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Trump impeachment trial:

    House impeachment manager Del. Stacey Plaskett (D-VI) defended the Democrats’ decision to cave on calling more witnesses at the Senate impeachment trial, declaring that what they really needed was “more senators with spines.” During a chaotic final day of former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial, Democrats won a vote to call additional witnesses after lead manager Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD) motioned for additional testimony. In the end, both sides agreed to merely enter GOP Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler’s statement that Trump told House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) during the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection that the mob was “more upset” about the election than McCarthy was. With Trump securing his second impeachment acquittal later that day, despite a surprising seven Republican senators joining Democrats in voting to convict, the House Democrats have taken heat for backing down over additional witnesses and testimony. During his interview with Plaskett on CNN’s...
    Sen. Chris CoonsChris Andrew CoonsSunday shows preview: Lawmakers weigh in on Trump impeachment trial; Biden administration eyes timeline for mass vaccinations Democrats blast Trump team videos: 'False equivalency'  LIVE COVERAGE: Trial ends for day as Senate moves to vote MORE (D-Del.) on Sunday blamed Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump conviction vote exposes GOP divide Pelosi rules out censure after Trump acquittal Raskin defends no witnesses deal: 'I made the call' MORE (R-Ky.) for former President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden on Trump acquittal: 'Substance of the charge is not in dispute' North Carolina GOP condemns Burr for impeachment vote against Trump Toomey on Trump vote: 'His betrayal of the Constitution' required conviction MORE’s acquittal in his second Senate impeachment trial. Appearing on ABC’s “This Week,” Coons echoed the assessment of Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinPelosi rules out censure after Trump acquittal Raskin defends no witnesses deal: 'I made the call' Liberals...
    Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharSunday shows preview: Lawmakers weigh in on Trump impeachment trial; Biden administration eyes timeline for mass vaccinations Portman, Whitehouse say COVID-19 is complicating opioid addiction fight Sanders confronts Tanden over past 'vicious attacks' MORE (D-Minn.) on Sunday expressed confidence that former President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden on Trump acquittal: 'Substance of the charge is not in dispute' North Carolina GOP condemns Burr for impeachment vote against Trump Toomey on Trump vote: 'His betrayal of the Constitution' required conviction MORE’s second impeachment trial would confer the judgment of history on him, despite his acquittal. “It’s not what we accomplished… it’s what our republic accomplished,” Klobuchar said of the trial on “Fox News Sunday.” “We’ve got to make sure that this doesn’t happen again. What this was about to me was about not hiding history.” Klobuchar added that the documentation cited by House impeachment managers would be “seared into” Americans’ memories...
    President Joe Biden confronted the acquittal of former President Donald Trump on Saturday by declaring that although Republican senators in the main did not vote against Trump, the “substance of the charge” that spawned the impeachment trial to his mind was “not in dispute.” As Breitbart news reported,  the Senate failed to clear the 67-vote barrier necessary to convict Trump of the charge he incited an insurrection on January 6, when Congress was certifying the 2020 presidential election. Seven Senate Republicans voted to convict Trump of inciting an insurrection, including Sens. Bill Cassidy (R-LA), Richard Burr (R-NC), Susan Collins (R-ME), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Mitt Romney (R-UT), Pat Toomey (R-PA), Ben Sasse (R-NE). Biden, who was at the Camp David presidential retreat when the decision came down, pointed to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConell (R-Ky.) who did not vote to convict Trump, as part of his statement in response. “While the final vote did...
    A Democratic senator who along with his colleagues served as jurors for former President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden on Trump acquittal: 'Substance of the charge is not in dispute' North Carolina GOP condemns Burr for impeachment vote against Trump Toomey on Trump vote: 'His betrayal of the Constitution' required conviction MORE's second impeachment trial defended the decision by House impeachment managers not to call witnesses even after the upper chamber voted in favor of doing so. Speaking on CNN's "State of the Union" on Sunday, Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphySenate looks to avoid dragged-out Trump impeachment battle Senate eyes speedy Trump impeachment trial Lawmakers lay blame on Trump over riot as second impeachment trial looms MORE (D-Conn.) asserted that Democratic managers had achieved their goal of drawing national attention to a statement released by Rep. Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerHouse GOP lawmaker unexpectedly shakes up Senate trial Raskin defends no witnesses deal: 'I made...
    Washington (CNN)Del. Stacey Plaskett on Sunday defended the Democratic House managers' decision not to call witnesses in former President Donald Trump's Senate impeachment trial, saying a day after Trump's acquittal that they "needed more senators with spines" in order to convict him."I know that people are feeling a lot of angst and believe that maybe if we had (a witness) the senators would have done what we wanted, but, listen, we didn't need more witnesses, we needed more senators with spines," Plaskett, who represents the US Virgin Islands' at-large congressional district and served as one of nine impeachment managers, told CNN's Jake Tapper on "State of the Union." The Senate on Saturday acquitted Trump of the impeachment charge of inciting a deadly riot at the US Capitol on January 6 in a vote that included seven Republicans siding with the chamber's Democrats to say the former President was guilty. Trump's...
    One of the Democratic House impeachment managers charged with prosecuting former President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden on Trump acquittal: 'Substance of the charge is not in dispute' North Carolina GOP condemns Burr for impeachment vote against Trump Toomey on Trump vote: 'His betrayal of the Constitution' required conviction MORE in his second impeachment trial defended her party's decision not to call witnesses in the Senate proceedings, saying on Sunday the managers had proved their case. Del. Stacey PlaskettStacey PlaskettPlaskett quips male lawmakers 'would not have their wives in one attempt talking to her' during impeachment trial Stacey Plaskett becomes first non-voting delegate in history to serve as impeachment manager The Memo: New riot footage stuns Trump trial MORE (D-V.I.) said on CNN's "State of the Union" that she believed she and her colleagues had convinced the majority of GOP senators of Trump's guilt in inciting the deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, pointing...
    CNN’s Jake Tapper grilled Congresswoman Stacey Plaskett (VI) over the decision by her fellow Democrats to abandon their push for witnesses at Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial before his acquittal. Plaskett was one of the House impeachment managers during the trial, and she joined Tapper on State of the Union after the CNN anchor noted that Senate Democrats dropped their plan to call witnesses in connection to the recent bombshell from Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (R-WA). As Plaskett defended the merits of the case against Trump despite failing to convict, Tapper asked her “why did you back down” instead of getting Beutler to testify on Trump’s call with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy. “I think we didn’t back down,” Plaskett answered. “I think what we did was we got what we wanted, which was her statement, which was what she said, and had it put into the record, and being...
    And so the verdict is ... Hallelujah. It’s over.  The acquittal of former President Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial is a fitting outcome to a case that should not have happened. Never before has a former president been impeached and put on trial, and it should never happen again.  DONNA BRAZILE: THE TRUMP IMPEACHMENT TRIAL AND OUR DUTY TO HISTORY This was a show trial, an attempt by Democrats to humiliate Trump after his election defeat and force Republicans to side with him or against him. While the president’s speech before the Capitol riot was at times too angry and bitter, there was nothing in it that could reasonably be seen as intending to incite an insurrection, as the single House article charged. More from Opinion Gregg Jarrett: Trump impeachment trial — defense skillfully destroys Dems' case against former president Justin Haskins: Biden's Made in America order – here's what part of America...
    Hollywood stars reacted harshly Saturday to former President Donald Trump's acquittal in his historic second impeachment trial.  The Senate's 57-43 vote in favor of conviction for incitement of insurrection in the Jan. 6 storming of the U.S. Capitol fell short of the supermajority needed.  A number of celebrities took to Twitter afterward to express their outrage.  CELEBRITIES REACT TO DONALD TRUMP'S SENATE IMPEACHMENT TRIAL Donald Trump's second impeachment trial has ended. (Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.) "Imagine if your boss sent a mob of ppl to your workplace to kill you, who beat up 140 cops & 5 people died. And when you had the chance to hold him accountable you were too scared. Repubs can't stand up for the American people because they can't even stand up for *themselves,*" wrote Padma Lakshmi. "43 traitors walk into a bar ..." a curt Don Cheadle wrote. "Morally bankrupt...
    SEVEN Republican Senators voted with the Democrats to impeach Donald Trump for inciting insurrection. Their backing was not enough to find the former President guilty and the historic second attempt at impeaching him fell short. 8Donald Trump was acquitted for a second timeCredit: AFP - Getty Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania voted to convict the 45th president. The seven GOP senators joined 48 Democrats and two senators who are independents in voting to impeach Trump, who was accused of inciting supporters to lay siege to the Capitol. Most of them aren't up for re-election soon with Murkowski is the only one of the group facing voters in 2022. Burr and Toomey aren't running for another term. Romney is the only one to vote to convict the...
    Congressman Jamie Raskin, the lead House impeachment manager, defended the Donald Trump impeachment trial as a “dramatic success in historical terms” a day after the former president’s acquittal. On Meet the Press, Chuck Todd noted that while seven Republicans voted to convict and even Mitch McConnell excoriated the former president, he and the majority of other Republicans voted to acquit Trump. Only 57 senators voted to convict Trump, not enough for the two-thirds vote required. “So do you feel like this was a success?” Todd asked. “Or do you feel like because you failed to convict that you can’t look at it any other way than a failure?” Raskin said it was a “dramatic success in historical terms” and noted how it was “the largest impeachment conviction vote in U.S. history, by far the most bipartisan majority that’s ever assembled in the Senate to convict.” “Unfortunately it didn’t reach the...
    Accompanied by police, House impeachment manager Del. Stacey Plaskett (D-VI) walks to the Senate Chamber on the second day of former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial at the U.S. Capitol on February 10, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) She stood tall. She stood firm. She wore fashion fit for a couturier corporate board runway, and when she spoke she did so with authority, confidence and the weight of her sister forebears on her shoulders. Virgin Islands Delegate Stacey Plaskett made history this past week by being the first U.S. delegate to ever serve as an impeachment manager. And serve she did. With all of the bluster of former President Donald Trump’s counsel, and all of the deceptions. Read More: Stacey Plaskett slams Trump’s impeachment defense: ‘Black women are sick and tired’ Del. Stacey Plaskett (D-VI) answers questions at a press conference after the...
    The Democratically controlled Senate just spent thousands of collective hours conducting an impeachment trial against a president who is no longer president. The president’s acquittal on Saturday was predetermined, as in the first impeachment effort a year ago — and known to be so to the Democratic prosecutors. The constitutionally mandated presiding judge — the chief justice of the Supreme Court — refused to show up.  Chief Justice John Roberts apparently believes an impeachment trial of a private citizen is either a waste of time or unconstitutional — or both. JOHN CRIBB: IS PRESIDENT'S DAY NEXT ON CANCEL CULTURE'S HITLIST? The Democratically-controlled House of Representatives is busy ferreting out purportedly extremist Republican House members. For the first time in memory, one party now removes committee members of the other. Yet for each Republican outlier, there is a corresponding Democratic firebrand member who has either called for violence or voiced anti-Semitic slurs...
    DONALD Trump has promised a comeback after the second attempt to impeach him failed. The former President is now free to run for office again after the Democrats were unable to muster enough votes in the Senate. 3Donald Trump said he looked forward to an 'incredible journey'Credit: AP:Associated Press The trial ended on Saturday as Democrats failed to get the two-thirds majority to find him guilty - leading him to blast impeachment as the "greatest witch hunt in history” in a statement. During this trial, the Democratic impeachment managers leading the prosecution against Trump cited preventing him running again in making their case for conviction. But in the aftermath, the former President promised MAGA fans he would be back. "Our historic, patriotic and beautiful movement to Make America Great Again has only just begun,” he said. “In the months ahead I have much to share with you, and I look...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell excoriated former President Trump Saturday in a speech on the Senate floor shortly after McConnell voted to acquit in the former president's second impeachment trial. In a speech with a first half reminiscent of the arguments made by House impeachment managers, McConnell said the former president was "practically and morally responsible" for the attack on the Capitol on January 6.  But McConnell argued that he believed it was unconstitutional to convict a president who was no longer in office. "This was an intensifying crescendo of conspiracy theories orchestrated by an outgoing president who seemed determined to either overturn the voters' decision or else torch our institutions on the way out," McConnell said.  McConnell was unequivocal about Mr. Trump's responsibility. "There is no question, none, that President Trump is practically and morally responsible for provoking the events of the day," he said, and added that...
    Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., attends a campaign event at the Herbert W. Best VFW Post 928 in Folsom, Pa., September 23, 2016. John McCain, R-Ariz., also attend in support of Toomey.Tom Williams | CQ Roll Call | Getty Images WASHINGTON – Seven Republican senators alongside all Democrats found former President Donald Trump guilty on Saturday for inciting the riot at the U.S. Capitol, though the bipartisan vote wasn't enough to reach the two-thirds majority required to convict. In Trump's second impeachment trial, Republican Sens. Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania voted to convict the 45th president. The seven GOP senators joined 48 Democrats and two senators who are independents. The Senate acquitted Trump in a 57-43 vote on the charge of inciting insurrection for his...
    By Jeff Mason and Richard Cowan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Former President Donald Trump's acquittal on charges of inciting a deadly attack on the U.S Capitol left Democrats and Republicans deeply divided on Sunday even as Washington seeks to move on with Democratic President Joe Biden's political agenda. The Senate trial concluded on Saturday with a 57-43 vote in favor of convicting the Republican former president, falling short of the two-thirds majority needed to do so. Seven Republicans joined the Senate's 48 Democrats and two independents in favor of conviction. The trial has left lawmakers and the country they represent in a continued state of political discord. The Capitol building and the White House both remain barricaded from the public. Biden appealed for unity to "heal this uncivil war and heal the very soul of our nation," saying each American had a duty and a responsibility to defend the truth. "This...
    THE impeachment trial of Donald Trump means Congress is now free to begin focusing on delivering Joe Biden’s stimulus package. The House and Senate are both on breaks this week meaning the final process could still take longer than expected as lawmakers mull over the $1.9 billion worth of measures. 3Joe Biden has proposed a stimulus package worth $1.9 trillionCredit: Getty Images - Getty 3Those earning below $75,000 will receive the $1400 checksCredit: Getty Images - Getty House impeachment managers’ initial call for witnesses in the Senate trial of the former President threatened to add weeks onto the process. But amid chaotic scenes, they dropped their call leading to the vote that resulted in Trump’s acquittal. The sprawling legislation still has to make its way through Congress before Americans can start receiving their checks. Nancy Pelosi has promised Democrats will try to pass the next coronavirus relief bill before the...
    The Senate has decided to acquit Donald Trump accused of having incited his supporters to invade the Capitol on January 6. Second acquittal The Senate acquitted, last Saturday, Donald trump accused ofincitement to insurgency voted against him by the House of Representatives.On January 6, Trumpists invaded Capitol Hill to challenge the election results, violence that left five people dead. Vote of seven Republican senators against Donald Trump Last Saturday, the Senators by 57 votes to 43 decided to declare the former president innocent three weeks after leaving the White House. > Dismissal of D. Trump: the trial is in accordance with the Constitution, according to the Senate During this second impeachment trial Donald trump, seven Republican senators voted against him against just one in the first trial. “End of a witch hunt” Former Republican President reacted to his acquittal by evoking the “end of a witch hunt”, in...
    "Saturday Night Live" mocked former President Trump's impeachment trial this weekend, calling it the "dumbest trial" ever just hours after senators voted to acquit him Saturday.  "The jurors who were deciding the case were the ones attacked by the defendant. The trial took place at the scene of the crime. Then, right after the trial ended, one of the jurors who voted to acquit Trump ran out and said, ‘Someone’s got to prosecute this guy, he did it, this man belongs in jail!'" Colin Jost, co-host of the show's Weekend Update fake news segment, joked. Jost was referring to Senate GOP Leader Mitch McConnell who voted to acquit Trump because he said it would be unconstitutional to convict an ex-president but claimed: "He didn't get away with anything yet." "President Trump is still liable for everything he did while in office," McConnell said after the vote to acquit Trump on charges he incited the Jan. 6 riot at the...
    United States President Democrat Joe Biden has spoken about the acquittal of his Republican predecessor Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial. LPresident Joe Biden said on Saturday that despite Donald Trump’s acquittal at his impeachment trial, “the merits of the charge” were “not in dispute,” and that the Jan.6 attack on Capitol Hill showed that democracy was “fragile”. “We must always remain vigilant” “Even if the final vote did not result in a conviction, the merits of the accusation are not disputed,” said the Democrat after the acquittal voted by the US Senate during the second impeachment trial of his predecessor republican. “This sad chapter in our history reminded us that democracy is fragile. That it must always be defended. That we must always remain vigilant, ”Joe Biden said in a statement. For the second time acquitted. Former US President Donald Trump escaped a guilty...
    President Biden spent Saturday evening playing Mario Kart with his grandchildren after Donald Trump was acquitted of inciting insurrection at his impeachment trial.  The Commander-in-chief, 78, looked to be blowing off steam following the political blow, as he gathered with his family at a games arcade in Washington, DC.  In a clip shared to Instagram Stories by his granddaughter, Naomi, 26, the President can be seen sitting at a Mario Kart Arcade GP console as he competes against another of his family members.  'Secret Service made an exception and let him drive himself!!!' Naomi captioned her short clip.  'A little rusty, but he still won (barely),' she added.  Biden can be seen cutting a casual figure in blue jeans and a baseball cap as he sits behind the wheel of the console.  It appears First Lady Jill Biden is hovering over him, with a blonde woman seen clad...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump was acquitted Saturday of inciting the horrific attack on the U.S. Capitol, concluding a historic impeachment trial that spared him the first-ever conviction of a current or former U.S. president but exposed the fragility of America’s democratic traditions and left a divided nation to come to terms with the violence sparked by his defeated presidency. Barely a month since the deadly Jan. 6 riot that stunned the world, the Senate convened for a rare weekend session to deliver its verdict, voting while armed National Guard troops continued to stand their posts outside the iconic building. The quick trial, the nation’s first of a former president, showed in raw and emotional detail how perilously close the invaders had come to destroying the nation’s deep tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power after Trump had refused to concede the election. Rallying outside the White House, he...
    Former President Trump was acquitted Saturday on charges of inciting an insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 in his second impeachment trial. Fast Facts The 57-43 vote fell short of the super-majority needed to convict Trump praised the acquittal and said he would give Americans a new "vision for a bright, radiant, and limitless" future Seven Republican senators sided with every Democrat and two Independents in voting to convict, but the vast majority of Republicans sided with the former president.  The 57-43 vote fell short of the super-majority needed to convict. Had Trump been convicted, the Senate would have moved to bar the 45th president from holding federal office ever again. After the acquittal, Trump called his impeachment "yet another phase of the greatest witch hunt in the history of our country" and said he would give Americans a new "vision for a bright, radiant, and limitless" future.  Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, who voted to...
    By LISA MASCARO, ERIC TUCKER and MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump was acquitted of inciting the horrific attack on the U.S. Capitol, concluding a historic impeachment trial that spared him the first-ever conviction of a current or former U.S. president but exposed the fragility of America’s democratic traditions and left a divided nation to come to terms with the violence sparked by his defeated presidency. Barely a month since the deadly Jan. 6 riot that stunned the world, the Senate convened for a rare weekend session to deliver its Saturday verdict, voting while armed National Guard troops continued to stand their posts outside the iconic building. The quick trial, the nation’s first of a former president, showed in raw and emotional detail how perilously close the invaders had come to destroying the nation's deep tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power after Trump had...
    By JULIE PACE, AP Washington Bureau Chief WASHINGTON (AP) — Three Republican senators spent an hour talking strategy with lawyers for the accused. The entire Senate served as jurors even though they were also targets of the crime. No witnesses were called. And the outcome was never in doubt. The second impeachment trial of Donald Trump laid bare the deep imperfections in the Constitution’s only process for holding a president accountable, for “high crimes and misdemeanors.” The proceedings packed an emotional punch and served as history's first accounting of the Jan. 6 riots on the U.S. Capitol, but the inherently political process never amounted to a real and unbiased effort to determine how the insurrection unfolded and whether Trump was responsible. The results were ultimately unsurprising: a fast impeachment in the Democratic-led House followed by acquittal in the Senate, where 17 Republicans were needed to convict. Only seven voted guilty,...
    By CALVIN WOODWARD, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump's first impeachment trial centered on a phone call Americans never heard with the leader of a country very far away. The trial went on for two weeks of he-said-she-said. There was a mountain of evidence to pore over but not one drop of blood to see. Trump's second impeachment trial was a steroidal sequel centered on the rage, violence and anguish of one day in Washington. There was nothing foreign or far away about it. There was blood. Together these trials a year apart spoke to one president's singular capacity to get into, and out of, trouble — the story of Trump's life. The only president to be impeached twice has once again evaded consequences, though this time as an election loser shunted off the field of play to the jeering section, at least for now. In a broadside against...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump was acquitted of inciting the horrific attack on the U.S. Capitol, concluding a historic impeachment trial that spared him the first-ever conviction of a current or former U.S. president but exposed the fragility of America’s democratic traditions and left a divided nation to come to terms with the violence sparked by his defeated presidency. Barely a month since the deadly Jan. 6 riot that stunned the world, the Senate convened for a rare weekend session to deliver its Saturday verdict, voting while armed National Guard troops continued to stand their posts outside the iconic building. The quick trial, the nation’s first of a former president, showed in raw and emotional detail how perilously close the invaders had come to destroying the nation’s deep tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power after Trump had refused to concede the election. Rallying outside the White House, he...
    Saturday Night Live’s Weekend Update kicked off with a series of jokes about former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial. “Well, like so many other men living in Florida, Donald Trump has once again escaped from justice,” anchor Colin Jost said, calling it the “dumbest trial ever.” “The jurors who were deciding the case were the ones attacked by the defendant,” said Jost. “The trial took place at the scene of the crime. Then, right after the trial ended, one the jurors who voted to acquit Trump ran out and said, ‘Someone’s got to prosecute this guy, he did it, this man belongs in jail!'” If you’re going to impeach a president, continued Jost, “don’t you think it’s sending a mob to kill the vice president?” Jost said he felt bad for former Vice President Mike Pence. “Forty-three of his work friends were like, come on, Mike, they only tried to hang you. Stop being such a drama queen.” “During Donald Trump’s impeachment house managers showed security footage...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Three Republican senators spent an hour talking strategy with lawyers for the accused. The entire Senate served as jurors even though they were also targets of the crime. No witnesses were called. And the outcome was never in doubt. The second impeachment trial of Donald Trump laid bare the deep imperfections in the Constitution’s only process for holding a president accountable, for “high crimes and misdemeanors.” The proceedings packed an emotional punch and served as history’s first accounting of the Jan. 6 riots on the U.S. Capitol, but the inherently political process never amounted to a real and unbiased effort to determine how the insurrection unfolded and whether Trump was responsible. The results were ultimately unsurprising: a fast impeachment in the Democratic-led House followed by acquittal in the Senate, where 17 Republicans were needed to convict. Only seven voted guilty, an insufficient number but a record...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump’s first impeachment trial centered on a phone call Americans never heard with the leader of a country very far away. The trial went on for two weeks of he-said-she-said. There was a mountain of evidence to pore over but not one drop of blood to see. Trump’s second impeachment trial was a steroidal sequel centered on the rage, violence and anguish of one day in Washington. There was nothing foreign or far away about it. There was blood. Together these trials a year apart spoke to one president’s singular capacity to get into, and out of, trouble — the story of Trump’s life. The only president to be impeached twice has once again evaded consequences, though this time as an election loser shunted off the field of play to the jeering section, at least for now. In a broadside against Trump every bit as brutal...
    Trump acquitted, denounced in historic impeachment trial The Latest: Biden says all Americans must ‘defend the truth’ Trial highlights: Acquittal, anger and a curve ball Trump remains dominant force in GOP following acquittal Dem retreat on witnesses brings messy end to Trump trial Biden White House seeks to turn page on Trump GOP’s McConnell: Trump morally responsible for Jan. 6 attack 7 Republicans vote to convict Trump in impeachment trial Rep. Herrera Beutler in middle of impeachment trial turmoil Which GOP senators are seen as possible votes against Trump? Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    After two weeks of struggling to make fun of politics in the Joe Biden era, Saturday Night Live finally had something to work with this weekend: The second impeachment trial and inevitable acquittal of Donald Trump. The scene opened on Saturday with “human White Claw” Tucker Carlson (played by Alex Moffat) hosting Kate McKinnon’s Lindsey Graham and Aidy Bryant’s Ted Cruz on his Fox News show. “There's a lot to cover tonight including the impeachment,” Carlson said at the top of the cold open sketch. “So in place of my usual monologue, here’s a loose collection of scaremongering non sequiturs. Is AOC hiding in your house right now? I wouldn’t put it past her. Pronouns for dogs? Come on, everybody knows they’re boys. Pixar: Is it making our kids depressed or gay? Pick one!” When Graham joined the show, he said, “Thank you, Tucker, it’s a great day for 30...
    BOSTON (CBS) – Senate Democrats came up short of the 67 votes needed to convict former President Donald Trump for impeachment on Saturday. Now, Massachusetts Sen. Ed Markey says that outcome could have serious repercussions down the line. In a historic vote, the Senate acquitted Trump in inciting the January 6 riots at the Capitol, with only 57 Senators voting “Guilty”. RELATED: Our Family Has Lost Everything: Worcester Court Officer Mourns Loss of 3 Family Members After Deadly House Fire Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell argued it’s unconstitutional to impeach a President who is no longer in office. But Markey now fears the acquittal will empower not only Trump, but his supporters who stormed the Capitol. “It’s a get out of jail free card the Republicans have given him,” Markey said. “And I think we’re now going to reap the whirlwinds from Donald Trump because he will feel there’s no...
    BOSTON (CBS) – Senate Democrats came up short of the 67 votes needed to convict former President Donald Trump for impeachment on Saturday. Now, Massachusetts Sen. Ed Markey says that outcome could have serious repercussions down the line. In a historic vote, the Senate acquitted Trump in inciting the January 6 riots at the Capitol, with only 57 Senators voting “Guilty”. RELATED: Our Family Has Lost Everything: Worcester Court Officer Mourns Loss of 3 Family Members After Deadly House Fire Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell argued it’s unconstitutional to impeach a President who is no longer in office. But Markey now fears the acquittal will empower not only Trump, but his supporters who stormed the Capitol. “It’s a get out of jail free card the Republicans have given him,” Markey said. “And I think we’re now going to reap the whirlwinds from Donald Trump because he will feel there’s no...
    Democrats made a huge mistake Saturday in cutting a last-minute deal not to call witnesses at the impeachment trial of Donald Trump after a handful of Republicans voted to allow them to do so. The country will pay a steep price for that political miscalculation. The failure to conduct a full impeachment trial was an insult to the majority of Americans who wanted to see Donald finally held to account for the damage he has done to the United States. Instead, a second acquittal sets the stage for the resurgence of Donald Trump and his nexus of domestic terrorism and disinformation as his reenergized cult is poised to wreak further damage to law and order in America. Witness testimony and corroboration could have brought to life the emotional documentary evidence that the House managers presented and provided more irrefutable public education about Trump’s violation of our democracy. Moreover, Trump’s team...
    WATCH: Day 5 of Donald Trump’s Senate impeachment hearing WTOP’s coverage of the Capitol riot President Joe Biden weighed in late Saturday night on former President Donald Trump’s acquittal in his second impeachment trial, saying that democracy is “fragile” and “must always be defended.” “This sad chapter in our history has reminded us that democracy is fragile. That it must always be defended. That we must be ever vigilant. That violence and extremism has no place in America. And that each of us has a duty and responsibility as Americans, and especially as leaders, to defend the truth and to defeat the lies,” Biden said in a statement. The Senate acquitted Trump in his second impeachment trial Saturday, voting that the former President was not guilty of inciting the deadly January 6 riot at the US Capitol. The final vote — 57 guilty to 43 not guilty —...
    More from: Michael Goodwin No ‘unity’ in Bidens executive orders: Goodwin With acquittal a foregone conclusion, the real drama is what Trump does next: Goodwin New York Times ties itself in woke knots: Goodwin Take the GOP deal, Mr. Prez: Goodwin Biden brood already cashing in on Joes presidency: Goodwin And so the verdict is . . . Hallelujah. It’s over.  The acquittal of former President Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial is a fitting outcome to a case that should not have happened. Never before has a former president been impeached and put on trial, and it should never happen again.  This was a show trial, an attempt by Democrats to humiliate Trump after his election defeat and force Republicans to side with him or against him. While the president’s speech before the Capitol riot was at times too angry and bitter, there was nothing in it that could...
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    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 11:00 p.m. President Joe Biden is responding to the acquittal of Donald Trump by stating that all Americans, especially the nation’s leaders, have a duty and responsibility “to defend the truth and to defeat the lies.” Biden says that in doing so, “that is how we end this uncivil war and heal the very soul of our nation. That is the task ahead. And it’s a task we must undertake together.” The new president also says “that violence and extremism has no place in America.” The White House issued Biden’s statement late Saturday night, several hours after the Senate failed to muster the two-thirds vote needed to convict Trump of incitement in the attack on the U.S. Capitol. The 57-43 vote included seven members of Trump’s own Republican Party. In looking back on...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- For President Joe Biden's first 100 days in office, Eyewitness News will have a special election edition of "The Countdown" to get you caught up with all of the day's political and campaign news.You can watch it online, on the ABC7NY app or on our Connected TV apps for Fire, Roku, Apple TV and Android TV. Click here to learn more.Saturday, Feb. 13The Senate on Saturday acquitted Donald Trump of inciting the horrific attack on the U.S. Capitol, concluding a historic impeachment trial that exposed the fragility of America's democratic traditions and left a divided nation to come to terms with the violence sparked by his defeated presidency.Friday, Feb. 12Donald Trump's impeachment lawyers accused Democrats of waging a campaign of "hatred" against the former president as they sped through their defense of his actions and fiery words before the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol,...
    (CNN)President Joe Biden weighed in late Saturday night on former President Donald Trump's acquittal in his second impeachment trial, saying that democracy is "fragile" and "must always be defended.""This sad chapter in our history has reminded us that democracy is fragile. That it must always be defended. That we must be ever vigilant. That violence and extremism has no place in America. And that each of us has a duty and responsibility as Americans, and especially as leaders, to defend the truth and to defeat the lies," Biden said in a statement. The Senate acquitted Trump in his second impeachment trial Saturday, voting that the former President was not guilty of inciting the deadly January 6 riot at the US Capitol. The final vote -- 57 guilty to 43 not guilty -- was 10 votes short of the 67 guilty votes needed to convict, with seven Republicans finding him guilty....
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Seven Republicans voted Saturday to convict former President Donald Trump in his Senate trial, easily the largest number of lawmakers to ever vote to find a president of their own party guilty at impeachment proceedings. While lawmakers acquitted Trump of inciting the Jan. 6 Capitol attack, they voted 57-43 to convict him — short of the two-thirds majority needed to find him guilty. Still, with seven Republicans joining all 50 Democrats in voting “guilty,” the Senate issued an unmistakable bipartisan chorus of condemnation of the former president that could have political implications for a GOP conflicted over its future. “If I can’t say what I believe that our president should stand for, then why should I ask Alaskans to stand with me?” Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska told reporters. Besides Murkowski, other Republican senators voting against Trump were Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana,...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS/AP) — Donald Trump was acquitted Saturday of inciting the horrific attack on the U.S. Capitol, concluding a historic impeachment trial that spared him the first-ever conviction of a current or former U.S. president but exposed the fragility of America’s democratic traditions and left a divided nation to come to terms with the violence sparked by his defeated presidency. The vote was 57-43, short of the two-thirds needed for conviction. Seven Republicans, including Sen. Pat Toomey, voted to convict. Here are the statements from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware senators. All found Trump guilty. RELATED: Senate Acquits Donald Trump In Second Impeachment Trial, Sen. Pat Toomey Among 7 Republicans Who Voted Guilty Sen.Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) “President Donald Trump’s defense team made several accurate observations at the impeachment trial. Many elected Democrats did want to impeach President Trump from the moment he won the 2016 election. The mainstream media was...
    Members of the media criticized Senate Democrats for deciding Saturday not to call witnesses in former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial. “It was a surprising twist in an already tumultuous trial, given that Democrats had asked to call witnesses earlier and the Senate passed the measure by a vote of 55 to 45,” Business Insider reported. Writer and member of the board of contributors at USA Today Tom Nichols questioned why Democrats backed down, adding that “maybe Trump deserved another term, just to teach you a lesson”: Democrats, you just got witnesses. Youre going to fold? Honestly, maybe Trump deserved another term, just to teach you a lesson. — Tom Nichols (@RadioFreeTom) February 13, 2021 Crooked Media co-founder Jon Favreau said it was “Not the end of the world, just dumb”: Well, this was just dumb. Congrats Democrats, all people will take away from this is that when...
    Democratic impeachment managers argued they were right not to call any witnesses after a Senate vote permitted them to do so during Saturday's trial, which ended up with former President Donald Trump's acquittal.  'We could have had 500 witnesses and it would have not have overcome the kinds of arguments being made by Mitch McConnell and other Republicans who were hanging their hats on the claim that it was somehow unconstitutional,' head House impeachment manager, Rep. Jamie Raskin, argued at a press conference after the Senate vote.      On Saturday morning, Raskin threw the impeachment trial into chaos when he said that the Democrats now wanted testimony and notes from Republican Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, who had information about a phone call between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, which indicated the now ex-president refused to call off his MAGA mob.  Rep. Jamie Raskin, the House's lead impeachment manager, said...
    More On: impeachment Trump attorney after impeachment win: ‘We’re going to Disney World’ Last-minute delays, missteps dominate Democrats’ impeachment finale Trump thanks senators who cleared him in ‘sad’ impeachment trial, talks of ‘work ahead of us’ Senate votes to acquit Donald Trump in impeachment trial Republicans on Saturday offered wide-ranging reactions to President Trump’s impeachment acquittal. Sen. John Kennedy (R-La.), who was among the 43 Senate Republicans voting to acquit Trump, tweeted, “Impeachment is not supposed to be political sport where one party seeks advantage over the other at the expense of the country. The merits of the Democrats’ case were not even close.” Trump confidante Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) wrote, “For the good of the country I hope this will be the last Senate impeachment where a President is impeached without a lawyer, without witnesses, and a trial record is built on hearsay upon hearsay.” Although he was not...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- The Senate has voted to acquit former President Donald Trump of incitement of insurrection in his second trial for impeachment.Seven Republicans joined all the Democrats in voting that the former President is guilty, however, it was still short of the 2/3 majority needed to convict.RELATED: Trump acquitted in 2nd impeachment trial; 7 Republicans vote to convictHours before the final vote the proceedings took a surprising turn.There was chaos and confusion on day five of Trump's second impeachment trial.House impeachment managers, in an unexpected move, forced a vote on a resolution to call witnesses -- specifically GOP Congresswoman Jaime Herrera Beutler, who voted to impeach Trump.The congresswoman in a statement Friday night said House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy told her that during the deadly riot Trump told McCarthy that the mob was "more upset about the election theft than you are.""Needless to say, this is an additional, critical...
    Former President Donald Trump celebrated his second impeachment acquittal after his Senate trial concluded on Saturday. The former president asserted that Congressional Democrats pursued the ongoing “witch hunt” because nearly 75 million Americans voted for his re-election. “This has been yet another phase of the greatest witch hunt in the history of our Country,” Trump wrote. “No president has ever gone through anything like it.” The Senate vote failed 57-43, ending the trial to impeach the former president. The vote failed to meet the two-thirds majority threshold needed to impeach Trump, but seven Republicans joined Democrats in finding the former president guilty. The failed impeachment attempt means that Trump can theoretically run again for president, something Democrats and some establishment Republicans were eager to prevent Trump signaled a future in politics but not necessarily through elected office. “Our historic, patriotic and beautiful movement to Make America Great Again has only...
    Democrat impeachment managers on Saturday drew harsh criticism from both the left and the right after their stark reversal on whether to call witnesses in the Senate trial of former President Donald Trump. Trump was found not guilty of inciting an insurrection in a 57-43 vote Saturday.  Critics said Democrats "caved" for having a press release from Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Wash., read into the record after initially asking to depose her -- a move that could have potentially elongated the impeachment trial by weeks.  Beutler threw a wrench into the impeachment proceedings after a Friday night statement in which she said Trump seemingly sided with the rioters at the Capitol on Jan. 6 during a conversation with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif. "When McCarthy finally reached the president on January 6 and asked him to publicly and forcefully call off the riot, the president initially repeated the falsehood that it was...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell on Saturday eviscerated former President Donald Trump for "provoking" the mobs that descended on the Capitol on Jan. 6, giving a lengthy statement on the Senate floor at the conclusion of the impeachment trial about the former president's culpability despite voting to acquit him of "incitement of insurrection." The Kentucky Republican's floor speech came minutes after the Senate voted mostly along party lines to acquit Trump of the charge after a fast-paced impeachment trial that lasted under a week. Like many GOP senators, McConnell hinged his reasoning for acquittal on the question of constitutionality – that the trial is "moot" because Trump is no longer president. Democrats, meanwhile, dispute this and argue McConnell is the reason the trial couldn't start sooner. But unlike most of his colleagues – with the exception of the seven Republicans who voted to convict – McConnell placed the blame for...
    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial ended Saturday with an acquittal as both of Nevada's two Democratic senators voted in a majority that fell short of the two-thirds needed for conviction. Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto said it was obvious that Trump “was willing to use almost every measure at his disposal to gain and retain power, even if it meant overturning a free and fair election through violence." Sen. Jacky Rosen said Trump incited a violent insurrection against the Congress and then “failed to take action to defend the Capitol, his vice president, law enforcement, or our democracy." Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Nevada, Associated Press
    More On: Trump impeachment trial Last-minute delays, missteps dominate Democrats’ impeachment finale Senate votes to acquit Donald Trump in impeachment trial Senator jokes about impeachment trial wardrobe malfunction Trump lawyer ‘Philly-delphia’ threat sparks laughter, rebuke in Senate They didn’t just win the Super Bowl but Donald Trump’s impeachment defense team appear to be feeling that way after getting the former president a second impeachment acquittal. “We’re going to Disney World,” Trump lawyer Michael van der Veen joked to reporters, repeating a line uttered by a litany of Super Bowl MVPs since Giants quarterback Phil Simms first said it following Big Blue’s win in 1987. Van der Veen uttered the phrase as he departed the Capitol after the Senate voted 57-43 against convicting the former commander-in-chief Saturday. Van der Veen then fist-bumped a colleague as they kept walking. Prior to departing, the group of lawyers were seen looking jovial...
    (CNN)There was never a doubt that former President Donald Trump would escape conviction in his latest impeachment trial. The "jurors" were, after all, politicians. And in a 50-50 Senate, the constitutional bar of 67 votes was never achievable. Not in these bitterly polarized times. But even as the final chapter was known from the start, it was essential that the story of Trump's brazen acts be told.It was the story of the months, not just the moment, of calculated incitement; of Trump's cold-blooded indifference to the lives he put in jeopardy at the US Capitol on January 6, including, most shockingly, that of his faithful Vice President Mike Pence.It was the story of a president, desperately trying to cling to power, weaponizing those he had radicalized to believe the election was being stolen from them and that it was their patriotic duty to prevent this. He summoned them to Washington,...
    Getty Images With former President Donald Trump being all-too-predictably acquitted in his second impeachment trial, there have now been three such events in the modern history of America. On each of these occasions the magnitude of the allegations and strength of the evidence has increased, while the credibility of the trials themselves have greatly, and pathetically, diminished. As is becoming a sadly common result every time our leaders are even reasonably tested, almost all of them have once again failed miserably. Other than the seven brave Republicans (the exact number I happened to predict back on January 18) who joined the 50 mostly self-serving Democrats who voted to convict Trump, the Senate dishonored itself with this sham trial, and set enormously dangerous precedents for our country’s future. I have argued on multiple occasions that the case against Trump was legal, legitimate, strong, and firmly grounded on pre-Trump conservative principles.  The...
    Miami : Without conviction, the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump ended. The billionaire was acquitted of the charge of “incitement to insurrection”, raised on January 13 by the House of Representatives of the United States Congress. The indictment, made a week after a mob of pro-Trump protesters stormed the Capitol building, was dismissed this Saturday by members of the Senate. That instance voted to determine the guilt or innocence of the magnate, who was said to have promoted the attack against the Legislative headquarters. The session ended with 57 yeses, 10 votes short of those needed to convict the New Yorker.. As it was expected, Democrats spoke out en bloc in favor of “impeachment.” Apart from them, seven Republican senators supported the initiative. Dissident lawmakers include Mitt Romney, who also distanced himself from partisan discipline last year, during the first vote of no confidence against Donald Trump. The...
    Former President Donald Trump's sons Donald Trump Jr. and Eric took to Twitter to gloat after their father was aquitted in his second impeachment trial Saturday afternoon.  Eric Trump simply tweeted '2-0.'  Trump Jr. sent out a series of tweets, calling the Senate proceedings a 'show trial' and blasting Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, who voted to acquit Trump, yet promptly took to the Senate floor to explain that he did hold the ex-president responsible for the violent January 6 insurrection.  Former President Donald Trump's sons Donald Trump Jr. (left) and Eric (right) gloated on Twitter after the Senate voted to acquit their father during his second impeachment trial  Eric Trump tweeted 2-0 after his father, former President Donald Trump, was acquitted by the Senate Saturday Donald Trump Jr. sent out a series of tweets after the Senate voted to acquit his father in an impeachment trial...
    Former US President Donald Trump has been acquitted in impeachmentimpeachment) for the crime of incitement to insurrection in the assault on the Capitol on January 6, one of the most convulsive days in the history of the country and in which five people died. The Republican votes of the Senate, constituted as a jury in this impeachment, saved Trump and prevented the Democrats from getting enough support to convict him. Only seven Republicans voted to convict Trump for “inciting insurrection”: Susan Collins, Lisa Murkowski, Mitt Romney, Ben Sasse, Bill Cassidy, Pat Toomey and Richard Burr. The final score was 57 in favor of the conviction and 43 against, insufficient numbers for Democrats who needed a majority of 67 votes to convict the former president, something that from the beginning seemed highly unlikely given the influence that Trump still has on his voter base. From the beginning, both parties had...
    BOSTON (CBS) – Massachusetts politicians reacted Saturday after the Senate voted to acquit former President Donald Trump of inciting the January 6 riot at the Capitol in his second impeachment trial. 50 Democrats and seven Republicans voted that Trump was “Guilty”, but it fell short of the two-thirds majority needed to convict him. RELATED: Massachusetts Reports 1,949 New COVID Cases, 65 Additional Deaths In response to the acquittal, Sen. Elizabeth Warren said in a tweet on Saturday: Donald Trump incited a mob of domestic terrorists to attack our Capitol and overturn the election. Even 7 Senate Republicans couldn’t stomach his act of insurrection. Our democracy must be stronger than the former president and the 43 senators who sided with him today. Donald Trump incited a mob of domestic terrorists to attack our Capitol and overturn the election. Even 7 Senate Republicans couldn’t stomach his act of insurrection. Our democracy must...
    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial ended Saturday with an acquittal as both of New Mexico's two Democratic senators voted in a majority that fell short of the two-thirds needed for conviction. Sen. Martin Heinrich said what happened Jan. 6 at the Capitol was a “violent and bloody attack on our democracy (that) was cultivated by months of Donald Trump repeating a completely baseless lie of election fraud, over and over and over again." Sen. Ben Ray Lujan said he “took no pleasure in voting to convict President Trump for inciting an insurrection against the U.S. government." But Lujan added that there was “no doubt that the former president did everything in his power to overturn the results of the 2020 election." Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: New Mexico, Associated Press
    PHOENIX (AP) — Former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial ended Saturday with an acquittal as both of Arizona's two Democratic senators voted in a majority that fell short of the two-thirds needed for conviction. Sen. Kyrsten Sinema said Trump “”betrayed his oath willfully, as no president has before" and “incited a violent insurrection against his own government because he did not like the outcome of a free and fair election." Sen. Mark Kelly said evidence demonstrated that Trump incited the violence at the Capitol on Jan. 6 and did it “with the intention of overturning the decision of the voters of Arizona." Kelly added that Trump ”then did nothing to stop it because he hoped it would be successful." Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Arizona, Associated Press
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 5:30 p.m. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi scoffed at the “cowardly” Senate Republicans who voted to acquit Donald Trump of inciting the Capitol siege. With the impeachment trial now over, some Democrats and Republicans in the House and Senate have suggested censure as an option. Pelosi panned those efforts as grossly inadequate in the face of the violent attack on the nation’s seat of power. Five people died. “What we saw in that Senate today was a cowardly group of Republicans who apparently have no options because they were afraid to defend their job,” she said at the Capitol. “We censure people for using stationary for the wrong purpose. We don’t censure people for inciting insurrection that kills people in the Capitol.” Pelosi joined House prosecutors at a press conference at the Capitol following...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., blasted Senate Republicans as cowards who refused to stand up to former President Trump and find him guilty in the impeachment trial. "What we saw in that Senate today was a cowardly group of Republicans," Pelosi said of the majority of the Senate GOP who found Trump "not guilty" of incitement of insurrection.  Pelosi joined the House impeachment managers Saturday at a news conference after the Senate acquitted Trump again in his second impeachment trial. The vote 57-43 in favor of conviction, but still 10 short of the supermajority needed. "Justice wasn't done," Pelosi said of the vote.  Pelosi took special aim at GOP Leader Mitch McConnell for delaying the start of the impeachment trial and then saying Saturday he couldn't vote to convict Trump because the trial started after Trump left office.  "You chose not to receive it," Pelosi said of the article of impeachment the...
    More On: Trump impeachment trial Senate votes to acquit Donald Trump in impeachment trial Senator jokes about impeachment trial wardrobe malfunction Trump lawyer ‘Philly-delphia’ threat sparks laughter, rebuke in Senate Here’s who could be called to testify at Trump’s impeachment trial Confusion, delays and objections were abound at Saturday’s rollercoaster conclusion of former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial — a day that began with Democratic infighting over a last-minute push for witnesses. House impeachment managers, led by Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.), kicked off the day suddenly announcing their desire to subpoena Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (R-Wash.) to testify, potentially opening the floodgates for dozens of other witnesses and delaying the final vote for weeks. Herrera Beutler said Friday that she was present for a call between House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and former President Trump during the Capitol riot. The move sparked a frenzy, as it became...
    President Trump is reacting to his being cleared in the Senate in his second impeachment trial, thanking his lawyers and the Republicans who voted to acquit but calling the entire affair “a sad commentary on our times.” “I want to first thank my team of dedicated lawyers and others for their tireless work upholding justice and defending truth,” Trump said in an email blast after the Senate voted 57-43, far short of the tally needed to convict. “My deepest thanks as well to all of the United States Senators and Members of Congress who stood proudly for the Constitution we all revere and for the sacred legal principles at the heart of our country. “It is a sad commentary on our times that one political party in America is given a free pass to denigrate the rule of law, defame law enforcement, cheer mobs, excuse rioters, and transform justice into...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 5:05 p.m. Trump lawyer jokes after acquittal: “We’re going to Disney World!” Donald Trump’s legal team is taking a victory lap after securing his acquittal in the Senate impeachment trial. Addressing reporters after the trial concluded, the team thanked the Senate for finding the former president not guilty of inciting the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol. Michael van der Veen, who presented the bulk of the defense, fist-bumped a colleague as he departed the Capitol. He joked: “We’re going to Disney World!” The vote on Trump’s impeachment was 57-43, with seven Republicans joining all Democrats to vote for Trump’s conviction. Two thirds of the Senate, or 67 votes, was needed for conviction. ___ HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT FORMER PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP’S SECOND SENATE IMPEACHMENT TRIAL: The Senate met in...
    Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrDemocratic group targets GOP senators with ads ahead of impeachment vote Senate panel advances Biden's education and labor secretary picks GOP senators criticized for appearing to pay half-hearted attention to trial MORE (R-N.C.), who twice voted that the impeachment trial of President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE was not constitutional, was a surprise vote to convict in Saturday's 57-43 vote. Burr in a statement condemned Trump for his actions, arguing he failed his duty and incited the mob attack on the Capitol on Jan. 6. "The evidence is compelling that President Trump is guilty of inciting an insurrection against a coequal branch of government and that the charge rises to the level of high Crimes and Misdemeanors,"...
    Savannah Rychcik February 13, 2021 0 Comments The Senate voted to acquit Former President Donald Trump on the charge of inciting an insurrection on Saturday after falling short of the 67 votes needed to convict him. The majority of senators voted to declare Trump guilty of the charge in a 57-43 vote, including seven Republicans. Sens. Richard Burr (R-NC), Bill Cassidy (R-La.), Susan Collins (R-Maine), Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), Mitt Romney (R-Utah), Ben Sasse (R-Neb.), and Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) all sided with Democrats. The Senate acquitted Donald Trump at his second impeachment trial. Vote is 57-43 aye. Needed 67.These Republicans joined all Democrats:Richard Burr (R-NC)Bill Cassidy (R-LA)Susan Collins (R-ME)Lisa Murkowski (R-AK)Mitt Romney (R-UT)Ben Sasse (R-NE)Pat Toomey (R-PA) pic.twitter.com/8VHZzfRc0a— The Recount (@therecount) February 13, 2021 The failure to convict Trump makes him the only president to be impeached and acquitted twice in the history of the United States. Trump released a statement following the...
    By ALAN FRAM, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Seven Republicans voted Saturday to convict former President Donald Trump in his Senate trial, easily the largest number of lawmakers to ever vote to find a president of their own party guilty at impeachment proceedings. While lawmakers voted 57-43 to find Trump guilty, the evenly divided Senate fell well short of the two-thirds majority required to convict an impeached president. But by joining all 50 Democrats who voted against Trump, the seven GOP senators created a clear majority against him and provided a bipartisan chorus of condemnation of the former president. Trump was acquitted of inciting an insurrection for riling up a crowd of his supporters before they attacked the U.S. Capitol last month. Voting to find Trump guilty were GOP Sens. Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of...
    Shortly after voting to allow witnesses to testify at the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, Democrats reversed course in an effort to prevent further delays to the Biden administration’s legislative agenda. On Saturday, the members of congress arguing in favor of Trump’s conviction asked the United States Senate to allow witnesses to be heard. The move came as impeachment managers, led by Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD), hoped that witness testimony would prove that Trump helped incite the January 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. Raskin, in particular, argued from the floor of the Senate on Saturday that it was vital to hear the testimony of Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (R-WA) before a verdict was reached. Herrera Beutler has claimed that on the day of the riot, House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) told her Trump had suggested the mob storming the capitol “was more upset about the...
    More On: donald trump Senate votes to acquit Donald Trump in impeachment trial Senator jokes about impeachment trial wardrobe malfunction Trump lawyer ‘Philly-delphia’ threat sparks laughter, rebuke in Senate Here’s who could be called to testify at Trump’s impeachment trial President Trump is reacting to his being cleared in the Senate in his second impeachment trial, thanking his lawyers and the Republicans who voted to acquit but calling the entire affair “a sad commentary on our times.” “I want to first thank my team of dedicated lawyers and others for their tireless work upholding justice and defending truth,” Trump said in an email blast after the Senate voted 57-43, far short of the tally needed to convict. “My deepest thanks as well to all of the United States Senators and Members of Congress who stood proudly for the Constitution we all revere and for the sacred legal principles at...
    The Senate voted Saturday to acquit former President Trump of inciting the uprising on Capitol Hill last month, marking the end of his second impeachment trial. Seven Republican senators broke ranks to support the conviction. The 57-43 vote fell far short of the 67 votes needed for conviction, but it was the most bipartisan guilty vote in a presidential impeachment trial and exposed the fractures in a divided Republican party over its future. The Republicans who voted in favor of the conviction were Senators Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania. Trump is the first president to be challenged twice and his trial was the first in US history of a former president. The House challenged him last month on a charge of incitement to insurrection on...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Saturday acquitted Donald Trump of inciting the horrific attack on the U.S. Capitol, concluding a historic impeachment trial that exposed the fragility of America’s democratic traditions and left a divided nation to come to terms with the violence sparked by his defeated presidency. Barely a month since the deadly Jan. 6 riot that stunned the world, the Senate convened for a rare Saturday session to deliver its verdict, voting while armed National Guard troops continued to stand their posts outside the iconic building. The quick trial, the nation’s first of a former president, showed how perilously close the invaders had come to destroying the nation’s deep tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power after Trump had refused to concede the election. Rallying outside the White House, he unleashed a mob of supporters to “fight like hell” for him at the Capitol just as...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 4:30 p.m. Minutes after voting to acquit Donald Trump of the impeachment charge, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said there is still “no question” that Trump was “practically and morally responsible for provoking” the deadly attack on the U.S. Capitol. McConnell said he could not vote to convict Trump because he is “constitutionally not eligible for conviction” because he is no longer president. He added that a conviction would have created a dangerous precedent that would give the Senate power to convict private political rivals and bar them from holding future office. McConnell added that impeachment is a “narrow tool for a narrow purpose.” The Senate voted 57-43 on Saturday to acquit Trump. A conviction required 67 votes. ___ 4:25 p.m. House impeachment managers were the driving force behind the last-minute move to...
    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Senate acquitted Donald Trump on Saturday in his second impeachment trial in a year, with fellow Republicans blocking conviction over the former president's role in the deadly assault by his supporters on the U.S. Capitol. The Senate vote of 57-43 fell short of the two-thirds majority needed to convict Trump on a charge of incitement of insurrection after a five-day trial in the same building ransacked by his followers on January 6, shortly after they heard him deliver a fiery speech. In the vote, seven of the 50 Senate Republicans joined the chamber's unified Democrats in favoring conviction. Trump left office on January 20, so impeachment could not be used to remove him from power. But Democrats had hoped to secure a conviction to hold him responsible for a siege that left a police officer and four other people dead and to set the stage for a...
    The conclusion of former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE’s second impeachment trial and the timeline for increased vaccinations across the country are expected to dominate this Sunday’s talk shows.  House impeachment managers and Trump’s defense team gave closing arguments Saturday following days of evidence and arguments. The Senate ultimately voted 57-43 to acquit Trump, with seven Republicans crossing party lines.  Democrats had argued that the Senate should vote to convict Trump and then vote to prevent him from ever running for office again, while Trump's defense team claimed the former president’s remarks challenging the results of the 2020 election were covered by the First Amendment and that he did not incite the deadly mob that stormed the Capitol...
    WASHINGTON -- The Senate on Saturday acquitted// Donald Trump of inciting the horrific attack on the U.S. Capitol, concluding a historic impeachment trial that exposed the fragility of America's democratic traditions and left a divided nation to come to terms with the violence sparked by his defeated presidency.Barely a month since the deadly Jan. 6 riot that stunned the world, the Senate convened for a rare Saturday session to deliver its verdict, voting while armed National Guard troops continued to stand their posts outside the iconic building.The quick trial, the nation's first of a former president, showed how perilously close the invaders had come to destroying the nation's deep tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power after Trump had refused to concede the election. Rallying outside the White House, he unleashed a mob of supporters to "fight like hell" for him at the Capitol just as Congress certified Democrat...
    After a disconcerting performance of his lawyers the day before in raising the curtain, the former president would have gone into a black anger. The presentation of the case against him began on Wednesday. Democratic prosecutors hope to ultimately convince 17 Republican senators to find Trump guilty of the criminal charges against him.
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 4:10 p.m. The Senate’s top Democrat says Jan. 6 will live as a “day of infamy” in American history and that the vote to acquit Donald Trump “will live as a vote of infamy in the history of the United States Senate.” Sen. Chuck Schumer, a New York Democrat, took to the Senate floor on Saturday to decry the Senate’s acquittal of the former president on a charge that he incited the deadly insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. He applauded the seven Republicans who joined all 50 Democrats in voting to convict Trump. He called the day of the riot the “final, terrible legacy” of Trump and said the stain of his actions will never be “washed away.” ___ HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT FORMER PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP’S SECOND SENATE IMPEACHMENT...
    WASHINGTON (CBS/AP) — The Senate on Saturday acquitted Donald Trump of inciting the horrific attack on the U.S. Capitol, concluding a historic impeachment trial that exposed the fragility of America’s democratic traditions and left a divided nation to come to terms with the violence sparked by his defeated presidency. The vote was 57-43, short of the two-thirds needed for conviction. Seven Republicans broke for their party to find Trump guilty. Pennsylvania Sen. Pat Toomey was one of seven Republicans to vote to convict Trump. RELATED: 35-Year-Old Man Facing DUI Charges After Crashing Into Occupied Ambulance In Dover, Police Say The quick trial, the nation’s first of a former president, showed how perilously close the invaders had come to shattering the nation’s deep tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power after Trump had refused to concede the election. RELATED: Gas Prices Go Up Again In New Jersey, Around Nation At...
    Former Republican President Donald Trump was acquitted on Saturday of charges of “incitement to insurrection” in the disturbances on Capitol Hill in the impeachment trial in the Senate. Although 57 senators voted in favor of convicting the former president, the figure did not reach the two-thirds (67 votes) necessary to do so. Miami World / EFE Senators who voted against the former president include 50 Democrats and seven Republicans. The upper house thus acquitted the former Republican president for the second time in a trial of this type, despite the requests of the political prosecutors in the case, who considered that Trump was responsible for having encouraged the mob of supporters that assaulted Congress on the 6th. January, in an episode that left 5 people dead. The result of the impeachment had already become predictable in recent days, because by the requirement of two-thirds of favorable votes, Democrats needed at...
    WASHINGTON -- The Senate voted 57-43 to acquitted former President Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial, meaning the Senate has not convicted the former president for inciting an insurrection.Though the majority voted "guilty," it takes a vote of two-thirds of those present (67 out of 100 if everyone is there) to convict.Seven Republicans -- Sen. Mitt Romney, Sen. Bill Cassidy, Sen. Susan Collins, Sen. Ben Sasse, Sen. Richard Burr and Sen. Lisa Murkowski and Sen. Pat Toomey -- crossed party lines in voting to convict Trump alongside 50 Democrats.Although Trump is no longer in office, this means he can run for a second presidential term.Trump released a statement after the vote, which read, in part: "This has been yet another phase of the greatest witch hunt in the history of our Country. No president has ever gone through anything like it, and it continues because our opponents cannot forget...
    Seven Republicans voted Saturday to convict former President Donald Trump in the Senate impeachment trial. In a 57-43 vote, Trump was acquitted in the Senate. Hours before the vote, lead impeachment manager Democratic Maryland Rep. Jamie Raskin made a surprise request by suggesting witness had come forward with more information about the Jan. 6 riot. The vote was approved after five Republicans joined Democrats to allow the witnesses to appear. Within hours, Democrats backtracked on the call for witnesses as there was an agreement that followed new information from Washington Republican Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler that Trump rejected House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s call to demand that his supporters leave the Capitol during the Jan. 6 riot. The agreement made it so her letter and additional evidence was entered into the record instead of having her or any witnesses testify. After the agreement the trial entered four hours of closing arguments,...
    The Senate voted to acquit former President Donald Trump Saturday of charges that he incited an insurrection on January 6. The Senate voted 57-43, meaning that the chamber failed to clear the 67-vote threshold necessary to convict Trump of the charge that he incited an insurrection on January 6, when Congress was certifying the 2020 presidential election. Seven Senate Republicans voted to convict Trump of inciting an insurrection, including Sens. Bill Cassidy (R-LA), Richard Burr (R-NC), Susan Collins (R-ME), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Mitt Romney (R-UT), Pat Toomey (R-PA), Ben Sasse (R-NE). Today’s vote marks the second time that Trump has escaped conviction from the Senate after a House Democrat majority voted to impeach Trump. House Democrats voted to impeach Trump the first time, accusing him of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. The Senate impeachment trial took a dramatic turn Saturday morning as the Senate voted to have additional...
    WASHINGTON (CBS/AP) — The Senate on Saturday acquitted Donald Trump of inciting the horrific attack on the U.S. Capitol, concluding a historic impeachment trial that exposed the fragility of America’s democratic traditions and left a divided nation to come to terms with the violence sparked by his defeated presidency. The vote was 57-43, short of the two-thirds needed for conviction. Seven Republicans broke for their party to find Trump guilty. Pennsylvania Sen. Pat Toomey was one of seven Republicans to vote to convict Trump. RELATED: 35-Year-Old Man Facing DUI Charges After Crashing Into Occupied Ambulance In Dover, Police Say The quick trial, the nation’s first of a former president, showed how perilously close the invaders had come to shattering the nation’s deep tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power after Trump had refused to concede the election. RELATED: Gas Prices Go Up Again In New Jersey, Around Nation At...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 4:05 p.m. Former President Donald Trump is welcoming his second impeachment acquittal and says his movement “has only just begun.” Trump in a lengthy statement is thanking his attorneys and his defenders in the House and Senate, who he said “stood proudly for the Constitution we all revere and for the sacred legal principles at the heart of our country.” He is slamming the trial as “yet another phase of the greatest witch hunt in the history of our Country.” And he is telling his supporters that, “Our historic, patriotic and beautiful movement to Make America Great Again has only just begun” and that he will have more to share with them in the months ahead. While Trump was acquitted by the Senate, seven Republicans voted to convict him, making it the most...
            
    The Senate voted largely along party lines on Saturday to acquit former President Donald Trump of "incitement of insurrection," concluding a fast-paced trial defined by a series of dramatic and contentious moments up until the last remaining hours of the proceeding. In a 57-43 vote, the Senate failed to reach a two-thirds majority, or 67 senators, to convict Trump over his role in the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol. Most Republicans, including Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, maintained that the Senate didn't have the constitutional authority to try an ex-president who is now a private citizen. While the outcome of the trial was a mostly foregone conclusion – marked by some confusing and surprising moments – Seven Republicans senators broke with their party and joined all Democrats on conviction: Susan Collins of Maine, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Richard Burr of North Carolina, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt...
    (CNN)Seven Republican senators joined with Democrats in voting to convict and declare former President Donald Trump guilty at the conclusion of his second impeachment trial. Ultimately, there were not enough votes for conviction, meaning that Trump has been acquitted of inciting an insurrection at the US Capitol on January 6. The GOP defections nevertheless stand as a sharp rebuke of the former President.The Republicans who voted for conviction were: Richard Burr Bill Cassidy Susan Collins Mitt Romney Lisa Murkowski Pat Toomey Ben Sasse This story is breaking and will be updated.