty Images LONDON — Tech giants could soon face hefty fines and stricter controls over their behavior as part of new wide-sweeping rules in the European Union. The European Commission, the executive arm of the EU, on Tuesday presented two new pieces of legislation that will affect how Big Tech operates. The region has long had concerns about how powerful some companies have become, and how this is a problem for smaller firms looking to compete in the European market. In this context, the new Digital Markets Act aims to tackle behavior that closes these markets off. One of the potential changes is putting an end to self-preferencing — when, for instance, app search results in an Apple product display options developed by the Californian firm. The idea is to give smaller app developers the same chance of being found and...
            by Scott McClallen  The Michigan Senate passed bipartisan criminal justice reform bills that aim to protect public safety, keep nonviolent offenders out of jail, and make it easier for people to get jobs. House Bills 5844 and 5854–5857 aim to reform a wide range of mandatory minimum sentences to allow judges discretion in sentencing nonviolent, minor crimes to account for collateral damages of the criminal justice system like broken families. State Sen. Sylvia Santana (D-Detroit) said many people can’t make bail pre-trial, so they’re stuck in jail, where they can’t take care of their family. House Bills 5846–5852 seek to reduce driver’s license suspensions for offenses not related to dangerous driving, such as driving without a valid license, which is the third-most-common reason for jail admission in Michigan. Critics argue it’s hard to keep a job to provide for a family without a license, and even harder to pay fines and fees without...
    By ALANNA DURKIN RICHER, Associated Press BOSTON (AP) — Gov. Charlie Baker did not overstep his authority when he issued sweeping orders to close businesses and limit gatherings to control the spread of the coronavirus, the highest court in Massachusetts said in a ruling released Thursday. The Supreme Judicial Court rejected a challenge brought on behalf of a group including salon owners, pastors and the headmaster of a private school, who accused the Republican governor of exercising "legislative police power” by declaring a state of emergency under the state’s Civil Defense Act. The court said the pandemic clearly merits action by the governor under the Cold War-era law. It also rejected the lawsuit's argument that the governor's actions infringe on people's constitutional rights to due process and free assembly. “Given that COVID-19 is a pandemic that has killed over a million people worldwide, it spreads from person to person, effective...
    Washington (CNN)The Trump administration has finalized a regulation that would place more limits on migrants seeking refuge in the United States, the latest in a series of rules that make it exceedingly difficult to claim asylum in the US and serving as yet another example of the challenges an incoming Biden administration will face in undoing President Donald Trump's policies.Under the rule, for example, an individual's asylum claim could face greater scrutiny if the person traveled through at least one country while on the way to the US but didn't seek refuge there. The Trump administration applied a similar rule to migrants traveling through Mexico from Latin America, but the latest rule widens the scope of people who could fall under those restrictions, with some exceptions, such as a victim of human trafficking. Biden administration prepares to inherit controversial Trump immigration policies The regulation also says that living unlawfully in...
    BOSTON (CBS/AP) — Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker did not overstep his authority when he issued sweeping orders to close businesses and limit gatherings to control the spread of the coronavirus, the state’s highest court said in a ruling released Thursday. The Supreme Judicial Court rejected a challenge brought on a behalf of a group including salon owners, pastors and the headmaster of a private school, who accused the Republican governor of exercising “legislative police power” by declaring a state of emergency under the state’s Civil Defense Act. The group argued that the governor had no authority to issue public health-related orders under the Cold War-era law it says was designed to protect the state from foreign invasions, insurrections, and catastrophic events like hurricanes and fires. Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey’s office called the group’s argument “profoundly misguided,” saying the pandemic that has killed nearly 11,000 people in the state is...
    State legislatures across the country are contemplating sweeping changes to the way elections are administered after a tumultuous presidential contest, one that ended with both the highest voter turnout in American history and the outgoing president baselessly calling its integrity into question. In its wake, election rules have become the hottest topic for state legislatures, especially in presidential battleground states. Lawmakers in a handful of states have begun introducing legislation in so-called pre-filing periods, windows that open before a session begins that enable lawmakers to propose bills. At least 60 election-related bills have been introduced in Texas, 26 are pending in New Hampshire and 41 in Montana, according to a count compiled by the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL). “We can expect a busier than ever elections agenda for the states in 2021,” said Wendy Underhill, director of the NCSL’s elections and redistricting programs. In some...
    A draft of a new law aimed at combating Islamic extremism was introduced by the French government Wednesday.  The proposed law targets places like home schools and mosques that teach principles counter to French values, according to the Associated Press. President Emmanuel Macron has spoken recently about a need to rid France of “separatists” that are undermining the country. (RELATED: Police Launch Investigation After Swastika Found In German Parliament Building) The law would outlaw homeschooling past the age of three outside of “special cases” and more strongly encourage mosques to register as places of worship and not just “associations,” the AP reports. It also takes steps to prevent arranged or otherwise coercive marriages, and forbids those convicted of crimes like provoking terrorism from frequently visiting mosques, reports the AP.  Macron vows to rein in Islamist separatists who reject French law https://t.co/8ETjqzkFvl — Yadu Singh (@dryadusingh) October 3, 2020 The...
    SILVER LAKE, LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- Silver Lake residents want the city to bring back relaxed street parking."I just don't understand how you can reconcile sheltering at home, while the city's enforcing parking citations at the same time. I just don't get it," said Silver Lake resident Albert Andrade.In March, Mayor Eric Garcetti announced relaxed street parking. It was part of his safer-at-home order. But on Oct. 15, street sweeping started up again.On Nov. 2, a program called Early Pay L.A. launched. It offers a $20 discount to people who pay for their citations within 48 hours.But like many residents nearby, Andrade said he is struggling with this."I work out of my car for about an hour just waiting for a spot to open up. I've seen a lot of people do that. Some people just give up and just own up to the fine. They just leave their car...
    The incoming Los Angeles district attorney, who was funded by George Soros, announced sweeping changes to his office’s law enforcement strategy immediately after assuming office on Monday. “NEW: L.A.'s new District Attorney George Gascon being inaugurated & making major announcements today,” Fox 11 Los Angeles reporter Bill Melugin tweeted Monday as George Gascon was set to be inaugurated as the 43rd district attorney. “No more death penalty, an end to cash bail, getting rid of all sentencing enhancements (gang, three strikes, etc), disbanding of the special circumstances committee.” Melugin continued: “Gascon is creating a use of force review board to take a look at police shootings going back to 2012, and has decided to reopen four cases so far. No longer prosecuting juveniles as adults. Will be looking to resentence at least 20,000 people sentenced under Jackie Lacey.” Gascon is creating a use of force review board to take a...
    Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro on Monday declared victory in the country's congressional elections, which were boycotted by opposition party leaders and seen widely by the international community as fraudulent.  “We have recovered the National Assembly with the majority vote of the Venezuelan people,” Maduro said in a televised address, according to The Associated Press. “It’s a great victory without a doubt for democracy.” The win gives Maduro full control of the country's socialist government, despite cries from protesters and other world powers of a rigged election, the AP noted. "Venezuela's electoral fraud has already been committed," U.S. Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoFocus on cabinet nominees' effectiveness and expertise, not just ideology State Dept. terminates five exchange programs with China, calling them 'propaganda' Pompeo imposes visa restrictions on Chinese officials over 'intimidation' tactics MORE tweeted. "The results announced by the illegitimate Maduro regime will not reflect the will of the Venezuelan people. What's happening today...
            by J. D. Davidson  In an effort that Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof said was four years in the making, the Ohio Senate voted Thursday to trim government regulations to help businesses across the state. The Senate voted to agree with House changes to Senate Bill 1, legislation that Obhof, R-Medina, said has been worked on by himself, Lt. Gov. Jon Husted and state Sens. Kristina Roegner, R-Hudson, and Rob McColley, R-Napoleon, for years. “As one of the most highly regulated states in the nation, passing Senate Bill 1 would drastically improve Ohio’s economy and job growth by eliminating unnecessary and burdensome administrative rules,” McColley said. “Cutting this red tape will positively impact businesses in our community, many of which are struggling because of the pandemic.” The Ohio House included language that would place limits on the state director of heath’s discretion to issue stay-at-home...
    By AMY TAXIN, Associated Press HUNTINGTON BEACH, Calif. (AP) — Many Californians were preparing Sunday for a new stay-at-home order that bars restaurant dining, shutters salons and limits retail in an effort to curb spiraling coronavirus infections and hospitalizations. The new rules that take effect before midnight in the vast region of Southern California, much of the San Francisco Bay Area and a large swath of the Central Valley also prohibit residents from gathering with people not in their households. Public health officials contend the measures are critical as space dwindles in intensive care units in Southern California and much of the Central Valley amid a surge in coronavirus infections. Some law enforcement officials in these same areas, however, said they don't plan to enforce the rules and are counting on residents to wear masks and practice physical distancing to protect themselves during the pandemic. “These closures and stay-at-home orders...
    By Amy Taxin | Associated Press HUNTINGTON BEACH — Many Californians were preparing Sunday for a new stay-at-home-order that bars restaurant dining, shutters salons and limits retail in an effort to curb spiraling coronavirus infections and hospitalizations. The new rules that take effect before midnight in the vast region of Southern California, much of the San Francisco Bay Area and a large swath of the Central Valley also prohibit residents from gathering with people not in their households. Public health officials contend the measures are critical as space dwindles in intensive care units in Southern California and much of the Central Valley amid a surge in coronavirus infections. Law enforcement officials in these same areas, however, said they don’t plan to enforce the rules and are counting on residents to wear masks and practice physical distancing to protect themselves during the pandemic. “These closures and stay-at-home orders are flat out...
    By JOCELYN GECKER, Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The vast region of Southern California, much of the San Francisco Bay area and a large swath of the Central Valley are about to be placed under a sweeping new lockdown in an urgent attempt to slow the rapid rise of coronavirus cases. The California Department of Public Health said Saturday the intensive care unit capacity in Southern California and Central Valley hospitals had fallen below a 15% threshold that triggers the new measures, which include strict closures for businesses and a ban on gathering with anyone outside of your own household. The new measures will take effect Sunday evening and remain in place for at least three weeks, meaning the lockdown will cover the Christmas holiday. Much of the state is on the brink of the same restrictions. Some counties have opted to impose them even before the mandate kicks...
    SAN FRANCISCO – The vast region of Southern California, much of the San Francisco Bay area and a large swath of the Central Valley are about to be placed under a sweeping new lockdown in an urgent attempt to slow the rapid rise of coronavirus cases. The California Department of Public Health said Saturday the intensive care unit capacity in Southern California and Central Valley hospitals had fallen below a 15% threshold that triggers the new measures, which include strict closures for businesses and a ban on gathering with anyone outside of your own household. The new measures will take effect Sunday evening and remain in place for at least three weeks, meaning the lockdown will cover the Christmas holiday. Much of the state is on the brink of the same restrictions. Some counties have opted to impose them even before the mandate kicks in, including five San Francisco...
    The House on Friday passed sweeping legislation that would decriminalize marijuana at the federal level, the first time either chamber of Congress has voted to decriminalize cannabis. The measure, the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment & Expungement Act, passed on a largely party-line vote of 228 to 164. Six Democrats voted against the legislation and five Republicans voted for it. The bill faces an uphill battle in the GOP-controlled Senate. DEVELOPING Tags Marijuana weed Cannabis
    In an effort that Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof said was four years in the making, the Ohio Senate voted Thursday to trim government regulations to help businesses across the state. The Senate voted to agree with House changes to Senate Bill 1, legislation that Obhof, R-Medina, said has been worked on by himself, Lt. Gov. Jon Husted and state Sens. Kristina Roegner, R-Hudson, and Rob McColley, R-Napoleon, for years. “As one of the most highly regulated states in the nation, passing Senate Bill 1 would drastically improve Ohio’s economy and job growth by eliminating unnecessary and burdensome administrative rules,” McColley said. “Cutting this red tape will positively impact businesses in our community, many of which are struggling because of the pandemic.” The Ohio House included language that would place limits on the state director of heath’s discretion to issue stay-at-home or stay-safe orders. The Senate rejected...
    Los Angeles County officials said they are hoping a new set of restrictions can help slow the unprecedented surge in COVID-19 cases but warned that a tougher stay-at-home measure will be necessary if cases keep spiking. Barbara Ferrer, the L.A. County health director, on Saturday said officials hope the more narrowly tailored restrictions will be sufficient to slow the spread of the coronavirus without reverting to stricter stay-at-home orders like those put in place in March. She said the county is “at a different place now than we were in March and April, when we didn’t have the science around masking and distancing. “Now that we do, it offers us a slightly different path forward,” she said. “But I’ll be honest: It only offers us a different path forward if everyone’s doing it.” The risk of allowing more people to be out, she said, is that the efforts to slow...
    DENVER (CBS4)– One year after the state legislature passed a controversial law, calling for an overhaul of oil and gas regulations, the new rules are now in place. The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission approved the sweeping changes that include new setbacks from homes, schools, wildlife habitats and waterways. (credit: iStock/Getty Images Plus) “Largely I have received positive support for where we have landed. There is a recognition and appreciation for the fact that the new rules are more robust and tougher and more comprehensive, but people seem to understand that this was to be expected, in changing the landscape from fostering to regulating in a protective manner,” says Commission Chair Jeff Robbins. Not everyone is happy about the new rules. Ben Holzschuh works for Rocky Mountain Wireline, a contractor for the industry. He’s worried the regulations will cripple an industry already struggling. A total of 7,300 oil and...
    TikTok : The Real Madrid player has once again shared a new dance that is very fashionable on the social network and has already accumulated thousands and thousands of visits.
    TikTok : It is the video of the moment on the short video platform. How do we make the gesture of talking on the phone?
    MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexico's Senate approved a sweeping cannabis legalization bill in a lopsided 82 to 18 vote on Thursday, paving the way for the creation of the world's largest legal marijuana market if the initiative passes the next hurdle in the lower house of Congress. Lawmakers are rushing to secure approval before the end of the current congressional session in mid-December. If given the green light, the law would allow the recreational, scientific, medical and industrial uses of cannabis, a major shift in the country where drug cartel violence in recent years has claimed over 100,000 lives. (Reporting by David Alire Garcia and Adriana Barrera; Editing by Daina Beth Solomon) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: Mexico
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — The Los Angeles Rams placed three players on the reserve/COVID-19 list Wednesday, one day after announcing that an unnamed player had tested positive for coronavirus. Rams tight end Kendall Blanton, safety Jake Gervase and wide receiver J.J Koski were placed on the reserve/COVID-19 list, which is designated for a player who either tests positive for COVID-19 or who has been in close contact with an infected person or persons. On Tuesday night, the Rams announced they would conduct nearly all football activities remotely with the only exception being select players with assigned rehab. “Out of an abundance of caution we are entering intensive protocol,” the statement said. “The decision was made in consultation with the NFL and medical officials as the health and safety of the team is our highest priority.” Meanwhile Wednesday, the National Football League announced sweeping new COVID- 19 regulations for all 32...
    Lawmakers in Michigan are responding to Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer after she implemented strong restrictions to try to combat another wave of COVID-19 infections. “The Supreme Court has told the governor that she needs to work with the legislature. I think the onus is placed on the governor to work with the people’s chamber, unfortunately, she has not done that,” Michigan state Rep. Phil Green told the Washington Examiner when asked about Whitmer’s restrictions, which went into effect Wednesday. Green’s comments echoed that of fellow Republicans, including Michigan Speaker of the House Lee Chatfield, who implored the governor to work with the GOP-controlled legislature. “The Legislature, which is the voice of the people of Michigan, led the way with a smarter plan of action to address this crisis back in the spring, which the governor ignored,” Chatfield said in a Facebook statement after Whitmer’s new restrictions were announced. ...
    In a sign of the continued political polarization surrounding COVID-19, officials in Orange County are expressing frustration following Gov. Gavin Newsom’s decision to move the region into the most restrictive reopening tier amid a dangerous new surge in coronavirus infections statewide. Conservative county leaders have long been at odds with the Democratic governor over the restrictions imposed on businesses, public spaces and activities, but it now appears that clash will stretch into the holiday season as California enters what could be its most challenging chapter of the pandemic. The state has rolled back reopenings in much of California as cases have climbed. Some areas are considering even more local restrictions — including hard-hit Los Angeles County, where officials have talked about a possible curfew and potentially limiting the number of customers allowed in some businesses — while others, including Bay Area counties like San Francisco, have voluntarily added restrictions that...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Philadelphia officials announced Monday major restrictions for restaurants and businesses across the city as coronavirus cases surge. Starting Friday, indoor dining will be banned and gyms and museums will be closed. The restrictions come as the number of daily COVID-19 cases in the city has jumped 700% in the past two months. “The average number of reported positive cases of COVID-19 per day in Philadelphia has jumped at least 700% in two months,” Mayor Jim Kenney said during a Monday afternoon press conference. City officials acknowledge businesses will be closed and jobs lost because of the new restrictions but, they say, they’re necessary to save lives. “We have to take action now,” Philadelphia Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas Farley said. All indoor public and private gatherings in Philadelphia are being restricted. “Please stay home, away from others as much as possible,” Farley said. “Don’t visit even friends and...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — The Archdiocese of Philadelphia will move its secondary schools to virtual learning after the city announced Monday that high schools will no longer be allowed to have in-person learning through the new year. Virtual learning will begin for secondary school students Monday, Nov. 23. Parish and regional elementary schools in the city will be allowed to continue in-person learning. The archdiocese expects Philadelphia high schools to go back to in-person learning in January. On Monday, city officials announced that all colleges and high schools will have to suspend in-person learning as part of sweeping restrictions to help curb the COVID-19 surge. The city is prohibiting indoor dining and gatherings for the next six weeks. In Montgomery County, kindergarten through 12th grades will move to all virtual beginning Nov. 23 for two weeks. MORE ON CBSPHILLY.COM  Man Shot Outside Of Willow Grove Park Mall, Police Say WATCH: New...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — The Archdiocese of Philadelphia will move its high schools to virtual learning after the city announced Monday that high schools will no longer be allowed to have in-person learning through the new year. Virtual learning will begin for high school students Monday, Nov. 23. Parish and regional elementary schools in the city will be allowed to continue in-person learning. The archdiocese expects Philadelphia high schools to go back to in-person learning in January. On Monday, city officials announced that all colleges and high schools will have to suspend in-person learning as part of sweeping restrictions to help curb the COVID-19 surge. The city is prohibiting indoor dining and gatherings for the next six weeks. In Montgomery County, kindergarten through 12th grades will move to all virtual beginning Nov. 23 for two weeks. MORE ON CBSPHILLY.COM  Man Shot Outside Of Willow Grove Park Mall, Police Say WATCH: New...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- Philadelphia leaders have announced sweeping new restrictions as the number of COVID-19 cases continues to rise in the city.Some of the restrictions include: no indoor dining, outdoor dining is allowed -- but only for household members, indoor gatherings are prohibited -- both public and private, employees must work from home unless not possible, retail stores can only have 5 people inside per 1,000 square feet, sports -- including youth, school and community -- are prohibited, and there will be closures of theaters, bowling alleys, museums, libraries, casinos and gyms.Schools will also be impacted. Colleges and universities and high schools will be online only. Elementary and middle schools will allow in-person learning while day care and child care facilities are allowed to continue in-person learning.Additionally, religious institutions are encouraged to hold services online and no more than 5% occupancy per 1,000 square feet are allowed.The restrictions will...
    Reuters November 15, 2020 0 Comments Washington Governor Jay Inslee announced sweeping new restrictions on gatherings and businesses on Sunday, including a ban on indoor service at restaurants and bars, to combat a recent surge in COVID-19 cases in the state. The restrictions, most of which will take effect Monday at 11:59 p.m. and last for one month, come as the average daily tally for cases has doubled in the past two weeks, Inslee told a news conference. The spike in cases “…means, unfortunately, the time has come to reinstate restrictions on activities statewide to preserve the public’s well-being and to save lives,” Inslee said. Indoor gatherings will be prohibited outside one’s household and outdoor gatherings will be limited to five people. Religious services and in-store retail will be limited to 25% occupancy, Inslee said, while fitness gyms must halt indoor services, and youth and adult sports will be...
    Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeTrump COVID-19 outreach to governors drops off Progressives unveil Biden Cabinet wish list Biden sweeps Trump in West Coast states MORE (D) on Sunday announced broad new restrictions that will affect restaurants, theaters, gyms and indoor gatherings. The new restrictions will last for at least four weeks. Restaurants will only be allowed to operate outdoor service and parties will be limited to five or fewer people. Gyms, theaters, museums will be shut down, the Seattle Times reports. Gatherings with people outside of a single household will be prohibited unless those involved have quarantine for a week and tested negative for the coronavirus. Religious services and offices will be allowed to remain open, though they must operate at 25 percent capacity. If possible, workplaces should mandate that employees work from home. Schools and courts will not be affected, though the newspaper notes that they are already...
    Capital News Service — President-elect Joe Biden established himself on the campaign trail as the antonym to President Donald Trump when it came to key policy stances, promising strong responses to the coronavirus pandemic, climate change, criminal justice, immigration and health care. “Anyone who is responsible for that many deaths should not remain as president of the United States of America,” Biden said during the final debate about Trump’s mishandling of the pandemic that resulted in 239,000 deaths and counting. Now, as he plans for the opening days of his presidency, Biden has made the pandemic his top priority. In his acceptance speech on Saturday, he said “getting COVID under control,” is the key to winning the “battle for the soul of America.” Biden also has signaled that he will use his presidential powers on a number of fronts in his first days in the White House, according to multiple news...
    LGBT advocacy and political lobbying group the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) has created a “Blueprint for Positive Change” to guide its anticipated Biden administration through 85 policy recommendations that it says will undo the “damage” done by President Donald Trump. HRC states in its “blueprint” that Biden could enact some of its policy recommendations fairly quickly through executive orders that would simply cancel Trump’s actions: Since taking office, the Trump administration has consistently targeted far reaching regulatory changes that undermine the rights of vulnerable communities, including those who are LGBTQ. The administration consistently mischaracterizes the law in federal regulations, legal memorandums, and litigation actions. These coordinated attacks on civil rights exploit the public’s traditionally limited engagement with federal legal actions and administrative developments, violating the public trust. HRC has laid out a roadmap to working with the Biden-Harris administration and ensuring we move equality forward by advancing policies to improve...
    MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexican senators on Friday began weighing a sweeping initiative to legalize recreational use and sale of marijuana, a proposal that could create the world's largest weed market in a country battered by a violent war against drug gangs. The Supreme Court ruled in 2018 that recreational marijuana should be permitted, and lawmakers in 2017 legalized the use of medicinal marijuana. But the country has yet to pass laws that would legalize its recreational use, or regulations for medicinal marijuana. Lawmakers are now rushing to try to meet a Dec. 15 deadline set by the Supreme Court for legalization, with the support of Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador who has aimed to removing the drug as a source of income for violent drug gangs. Discussed by the Senate's health, justice, and legislative studies commissions on Friday, the marijuana bill would allow licensed sale of pot, let...
    Joe Biden is planning a major overhaul of President Trump’s immigration agenda, reversing his Muslim travel ban and freezing deportations for 100 days, according to a new report. The incoming Biden administration is bullish about its ability to undo many of Trump’s signature immigration policies because so many were created with executive action, one source familiar with the plans told CBS News. “All that stuff was done administratively through the [president’s] executive authority, and so a new executive can basically reject those and start from scratch,” the source said. Biden is eyeing several immediate changes, including dismantling Trump’s ban on immigration from 13 predominantly Muslim and African nations. Shortly after taking office, Trump signed an executive order that banned foreign nationals from seven countries –- Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen –- from visiting the United States. In January, Nigeria, Eritrea, Sudan, Tanzania, Myanmar and Kyrgyzstan were added...
    Joe Biden is planning a major overhaul of President Trump’s immigration agenda, reversing his Muslim travel ban and freezing deportations for 100 days, according to a new report. The incoming Biden administration is bullish about its ability to undo many of Trump’s signature immigration policies because so many were created with executive action, one source familiar with the plans told CBS News. “All that stuff was done administratively through the [president’s] executive authority, and so a new executive can basically reject those and start from scratch,” the source said. Biden is eyeing several immediate changes, including dismantling Trump’s ban on immigration from 13 predominantly Muslim and African nations. Shortly after taking office, Trump signed an executive order that banned foreign nationals from seven countries –- Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen –- from visiting the United States. In January, Nigeria, Eritrea, Sudan, Tanzania, Myanmar and Kyrgyzstan were added to...
    While the COVID-19 public health crisis and its impact on the U.S. economy will preoccupy President-elect Joe Biden during his first weeks in office, the incoming Democratic administration is also expected to quickly start dismantling President Trump's immigration agenda. After Mr. Biden is sworn-in in January, his administration will move to fully restore an Obama-era program that shields 640,000 undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children from deportation, halting Mr. Trump's unsuccessful efforts to end it, people familiar with the plans told CBS News. The incoming administration also intends to rescind Mr. Trump's travel and immigration restrictions on 13 mostly African or predominantly Muslim countries. Mr. Biden will look to implement a 100-day freeze on deportations while his administration issues guidance narrowing who can be arrested by immigration agents. Obama-era memos that prioritized the deportation of immigrants with criminal convictions, recent border-crossers and those who entered the...
    LONDON (Reuters) - Britain will intervene to block takeovers and corporate deals that threaten national security, the government said on Wednesday, publishing details of new laws covering potentially sensitive sectors such as defence and energy. The National Security and Investment Bill will give ministers new powers to scrutinise and intervene in "malicious" foreign investment, addressing long-standing concerns that some deals could compromise security or vital infrastructure. "Hostile actors should be in no doubt – there is no back door into the UK," said business minister Alok Sharma.   "This bill will mean that we can continue to welcome job-creating investment to our shores, while shutting out those who could threaten the safety of the British people." Earlier this year, ministers blocked Chinese communications firm Huawei from parts of its communications network over concerns about spying. In 2016 Britain delayed a nuclear power project in England over concerns about Chinese state funding....
    By Maria Recio | Austin American-Statesman WASHINGTON — When national Democrats helicoptered into Austin in April 2019 and set up an operation to flip GOP seats in the U.S. House in 2020 — a list that grew from six districts to 10 — they exuded confidence, and Republicans took notice. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee was fresh off gaining two Texas seats in 2018 and declared that the Lone Star State was “ground zero” for expanding the Democratic majority in the House. Instead, GOP candidates won nine of the races, some by double digits, and Republican Beth Van Duyne is leading in a North Texas congressional race that has not yet been called. “If you’re going to get hit by a truck, you want to see it coming,” said Matt Angle, director of the Lone Star Project, a Democratic political action committee in Washington and Texas. He and other Democratic...
    Anna EskamaniPhoto via NSFForget purple state. And don't even think about blue state. Florida Republicans dominated Tuesday's elections from the top of the ballot on down, leaving Democrats searching for answers after more than two decades of GOP control of the state. In a victory that by Sunshine State standards was a landslide, President Donald Trump defeated Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden by more than three percentage points in Florida, more than doubling the edge he held over Democrat Hillary Clinton four years ago. Republicans upset two incumbent South Florida congresswomen, flipped five state House seats and could pick up a seat in the state Senate, making a mockery of Democrats’ hopes to cut into the GOP’s legislative dominance. The across-the-board losses leave Democrats and their state party in shreds as they begin to gear up for mid-term elections in 2022, including a gubernatorial election. Even before Trump officially notched...
    The stock market was up big Wednesday despite lingering questions over what the exact outcome of the previous day’s elections will be.  The S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Average were up more Wednesday than any other day after an election in at least 40 years, according to the BBC. The S&P ended the day up 2.2% while the Dow saw an increase of 1.3%. (RELATED: Florida Passes $15 Minimum Wage Amendment) “It looks like it’s divided government regardless of who takes the White House,” FHN Financial Chief Economist Chris Low told the BBC. “That means a lot less probability of big sweeping legislative change, big sweeping spending or tax programs.” Health care and tech stocks led the market increase, with the tech-centric Nasdaq up almost 4%. There was initially a dip in market futures during the night, as Democrats’ underperformance appeared to eliminate any possibility of a large stimulus...
    Inspectors said they have finished sweeping through U.S. Postal Service processing facilities in several states.This comes hours after a federal judge ordered USPS to send inspectors to several processing facilities in key battleground states, including Texas, to ensure that no mail-in ballot is left behind.U.S. Judge Emmet Sullivan ruled on Election Day that the postal service must "sweep the facilities between 12:30 p.m. (EST) and 3:00 p.m. (EST) to ensure that no ballots have been held up and that any identified ballots are immediately sent out for delivery."Inspectors were also ordered to report back to the court by 4:30 p.m. to confirm that sweeps were conducted and that no ballots were left behind, Sullivan wrote.Concerns grew after a lawsuit brought in August by the NAACP accusing the postal service and its leader, Postmaster General Louis DeJoy, of disenfranchising voters of color by implementing a set of cost-cutting initiatives that slowed...
    Supporters of President Donald Trump at two of his rallies in Pennsylvania on Monday described the enthusiasm for the president that appears to be taking over the state. Breitbart News spoke with several Americans at the events in Scranton and Reading. One man said, “My wife and I traveled all Pennsylvania on our motorcycle this year and we have seen probably 25 to one Trump signs to Biden.” Three young men from Berks County said there were a few supporters of former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) in their area but “we outweigh them.” One in their group said he believed Pennsylvania was “Two cities of blue filled with a land of red all around it.” An estimated 57,000 people showed up to Trump’s rally in Butler on Saturday night, according to Breitbart News. According to my friend Denise, who was at the last rally in...
    Virginia became the third state to ban no-knock warrants after Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam on Wednesday signed several sweeping new laws to reform policing after the deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor led to a national reckoning on racial bias. Northam signed Senate Bill 5030, sponsored by state Sen. Mamie Locke, which incorporates a number of police reform measures passed by the state House of Delegates. Besides banning no-knock warrants, it creates a statewide minimum training for law enforcement officers on racism, biased profiling and de-escalation techniques. The law also seeks to reduce the militarization of police by prohibiting law enforcement from obtaining or using specified equipment, including grenades, weaponized aircraft and high-caliber firearms. Northam amended the house bill to clarify that law enforcement agencies can seek a waiver to use restricted equipment for search-and-rescue missions. BREONNA TAYLOR'S MOTHER WANTS NEW PROSECUTOR TO INVESTIGATE COPS WHO SHOT HER...
    When ex-Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale was tackled, detained, and hospitalized late last month after his wife alleged he was violent and trying to hurt himself, Fort Lauderdale police confiscated 10 firearms from his home. Candice Parscale later said that her husband “was not violent towards me that day or any day prior”, but police began a legal process to try to keep those guns away from Pascale for a longer time under Florida’s “red flag” law, enacted after the 2018 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. Red flag laws like Florida’s (sometimes called Extreme Risk Protection Orders or Gun Violence Restraining Orders) give authorities varying abilities to temporarily seize guns from someone deemed to be an immediate threat to themselves or others, as reported by immediate family members (or in some states, others). Nineteen states and the District of Columbia have adopted such laws,...
    After nearly seven months of overlooking violations because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Los Angeles Department of Transportation is resuming enforcement of most parking rules. As of Thursday, the city will go back to issuing $73 tickets for parking during street-sweeping hours. LADOT spokesman Colin Sweeney said the decision to resume enforcement followed a return to near pre-pandemic traffic levels as businesses and facilities reopen. The department also found an increasing need to resume street sweeping because of “quality-of-life issues,” Sweeney said. The enforcement suspension, which began March 16, has led to “debris and trash buildup around unmoved vehicles” that created public health concerns, including rodent infestations, according to a September report issued by LADOT. “Even with the [complaint] line closed, LADOT received daily complaints from disgruntled residents requesting vehicles be cited and/or removed,” the report said. California L.A. will be ticketing on street-sweeping...
    (CNN)Following allegations of pay discrimination from the Department of Labor, Princeton University has agreed to pay close to $1 million in back pay to female professors.The Department of Labor's Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs found that between 2012 and 2014, 106 women in full professor positions at Princeton were paid less than their male counterparts. Though the findings were only preliminary, the university and the office reached an early resolution this month, with the school agreeing to pay $925,000 in back pay and at least $250,000 in future salary adjustments. In addition to the money, the university has also agreed to conduct statistical analyses to determine further significant disparities against female professors, as well as pay equity training for its staff. The Department of Labor began its review of Princeton nearly a decade ago, Ben Chang, a spokesman for the university, said in a statement. After pausing the review...
    LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Los Angeles Rams’ four-game sweep of the NFC East sometimes seemed like the preseason that NFL teams never got this year. The Rams can only beat the teams in front of them, and they’ve done it emphatically so far against what looks like the NFL’s worst division. After completing the demolition with a 30-10 win over Washington on Sunday, the Rams (4-1) are moving on to tougher matchups on their schedule with a strong record and a firm knowledge of what’s working for them. “It’s a lot of confidence,” said quarterback Jared Goff, who passed for 309 yards in the pouring rain and also rushed for a touchdown. “Right off the bat, in five weeks, we’re 4-0 versus one division, and that gives you a little boost of confidence, (but) obviously there’s a long ways to go.” Los Angeles controlled most aspects of its...
    Braves star Ronald Acuña will not miss facing the Marlins The Marlins made a habit of hitting Acuña this season, plunking the rising star with pitches at double the rate of the rest of baseball. Acuña rightfully displayed some frustration around this fact, and even paused to question Sandy Alcantara during Game 1. Alcantara responded with some serious fighting words, but nothing ever came of it. In this case, perhaps it’s a good thing Acuña can take out his frustration on social media. Acuña sent a clear message on Twitter after downing the Marlins. Post-Game 1, Acuña channeled Conor McGregor in his response. After the series sweep, Acuña was far less kind. Enter Dame Dolla. ???????? pic.twitter.com/BCZdj40ygV — Ronald Acuna Jr (@ronaldacunajr24) October 8, 2020 There’s nothing better than waving goodbye to a rivalMarlins-Braves is set up to be the NL East rivalry of the future, with both teams featuring...
    Washington (CNN)The US unilaterally imposed sweeping sanctions on Iran's financial sector in a move that critics say could have unintended consequences, including a detrimental impact on the ability of the Iranian people to access humanitarian resources.Thursday's tranche of sanctions -- coming less than a month before the US presidential election -- are the latest in the Trump administration's "maximum pressure" campaign that they say is aimed at causing Tehran to change its behavior. That campaign -- under which the administration walked away from the Iran nuclear deal -- has left the US largely isolated from key European allies.The approach of the US elections helps push Lebanon and Iraq to the brinkIn a press release, the Treasury Department said it sanctioned 16 banks "for operating in Iran's financial sector," one bank "for being owned or controlled by a sanctioned Iranian bank," and another bank affiliated with the Iranian military.Under the new...
    BRADENTON, Fla. (AP) — Seattle Storm wins second WNBA championship in three seasons, sweeping Las Vegas Aces. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    The Trump administration on Tuesday announced sweeping rule changes to the controversial H-1B guest worker program -- changes that the administration says will protect American wages, crack down on abuse and impact more than a third of the tens of thousands of applications filed each year. “With millions of Americans looking for work, and as the economy continues its recovery, immediate action is needed to guard against the risk lower cost foreign labor can pose to the wellbeing of U.S. workers,” Deputy Secretary of Labor Patrick Pizzella said in a call with reporters. TRUMP SIGNS ORDER EXPANDING IMMIGRATION RESTRICTIONS TO INCLUDE H-1B, OTHER GUEST-WORKER PROGRAMS  The H-1B visa, for high-skilled workers, has been dogged by accusations of abuse and fraud for years, with critics saying it has been used by tech companies in particular to replace American middle-class workers with cheaper foreign labor and to keep wages low in general. Those in favor of the program say it...
    Apparently Shawn Mendes has been all up in his head during his quarantine. The “In My Blood” singer-songwriter, 22, is lost in a sea of thoughts on his new single “Wonder,” which dropped on Friday. As the sweeping ballad begins, Mendes muses, “I wonder, if I’m being real / Do I speak my truth or do I filter how feel? / I wonder, wouldn’t it be nice / To live inside a world that isn’t black and white?” Later, as rumbling drums add to the dramatic atmosphere, he delves deeper into self-examination: “I wonder, why I’m so afraid / Of saying something wrong and never said I was a saint / I wonder, when I cry into my hands / I’m conditioned to feel like it makes me less of a man.” His reflections, though, ultimately turn romantic: “I wonder what it’s like to be loved by you.” The lyric...
    Head of the EPA Andrew Wheeler sent a letter to Gov. Gavin Newsom, D-Calif., earlier this week, criticizing his executive order banning the sale of new gas-powered vehicles by 2035, asking how the state can attempt such an endeavor when it "can't even keep the lights on." "Your state is already struggling to maintain reliable electricity for today's demands," part of the letter read. "California's record of rolling blackouts – unprecedented in size and scope – coupled with recent requests to neighboring states for power begs the question of how you expect to run an electric car fleet that will come with significant increases in electricity demand when you can't even keep the lights on." Newsom's order, signed last Monday, aims to ban the sale of new internal combustion engine cars and directs the California Air Resources Board to develop a phase-out plan that would require 100 percent zero-emissions personal use and drayage vehicles by 2035....
    Carlos Correa was feeling confident after driving in the tie-breaking run that helped the Houston Astros advance past the Minnesota Twins in Wednesday’s American League Wild Card series game, and he took it as an opportunity to address the haters. Correa’s seventh-inning hit sealed the Twins’ fate, marking their 18th straight postseason loss after getting swept by the Astros, but for the 26-year-old shortstop, Wednesday’s win meant something bigger for his embattled franchise. PAIR ARRESTED AT PROGRESSIVE FIELD FOR TRESPASSING DURING INNDIANS-YANKEES POSTSEASON “I know a lot of people are mad. I know a lot of people don’t want to see us here,” Correa said in a postgame press conference. "But what are they going to say now?” He was referencing the sign-stealing scandal in which Major League Baseball concluded in January that the team had recorded opposing teams’ signs during games throughout 2017 and part of the 2018 season. The...
    The Los Angeles City Council moved Wednesday to resume enforcement of street parking violations following a department report that cited complaints about trash piling up on roadways and a drop in city revenue. City officials halted enforcement amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic that cost many Angelenos their jobs and forced others to work from home, ultimately creating more competition for parking spots in some neighborhoods. Now, traffic officers will return to handing out $73 street sweeping enforcement tickets beginning Oct. 15. Enforcement of rules pertaining to abandoned and oversize vehicles, overnight restrictions, peak-hour and anti-gridlock zones, and expired registrations also will resume on that date. The impounding of vehicles that serve as dwellings will be delayed while the city comes up with a “next step” plan, under an amendment submitted Wednesday by City Councilman Joe Buscaino. Enforcement of expired preferential parking district permits will also start Oct. 15. Parking...
    Hurricane Sandy Fast Facts Meet the K-shaped recession, where professional workers are largely fine and everyone else is doing awful Barclays Promotes Risk Head in Sweeping Changes to Leadership (Bloomberg) -- Barclays Plc has promoted C.S. Venkatakrishnan to global head of markets in a sweeping overhaul of its senior ranks. © Bloomberg The Barclays Plc office headquarters office building stands in the Canary Wharf business, financial and shopping district of London, U.K., on Friday, Sept. 18, 2020. After a pause during lockdown, lenders from Citigroup Inc. to HSBC Holdings Plc have restarted cuts, taking gross losses announced this year to a combined 63,785 jobs, according to a Bloomberg analysis of filings. Venkatakrishnan, currently chief risk officer, will also serve as co-president of Barclays Bank Plc, a unit that includes the investment bank. Paul Compton will become co-president of this business, as well as global head of banking, according to...
    SAN ANTONIO – Twenty U.S. veterans are dying by suicide every day, and the VA reports that approximately 14 of those 20 are typically not under their care. Statistics like these prompted a bipartisan group of U.S. senators to draft a bill that would bring sweeping changes to the Department of Veteran Affairs' mental health services. Senate Bill 785, also known as the Commander John Scott Hannon Veterans Mental Health Care Improvement Act, has now passed the Senate and House and is headed to President Donald Trump’s desk for approval. The bill does the following: establishes increased accountability over the department’s mental health and suicide prevention programs; expands VA tele-health capabilities to better serve rural veterans; bolsters and expedites federal research capabilities; directs the VA to embark on a precision medicine initiative that will improve how mental health conditions are diagnosed and treated; makes necessary improvements to the VA...
    Tesla founder Elon Musk refused to walk back comments he made in May downplaying the dangers of the coronavirus. Speaking on the New York Times opinion podcast Sway, Musk told host Kara Swisher that he and his family would not be taking a coronavirus vaccine because he doesn't believe the virus poses a serious enough risk to their health. “I’m not at risk, neither are my kids,” Musk said. Musk said sweeping restrictions on movement and business enacted due to the coronavirus had “diminished" his "faith in humanity." The entrepreneur said that instead of sweeping lockdowns, governments should focus on isolating those most at risk while allowing the rest of society to continue with normal life. Musk told Fisher that "anyone who is at risk" should be "quarantined until the storm passes." When Fisher said that some people could be more at risk if Musk's idea became a...
    THE number of coronavirus deaths worldwide passed one million on Monday evening – more than H.I.V., malaria, influenza, cholera and measles combined during the same 10-month period. Having initially begun by striking residents in Wuhan, China, COVID-19 may eventually overtake tuberculosis and hepatitis as the world's deadliest infectious disease. 1 The number of coronavirus deaths worldwide reached one million on Monday evening [stock image]Credit: AP:Associated Press The crisis has devastated the global economy over the past 10 months, testing world leaders and pitting science against politics. Monday's milestone was reported by Johns Hopkins University and relates to a population the size f Jerusalem or Austin, Texas. Due to inconsistent reporting, testing – and even suspected concealment by some countries – the true death toll form the virus is expected to be even higher. More to follow... For the latest news on this story keep checking back at Sun Online. The...
    By JIM SALTER, Associated Press O'FALLON, Mo. (AP) — A federal appeals court panel is weighing the fate of a sweeping Missouri abortion law, including a provision that prohibits a woman from having an abortion because the fetus has Down syndrome. A three-judge panel of the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in St. Louis heard arguments Thursday in the legal battle over the 2019 measure that bans abortions at or after eight weeks of pregnancy. The appeals court ruling isn’t expected for several weeks. Reproductive Health Services of Planned Parenthood, operator of Missouri's lone abortion clinic, and the American Civil Liberties Union sued. A federal judge blocked the law while the legal challenge plays out, prompting the state’s appeal to the 8th Circuit. U.S. District Judge Howard Sachs said at the time of his ruling last year that Planned Parenthood and the ACLU would likely succeed in their lawsuit...
    O’FALLON, Mo. (AP) — A federal appeals court panel is weighing the fate of a sweeping Missouri abortion law, including a provision that prohibits a woman from having an abortion because the fetus has Down syndrome. A three-judge panel of the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in St. Louis heard arguments Thursday in the legal battle over the 2019 measure that bans abortions at or after eight weeks of pregnancy. The appeals court ruling isn’t expected for several weeks. Reproductive Health Services of Planned Parenthood, operator of Missouri’s lone abortion clinic, and the American Civil Liberties Union sued. A federal judge blocked the law while the legal challenge plays out, prompting the state’s appeal to the 8th Circuit. U.S. District Judge Howard Sachs said at the time of his ruling last year that Planned Parenthood and the ACLU would likely succeed in their lawsuit alleging that the law is...
    The House on Thursday passed a broad bill that aims to boost energy efficiency and renewable energy sources as part of an attempt to combat climate change.  The chamber approved the 900-page Clean Energy and Jobs Innovation Act in a 220-185 vote.  The legislation would create research and development programs for solar, wind, advanced geothermal energy and hydroelectric power as well as lessening pollution from fossil fuel production.  It would also establish more rigorous building codes and bolster energy efficiency requirements and weatherization programs.  The bill moved rapidly through the House. It was first introduced last week and did not go through any legislative hearings. A similar energy innovation package that was introduced in the Senate earlier this year has recently been reenergized after legislators came to an agreement on an amendment seeking to phase down the use of a type of greenhouse gas.  A senior House Democratic aide told...
    A comprehensive executive branch reform bill introduced by House Democrats Wednesday would strengthen Congress' ability to check executive power in the future. The most sweeping set of reforms since Watergate comes at a time that Donald Trump is, quite literally, threatening to abandon the Constitution to retain power. So, yeah, these reforms are needed. If not three years too late. Writing about the package in an op-ed in the Los Angeles Times, Rep. Adam Schiff, chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, says that when Trump was inaugurated in 2017: "I was confident that our Constitution and democratic institutions, which had survived the Civil War, terrorist attacks, economic crises and more, could withstand an unscrupulous president." That changed, he continued. "What I did not foresee was the awful degree to which the party of the president would surrender its institutional responsibilities in order to protect its hold on power—and the...
    NANCY Pelosi and top Democrats have launched a sweeping bid to "rein in abusive presidents" and said Donald Trump "left them no choice." The legislation, that was revealed on Wednesday, will hope to curb abuses of presidential pardons, prevent presidents from profiting from office and secure administrative compliance with congressional subpoenas, according to the Hill. ⚠️ Follow our US election 2020 live blog for the latest news & updates 2Pelosi announced the legislation on WednesdayCredit: Reuters However, despite Trump's behavior allegedly influencing the legislation, the law will not come into play while the president is still serving his term in the White House. "During this once-in-a-generation moment, the Congress has a sacred obligation for the people to defend the rule of law and restore accountability and basic ethics to the government. And that is exactly what we're doing [with this package]," the House Speaker said. "It is sad that...
    By MARY CLARE JALONICK and MATTHEW DALY, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats are proposing a sweeping bill to curb presidential abuses, a pitch to voters weeks ahead of Election Day as they try to defeat President Donald Trump, capture the Senate from Republicans and keep their House majority. The legislation, a wide-ranging package of new and revised bills, will be announced Wednesday morning by the heads of seven House committees. It would, among other measures, limit the president’s pardon power, strengthen laws to ban presidents from receiving gifts or payments from foreign governments, better protect independent agency watchdogs and whistleblowers from firing or retribution and require better reporting by campaigns of foreign election interference. Each of the bill’s provisions is a response to actions by Trump or his administration that Democrats saw as abuses of presidential power. It builds on an elections and ethics reform package from House...
    WASHINGTON – House Democrats are proposing a sweeping bill to curb presidential abuses, a pitch to voters weeks ahead of Election Day as they try to defeat President Donald Trump, capture the Senate from Republicans and keep their House majority. The legislation, a wide-ranging package of new and revised bills, will be announced Wednesday morning by the heads of seven House committees. It would, among other measures, limit the president’s pardon power, strengthen laws to ban presidents from receiving gifts or payments from foreign governments, better protect independent agency watchdogs and whistleblowers from firing or retribution and require better reporting by campaigns of foreign election interference. Each of the bill’s provisions is a response to actions by Trump or his administration that Democrats saw as abuses of presidential power. It builds on an elections and ethics reform package from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that the House passed soon...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — House passes government-wide temporary funding bill in sweeping bipartisan vote, averting shutdown threat. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    The United States is imposing sweeping new sanctions on Iran to curb Tehran's nuclear, missile, and conventional arms threats after Washington asserted the United Nations arms embargo on Iran was reimposed indefinitely late Saturday. White House National Secretary Adviser Robert O'Brien said Monday that U.S. President Donald Trump's administration is imposing new sanctions and export control measures on 27 entities and individuals connected to Iran's nuclear weapons program. A White House executive order lays out plans to block the property of individuals involved in transferring arms materials and military equipment to and from Iran. The State Department and Treasury Department also outline how foreign individuals and businesses will be penalized for violations. Iran's Defense Industries Organization (DIO) and its director, Mehrdad Akhlaghi-Ketabchi, and Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro are among those being sanctioned. "For nearly two years, corrupt officials in Tehran have worked with the illegitimate regime in Venezuela to flout...
    The White House on Monday issued a threat to veto the sweeping clean energy legislation House Democratic leadership has teed up for a vote this week. The House bill would “undermine the Administration’s deregulatory agenda and empower the government to select favored solutions while reinstating big-government policies and programs,” the White House said in a statement of administration policy. The White House also slammed the House bill as increasing government spending, overlooking needed changes to environmental permitting, and creating a green bank that would fund “projects similar to well known failures like Solyndra.” Solar panel manufacturer Solyndra went bankrupt after receiving hundreds of millions in federal loans during the Obama administration. The House bill, known as the Clean Economy Jobs and Innovation Act, is a compilation of dozens of smaller clean energy-related bills, many of them bipartisan. Nonetheless, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Majority Leader Steny Hoyer framed the legislation...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — The federal government released broad plans Wednesday aimed at distributing free COVID-19 vaccines within a day after an emergency use authorization or full approval is granted. That could happen by November but is more likely in January. Local health departments received the new federal guidance Wednesday morning. The documents give local health departments 30 days to submit plans for receiving and distributing a COVID-19 vaccine. So by Oct. 16, the feds want all the logistics in place. There’s now a detailed playbook for Operation Warp Speed to quickly distribute a free COVID-19 vaccine as soon as one is cleared within 24 hours. Federal health agencies and the Defense Department delivered the sweeping plans to Congress Wednesday. That includes instructions for local agencies to have their distribution plans ready by mid-October. “I’m glad to see that there is a plan being released. It’s in line with a lot...
    WASHINGTON -- The government outlined a sweeping plan Wednesday to make vaccines for COVID-19 available for free to all Americans when proven safe and effective, though a top public health official made clear that widespread vaccination of millions of Americans couldn't come until well into next year.In a report to Congress and an accompanying "playbook" for states and localities, federal health agencies and the Defense Department sketched out complex plans for a vaccination campaign to begin gradually in January or even late this year, eventually ramping up to reach any American who wants a shot.President Donald Trump asserted Tuesday that a vaccine could be three to four weeks away. But the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told Congress Wednesday that it would take six to nine months after any shot's approval to distribute it nationally.EMBED More News Videos Learn more about coronavirus symptoms and other helpful...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — The federal government released broad plans today aimed at distributing free COVID-19 vaccines within a day after an emergency use authorization or full approval is granted. That could happen by November but is more likely in January. Local health departments received the new federal guidance Wednesday morning. The documents give local health departments 30 days to submit plans for receiving and distributing a COVID-19 vaccine. So by Oct. 16, the feds want all the logistics in place. There’s now a detailed playbook for Operation Warp Speed to quickly distribute a free COVID-19 vaccine as soon as one is cleared within 24 hours. Federal health agencies and the Defense Department delivered the sweeping plans to Congress Wednesday. That includes instructions for local agencies to have their distribution plans ready by mid-October. “I’m glad to see that there is a plan being released. It’s in line with a lot...
    WASHINGTON -- The government outlined a sweeping plan Wednesday to make vaccines for COVID-19 available for free to all Americans, assuming a safe and effective shot is developed, even as top health officials faced questions about political interference with virus information reaching the public.In a report to Congress and an accompanying "playbook" for states and localities, federal health agencies and the Defense Department sketched out complex plans for a vaccination campaign to begin gradually in January or even late this year, eventually ramping up to reach any American who wants a shot. The Pentagon would be involved with the distribution of vaccines, but civilian health workers would be the ones giving shots.The whole enterprise faces remaining skepticism. Only about half of Americans said they'd get vaccinated in an Associated Press-NORC poll taken in May. Since then, questions have only mounted about whether the government is trying to rush treatments and...
    WASHINGTON -- The government outlined a sweeping plan Wednesday to make vaccines for COVID-19 available for free to all Americans, assuming a safe and effective shot is developed, even as top health officials faced questions about political interference with virus information reaching the public.In a report to Congress and an accompanying "playbook" for states and localities, federal health agencies and the Defense Department sketched out complex plans for a vaccination campaign to begin gradually in January or even late this year, eventually ramping up to reach any American who wants a shot. The Pentagon would be involved with the distribution of vaccines, but civilian health workers would be the ones giving shots.The whole enterprise faces remaining skepticism. Only about half of Americans said they'd get vaccinated in an Associated Press-NORC poll taken in May. Since then, questions have only mounted about whether the government is trying to rush treatments and...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Philadelphia public health officials are working to prepare for a COVID-19 vaccine plan after the federal government outlined a sweeping plan Wednesday to make those vaccines available for free to all Americans, assuming a safe and effective shot is established and widely accepted though polls show skepticism remains across America. In a report to Congress and an accompanying “playbook” for states and localities, federal health agencies and the Defense Department sketched out complex plans for a vaccination campaign to begin gradually in January or even later this year, eventually ramping up to reach any American who wants a shot. Matt Rankin, spokesperson for the Philadelphia Department of Public Health, said the department received the federal guidance on Wednesday morning and a plan is due in 30 days on October 16. The Pentagon is involved with the distribution of vaccines, but civilian health workers would be the ones...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal government outlined a sweeping plan Wednesday to make vaccines for COVID-19 available for free to all Americans, assuming a safe and effective shot is established and widely accepted though polls show skepticism remains across America. In a report to Congress and an accompanying “playbook” for states and localities, federal health agencies and the Defense Department sketched out complex plans for a vaccination campaign to begin gradually in January or even later this year, eventually ramping up to reach any American who wants a shot. The Pentagon is involved with the distribution of vaccines, but civilian health workers would be the ones giving shots. The campaign is “much larger in scope and complexity than seasonal influenza or other previous outbreak-related vaccination responses,” says the playbook for states from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Although President Donald Trump asserted Tuesday in an ABC News town hall that a vaccine...
    Loading the player... WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal government outlined a sweeping plan Wednesday to make vaccines for COVID-19 available for free to all Americans, even as polls show a strong undercurrent of skepticism rippling across the land. In a report to Congress and an accompanying “playbook” for states and localities, federal health agencies and the Defense Department sketched out complex plans for a vaccination campaign to begin gradually in January or possibly later this year, eventually ramping up to reach any American who wants a shot. The Pentagon is involved with the distribution of vaccines, but civilian health workers will be the ones giving shots. Read More: LSU football coach on COVID-19: ‘Most of our players have caught it’ The campaign is “much larger in scope and complexity than seasonal influenza or other previous outbreak-related vaccination responses,” said the playbook for states from the Centers for Disease Control...
    By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal government outlined a sweeping plan Wednesday to make vaccines for COVID-19 available for free to all Americans, even as polls show a strong undercurrent of skepticism rippling across the land. In a report to Congress and an accompanying “playbook” for states and localities, federal health agencies and the Defense Department sketched out complex plans for a vaccination campaign to begin gradually in January or possibly later this year, eventually ramping up to reach any American who wants a shot. The Pentagon is involved with the distribution of vaccines, but civilian health workers will be the ones giving shots. The campaign is “much larger in scope and complexity than seasonal influenza or other previous outbreak-related vaccination responses,” said the playbook for states from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among the highlights: — For most vaccines, people will need two...
    WASHINGTON – The federal government outlined a sweeping plan Wednesday to make vaccines for COVID-19 available for free to all Americans, even as polls show a strong undercurrent of skepticism rippling across the land. In a report to Congress and an accompanying “playbook” for states and localities, federal health agencies and the Defense Department sketched out complex plans for a vaccination campaign to begin gradually in January or possibly later this year, eventually ramping up to reach any American who wants a shot. The Pentagon is involved with the distribution of vaccines, but civilian health workers will be the ones giving shots. The campaign is “much larger in scope and complexity than seasonal influenza or other previous outbreak-related vaccination responses,” said the playbook for states from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among the highlights: — For most vaccines, people will need two doses, 21 to 28 days apart....