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Trump’s second impeachment:

    WASHINGTON -- Former President Donald Trump's historic Senate impeachment started Tuesday, this time over the deadly Jan. 6 insurrection at the United States Capitol.While Trump's acquittal is expected, all 100 senators will first have to sit at their desks and listen to hours of graphic testimony from House Democrats about the riots, which left five people dead. The House impeached Trump on Jan. 13, one week after the violence.Here's a look at things to know about what's next for the former president and Congress.How to watch the impeachment trialYou can watch live coverage here on our website or on our streaming apps for Apple TV, Android TV, Fire TV and Roku. Throughout the trial, stay up to date on all the impeachment trial developments with "Good Morning America," "World News Tonight" and other ABC News shows.Why was Trump impeached again?Then-President Donald Trump was impeached by the U.S. House for a...
    WASHINGTON -- Former President Donald Trump's historic Senate impeachment trial begins Tuesday, this time over the deadly Jan. 6 insurrection at the United States Capitol.While Trump's acquittal is expected, all 100 senators will first have to sit at their desks and listen to hours of graphic testimony from House Democrats about the riots, which left five people dead. The House impeached Trump on Jan. 13, one week after the violence.Here's a look at things to know about what's next for the former president and Congress.Why was Trump impeached again?Then-President Donald Trump was impeached by the U.S. House for a historic second time on Jan. 13, charged with "incitement of insurrection" over the deadly mob siege of the U.S. Capitol just days earlier. The four-page article of impeachment says that Trump "gravely endangered the security of the United States and its institutions of Government."EMBED More News Videos Elizabeth Schulze has more...
    The second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump begins today. Trump was charged with incitement of insurrection by the House after the attack on the Capitol last month. House impeachment managers and Trump’s legal team will debate the constitutionality of the case today. After a Senate vote, which will likely pass, both sides will begin opening arguments on Wednesday. What time does the impeachment start? The first day of the trial begins at 1PM ET. There will be four hours for both sides to present arguments. The House has already voted to bring an article of impeachment against Trump, so the Senate arguments will be over whether the misconduct is sufficient to justify penalties, including potentially barring Trump from holding federal office in the future. How long will the trial last? After the Senate vote passes, both sides will have 16 hours over two days to make their...
    WASHINGTON - The historic second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump starts Tuesday in the U.S. Senate, with Trump accused of inciting insurrection a month ago by urging his supporters to confront lawmakers at the U.S. Capitol as they were certifying that Democrat Joe Biden had defeated Trump in the 2020 election. The protest turned into mayhem, as about 800 supporters of Trump stormed past authorities into the Capitol, smashed doors and windows, ransacked some congressional offices and scuffled with police. Five people were left dead, including a Capitol Police officer whose death is under investigation as a homicide and a rioter shot by a police officer. The 100 senators – split evenly between Republican and Democratic caucuses -- hearing the impeachment case against the single-term president are in a unique position: many of them were witnesses themselves to the chaos of January 6 as they fled the Senate chamber...
    To view past editions of The Hill's 12:30 Report, click here: http://bit.ly/1M1mIfw  To receive The Hill's 12:30 Report in your inbox, please sign up here: http://bit.ly/1Tt4hqN --> A midday take on what's happening in politics and how to have a sense of humor about it.* *Ha. Haha. Hahah. Sniff. Haha. Sniff. Ha--breaks down crying hysterically.   The Hill’s 12:30 Report: Impeachment trial about to begin | Today’s proceedings focus on trial legality | Primer on what to expect | Trial could finish next week if no witnesses are called | Impeachment managers go for emotional impact | To avoid abstract legal analysis | Trial poses risks for Dems & GOP | Sights and sounds | COVID variants worrisome to progress | Biden announces first official domestic trip | National Pizza Day deals   HAPPENING TODAY Round two: ding, ding:     The second impeachment trial of former President TrumpDonald TrumpDOJ to seek resignations of most Trump-appointed US attorneys: report Trump attorney withdraws request to not hold impeachment...
      The Senate is opening its second impeachment trial for former President TrumpDonald TrumpDOJ to seek resignations of most Trump-appointed US attorneys: report Trump attorney withdraws request to not hold impeachment trial on Saturday Kinzinger in op-ed calls on GOP senators to convict Trump in impeachment trial MORE on Tuesday afternoon — this time with Trump an ex-president residing at his estate in Florida, not the White House.  The trial centers on whether Trump incited a mob that attacked the Capitol on Jan. 6, forcing the evacuation of lawmakers who at the time were certifying President BidenJoe BidenDemocrats say Trump impeachment defense 'wholly without merit' A US-Israel defense treaty has benefits — and perils White House: Biden won't spend much time watching Trump impeachment trial MORE's Electoral College win over Trump.  Five people died in connection to the riot, including a Capitol Hill police officer. The crowd was seeking to stop the Electoral...
    The second impeachment trial of Donald Trump will begin today as the Senate deliberates the charge against the former president for incitement of insurrection. The trial is scheduled to begin at 1:00 p.m. ET. The trial comes just over a month after Trump’s supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol in a violent attempt to stop Congress from certifying his 2020 election loss to President Joe Biden. The insurgency was fueled by Trump’s unsubstantiated claims that the election was corrupted by mass fraud, and it was preceded by dozens of failed attempts to overturn the election results in and out of court. On Jan. 13, Trump become the only U.S. president to be impeached twice. The former president previously faced the possibility of being removed from office on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress after he pressured the Ukrainian government into launching an investigation to undermine Biden...
    Europa Press/AP Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.Good morning and welcome to the second impeachment trial of Donald J. Trump. The historic proceedings—which mark both the first time a president has been impeached twice, as well as the first impeachment trial for a former president—come about a month after the House charged Trump with inciting the January 6 Capitol insurrection. The attack left five people, including a Capitol police officer, dead. Today’s debate, set to begin at 1 p.m. ET, will largely focus on the constitutionality of the trial, with Trump’s defense arguing it isn’t because he’s no longer in office.  With many Republicans signaling they won’t vote to convict Trump no matter the evidence, Trump’s acquittal is all but a foregone conclusion, and the trial is expected to be an...
    By Jeremy Herb, Manu Raju and Lauren Fox | CNN The second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump begins in the Senate today, where senators will be confronted with the violent events of the January 6 riots and whether Trump is culpable for inciting the insurrectionists that attacked the Capitol and placed their lives in danger. The historic trial has a number of firsts: It’s the first time in US history a president will be tried in the Senate court of impeachment for a second time. And it’s the first time that a former President will face the prospect of conviction and disbarment of office. Trump’s title of former president will be front and center during the trial’s opening day, which begins at 1 p.m. ET. After the Senate approves the rules of the trial, the Senate will hear from the House impeachment managers and Trump’s team about whether...
    Evan Vucci/AP Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.The second time around is often not as exciting as the first. The novelty is not there. The thrill is gone. When Donald Trump was impeached by the House of Representatives and placed on trial about a year ago, that was a historic occasion. Only two prior presidents had been indicted by the House and tried by the Senate. Many Americans had never before witnessed this rarely used constitutional mechanism in operation. Now, as the Senate convenes a trial for Trump’s record-setting second impeachment—which charges him with “incitement of insurrection”—there may oddly be a touch of the ho-hum to the endeavor. In standard terms, the stakes are not as high as they are for the usual impeachment trial. Trump has already been extricated from...
    This Tuesday begins the historic second political trial against Donald Trump, who is accused of “inciting insurrection” for the violent events in the assault on the Capitol on January 6 that left at least five dead and dozens of arrests . Miami World / AP The process against Trump is scheduled to begin this Tuesday at 1 p.m. ET in the federal Senate. That day, the then president gave a speech urging his supporters to march towards the headquarters of Congress, given their unfounded allegations that there was a fraud in the November presidential election, which Joe Biden won. Both houses of the legislature were meeting to endorse the victory of Biden, who were forced to suspend the session for several hours, until the Trump supporters were evicted by the security forces, and the legislators were able to ratify the victory of the democrat in The elections. Senators will...
    Former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial will begin Tuesday, when senators will consider whether to convict the former president of incitement of insurrection after a mob of his supporters overran the U.S. Capitol in a deadly attack on January 6. Mr. Trump will likely be acquitted, but senators are still obligated to sit through hours of arguments from House impeachment managers and the president's attorneys. The House impeached Mr. Trump on January 13, one week after the assault on the Capitol, on a charge of inciting an insurrection. Ten House Republicans joined every Democrat in voting to impeach Mr. Trump.  Here are details of the impeachment trial: How will the trial work?The Constitution grants the Senate "the sole Power to try all Impeachments," with a two-thirds vote required to convict. The president, vice president or any civil officer of the federal government may be impeached and tried. The House has appointed...
    By Susan Cornwell WASHINGTON (Reuters) - When former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial opens on Tuesday, presiding over it will not be U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts, who oversaw Trump's first trial, but a Democratic senator who will also get a say in the verdict. Patrick Leahy of Vermont is president pro tempore of the Senate, meaning he is empowered to preside over Senate sessions in the absence of Vice President Kamala Harris. The Constitution requires the Supreme Court chief to preside in presidential impeachments. When Leahy, who at age 80 is the longest-serving member of the Senate, disclosed last month he would fill that role in Trump's trial, he noted the president pro tempore had historically presided over Senate impeachment trials of non-presidents. Trump left the White House last month after his Nov. 3 election defeat by now-President Joe Biden. Leahy, a liberal lawmaker, has vowed to be...
    Former President Trump's second impeachment trial will begin on Tuesday, February 9, as senators gather to consider whether to convict the former president of incitement of insurrection after a mob of his supporters overran the U.S. Capitol in a deadly attack on January 6. CBSN will air the trial in full and CBSN's Elaine Quijano will provide analysis after it has concluded for the day.  "CBS Evening News" anchor Norah O'Donnell will anchor CBS News' special report from Washington, D.C. She will be joined by CBS News chief White House correspondent Nancy Cordes and CBS News chief Washington correspondent Major Garrett, as well as CBS News political analyst and "60 Minutes" correspondent John Dickerson in New York. CBS News correspondents Nikole Killion, Kris Van Cleave and Jeff Pegues will report from the Capitol. The House voted to impeach Mr. Trump on January 13 on a charge of inciting an insurrection. Ten House Republicans joined every Democrat...
    DONALD Trump is the only US president to be impeached twice. The historic trial of the former president begins today, with Trump facing a single article of impeachment. 2Donald Trump's impeachment trial begins todayCredit: Getty Images - Getty It's a political trial - not a criminal one. What time will Donald Trump's second impeachment trial begin? Senators are expected to convene at about midday to begin proceedings under plans agreed by the chamber's Republican and Democrat leaders, Mitch McConnell and Chuck Schumer. First off, there will be four hours of debate, equally divided between Trump's legal team and the impeachment managers, on whether the trial is constitutional. This will be followed by a vote needing a simple majority to proceed. If senators agree to move forward, the main part of the trial will begin. It will see the prosecution and defense given up to 16 hours each from tomorrow to...
    (CNN)The second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump begins in the Senate on Tuesday, where senators will be confronted with the violent events of the January 6 riots and whether Trump is culpable for inciting the insurrectionists that attacked the Capitol and placed their lives in danger.The historic trial has a number of firsts: It's the first time in US history a president will be tried in the Senate court of impeachment for a second time. And it's the first time that a former President will face the prospect of conviction and disbarment of office.Trump's title of former president will be front and center during the trial's opening day, which begins at 1 p.m. ET. After the Senate approves the rules of the trial, the Senate will hear from the House impeachment managers and Trump's team about whether the trial itself is constitutional.After four hours of debate, the Senate...
    Donald Trump's impeachment trial begins on Tuesday, with his legal team setting out to argue both that the trial is unconstitutional and the former president blameless for the Capitol riot, and the prosecution painting a picture of a man whose words incited a mob to attack the seat of government in an insurrection that cost five people their lives. The nine Democratic impeachment managers for the House, which impeached Trump last month, argue that he alone was responsible for inciting the mob who interrupted the presidential electoral count. 'The evidence of President Trump's conduct is overwhelming,' the nine managers, who will serve as prosecutors, wrote in a brief. 'He has no valid excuse or defense for his actions.' Donald Trump is the first president in U.S. history to have been impeached twice by the House Trump's lawyers argue his January 6 speech is protected under the First Amendment...
    (CNN)The point of Donald Trump's second impeachment is not his actual conviction. The quivering weakness of many Republican senators, who will not be moved to vote against him even after he incited a mob to attack the Capitol, means conviction appears impossible. But Trump can still be held to account. Michael D'Antonio Indeed, this reckoning has already begun. Of all the myths about Donald Trump, the one that shows him continuously escaping all responsibility for his destructive actions may be the most enduring. During years of studying and writing about him I have often believed it myself. But now, with the House impeachment managers about to tell the story of Trump's failed effort to overturn the 2020 election result, I can see that they have already delivered the kind of justice he deserves.Read More The disgrace that attached to Trump as he was impeached a second time -- with 10...
    By Zachary B. Wolf | CNN When former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial kicks off Tuesday afternoon, Americans will relive — through the eyes of the senators sitting in judgment of his actions — the assault on the Capitol we all witnessed in real time just a little more than a month ago. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer offered his assessment of why the trial is necessary late Monday as he laid out the rules of engagement both sides have agreed on to conduct the proceedings. “Following the despicable attack on January 6, there must, there must be truth and accountability if we are going to move forward, heal and bring our country together once again,” he said on the Senate floor. “Sweeping something as momentous as this under the rug brings no healing whatsoever.” Here’s what we know about the trial The trial starts Tuesday. There will be...
    (CNN)When former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial kicks off Tuesday afternoon, Americans will relive -- through the eyes of the senators sitting in judgment of his actions -- the assault on the Capitol we all witnessed in real time just a little more than a month ago. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer offered his assessment of why the trial is necessary late Monday as he laid out the rules of engagement both sides have agreed on to conduct the proceedings."Following the despicable attack on January 6, there must, there must be truth and accountability if we are going to move forward, heal and bring our country together once again," he said on the Senate floor. "Sweeping something as momentous as this under the rug brings no healing whatsoever." Here's what we know about the trialThe trial starts Tuesday. There will be up to four hours of debate and then...
    WASHINGTON - The historic second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump starts Tuesday in the U.S. Senate, with Trump accused of inciting insurrection a month ago by urging his supporters to confront lawmakers at the U.S. Capitol as they were certifying that Democrat Joe Biden had defeated Trump in the 2020 election. The protest turned into mayhem, as about 800 supporters of Trump stormed past authorities into the Capitol, smashed doors and windows, ransacked some congressional offices and scuffled with police. Five people were left dead, including a Capitol Police officer whose death is under investigation as a homicide and a rioter shot by a police officer. The 100 senators — 50 Republicans and 50 Democrats — hearing the impeachment case against the single-term president are in a unique position: many of them were witnesses themselves to the chaos of January 6 as they fled the Senate chamber for their...
    Starts on second impeachment against Donald Trump in the Senate of state United. The result will condition your aspirations to try to return to White House. The Democrats they will need the support of up to 17 Republican senators to convict Donald Trump and disqualify him from politics. The last two seats they won in the US elections in the state of Georgia have a majority in the Upper House. Was acquitted by a Senate Republican majority of the charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress in his first political trial for pressure on Ukraine. Now he is charged with “inciting insurrection” by the assault on Capitol. The veteran Democratic senator Vermont Patrick J. Leahy He will be the one who presides over this impeachment or political trial. The Democratic Congressman Maryland Jamie Raskin will lead the team of “prosecutors.” And the congressman Joaquin Casto...
    The lawyers representing former President Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial outlined their legal defense in a memo released Monday. Trump was impeached by the House of Representatives for a historic second time in January for his role in the riots at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, and now faces a trial in front of the Senate. Read the full pre-trial memo defending Trump against the charges below: Tags: Donald Trump, impeachment
    This Tuesday opens in the Senate the second impeachment trial of the former US president, after the one that resulted in his acquittal on February 5, 2020. correspondent in New York Donald Trump has still not emerged from his media isolation, since his stealthy departure from the White House on January 20. But here he is again on the front of the stage, forced and forced. This Tuesday opens in the Senate his second impeachment trial, after the one that led to his acquittal on February 5, 2020. 1 What is Donald Trump accused of?
    U.S. President Donald Trump speaks in the East Room of the White House during an event with U.S. mayors on January 24, 2020 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer | Getty Images Former President Donald Trump on Tuesday faces the start of his second impeachment trial, an uphill battle for Democrats determined to prove him guilty in the wake of the deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol. Despite the unprecedented circumstances, the unanswered logistical questions regarding the trial and the uncertain political ramifications, experts see acquittal as the likely outcome of the trial. The House impeachment managers, led by Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., nevertheless aim to convince two thirds of the divided Senate to convict Trump of inciting the Jan. 6 invasion. But their path is filled with obstacles, including Republicans who largely doubt the legality of the trial itself and a Democratic president, Joe Biden, who's eager for Congress to get...
    More On: impeachment Rep. Waters denies calling for violence against Republicans Trump’s impeachment trial sets a troubling precedent Republicans blast Dems for Senate impeachment trial: ‘Zero chance of conviction’ Wyoming GOP censures Liz Cheney over Trump impeachment vote The Senate will kick off the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump this week, with Democrats pushing forward despite little-to-no GOP support for the effort. The trial is expected to last no more than a week, as is preferred by both Democrats and Republicans in the body. On Tuesday, House impeachment managers, led by Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.), will debate Trump’s attorneys, David Schoen and Bruce Castor, on the constitutionality of the trial itself. The trial marks the first time a former president has been impeached, despite technically still being president when the House voted. That fact has raised considerable objections by Republicans over whether the trial itself...
    The second trial against Donald Trump begins this week with a sense of urgency: Democrats who want to bring the former president to justice for the violent assault on Capitol Hill and Republicans who want to put the whole matter behind him as soon as possible. Miami World / AP The trial will begin on Tuesday, just over an exact month after the deadly riot on January 6. But most likely it will be very different from the first trial against Trump at the beginning of last year. This time, Trump’s cry of “Fight hard!” before the mob that subsequently stormed the headquarters of the US Congress. Although the result could be the same, that is, that Trump is acquitted, this process could take half as long as the previous one. Senators from both parties are still negotiating the details of the procedure, such as the length of opening arguments,...
    Reuters February 8, 2021 0 Comments Former President Trump faced a deadline to submit a pretrial brief on Monday, a day before the Senate is due to begin his second impeachment trial on a charge of inciting insurrection arising from the deadly Jan. 6 rampage at the U.S. Capitol. The nine Democratic House of Representatives lawmakers who will serve as prosecutors hope to persuade members of the 100-seat Senate to convict Trump and ultimately bar him from holding public office again. Trump ended his four-year term in office on Jan. 20, having lost the Nov. 3 election to Democrat Joe Biden. Monday’s deadline for the filing by Trump’s legal team comes as the defense prepares to emphasize its argument – laid out in an earlier filing – that the Senate lacks the constitutional authority to conduct the trial now that he has left office and is a private citizen....
    Republican and Democratic members of Congress on Sunday weighed in on the second impeachment trial of former President TrumpDonald TrumpTwitter permanently suspends Gateway Pundit founder's account Wyoming Republican Party censures Cheney over Trump impeachment vote Trump access to intelligence briefings will be determined by officials, White House says: report MORE, set to begin in the Senate this week. While some Republicans laid blame on Trump for encouraging a mob storm the Capitol last month to contest his 2020 presidential election loss, they continued to question the legality of an impeachment trial of a former president. Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSunday shows preview: Budget resolution clears path for .9 trillion stimulus; Senate gears up for impeachment trial Senate Republicans don't want Trump to testify in impeachment trial McConnell congratulates Cheney on surviving attempted ousting from leadership MORE (R-S.C.), one of Trump’s most vocal supporters during his presidency, affirmed his opposition to a trial citing...
    (CNN)The second Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump is scheduled to kick off Tuesday with some of the key questions about the trial itself -- including how long it will go and whether any witnesses will be called -- still unanswered.The ultimate outcome of the trial does not appear to be in doubt: Trump will be acquitted by the Senate for the second time, falling well short of the two-thirds votes needed for conviction. But that doesn't mean the next week -- and possibly two -- will be without drama as the House impeachment managers recount the destruction caused in the deadly January 6 riot and argue that Trump was the one who incited the insurrectionists to ransack the US Capitol.House Democrats on Thursday sought testimony from Trump himself at the trial, a move that was swiftly rejected by Trump's legal team. Democrats are unlikely to subpoena the...
    One month after the assault on the Capitol by a mob of followers of the now former president of the United States, Donald Trump, the country prepares for the start next week of the second political trial of the former president, accused of “inciting the insurrection ”and that he could end up disqualified for life from holding public office. Only 30 days have passed and the political scene in the US is not the same as that of that fateful day, in which five people died in the assault on the headquarters of the federal Congress, including a policeman. Trump is now out of the White House, confined to his golf club in Mar-a-Lago (Florida) and isolated to communicate with the general public due to the veto imposed on him by the main social networks after those events. WASHINGTON, A HAVEN OF PEACE WITHOUT TRUMP The presidential mansion is now...
    February 6, 2021 5:12 PM | With information from EFE 15 minutes. One month after the assault on the US Capitol by a mob of followers of the now former President Donald Trump, the country is nearing the start of the second impeachment of the former president, accused of “inciting insurrection” and who could end up disqualified from for life to hold public office. Only 30 days have passed and the political scene in the US is not the same as that of that fateful day. 5 people died in the assault on the headquarters of the federal Congress, including a policeman. Trump is being held at his Mar-a-Lago golf club in Florida. He is isolated to communicate with the general public due to the veto imposed on him by the main social networks after these events. Washington, a haven of peace The presidential mansion is now occupied by a...
    U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts presided over former President Trump's first impeachment trial a year ago but in his second one set to start next week, he will not be returning because the former president is out of office.Fast Facts Sen. Patrick Leahy, a Democrat and president pro tempore of the Senate, will preside over the trial Trump was impeached for the second time last month for "incitement of insurrection" relating to the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riots That responsibility will fall to Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., who became the president pro tempore of the Senate in January when Democrats regained the majority. The president pro tempore is typically the most senior U.S. senator of the party in power and 80-year-old Leahy has served in the Senate longer than any other Democrat. The designation carries responsibilities as the third in line of succession to the presidency following the vice president and House speaker. The House impeached Trump...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Donald Trump’s historic second impeachment trial begins Tuesday, forcing the Senate to decide whether to convict him of incitement of insurrection after a violent mob of his supporters laid siege to the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. While Trump’s acquittal is expected, all 100 senators will first have to sit at their desks and listen to hours of graphic testimony from House Democrats about the riots, which left five people dead. The House impeached Trump on Jan. 13, one week after the violence. A look at the basics of the upcoming impeachment trial: HOW DOES THE TRIAL WORK? The Constitution says the House has the sole power of impeachment while the Senate has the sole power to try the individual on the charges. The person being impeached — who can be the president, the vice president or any civil officer of the United States —...
    BY MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Donald Trump's historic second impeachment trial begins Tuesday, forcing the Senate to decide whether to convict him of incitement of insurrection after a violent mob of his supporters laid siege to the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. While Trump’s acquittal is expected, all 100 senators will first have to sit at their desks and listen to hours of graphic testimony from House Democrats about the riots, which left five people dead. The House impeached Trump on Jan. 13, one week after the violence. A look at the basics of the upcoming impeachment trial: HOW DOES THE TRIAL WORK? The Constitution says the House has the sole power of impeachment while the Senate has the sole power to try the individual on the charges. The person being impeached — who can be the president, the vice president or any civil...
    Donald Trump has been impeached for his role in using lies and incendiary language, over a period of months, to subvert the 2020 election, obstruct the business of the nation, and “gravely endanger the security of the United States and its institutions.” Those articles of impeachment have been forwarded to the Senate, along with supporting documents, to show that Donald J. Trump is uniquely responsible for the Jan. 6 assault on the United States Capitol, and that his behavior on that day “was not an isolated event.” Unsurprisingly, House impeachment managers intend to focus on exactly these issues: Trump’s words, actions, and inactions as they relate to violence on Jan. 6. That includes how Trump encouraged the presences of white nationalist militias, lied repeatedly about the outcome of the election in ways meant to inflame his supporters, drove the whole mass toward the Capitol, and stood aside in pleasure as insurgents swarmed the halls...
    Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz on Wednesday offered to represent former President Trump in his second impeachment trial, telling Fox News he would be willing to resign from his seat in the House of Representatives if asked to join the Trump legal team. Gaetz, R-Fla., told Fox News on Wednesday that he has not been asked to join the former president’s defense, but offered to do so. TRUMP ANNOUNCES NEW LEGAL TEAM FOR IMPEACHMENT TRIAL "I only regret that I have but one political career to give to my president," Gaetz told Fox News. Gaetz told Fox News that he offered to represent Trump through Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, and former Trump chief of staff Mark Meadows "weeks ago." "When ethics advised that sitting House members couldn’t do it, the conversations ceased," Gaetz explained. Gaetz, though, told Fox News that, if Trump asked him to join his defense, he would accept....
    So now, after four-plus years of praising Donald Trump’s “exquisite” leadership; four-plus years of waving away lines like the one about finding the Second Amendment solution for Hillary Clinton by saying he was just joking; and lately, after nine weeks of mostly being accomplices to Trump’s insane claims about election fraud; after Trump has torn the country in two and bullied local Republicans trying to do their jobs and instigated a riot that sought to kill his own vice president and did kill a police officer, exactly 10 members of the Republican Party out of 207 voting in the House of Representatives went on record as being willing to impeach Trump. For most of America, the week since the riots has if anything intensified the horror. With each new day, we see shocking videos showing that some of the intruders knew the Capitol floor plan. We learn new details about...
    REUTERS/Yuri GripasFormer President Donald TrumpApparently, as stories like this one from the Washington Post suggest, Donald Trump fired his impeachment legal team and hired a new one because the first team wasn’t willing to use the impeachment trial to continue making Trump’s ridiculous and disproven argument that the election was stolen from him. I’ve long since stopped expecting truth or logic from Trump. And I gather that it doesn’t matter what his lawyers argue, because enough Republican senators have already indicated that they will not vote to convict him, mostly relying on the almost-reasonable argument that it’s pointless to impeach a president who has already left office. (That’s arguable, since the conviction would lead to a second vote, barring Trump for running for office again, and that wouldn’t be totally pointless.) To belabor the obvious, and I have no idea which of the nonsensical things Trump says he actually believes,...
    (CNN)Donald Trump's new political committee took in more $30 million in the final weeks of 2020 as he made relentless and baseless claims of voter fraud, new filings show.And Trump's Save America political action committee started this year with a substantial $31.1 million in cash reserves, as the former president faces a second impeachment trial in the US Senate and works to cement his standing as an enduring force in Republican politics.Sunday's filings offer a snapshot of the continued financial backing from Trump's loyal supporter base. He formed Save America shortly after losing the election last November. Even as his legal team's claims of fraud were tossed out in courts around the country, Trump aggressively sought new donations, imploring his contributors to help fund his "election defense." The House can impeach Donald Trump, but it cant stop him from fundraising in the futureBut the first and largest cut of contributions...
    (CNN)Two Republican senators said Sunday they'll remain fair jurors and listen to the evidence presented during former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial set to begin February 9.Ohio Sen. Rob Portman, a moderate Republican, told CNN's Dana Bash on "State of the Union" that he believed Trump's comments leading up to the Capitol attack were partly responsible for the violence and that he'll keep an open mind. "I have said with regard to the President's comments that day that they were partly responsible for what happened for the horrible violence on Capitol Hill. I've also said that what he did was wrong and inexcusable. I've used the word inexcusable because that is how I feel. We'll see. I am a juror and will keep an open mind but I think the constitutionality issue has to be addressed," said Portman, who won't seek reelection after his term ends in 2022.Another moderate...
    The Weasel meets his Fuhrer Quavering under explicit threats from Donald Trump that he will start a neo-fascist third party (grossly named “The Patriot Party”), Senate Republicans, led by Kentucky blowhard Rand Paul, have signaled that there is no way they would ever vote to convict Trump for inciting the deadly insurrection that killed five people on Jan. 6, and sent hordes of stinking Trump supporters to smear feces all over the House and Senate chambers while trying to hunt down members of those legislative bodies. Now that we know this, now that it’s clear, let’s just remember who controls the trial and the admissible evidence in that trial: the Democratic Senate. Just like then-Majority Leader Mitch McConnell constrained the first trial by admitting no witnesses or evidence, Democrats are free to admit whatever it takes to paint a clear picture of the environment Trump created, which motivated and aided his incitement...
    TED Cruz and Marco Rubio lead the Republican senators blasting the "vindictive" second impeachment of former President Donald Trump. Senators Ted Cruz, 50, Marco Rubio, 49, and Lindsey Graham, 65, all appeared on Fox News on Tuesday proclaiming that it was wrong to go ahead with the impeachment. 7Senator Ted Cruz, 50, appeared on Fox News on TuesdayCredit: Splash News 7Marco Rubio dubbed Trump's second impeachment as a 'clown show'Credit: Alamy Live News 7Trump was formally impeached for a second time earlier this monthCredit: AP:Associated Press Sen Rand Paul, 58, spoke with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo following his three colleagues. Rubio dubbed the second impeachment as a "clown show," a "joke," and a "waste of time that is going to hurt America." In his eyes, putting Trump in an unfavorable position after his presidency was "typical in the third world." His comments come as Republican senators have left the charge of...
    HOUSE Speaker Nancy Pelosi has been slammed as the "most destructive speaker in history" by her predecessor Newt Gingrich. Speaking on Fox News, Gingrich, who served as the 50th Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, branded Pelosi as "dangerous". 3Newt Gringrich called Pelosi 'dangerous' and 'the most destructive speaker in history'Credit: Fox News 3House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was accused of 'pushing through radical positions'Credit: The Mega Agency When asked by host Laura Ingraham his position on Pelosi, Gingrich answered: "First off, she keeps violating the Constitution, the latest impeachment is just a simple example.  "She uses her power ruthlessly and she has really pushed through the most radical positions ever taken by an American Speaker, including abolishing mother and father and uncle and aunt and son and daughter as words, literally trying to strip out any gender reference from the House of Representatives. "I think she's very dangerous,"...
              Tennessee’s two U.S. senators on Tuesday formally objected to putting former President Donald Trump on trial for a second impeachment. Trump left office one week ago. U.S. Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) and U.S. Sen. Bill Hagerty (R-TN) announced their positions while posting on their respective social media platforms. This, after U.S. Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) forced his colleagues to vote on the constitutionality of holding an impeachment trial for a former president. According to American Greatness, the vote was 55 to 45. Blackburn tweeted Tuesday that she supported Paul’s objection “to holding a partisan, unconstitutional trial against a former president.” “It is time for our country to move forward, instead of looking backwards and fighting the same battles with each other,” Blackburn wrote. Hagerty emailed a press release and also called Trump’s second impeachment trial unconstitutional. “Today I was sworn-in for the upcoming...
    Congressional Democrats' push to convicted former President Donald Trump of impeachable offenses is "driven by the partisan rage and the partisan anger that the Democrats feel," Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, told "Hannity" Tuesday.  "They hate Donald J. Trump and they are engaging in an act that I think is petty retribution and that is vindictive and a waste of time," Cruz told host Sean Hannity, adding, "and so I think it’s time to move on." Cruz told "Hannity" he heard the 46th president call for unity in his inaugural address, but Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., must not have gotten the message. "Unfortunately, congressional Democrats weren't listening to a word he said," Cruz said of Biden. "And the very first step that they took is to charge down the road of a partisan and divisive and angry impeachment trial." VideoTurning to the impeachment itself, Cruz argued the House's action "doesn't meet the constitutional standard. "They didn't pretend to follow due process, they didn't...
    Senate Republicans seem ready to hand former President TrumpDonald TrumpSchumer: Impeachment trial will be quick, doesn't need a lot of witnesses Nurse to be tapped by Biden as acting surgeon general: report Schumer calls for Biden to declare climate emergency MORE his second acquittal in an impeachment trial in a little more than a year after just five GOP senators on Tuesday rejected a motion that the trial was unconstitutional.  Most GOP senators haven’t formally announced how they will vote on convicting Trump and, in a shift from 2020, most are not rushing to defend him after a mob, egged on by the then-president, sacked the Capitol. But Tuesday’s vote, which sidelined the effort from Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate to vote Tuesday on Biden's secretary of State pick Leahy, not Roberts, to preside over impeachment trial Sunday shows preview: All eyes on Biden administration to tackle coronavirus MORE (R-Ky.), sends a...
    Vermont Democratic Sen. Pat Leahy was hospitalized Tuesday just hours after being sworn in to preside over the second impeachment of President Donald Trump. Leahy, 80, is the president pro tempore of the Senate. He is third in the line of succession and the most senior Democrat in the Senate. He took up his role presiding as other senators were sworn in as the court of impeachment Tuesday.  'This evening, Sen. Leahy was in his Capitol office and was not feeling well. He was examined in the Capitol by the Attending Physician, his spokesman David Carle told ABC News. In this image from video, Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, swears in Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., the president pro tempore of the Senate, who will preside over the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. Leahy was hospitalized after telling the Capitol...
    More On: impeachment Senators to be sworn in today for Trump’s impeachment trial Biden doubts Senate will convict Trump, but says trial ‘has to happen’: report Trump article of impeachment over Capitol riot sent to Senate Sen. Pat Leahy will preside over Trump’s Senate trial WASHINGTON — The US Senate was sworn in as jurors for the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump on Tuesday afternoon. All 100 senators were sworn in by Sen. Patrick Leahy, (D-Vt.), the president pro tempore of the Democratic-controlled Senate, who will oversee proceedings instead of Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts because Trump is no longer president. Congress is gearing-up for its second impeachment trial in 13 months on accusations Trump incited the Jan. 6 riot at the US Capitol by encouraging his supporters to overturn the presidential election.  On Monday evening, Democratic members of the House impeachment team walked the single article of...
    White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki took a nuanced approach when asked to elaborate on President Joe Biden’s thoughts about the second impeachment of former president Donald Trump. Biden provided an off-camera interview on Monday, shortly after the House of Representatives presented the Senate with the article to impeach Trump for inciting the insurrectionist mob that attacked the U.S. Capitol earlier this month to overturn the 2020 election. The president told CNN that the trial against his predecessor “has to happen,” though he doubts enough Republicans will vote to convict Trump and bar him from holding public office ever again. When asked what Biden meant by all of that on Tuesday, Psaki began with a longwinded tangent about how the impeachment process has played out so far. She eventually invoked Biden’s previous hope that “the Senate leadership will find a way to deal with their Constitutional responsibilities on impeachment while...
    The House impeachment managers delivered the article of impeachment to the Senate on Monday, and the Senate will convene Tuesday afternoon to issue a summons to Donald Trump for his second impeachment trial. But the trial itself won’t begin until February 9, leaving Trump time to try to find a second lawyer willing to take on his defense. South Carolina lawyer Butch Bowers will lead the defense, but other lawyers are proving reluctant to associate themselves with the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol, in addition to very reasonable concerns that Trump won’t pay them. While Republicans are trying to forestall the trial by arguing that Trump can’t be tried now that he’s no longer in office, President Joe Biden told CNN on Monday that  “I think it has to happen,” because, while the trial may be cause delays in his own agenda, there would be “a worse effect if...
    Former White House national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonPence, other GOP officials expected to skip Trump send-off NSA places former GOP political operative in top lawyer position after Pentagon chief's reported order After insurrection: The national security implications MORE is predicting the second impeachment of former president Donald TrumpDonald TrumpSchumer: Impeachment trial will be quick, doesn't need a lot of witnesses Nurse to be tapped by Biden as acting surgeon general: report Schumer calls for Biden to declare climate emergency MORE is also unlikely to end in a conviction and could do more harm to the country than good.  "Like Impeachment 1.0, the 2021 edition is badly conceived, poorly executed, and likely to produce precisely what the first round did: results 180 degrees contrary to the objectives that impeachment supporters say they want," Bolton wrote in the National Review. "Like the first, it is too narrowly drawn (first Ukraine, now the Capitol...
    When former President Trump is tried again for impeachment, it will be Senator Patrick Leahy, the president pro tempore of the Senate, who will be presiding, rather than Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts. "The president pro tempore has historically presided over Senate impeachment trials of non-presidents," Leahy confirmed in a statement on Monday. "When presiding over an impeachment trial, the president pro tempore takes an additional special oath to do impartial justice according to the Constitution and the laws. It is an oath that I take extraordinarily seriously."  Roberts presided over Mr. Trump's first impeachment trial, as designated by the Constitution. But the Constitution is silent on the question of who presides over the Senate trial of a former president, and a former president has never faced an impeachment trial.  A Leahy aide said over the weekend that it was not the senator's preference to preside over the...
    U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts is not interested in presiding over another Senate impeachment trial against former President Trump, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said in an interview Monday night. There have been rumblings that Roberts would bow out before the Senate trial, which would make way for Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., to preside. A Senate source told Fox News that the president pro tempore of the body presides in cases when the impeached individual is no longer president of the U.S. Schumer told MSNBC that the decision was up to Roberts. "The Constitution says the chief justice presides for a sitting president. So it was up to John Roberts whether he wanted to preside with a president who is no longer sitting, Trump, and he doesn't want to do it," Schumer said. House Democrats delivered the impeachment case against Trump to the Senate late Monday for the start of his historic trial, but...
    Senate Majarity Leader Chuck Schumer says the ball was in Chief Justice John Roberts's court when he was offered and declined the chance to preside over former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial. The New York Democrat told MSNBC's Rachel Maddow in an interview that aired Monday evening that Roberts is not constitutionally required to preside over the proceedings given the fact that Trump is no longer in office. "The Constitution says the chief justice presides for a sitting president," Schumer said. "So it was up to John Roberts whether he wanted to preside with a president who's no longer sitting, Trump, and he doesn't want to do it." The Senate majority leader went on to explain the logic behind the selection of Sen. Patrick Leahy, a Democrat from Vermont, as the presiding officer. "So traditionally what has happened is then the next in line is the [Senate president pro...
    A faction of Republican senators aim to defuse former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial before it even starts. The plan was presented by Sen. Ron Johnson, a Wisconsin Republican, in a short tweet thread Monday evening after the House impeachment managers delivered to the Senate an article charging Trump with inciting an insurrection in connection to the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. "I will work with other like-minded Republican senators to challenge the constitutionality of this vindictive #impeachment trial before it begins," Johnson said. "On January 6 we collectively acknowledged it was not wise for Congress to overrule the wishes of voters," he added. "Why would we think it makes sense to pre-emptively do so now?" Ten Republicans joined Democrats in voting to impeach Trump a historic second time. Trump previously was impeached in December 2019 on two Ukraine-related articles of impeachment, but was acquitted by the...
    Washington (CNN)Chief Justice John Roberts has long been a student of history, but this is one part of history -- presiding at the second trial of Donald Trump -- he can do without. Roberts won a reprieve from another ordeal with Trump, a man who challenged judicial integrity, declared he could get his way at the Supreme Court and then called the justices "totally incompetent and weak" when he failed to prevail. Sen. Patrick Leahy, a Vermont Democrat and the president pro tempore of the chamber, will preside for Trump's second impeachment trial. Heres what you need to know about impeachmentThe terms of the Constitution dictate that "When the President of the United States is impeached, the Chief Justice shall preside." And last year at this time, the robed Roberts sat high on the Senate dais for the trial of then-President Trump. It was his constitutional duty, although at...
    Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) exits the Senate chamber after the third day of the Senate impeachment trial of U.S. President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, January 23, 2020.Erin Scott | Reuters Sen. Patrick Leahy, not Chief Justice John Roberts, will preside over the imminent impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump. Leahy is the president pro tempore of the Senate, and is the longest-serving active Democrat in the chamber. "When I preside over the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, I will not waver from my constitutional and sworn obligations to administer the trial with fairness, in accordance with the Constitution and the laws," Leahy said in a statement. The president pro tempore of the Senate historically presides over impeachment trials of non-presidents. Typically, the chief justice of the United States presides over presidential impeachment trials. The trial is set to advance the week of...
    (CNN)This quiet is so startling -- like the moment when a siren is switched off -- that it almost seems unreal. Thanks to Twitter, Facebook, and votes cast by the American people, former President Donald Trump has been muted. However, this silence is not the same as absence. He remains, in fact, a threat to the political order, as the more rabid element of the Christian right would be poised to embrace him as a martyr. (Martyrdom has a significant place in the minds of many conservative Evangelicals.) The only president ever to be impeached twice, Trump will soon be tried in the Senate on the charge of "inciting violence against the government of the United States." His incitements included months of false claims that the 2020 election was rigged against him and a call for his supporters to "fight like hell," which they heeded by immediately launching a bloody...
    Sen. Patrick Leahy, President pro tempore of the U.S. Senate, is expected to preside over the upper chamber’s second impeachment trial of President Donald Trump — not U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts — according to CNN and NBC News. New – Sen. Patrick Leahy, the Senate pro tempore, is expected to preside in impeachment trial, two sources tell me and @JoanBiskupic – not Chief Justice John Roberts Senators preside when the person facing trial isn’t the current president of the United States, per one source — Manu Raju (@mkraju) January 25, 2021 Two sources tell @NBCNews that Sen LEAHY is expected to preside of the impeachment trial of Pres Trump. The Chief Justice would have presided if the trial was over a sitting president, which he is not — Frank Thorp V (@frankthorp) January 25, 2021 Leahy’s office would not confirm the reports, instead saying the matter is up...
    Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Thousands of National Guard troops will remain in Washington, D.C., through the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump thanks to continuing threats of violence against lawmakers. The number of troops has already dropped and will continue to drop from a high of around 25,000 to below 20,000 now. It is slated to drop to 5,000 in February. In addition to the threat of armed protesters returning during the impeachment trial, law enforcement agencies are looking into threats that were “Mainly posted online and in chat groups” and “have included plots to attack members of Congress during travel to and from the Capitol complex during the trial,” the Associated Press reported based on information from an unnamed official who “had been briefed on the matter.” These threats are not hard to imagine. Indeed, one of the alleged Capitol attackers already faces charges for threats against Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and for saying it’s “huntin[g] season”...
    Barely more than a year after delivering two impeachment articles to the Senate against former President Donald Trump, House Democrats Monday will make the trip once again, this time with one article charging the ex-president with inciting the Jan. 6 attack on the United States Capitol. A new cast of Democratic lawmakers will make the ceremonial march from the House to the Senate at around 7 p.m. on Monday. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler and House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, who led the last impeachment trial, aren’t part of the team this time. Instead, Rep. Jamie Raskin, a Maryland Democrat and top lawmaker on the House Judiciary Committee, will lead a group of new Democratic impeachment managers to the Senate, which includes Reps. Eric Swalwell of California, David Cicilline of Rhode Island, Joaquin Castro of Texas, and Madeleine Dean of Pennsylvania. They will deliver one article...
    Reuters January 25, 2021 0 Comments The U.S. House of Representatives on Monday will formally charge ex-President Donald Trump with inciting insurrection in a fiery speech to his followers before this month’s deadly attack on the Capitol, signaling the start of his second impeachment trial. Nine House Democrats who will serve as prosecutors will proceed through the building where hundreds of Trump supporters fought with police, leaving five dead, at about 7 p.m. on Monday (0000 GMT), carrying the article of impeachment to the Senate where Trump will face trial. A similar ceremony was carried out for Trump’s first impeachment trial last January, when the House clerk and sergeant at arms led a small procession of lawmakers through a hushed Capitol. It will mark two historic firsts – Trump is the only U.S. president to have been impeached by the House twice and will be the first to face...
    Former President Trump has the dubious honor of being the only president to be impeached twice, and is also the first to face a trial after leaving office, so the Senate will enter into uncharted constitutional waters when the impeachment trial begins next month. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday evening that the impeachment trial for Mr. Trump would begin on February 8. The House impeachment managers will deliver the single article of impeachment to the Senate on Monday, January 25. Senators will be sworn in as members of the impeachment court the following day, on Tuesday, January 26. Both the impeachment managers and Mr. Trump's attorneys will each have time to deliver legal briefs stating their cases, before the trial formally begins two weeks after the article was first delivered to the Senate. The extra time allows for both sides to prepare their presentations, and lets senators continue...
    When the House acted swiftly to impeach Donald Trump for a second time on Jan. 13, the actual Articles of Impeachment were shockingly brief. With just five pages, the first of which is completely taken up with the names of sponsors who signed onto the resolution, the gist of the single article is that Trump repeatedly issued false statements that inflamed the crowd and incited insurgents on Jan. 6. The statements cited in the resolution include Trump’s oft-repeated claim that “we won this election, and we won it by a landslide” and more aggressive statements like “if you don’t fight like hell, you’re not going to have a country anymore.” Those statements, which Trump repeated at the rally he held shortly before the insurgents swarmed up the steps of the Capitol, may seem scant. And arguments over whether they are really incitement to violence may seem to allow Republicans a lot...
    Spike Lee recently became the 34th recipient of the American Cinematheque Award. Johnny Nunez/WireImage Insider spoke to Spike Lee about politics and his four-decade career. The filmmaker also spoke about why he has decided to support disgraced filmmaker Nate Parker. "I'm not spending any of my time left...trying to argue with someone and change their mind," he said.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. There is perhaps no filmmaker better positioned to speak to the current political climate than Spike Lee. The 63-year-old New Yorker has spent almost four decades as the film world's most outspoken auteur. Just last summer, his 1989 masterpiece "Do The Right Thing" was again atop every watch list with audiences stunned by the stark similarities between the deaths of Lee's fictional character Radio Raheem and George Floyd in Minneapolis at the hands of law enforcement. So, it was incredibly fortuitous that...
    He second impeachment or impeachment against the former president of the United States, Donald trump, start the next week of February 8. He is accused of “inciting insurrection” with the assault on the Capitol. This has been reported by the leader of the Democratic majority in the Senate, Chuck Schumer. He indicated that accusations for impeachment will be sent to the Upper House this week and that procedural matters and preparations will begin. The head of the Republican minority in the Senate, Mitch McConnell, asked for a delay in the beginning of the impeachment trial in order to prepare the defense of Donald Trump. “The trial will take place in the United States Senate, and there will be a vote on whether or not to ‘convict’ the president,” Schumer said. In addition, it indicated that it will be a “full and fair trial.” ...
    Barring a last-minute deal, the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump will begin next week, triggered by the House plan Monday to deliver an article charging him with inciting an insurrection that led to the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. “The fact is, the House will deliver the article of impeachment to the Senate. The Senate will conduct a trial of the impeachment of Donald Trump,” Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor. Speaker Nancy Pelosi plans to send the article over Monday, and a trial would begin the next day unless Schumer and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell strike an agreement to delay the proceedings. McConnell, a Kentucky Republican, said he wants to postpone a trial until mid-February in order to provide time for Trump to prepare an adequate defense. The extra days, McConnell said, would also give Democrats more time to...
    Accused of encouraging his supporters to launch the invasion of Capitol Hill on January 6, former US President Donald Trump would become ineligible if found guilty. Trial begins February 8 Democratic leaders in Congress announced Friday, January 22, the date for the impeachment trial of Donald trump. It will begin the second week of February in the Senate that the upper house received the former president’s indictment early next week, reports Le Figaro. This two-week delay between the delivery of the indictment and the start of the debates will allow the Senate to confirm the members of its government. “Once the files are drafted, the presentation by the parties will begin the week of February 8”, said Friday night Chuck Schumer, the Democratic leader of the Senate. “Incitement to insurgency” Judged for “incitement to insurgency”, Donald trump is accused of having encouraged his supporters to break...
    This two-week delay between the delivery of the indictment and the start of the proceedings will ensure that the trial does not monopolize the sessions in the upper house for the start of Joe Biden’s term. The Senate will thus be able in particular to confirm the members of its government. “Once the files are drafted, the presentation by the parties will begin the week of February 8,” Chuck Schumer, the Democratic leader of the Senate, where Donald Trump is to be tried for “incitement to insurgency” said Friday evening. Mr. Schumer had previously clarified to his colleagues that the indictment “would be sent to the Senate on Monday”. “Our prosecutors are ready to defend their case before the 100 senators who will serve as judges during the trial,” Ms. Pelosi then confirmed in a statement. Concretely, these “prosecutors” – elected Democrats of the House led by Jamie Raskin...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer's commitment to holding a post-presidential impeachment trial of Donald Trump sets the stage for an "ugly, feudal farce," Laura Ingraham said Friday.  "Chuck Schumer is pushing forward with a trial almost one year after the first impeachment farce that focused on Ukraine," said "The Ingraham Angle" host. "After initially suggesting a trial next week, the Senate reached an agreement earlier to push it to February 9th. That doesn't change the facts: This is an egregious, vicious act of political violence against the U.S. Constitution and our country." Holding a trial is also, Ingraham added, "an incredibly stupid mistake that's going to hurt Joe Biden." Supporters of holding a trial, Ingraham said, should "spare us the claim that Democrats and a handful of Republicans are trying to make that they truly care about punishing individuals who incite political violence.  TRUMP IMPEACHMENT TRIAL DELAYED TO WEEK OF FEB. 8, SCHUMER SAYS "Where was their sanctimony and demand for justice when Minneapolis was smoldering? ... Or how about when...
    Democrats are really eager to get former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial started. A little slip of the tongue punctuated Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer's announcement Friday that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi will send the article of impeachment to the Senate on Monday. “The Senate will conduct a trial of the impeachment of Donald Trump,” Schumer, a New York Democrat, said on the Senate floor, in his third day as majority leader. “It will be a full trial. It will be a fair trial. But make no mistake: There will be a trial, and when that trial ends, senators will have to decide if they believe Donald Trump incited the erection — insurrection against the United States," he added, quickly correcting himself. SCHUMER: "Senators will have to decide if they believe Donald Trump incited the ERECTION against the United States." pic.twitter.com/GllUiqAEUy— Breaking911 (@Breaking911) January 22, 2021 Trump was impeached...
    Republican South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham said Thursday that some Democratic senators are getting cold feet over impeaching former President Donald Trump and fear it will “blow up in their face.” “There’s more than a handful of Democrats praying that [President] Joe Biden will get on the phone and call [Senate Majority Leader Chuck] Schumer and say ‘its over’ because they understand this is going to blow up in their face politically,” Graham told Fox News’ “Hannity.”   “I’ve never felt better about the Republican Senate conference being united behind the idea that what the House did was wrong in terms of process,” he added. (RELATED: Lindsey Graham: ‘If You’re Wanting To Erase Donald Trump From The [Republican] Party, You’re Going To Get Erased’) The House of Representatives voted Jan. 13 to impeach Trump for the second time for allegedly inciting the riot that broke out Jan. 6. During...
    Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts is apparently looking to sit out former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial — and not without good reason. Trump’s trial, in which the Senate for the first time will weigh the alleged crimes of an ex-president, presents a tangle of constitutional difficulties for Roberts, legal scholars told the Washington Examiner. That could be good news for the chief justice, who faced harsh scrutiny during Trump’s first trial and wants no part in the second go-around, according to multiple reports. The strongest argument for Roberts to stay on the sidelines is the fact that the Constitution only directs the chief justice to preside over a sitting president’s trial, said Michael Dorf, a professor of constitutional law at Cornell University. Under normal impeachment conditions, he added, that arrangement saves the vice president, who usually acts as the presiding officer over the Senate, from the appearance...
    Former President Donald Trump has picked a South Carolina attorney to represent him in his impending Senate impeachment trial, according to a close ally. Butch Bowers, of Bowers Law Office, will represent the president, Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said on a Senate GOP conference call on Thursday, Punchbowl News first reported. He did not immediately return a request for comment from the Washington Examiner. Trump was impeached last week for "incitement of insurrection" after he encouraged his supporters who attended a rally in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 6 to march to the U.S. Capitol to express their displeasure with Congress's intent to certify Biden's electoral victory. Rioters, many of which were Trump supporters, breached the building, resulting in five deaths and a widespread investigation leading to arrests and charges. Bowers previously served as counsel to the governor of North Carolina a number of times regarding HB2 litigation...
    Senator Lindsey Graham is calling on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to 'unequivocally' denounce efforts to convict President Donald Trump after he was impeached for an historic second time.  Graham referred to McConnell as a legislative 'street fighter' in an interview with Fox News' Hannity programme on Tuesday, urging all Republicans to 'stand up and fight back'. Trump was impeached on Wednesday last week over allegedly inciting his supporters to storm the Capitol a week earlier. Five people died in the mayhem, including a police officer killed by rioters. 'What we need right now is Senator McConnell to unequivocally say the second impeachment of Donald Trump after he leaves office is not only unconstitutional, it is bad for the country, Graham said. The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee also praised McConnell for 'everything that he did' to help Trump during his time as president. Watch the latest video at...
    Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., is fighting efforts to convict President Trump in the Senate after he was impeached for a second time by the House of Representatives, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., should do the same, Graham told Fox News’ "Hannity" Tuesday. "What we need right now is Sen. McConnell to unequivocally say the second impeachment of Donald Trump after he leaves office is not only unconstitutional, it is bad for the country," said Graham, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee. "Stand up and fight back." Graham praised McConnell for helping President Trump with "everything that he did" and referred to the majority leader as a legislative "street fighter." The senator extended his call to all Republican members, emphasizing the alleged unconstitutionality of pursuing a conviction after Trump has left office. MCCONNELL SAYS TRUMP 'PROVOKED' THE CAPITOL RIOT AS SENATE WEIGHS ANOTHER IMPEACHMENT TRIAL Video"Our country needs to heal," he said. "A second impeachment of Donald...
    PRESIDENT Donald Trump was impeached for the second time in January of 2020. A Senate trial will follow after he leaves office. 4U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi presides over the vote to impeach President Donald Trump for a second timeCredit: Reuters What is the timeline of Trump's second impeachment? January 6, 2021: A mob filled with Trump supporters, angry over his valid election loss, riot at the Capitol in Washington, DC, and trespass into the building. At least five people died as a result of the riot, and hundreds more were arrested. January 8, 2021: President Trump is banned from Twitter and would be banned from other social media platforms. January 11 - House Speaker Nancy Pelosi introduces a single article of impeachment charging Trump with "incitement to insurrection." January 12 - Rumors have begun spreading suggesting that Trump could declare martial law in an attempt to overturn the election. January...
    Chief Justice John Roberts is eager to avoid presiding over Donald Trump's second impeachment trial – after he became a lightning rod during the first one. Just as the Senate is seeking to ascertain how it might proceed with an impeachment trial without blowing up the start of Joe Biden's term, the Supreme Court could face its own business being rearranged. The Constitution states that 'When the President of the United States is tried the Chief Justice shall preside.' But with the Senate having been in recess since the House voted to impeach, the trial will occur when Trump is no longer in office – potentially giving Roberts an out.   Supreme Court Justice John Roberts is not keen to preside over the historic second impeachment of Donald Trump 'He wants no further part of this,' a Capitol Hill source told Politico.  Roberts has spent his tenure seeking to avoid...
    More On: impeachment Rep. Raskin: Article of impeachment will be delivered to Senate ‘soon’ Sen. Graham urges Chuck Schumer not to hold impeachment trial Rep. Raskin talks serving as impeachment manager after son’s suicide Giuliani claims he’s on impeachment defense team; Trump rep begs to differ Senate Democratic Whip Dick Durbin will not formally push his caucus to vote in favor of convicting President Trump in his second impeachment trial, describing it as a personal decision for lawmakers. Speaking to CNN’s “State of the Union” Sunday morning, Durbin (D-Ill.) made the remarks after being asked if he believed every Democrat would vote in favor of impeaching the outgoing president, to which he responded that he did not know the answer. Durbin, who is set to become the No. 2 Senate Democrat when the party takes control on Wednesday, explained that he agreed with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.)...
    Democratic senators on Sunday outlined how the chamber plans to address President TrumpDonald TrumpFacebook temporarily bans ads for weapons accessories following Capitol riots Sasse, in fiery op-ed, says QAnon is destroying GOP Section 230 worked after the insurrection, but not before: How to regulate social media MORE’s second impeachment trial, while Republican House members criticized the president in the wake of the deadly Capitol riot. Senate Minority Whip Dick DurbinDick DurbinSunday shows preview: Washington prepares for an inauguration and impeachment; coronavirus surges across the US Democrats looking to speed through Senate impeachment trial Schumer says Democrats will probe extremist groups after Capitol attack MORE (D-Ill.) said on CNN’s “State of the Union” that he would not whip votes in his caucus during the trial, saying he thought it was too important of an act to apply pressure to members to convict. “When it comes to an issue of this gravity and constitutional...
    Senate Democratic Whip, Dick DurbinDick DurbinSunday shows preview: Washington prepares for an inauguration and impeachment; coronavirus surges across the US Democrats looking to speed through Senate impeachment trial Schumer says Democrats will probe extremist groups after Capitol attack MORE (Ill.) said Sunday that he is not going to whip votes in his caucus in favor convicting President TrumpDonald TrumpFacebook temporarily bans ads for weapons accessories following Capitol riots Sasse, in fiery op-ed, says QAnon is destroying GOP Section 230 worked after the insurrection, but not before: How to regulate social media MORE in his upcoming impeachment trial. In an interview with CNN's "State of the Union," Durbin explained that the gravity of an impeachment vote was too great for Senate leadership to pressure members one way or the other. “When it comes to an issue of this gravity and constitutional importance, members really have to follow their own conscience," Durbin told CNN's Jake TapperJacob (Jake)...
    Related news The Caution takes over Wall Street again in a session in which the US Congress will vote whether to open a new reprobation process against the acting president, Donald Trump. The indices once again mark narrow swings at both ends of their graph, while the macroeconomic data provides few surprises. Various Republican congressmen have already been in favor to endorse this impeachment understanding that the leader of his party instigated the recent assault by protesters on the Capitol. However, all possibilities are on the table, except for the intervention of the president-elect Joe biden, who has already ruled out using his powers to disable his rival. With this uncertain scenario, narrow movements in which the large indices struggle to safeguard your recent new all-time highs. He Dow Jones 0.03% is left but holds the 31,060 points. He S&P 500 it has added a quarter of a point...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is holding her weekly press conference at the Capitol Visitor Center on Friday, two days after the House voted to impeach President Trump for a second time, and amid security concerns ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration. FBI Director Chris Wray said Thursday the agency is tracking an "extensive amount of concerning online chatter," including calls for armed protests ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's January 20 inauguration.  How to watch Pelosi's press conference today  What: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi holds her weekly press conference   Date: Friday, January 15, 2021 Time: 11:30 a.m. ET Location:  Capitol Visitor Center, Washington D.C.  Online stream: Live on CBSN in the player above and on your mobile or streaming device. Pelosi is expected to address to address security concerns, as well as Mr. Biden's roughly $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief proposal that he unveiled on Thursday night. The massive stimulus bill is expected...