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    (CNN)The second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump begins in the Senate on Tuesday, where senators will be confronted with the violent events of the January 6 riots and whether Trump is culpable for inciting the insurrectionists that attacked the Capitol and placed their lives in danger.The historic trial has a number of firsts: It's the first time in US history a president will be tried in the Senate court of impeachment for a second time. And it's the first time that a former President will face the prospect of conviction and disbarment of office.Trump's title of former president will be front and center during the trial's opening day, which begins at 1 p.m. ET. After the Senate approves the rules of the trial, the Senate will hear from the House impeachment managers and Trump's team about whether the trial itself is constitutional.After four hours of debate, the Senate...
    Donald Trump's impeachment trial begins on Tuesday, with his legal team setting out to argue both that the trial is unconstitutional and the former president blameless for the Capitol riot, and the prosecution painting a picture of a man whose words incited a mob to attack the seat of government in an insurrection that cost five people their lives. The nine Democratic impeachment managers for the House, which impeached Trump last month, argue that he alone was responsible for inciting the mob who interrupted the presidential electoral count. 'The evidence of President Trump's conduct is overwhelming,' the nine managers, who will serve as prosecutors, wrote in a brief. 'He has no valid excuse or defense for his actions.' Donald Trump is the first president in U.S. history to have been impeached twice by the House Trump's lawyers argue his January 6 speech is protected under the First Amendment...
    By Zachary B. Wolf | CNN When former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial kicks off Tuesday afternoon, Americans will relive — through the eyes of the senators sitting in judgment of his actions — the assault on the Capitol we all witnessed in real time just a little more than a month ago. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer offered his assessment of why the trial is necessary late Monday as he laid out the rules of engagement both sides have agreed on to conduct the proceedings. “Following the despicable attack on January 6, there must, there must be truth and accountability if we are going to move forward, heal and bring our country together once again,” he said on the Senate floor. “Sweeping something as momentous as this under the rug brings no healing whatsoever.” Here’s what we know about the trial The trial starts Tuesday. There will be...
    (CNN)When former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial kicks off Tuesday afternoon, Americans will relive -- through the eyes of the senators sitting in judgment of his actions -- the assault on the Capitol we all witnessed in real time just a little more than a month ago. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer offered his assessment of why the trial is necessary late Monday as he laid out the rules of engagement both sides have agreed on to conduct the proceedings."Following the despicable attack on January 6, there must, there must be truth and accountability if we are going to move forward, heal and bring our country together once again," he said on the Senate floor. "Sweeping something as momentous as this under the rug brings no healing whatsoever." Here's what we know about the trialThe trial starts Tuesday. There will be up to four hours of debate and then...
    WASHINGTON - The historic second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump starts Tuesday in the U.S. Senate, with Trump accused of inciting insurrection a month ago by urging his supporters to confront lawmakers at the U.S. Capitol as they were certifying that Democrat Joe Biden had defeated Trump in the 2020 election. The protest turned into mayhem, as about 800 supporters of Trump stormed past authorities into the Capitol, smashed doors and windows, ransacked some congressional offices and scuffled with police. Five people were left dead, including a Capitol Police officer whose death is under investigation as a homicide and a rioter shot by a police officer. The 100 senators — 50 Republicans and 50 Democrats — hearing the impeachment case against the single-term president are in a unique position: many of them were witnesses themselves to the chaos of January 6 as they fled the Senate chamber for their...
    Former President Trump's second impeachment trial will begin on Tuesday, February 9, as senators gather to consider whether to convict the former president of incitement of insurrection after a mob of his supporters overran the U.S. Capitol in a deadly attack on January 6. CBSN will air the trial in full and CBSN's Elaine Quijano will provide analysis after it has concluded for the day.  "CBS Evening News" anchor Norah O'Donnell will anchor CBS News' special report from Washington, D.C. She will be joined by CBS News chief White House correspondent Nancy Cordes and CBS News chief Washington correspondent Major Garrett, as well as CBS News political analyst and "60 Minutes" correspondent John Dickerson in New York. CBS News correspondents Nikole Killion, Kris Van Cleave and Jeff Pegues will report from the Capitol. How to watch Trump's second impeachment trial What: Former President Trump's Senate impeachment trial Date: Trial...
    Starts on second impeachment against Donald Trump in the Senate of state United. The result will condition your aspirations to try to return to White House. The Democrats they will need the support of up to 17 Republican senators to convict Donald Trump and disqualify him from politics. The last two seats they won in the US elections in the state of Georgia have a majority in the Upper House. Was acquitted by a Senate Republican majority of the charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress in his first political trial for pressure on Ukraine. Now he is charged with “inciting insurrection” by the assault on Capitol. The veteran Democratic senator Vermont Patrick J. Leahy He will be the one who presides over this impeachment or political trial. The Democratic Congressman Maryland Jamie Raskin will lead the team of “prosecutors.” And the congressman Joaquin Casto...
    The lawyers representing former President Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial outlined their legal defense in a memo released Monday. Trump was impeached by the House of Representatives for a historic second time in January for his role in the riots at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, and now faces a trial in front of the Senate. Read the full pre-trial memo defending Trump against the charges below: Tags: Donald Trump, impeachment
    This Tuesday opens in the Senate the second impeachment trial of the former US president, after the one that resulted in his acquittal on February 5, 2020. correspondent in New York Donald Trump has still not emerged from his media isolation, since his stealthy departure from the White House on January 20. But here he is again on the front of the stage, forced and forced. This Tuesday opens in the Senate his second impeachment trial, after the one that led to his acquittal on February 5, 2020. 1 What is Donald Trump accused of?
    U.S. President Donald Trump speaks in the East Room of the White House during an event with U.S. mayors on January 24, 2020 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer | Getty Images Former President Donald Trump on Tuesday faces the start of his second impeachment trial, an uphill battle for Democrats determined to prove him guilty in the wake of the deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol. Despite the unprecedented circumstances, the unanswered logistical questions regarding the trial and the uncertain political ramifications, experts see acquittal as the likely outcome of the trial. The House impeachment managers, led by Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., nevertheless aim to convince two thirds of the divided Senate to convict Trump of inciting the Jan. 6 invasion. But their path is filled with obstacles, including Republicans who largely doubt the legality of the trial itself and a Democratic president, Joe Biden, who's eager for Congress to get...
    More On: impeachment Rep. Waters denies calling for violence against Republicans Trump’s impeachment trial sets a troubling precedent Republicans blast Dems for Senate impeachment trial: ‘Zero chance of conviction’ Wyoming GOP censures Liz Cheney over Trump impeachment vote The Senate will kick off the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump this week, with Democrats pushing forward despite little-to-no GOP support for the effort. The trial is expected to last no more than a week, as is preferred by both Democrats and Republicans in the body. On Tuesday, House impeachment managers, led by Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.), will debate Trump’s attorneys, David Schoen and Bruce Castor, on the constitutionality of the trial itself. The trial marks the first time a former president has been impeached, despite technically still being president when the House voted. That fact has raised considerable objections by Republicans over whether the trial itself...
    The second trial against Donald Trump begins this week with a sense of urgency: Democrats who want to bring the former president to justice for the violent assault on Capitol Hill and Republicans who want to put the whole matter behind him as soon as possible. Miami World / AP The trial will begin on Tuesday, just over an exact month after the deadly riot on January 6. But most likely it will be very different from the first trial against Trump at the beginning of last year. This time, Trump’s cry of “Fight hard!” before the mob that subsequently stormed the headquarters of the US Congress. Although the result could be the same, that is, that Trump is acquitted, this process could take half as long as the previous one. Senators from both parties are still negotiating the details of the procedure, such as the length of opening arguments,...
    Reuters February 8, 2021 0 Comments Former President Trump faced a deadline to submit a pretrial brief on Monday, a day before the Senate is due to begin his second impeachment trial on a charge of inciting insurrection arising from the deadly Jan. 6 rampage at the U.S. Capitol. The nine Democratic House of Representatives lawmakers who will serve as prosecutors hope to persuade members of the 100-seat Senate to convict Trump and ultimately bar him from holding public office again. Trump ended his four-year term in office on Jan. 20, having lost the Nov. 3 election to Democrat Joe Biden. Monday’s deadline for the filing by Trump’s legal team comes as the defense prepares to emphasize its argument – laid out in an earlier filing – that the Senate lacks the constitutional authority to conduct the trial now that he has left office and is a private citizen....
    Republican and Democratic members of Congress on Sunday weighed in on the second impeachment trial of former President TrumpDonald TrumpTwitter permanently suspends Gateway Pundit founder's account Wyoming Republican Party censures Cheney over Trump impeachment vote Trump access to intelligence briefings will be determined by officials, White House says: report MORE, set to begin in the Senate this week. While some Republicans laid blame on Trump for encouraging a mob storm the Capitol last month to contest his 2020 presidential election loss, they continued to question the legality of an impeachment trial of a former president. Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSunday shows preview: Budget resolution clears path for .9 trillion stimulus; Senate gears up for impeachment trial Senate Republicans don't want Trump to testify in impeachment trial McConnell congratulates Cheney on surviving attempted ousting from leadership MORE (R-S.C.), one of Trump’s most vocal supporters during his presidency, affirmed his opposition to a trial citing...
    Former President Trump's second impeachment trial will begin Tuesday, when senators will consider whether to convict the former president of incitement of insurrection after a mob of his supporters overran the U.S. Capitol in a deadly attack on January 6. Mr. Trump will likely be acquitted, but senators are still obligated to sit through hours of arguments from House impeachment managers and the president's attorneys. The House impeached Mr. Trump on January 13, one week after the assault on the Capitol, on a charge of inciting an insurrection. Ten House Republicans joined every Democrat in voting to impeach Mr. Trump.  Here are details of the impeachment trial: How will the trial work?The Constitution grants the Senate "the sole Power to try all Impeachments," with a two-thirds vote required to convict. The president, vice president or any civil officer of the federal government may be impeached and tried. The House has appointed impeachment...
    (CNN)The second Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump is scheduled to kick off Tuesday with some of the key questions about the trial itself -- including how long it will go and whether any witnesses will be called -- still unanswered.The ultimate outcome of the trial does not appear to be in doubt: Trump will be acquitted by the Senate for the second time, falling well short of the two-thirds votes needed for conviction. But that doesn't mean the next week -- and possibly two -- will be without drama as the House impeachment managers recount the destruction caused in the deadly January 6 riot and argue that Trump was the one who incited the insurrectionists to ransack the US Capitol.House Democrats on Thursday sought testimony from Trump himself at the trial, a move that was swiftly rejected by Trump's legal team. Democrats are unlikely to subpoena the...
    One month after the assault on the Capitol by a mob of followers of the now former president of the United States, Donald Trump, the country prepares for the start next week of the second political trial of the former president, accused of “inciting the insurrection ”and that he could end up disqualified for life from holding public office. Only 30 days have passed and the political scene in the US is not the same as that of that fateful day, in which five people died in the assault on the headquarters of the federal Congress, including a policeman. Trump is now out of the White House, confined to his golf club in Mar-a-Lago (Florida) and isolated to communicate with the general public due to the veto imposed on him by the main social networks after those events. WASHINGTON, A HAVEN OF PEACE WITHOUT TRUMP The presidential mansion is now...
    U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts presided over former President Trump's first impeachment trial a year ago but in his second one set to start next week, he will not be returning because the former president is out of office.Fast Facts Sen. Patrick Leahy, a Democrat and president pro tempore of the Senate, will preside over the trial Trump was impeached for the second time last month for "incitement of insurrection" relating to the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riots That responsibility will fall to Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., who became the president pro tempore of the Senate in January when Democrats regained the majority. The president pro tempore is typically the most senior U.S. senator of the party in power and 80-year-old Leahy has served in the Senate longer than any other Democrat. The designation carries responsibilities as the third in line of succession to the presidency following the vice president and House speaker. The House impeached Trump...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Donald Trump’s historic second impeachment trial begins Tuesday, forcing the Senate to decide whether to convict him of incitement of insurrection after a violent mob of his supporters laid siege to the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. While Trump’s acquittal is expected, all 100 senators will first have to sit at their desks and listen to hours of graphic testimony from House Democrats about the riots, which left five people dead. The House impeached Trump on Jan. 13, one week after the violence. A look at the basics of the upcoming impeachment trial: HOW DOES THE TRIAL WORK? The Constitution says the House has the sole power of impeachment while the Senate has the sole power to try the individual on the charges. The person being impeached — who can be the president, the vice president or any civil officer of the United States —...
    BY MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Donald Trump's historic second impeachment trial begins Tuesday, forcing the Senate to decide whether to convict him of incitement of insurrection after a violent mob of his supporters laid siege to the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. While Trump’s acquittal is expected, all 100 senators will first have to sit at their desks and listen to hours of graphic testimony from House Democrats about the riots, which left five people dead. The House impeached Trump on Jan. 13, one week after the violence. A look at the basics of the upcoming impeachment trial: HOW DOES THE TRIAL WORK? The Constitution says the House has the sole power of impeachment while the Senate has the sole power to try the individual on the charges. The person being impeached — who can be the president, the vice president or any civil...
    Donald Trump has been impeached for his role in using lies and incendiary language, over a period of months, to subvert the 2020 election, obstruct the business of the nation, and “gravely endanger the security of the United States and its institutions.” Those articles of impeachment have been forwarded to the Senate, along with supporting documents, to show that Donald J. Trump is uniquely responsible for the Jan. 6 assault on the United States Capitol, and that his behavior on that day “was not an isolated event.” Unsurprisingly, House impeachment managers intend to focus on exactly these issues: Trump’s words, actions, and inactions as they relate to violence on Jan. 6. That includes how Trump encouraged the presences of white nationalist militias, lied repeatedly about the outcome of the election in ways meant to inflame his supporters, drove the whole mass toward the Capitol, and stood aside in pleasure as insurgents swarmed the halls...
    Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz on Wednesday offered to represent former President Trump in his second impeachment trial, telling Fox News he would be willing to resign from his seat in the House of Representatives if asked to join the Trump legal team. Gaetz, R-Fla., told Fox News on Wednesday that he has not been asked to join the former president’s defense, but offered to do so. TRUMP ANNOUNCES NEW LEGAL TEAM FOR IMPEACHMENT TRIAL "I only regret that I have but one political career to give to my president," Gaetz told Fox News. Gaetz told Fox News that he offered to represent Trump through Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, and former Trump chief of staff Mark Meadows "weeks ago." "When ethics advised that sitting House members couldn’t do it, the conversations ceased," Gaetz explained. Gaetz, though, told Fox News that, if Trump asked him to join his defense, he would accept....
    WASHINGTON -- For the second time in as many years, the House of Representatives impeached President Donald Trump, this time over the deadly Jan. 6 insurrection at the United States Capitol.With the Senate trial approaching, here's a look at things to know about what's next for the former president and Congress.Why was Trump impeached again?Then-President Donald Trump was impeached by the U.S. House for a historic second time on Jan. 13, charged with "incitement of insurrection" over the deadly mob siege of the U.S. Capitol just days earlier. The four-page article of impeachment says that Trump "gravely endangered the security of the United States and its institutions of Government."EMBED More News Videos Elizabeth Schulze has more on the historic impeachment of President Trump on Wednesday. The House voted 232-197 to impeach Trump, including ten Republicans. The proceedings moved at lightning speed, with lawmakers voting just one week after violent pro-Trump...
    (CNN)Donald Trump's new political committee took in more $30 million in the final weeks of 2020 as he made relentless and baseless claims of voter fraud, new filings show.And Trump's Save America political action committee started this year with a substantial $31.1 million in cash reserves, as the former president faces a second impeachment trial in the US Senate and works to cement his standing as an enduring force in Republican politics.Sunday's filings offer a snapshot of the continued financial backing from Trump's loyal supporter base. He formed Save America shortly after losing the election last November. Even as his legal team's claims of fraud were tossed out in courts around the country, Trump aggressively sought new donations, imploring his contributors to help fund his "election defense." The House can impeach Donald Trump, but it cant stop him from fundraising in the futureBut the first and largest cut of contributions...
    (CNN)Two Republican senators said Sunday they'll remain fair jurors and listen to the evidence presented during former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial set to begin February 9.Ohio Sen. Rob Portman, a moderate Republican, told CNN's Dana Bash on "State of the Union" that he believed Trump's comments leading up to the Capitol attack were partly responsible for the violence and that he'll keep an open mind. "I have said with regard to the President's comments that day that they were partly responsible for what happened for the horrible violence on Capitol Hill. I've also said that what he did was wrong and inexcusable. I've used the word inexcusable because that is how I feel. We'll see. I am a juror and will keep an open mind but I think the constitutionality issue has to be addressed," said Portman, who won't seek reelection after his term ends in 2022.Another moderate...
    The Weasel meets his Fuhrer Quavering under explicit threats from Donald Trump that he will start a neo-fascist third party (grossly named “The Patriot Party”), Senate Republicans, led by Kentucky blowhard Rand Paul, have signaled that there is no way they would ever vote to convict Trump for inciting the deadly insurrection that killed five people on Jan. 6, and sent hordes of stinking Trump supporters to smear feces all over the House and Senate chambers while trying to hunt down members of those legislative bodies. Now that we know this, now that it’s clear, let’s just remember who controls the trial and the admissible evidence in that trial: the Democratic Senate. Just like then-Majority Leader Mitch McConnell constrained the first trial by admitting no witnesses or evidence, Democrats are free to admit whatever it takes to paint a clear picture of the environment Trump created, which motivated and aided his incitement...
    TED Cruz and Marco Rubio lead the Republican senators blasting the "vindictive" second impeachment of former President Donald Trump. Senators Ted Cruz, 50, Marco Rubio, 49, and Lindsey Graham, 65, all appeared on Fox News on Tuesday proclaiming that it was wrong to go ahead with the impeachment. 7Senator Ted Cruz, 50, appeared on Fox News on TuesdayCredit: Splash News 7Marco Rubio dubbed Trump's second impeachment as a 'clown show'Credit: Alamy Live News 7Trump was formally impeached for a second time earlier this monthCredit: AP:Associated Press Sen Rand Paul, 58, spoke with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo following his three colleagues. Rubio dubbed the second impeachment as a "clown show," a "joke," and a "waste of time that is going to hurt America." In his eyes, putting Trump in an unfavorable position after his presidency was "typical in the third world." His comments come as Republican senators have left the charge of...
              Tennessee’s two U.S. senators on Tuesday formally objected to putting former President Donald Trump on trial for a second impeachment. Trump left office one week ago. U.S. Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) and U.S. Sen. Bill Hagerty (R-TN) announced their positions while posting on their respective social media platforms. This, after U.S. Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) forced his colleagues to vote on the constitutionality of holding an impeachment trial for a former president. According to American Greatness, the vote was 55 to 45. Blackburn tweeted Tuesday that she supported Paul’s objection “to holding a partisan, unconstitutional trial against a former president.” “It is time for our country to move forward, instead of looking backwards and fighting the same battles with each other,” Blackburn wrote. Hagerty emailed a press release and also called Trump’s second impeachment trial unconstitutional. “Today I was sworn-in for the upcoming...
    Senate Republicans seem ready to hand former President TrumpDonald TrumpSchumer: Impeachment trial will be quick, doesn't need a lot of witnesses Nurse to be tapped by Biden as acting surgeon general: report Schumer calls for Biden to declare climate emergency MORE his second acquittal in an impeachment trial in a little more than a year after just five GOP senators on Tuesday rejected a motion that the trial was unconstitutional.  Most GOP senators haven’t formally announced how they will vote on convicting Trump and, in a shift from 2020, most are not rushing to defend him after a mob, egged on by the then-president, sacked the Capitol. But Tuesday’s vote, which sidelined the effort from Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate to vote Tuesday on Biden's secretary of State pick Leahy, not Roberts, to preside over impeachment trial Sunday shows preview: All eyes on Biden administration to tackle coronavirus MORE (R-Ky.), sends a...
    Vermont Democratic Sen. Pat Leahy was hospitalized Tuesday just hours after being sworn in to preside over the second impeachment of President Donald Trump. Leahy, 80, is the president pro tempore of the Senate. He is third in the line of succession and the most senior Democrat in the Senate. He took up his role presiding as other senators were sworn in as the court of impeachment Tuesday.  'This evening, Sen. Leahy was in his Capitol office and was not feeling well. He was examined in the Capitol by the Attending Physician, his spokesman David Carle told ABC News. In this image from video, Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, swears in Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., the president pro tempore of the Senate, who will preside over the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. Leahy was hospitalized after telling the Capitol...
    More On: impeachment Senators to be sworn in today for Trump’s impeachment trial Biden doubts Senate will convict Trump, but says trial ‘has to happen’: report Trump article of impeachment over Capitol riot sent to Senate Sen. Pat Leahy will preside over Trump’s Senate trial WASHINGTON — The US Senate was sworn in as jurors for the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump on Tuesday afternoon. All 100 senators were sworn in by Sen. Patrick Leahy, (D-Vt.), the president pro tempore of the Democratic-controlled Senate, who will oversee proceedings instead of Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts because Trump is no longer president. Congress is gearing-up for its second impeachment trial in 13 months on accusations Trump incited the Jan. 6 riot at the US Capitol by encouraging his supporters to overturn the presidential election.  On Monday evening, Democratic members of the House impeachment team walked the single article of...
    The House impeachment managers delivered the article of impeachment to the Senate on Monday, and the Senate will convene Tuesday afternoon to issue a summons to Donald Trump for his second impeachment trial. But the trial itself won’t begin until February 9, leaving Trump time to try to find a second lawyer willing to take on his defense. South Carolina lawyer Butch Bowers will lead the defense, but other lawyers are proving reluctant to associate themselves with the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol, in addition to very reasonable concerns that Trump won’t pay them. While Republicans are trying to forestall the trial by arguing that Trump can’t be tried now that he’s no longer in office, President Joe Biden told CNN on Monday that  “I think it has to happen,” because, while the trial may be cause delays in his own agenda, there would be “a worse effect if...
    When former President Trump is tried again for impeachment, it will be Senator Patrick Leahy, the president pro tempore of the Senate, who will be presiding, rather than Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts. "The president pro tempore has historically presided over Senate impeachment trials of non-presidents," Leahy confirmed in a statement on Monday. "When presiding over an impeachment trial, the president pro tempore takes an additional special oath to do impartial justice according to the Constitution and the laws. It is an oath that I take extraordinarily seriously."  Roberts presided over Mr. Trump's first impeachment trial, as designated by the Constitution. But the Constitution is silent on the question of who presides over the Senate trial of a former president, and a former president has never faced an impeachment trial.  A Leahy aide said over the weekend that it was not the senator's preference to preside over the...
    U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts is not interested in presiding over another Senate impeachment trial against former President Trump, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said in an interview Monday night. There have been rumblings that Roberts would bow out before the Senate trial, which would make way for Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., to preside. A Senate source told Fox News that the president pro tempore of the body presides in cases when the impeached individual is no longer president of the U.S. Schumer told MSNBC that the decision was up to Roberts. "The Constitution says the chief justice presides for a sitting president. So it was up to John Roberts whether he wanted to preside with a president who is no longer sitting, Trump, and he doesn't want to do it," Schumer said. House Democrats delivered the impeachment case against Trump to the Senate late Monday for the start of his historic trial, but...
    Senate Majarity Leader Chuck Schumer says the ball was in Chief Justice John Roberts's court when he was offered and declined the chance to preside over former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial. The New York Democrat told MSNBC's Rachel Maddow in an interview that aired Monday evening that Roberts is not constitutionally required to preside over the proceedings given the fact that Trump is no longer in office. "The Constitution says the chief justice presides for a sitting president," Schumer said. "So it was up to John Roberts whether he wanted to preside with a president who's no longer sitting, Trump, and he doesn't want to do it." The Senate majority leader went on to explain the logic behind the selection of Sen. Patrick Leahy, a Democrat from Vermont, as the presiding officer. "So traditionally what has happened is then the next in line is the [Senate president pro...
    A faction of Republican senators aim to defuse former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial before it even starts. The plan was presented by Sen. Ron Johnson, a Wisconsin Republican, in a short tweet thread Monday evening after the House impeachment managers delivered to the Senate an article charging Trump with inciting an insurrection in connection to the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. "I will work with other like-minded Republican senators to challenge the constitutionality of this vindictive #impeachment trial before it begins," Johnson said. "On January 6 we collectively acknowledged it was not wise for Congress to overrule the wishes of voters," he added. "Why would we think it makes sense to pre-emptively do so now?" Ten Republicans joined Democrats in voting to impeach Trump a historic second time. Trump previously was impeached in December 2019 on two Ukraine-related articles of impeachment, but was acquitted by the...
    Washington (CNN)Chief Justice John Roberts has long been a student of history, but this is one part of history -- presiding at the second trial of Donald Trump -- he can do without. Roberts won a reprieve from another ordeal with Trump, a man who challenged judicial integrity, declared he could get his way at the Supreme Court and then called the justices "totally incompetent and weak" when he failed to prevail. Sen. Patrick Leahy, a Vermont Democrat and the president pro tempore of the chamber, will preside for Trump's second impeachment trial. Heres what you need to know about impeachmentThe terms of the Constitution dictate that "When the President of the United States is impeached, the Chief Justice shall preside." And last year at this time, the robed Roberts sat high on the Senate dais for the trial of then-President Trump. It was his constitutional duty, although at...
    Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) exits the Senate chamber after the third day of the Senate impeachment trial of U.S. President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, January 23, 2020.Erin Scott | Reuters Sen. Patrick Leahy, not Chief Justice John Roberts, will preside over the imminent impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump. Leahy is the president pro tempore of the Senate, and is the longest-serving active Democrat in the chamber. "When I preside over the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, I will not waver from my constitutional and sworn obligations to administer the trial with fairness, in accordance with the Constitution and the laws," Leahy said in a statement. The president pro tempore of the Senate historically presides over impeachment trials of non-presidents. Typically, the chief justice of the United States presides over presidential impeachment trials. The trial is set to advance the week of...
    (CNN)This quiet is so startling -- like the moment when a siren is switched off -- that it almost seems unreal. Thanks to Twitter, Facebook, and votes cast by the American people, former President Donald Trump has been muted. However, this silence is not the same as absence. He remains, in fact, a threat to the political order, as the more rabid element of the Christian right would be poised to embrace him as a martyr. (Martyrdom has a significant place in the minds of many conservative Evangelicals.) The only president ever to be impeached twice, Trump will soon be tried in the Senate on the charge of "inciting violence against the government of the United States." His incitements included months of false claims that the 2020 election was rigged against him and a call for his supporters to "fight like hell," which they heeded by immediately launching a bloody...
    Sen. Patrick Leahy, President pro tempore of the U.S. Senate, is expected to preside over the upper chamber’s second impeachment trial of President Donald Trump — not U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts — according to CNN and NBC News. New – Sen. Patrick Leahy, the Senate pro tempore, is expected to preside in impeachment trial, two sources tell me and @JoanBiskupic – not Chief Justice John Roberts Senators preside when the person facing trial isn’t the current president of the United States, per one source — Manu Raju (@mkraju) January 25, 2021 Two sources tell @NBCNews that Sen LEAHY is expected to preside of the impeachment trial of Pres Trump. The Chief Justice would have presided if the trial was over a sitting president, which he is not — Frank Thorp V (@frankthorp) January 25, 2021 Leahy’s office would not confirm the reports, instead saying the matter is up...
    Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Thousands of National Guard troops will remain in Washington, D.C., through the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump thanks to continuing threats of violence against lawmakers. The number of troops has already dropped and will continue to drop from a high of around 25,000 to below 20,000 now. It is slated to drop to 5,000 in February. In addition to the threat of armed protesters returning during the impeachment trial, law enforcement agencies are looking into threats that were “Mainly posted online and in chat groups” and “have included plots to attack members of Congress during travel to and from the Capitol complex during the trial,” the Associated Press reported based on information from an unnamed official who “had been briefed on the matter.” These threats are not hard to imagine. Indeed, one of the alleged Capitol attackers already faces charges for threats against Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and for saying it’s “huntin[g] season”...
    Barely more than a year after delivering two impeachment articles to the Senate against former President Donald Trump, House Democrats Monday will make the trip once again, this time with one article charging the ex-president with inciting the Jan. 6 attack on the United States Capitol. A new cast of Democratic lawmakers will make the ceremonial march from the House to the Senate at around 7 p.m. on Monday. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler and House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, who led the last impeachment trial, aren’t part of the team this time. Instead, Rep. Jamie Raskin, a Maryland Democrat and top lawmaker on the House Judiciary Committee, will lead a group of new Democratic impeachment managers to the Senate, which includes Reps. Eric Swalwell of California, David Cicilline of Rhode Island, Joaquin Castro of Texas, and Madeleine Dean of Pennsylvania. They will deliver one article...
    Reuters January 25, 2021 0 Comments The U.S. House of Representatives on Monday will formally charge ex-President Donald Trump with inciting insurrection in a fiery speech to his followers before this month’s deadly attack on the Capitol, signaling the start of his second impeachment trial. Nine House Democrats who will serve as prosecutors will proceed through the building where hundreds of Trump supporters fought with police, leaving five dead, at about 7 p.m. on Monday (0000 GMT), carrying the article of impeachment to the Senate where Trump will face trial. A similar ceremony was carried out for Trump’s first impeachment trial last January, when the House clerk and sergeant at arms led a small procession of lawmakers through a hushed Capitol. It will mark two historic firsts – Trump is the only U.S. president to have been impeached by the House twice and will be the first to face...
    Former President Trump has the dubious honor of being the only president to be impeached twice, and is also the first to face a trial after leaving office, so the Senate will enter into uncharted constitutional waters when the impeachment trial begins next month. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday evening that the impeachment trial for Mr. Trump would begin on February 8. The House impeachment managers will deliver the single article of impeachment to the Senate on Monday, January 25. Senators will be sworn in as members of the impeachment court the following day, on Tuesday, January 26. Both the impeachment managers and Mr. Trump's attorneys will each have time to deliver legal briefs stating their cases, before the trial formally begins two weeks after the article was first delivered to the Senate. The extra time allows for both sides to prepare their presentations, and lets senators continue...
    He second impeachment or impeachment against the former president of the United States, Donald trump, start the next week of February 8. He is accused of “inciting insurrection” with the assault on the Capitol. This has been reported by the leader of the Democratic majority in the Senate, Chuck Schumer. He indicated that accusations for impeachment will be sent to the Upper House this week and that procedural matters and preparations will begin. The head of the Republican minority in the Senate, Mitch McConnell, asked for a delay in the beginning of the impeachment trial in order to prepare the defense of Donald Trump. “The trial will take place in the United States Senate, and there will be a vote on whether or not to ‘convict’ the president,” Schumer said. In addition, it indicated that it will be a “full and fair trial.” ...
    Barring a last-minute deal, the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump will begin next week, triggered by the House plan Monday to deliver an article charging him with inciting an insurrection that led to the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. “The fact is, the House will deliver the article of impeachment to the Senate. The Senate will conduct a trial of the impeachment of Donald Trump,” Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor. Speaker Nancy Pelosi plans to send the article over Monday, and a trial would begin the next day unless Schumer and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell strike an agreement to delay the proceedings. McConnell, a Kentucky Republican, said he wants to postpone a trial until mid-February in order to provide time for Trump to prepare an adequate defense. The extra days, McConnell said, would also give Democrats more time to...
    Accused of encouraging his supporters to launch the invasion of Capitol Hill on January 6, former US President Donald Trump would become ineligible if found guilty. Trial begins February 8 Democratic leaders in Congress announced Friday, January 22, the date for the impeachment trial of Donald trump. It will begin the second week of February in the Senate that the upper house received the former president’s indictment early next week, reports Le Figaro. This two-week delay between the delivery of the indictment and the start of the debates will allow the Senate to confirm the members of its government. “Once the files are drafted, the presentation by the parties will begin the week of February 8”, said Friday night Chuck Schumer, the Democratic leader of the Senate. “Incitement to insurgency” Judged for “incitement to insurgency”, Donald trump is accused of having encouraged his supporters to break...
    This two-week delay between the delivery of the indictment and the start of the proceedings will ensure that the trial does not monopolize the sessions in the upper house for the start of Joe Biden’s term. The Senate will thus be able in particular to confirm the members of its government. “Once the files are drafted, the presentation by the parties will begin the week of February 8,” Chuck Schumer, the Democratic leader of the Senate, where Donald Trump is to be tried for “incitement to insurgency” said Friday evening. Mr. Schumer had previously clarified to his colleagues that the indictment “would be sent to the Senate on Monday”. “Our prosecutors are ready to defend their case before the 100 senators who will serve as judges during the trial,” Ms. Pelosi then confirmed in a statement. Concretely, these “prosecutors” – elected Democrats of the House led by Jamie Raskin...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer's commitment to holding a post-presidential impeachment trial of Donald Trump sets the stage for an "ugly, feudal farce," Laura Ingraham said Friday.  "Chuck Schumer is pushing forward with a trial almost one year after the first impeachment farce that focused on Ukraine," said "The Ingraham Angle" host. "After initially suggesting a trial next week, the Senate reached an agreement earlier to push it to February 9th. That doesn't change the facts: This is an egregious, vicious act of political violence against the U.S. Constitution and our country." Holding a trial is also, Ingraham added, "an incredibly stupid mistake that's going to hurt Joe Biden." Supporters of holding a trial, Ingraham said, should "spare us the claim that Democrats and a handful of Republicans are trying to make that they truly care about punishing individuals who incite political violence.  TRUMP IMPEACHMENT TRIAL DELAYED TO WEEK OF FEB. 8, SCHUMER SAYS "Where was their sanctimony and demand for justice when Minneapolis was smoldering? ... Or how about when...
    Democrats are really eager to get former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial started. A little slip of the tongue punctuated Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer's announcement Friday that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi will send the article of impeachment to the Senate on Monday. “The Senate will conduct a trial of the impeachment of Donald Trump,” Schumer, a New York Democrat, said on the Senate floor, in his third day as majority leader. “It will be a full trial. It will be a fair trial. But make no mistake: There will be a trial, and when that trial ends, senators will have to decide if they believe Donald Trump incited the erection — insurrection against the United States," he added, quickly correcting himself. SCHUMER: "Senators will have to decide if they believe Donald Trump incited the ERECTION against the United States." pic.twitter.com/GllUiqAEUy— Breaking911 (@Breaking911) January 22, 2021 Trump was impeached...
    Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts is apparently looking to sit out former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial — and not without good reason. Trump’s trial, in which the Senate for the first time will weigh the alleged crimes of an ex-president, presents a tangle of constitutional difficulties for Roberts, legal scholars told the Washington Examiner. That could be good news for the chief justice, who faced harsh scrutiny during Trump’s first trial and wants no part in the second go-around, according to multiple reports. The strongest argument for Roberts to stay on the sidelines is the fact that the Constitution only directs the chief justice to preside over a sitting president’s trial, said Michael Dorf, a professor of constitutional law at Cornell University. Under normal impeachment conditions, he added, that arrangement saves the vice president, who usually acts as the presiding officer over the Senate, from the appearance...
    Former President Donald Trump has picked a South Carolina attorney to represent him in his impending Senate impeachment trial, according to a close ally. Butch Bowers, of Bowers Law Office, will represent the president, Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said on a Senate GOP conference call on Thursday, Punchbowl News first reported. He did not immediately return a request for comment from the Washington Examiner. Trump was impeached last week for "incitement of insurrection" after he encouraged his supporters who attended a rally in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 6 to march to the U.S. Capitol to express their displeasure with Congress's intent to certify Biden's electoral victory. Rioters, many of which were Trump supporters, breached the building, resulting in five deaths and a widespread investigation leading to arrests and charges. Bowers previously served as counsel to the governor of North Carolina a number of times regarding HB2 litigation...
    PRESIDENT Donald Trump was impeached for the second time in January of 2020. A Senate trial will follow after he leaves office. 4U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi presides over the vote to impeach President Donald Trump for a second timeCredit: Reuters What is the timeline of Trump's second impeachment? January 6, 2021: A mob filled with Trump supporters, angry over his valid election loss, riot at the Capitol in Washington, DC, and trespass into the building. At least five people died as a result of the riot, and hundreds more were arrested. January 8, 2021: President Trump is banned from Twitter and would be banned from other social media platforms. January 11 - House Speaker Nancy Pelosi introduces a single article of impeachment charging Trump with "incitement to insurrection." January 12 - Rumors have begun spreading suggesting that Trump could declare martial law in an attempt to overturn the election. January...
    Chief Justice John Roberts is eager to avoid presiding over Donald Trump's second impeachment trial – after he became a lightning rod during the first one. Just as the Senate is seeking to ascertain how it might proceed with an impeachment trial without blowing up the start of Joe Biden's term, the Supreme Court could face its own business being rearranged. The Constitution states that 'When the President of the United States is tried the Chief Justice shall preside.' But with the Senate having been in recess since the House voted to impeach, the trial will occur when Trump is no longer in office – potentially giving Roberts an out.   Supreme Court Justice John Roberts is not keen to preside over the historic second impeachment of Donald Trump 'He wants no further part of this,' a Capitol Hill source told Politico.  Roberts has spent his tenure seeking to avoid...
    Democratic senators on Sunday outlined how the chamber plans to address President TrumpDonald TrumpFacebook temporarily bans ads for weapons accessories following Capitol riots Sasse, in fiery op-ed, says QAnon is destroying GOP Section 230 worked after the insurrection, but not before: How to regulate social media MORE’s second impeachment trial, while Republican House members criticized the president in the wake of the deadly Capitol riot. Senate Minority Whip Dick DurbinDick DurbinSunday shows preview: Washington prepares for an inauguration and impeachment; coronavirus surges across the US Democrats looking to speed through Senate impeachment trial Schumer says Democrats will probe extremist groups after Capitol attack MORE (D-Ill.) said on CNN’s “State of the Union” that he would not whip votes in his caucus during the trial, saying he thought it was too important of an act to apply pressure to members to convict. “When it comes to an issue of this gravity and constitutional...
    Senate Democratic Whip, Dick DurbinDick DurbinSunday shows preview: Washington prepares for an inauguration and impeachment; coronavirus surges across the US Democrats looking to speed through Senate impeachment trial Schumer says Democrats will probe extremist groups after Capitol attack MORE (Ill.) said Sunday that he is not going to whip votes in his caucus in favor convicting President TrumpDonald TrumpFacebook temporarily bans ads for weapons accessories following Capitol riots Sasse, in fiery op-ed, says QAnon is destroying GOP Section 230 worked after the insurrection, but not before: How to regulate social media MORE in his upcoming impeachment trial. In an interview with CNN's "State of the Union," Durbin explained that the gravity of an impeachment vote was too great for Senate leadership to pressure members one way or the other. “When it comes to an issue of this gravity and constitutional importance, members really have to follow their own conscience," Durbin told CNN's Jake TapperJacob (Jake)...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — For a second time, Republican senators face the choice of whether to convict President Donald Trump in an impeachment trial. While only one GOP senator, Utah’s Mitt Romney, voted to convict Trump last year, that number could increase as lawmakers consider whether to punish Trump for his role in inciting a deadly insurrection at the Capitol. Whatever they decide, Trump is likely to be gone from the White House when the verdict comes in. An impeachment trial is likely to start next week, as early as Inauguration Day, raising the specter of the Senate trying the previous president even as it moves to confirm the incoming president’s Cabinet. GOP leader Mitch McConnell, who says he’s undecided, is one of several key senators to watch, along with Democratic leader Chuck Schumer, who is set to take the Senate reins as his party reclaims the Senate majority. Others to...
    Sen. Lisa Murkowski says the second House impeachment of President Trump was an appropriate course of action. The Alaska Republican, known for her centrism and willingness to break from her party, released a statement on Thursday afternoon assuring her constituents that she will carefully consider the case for convicting Trump on a charge of incitement of insurrection following the deadly riots last week. “For months, the President has perpetrated false rhetoric that the election was stolen and rigged, even after dozens of courts ruled against these claims,” Murkowski said. “When he was not able to persuade the courts or elected officials, he launched a pressure campaign against his own Vice President, urging him to take actions that he had no authority to do." Although Trump claims he did nothing wrong in his bid to challenge the integrity of President-elect Joe Biden's victory, Murkowski stressed that the president's...
    VIDEO5:1305:13Pres. Donald Trump condemns the 'calamity at the Capitol'News Videos One week after his supporters stormed Capitol Hill in a deadly riot and hours after his second impeachment in the House, President Donald Trump on Wednesday delivered his clearest condemnation yet of the Jan. 6 violence. "I want to be very clear. I unequivocally condemn the violence that we saw last week. Violence and vandalism have absolutely no place in our country, and no place in our movement," Trump said in a video posted by the White House's official Twitter account. Trump took no responsibility for the attacks.VIDEO8:1308:13The Capitol siege: An hour-by-hour breakdown of how the day unfoldedPoliticsThe five-minute video, which appears to show Trump speaking from the Resolute Desk of the Oval Office, arrived as the president faces an upcoming trial in the Senate. Democrats have pushed for Trump's immediate removal from office, arguing that his presence in power...
    President TrumpDonald TrumpCotton: Senate lacks authority to hold impeachment trial once Trump leaves office Marjorie Taylor Greene says she will introduce impeachment articles against Biden ICE acting director resigns weeks after assuming post MORE is reportedly considering hiring an attorney who spoke at the "Stop the Steal" rally in Washington, D.C. last week before the president's supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol as part of Trump's defense in his second impeachment trial.  Two unidentified sources told Reuters that John Eastman, a conservative attorney who clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence ThomasClarence ThomasBiden's identity politics do a disservice to his nominees For conservative justices, faith in 'religious freedom' trumps public health Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers call for action after 'devastating' cyberattack on federal government | US cyber agency issues emergency directive following hacks | FTC opens privacy study into major internet platforms MORE and who was part of the legal team that represented Trump in cases...
    Trump has called on Americans to be united and does not discuss his impeachment while Joe Biden has asked Congress to work on priorities despite the trial. LUS President Donald Trump on Wednesday evening called for unity, saying violence “has no place” in America. “None of my real supporters could be in favor of political violence,” he said in a video message in which he never mentions his indictment by Congress for encouraging the assault on his sympathizers against the Capitol. “If you do this, you are not supporting our movement, you are attacking it, you are attacking our country. We cannot tolerate it, ”he added. Biden: working on priorities For his part, President-elect Joe Biden on Wednesday asked Congress to work on the priorities of his program, despite the impeachment trial of Donald Trump, which will open after the Democrat comes...
    Donald Trump’s trial will take place after he leaves the White House, that is to say after Joe Biden takes office on January 20. A historical situation It is the first time in the history of the United States that an impeachment has been voted twice against the same president. Donald trump would soon be tried by the Senate following the indictment by the House on Wednesday for “incitement to insurgency”. The decision was passed by 232 votes to 197. In total, ten Republicans, including Liz Cheney, the daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, participated in the vote with them. “No one is above the law, not even the President of the United States”, said Nancy Pelosi, the leader of the House Democrats on the remarks echoed by 20 minutes. In his opinion, Donald Trump represents “a danger to democracy”. He is, in fact, accused by the...
    Trump has called on Americans to be united and does not discuss his impeachment while Joe Biden has asked Congress to work on priorities despite the trial. LUS President Donald Trump on Wednesday evening called for unity, saying violence “has no place” in America. “None of my real supporters could be in favor of political violence,” he said in a video message in which he never mentions his indictment by Congress for encouraging the assault on his sympathizers against the Capitol. “If you do this, you are not supporting our movement, you are attacking it, you are attacking our country. We cannot tolerate it, ”he added. Biden: working on priorities For his part, President-elect Joe Biden on Wednesday asked Congress to work on the priorities of his program, despite the impeachment trial of Donald Trump, which will open after the Democrat comes...
              Live from Music Row Wednesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed Tennessee Star National Correspondent Neil W. McCabe to the newsmakers line live from Washington, D.C. During the third hour, McCabe weighed in on the looming second impeachment of President Trump and whether or not it would lead to a trial in the Senate. He added that he believes the president would be impeached yet may still offer a range of pardons to warriors and possibly a pre-emtptive Stephen K. Bannon. Leahy: On our newsmaker line our Washington correspondent for the Star News Network Neil McCabe. Good morning, Neil. McCabe: Hey, Mike, Crom. Glad to be with you and good morning. Leahy: Well we’ve got seven days and 5 hours left in the...
    Wednesday's House vote to impeach President Trump has teed up a Senate trial where President Donald Trump will once again decide on a team to represent him – this time on a charge of 'incitement of insurrection.' Sources have already said Trump may turn to lawyer Rudy Giuliani as he battles impeachment a second time, this time before a Senate 'jury' that may be considerably more skeptical than last time. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Wednesday he does not know how he will vote. Giuliani has been a key legal advisor to Trump while also leading a personal crusade to unearth potential dirt on Joe Biden in Ukraine as well as on his son's business dealings. Donald Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani, who has led Trump's legal effort to overturn the election results in court, is expected to head his legal effort as the impeachment trial approaches in the...
    WASHINGTON (CBS/CNN) — For the first time in U.S. history, a president of the United States has been impeached for the second time. The House of Representatives voted Wednesday to impeach President Donald Trump in a bipartisan vote to condemn his role inciting the riot at the U.S. Capitol last week. Pennsylvania Congresswoman Madeleine Dean is one of the nine impeachment managers. “I am honored to serve as an impeachment manager among my esteemed colleagues,” Dean said in a statement. “It is for the sake of our country, not the hate of one man or anyone, but for the love of our country and Constitution. The case is clear: it is our solemn duty to impeach Donald J. Trump. This tragedy must have consequences.” House Democrats and ten Republicans — including the House’s No. 3 Republican — voted in favor of the impeachment of Trump exactly one week after a...
    Bradley Cortright January 13, 2021 0 Comments The House is making history by voting to impeach a U.S. president for the second time. On Wednesday, lawmakers voted to impeach Trump on the charge of “incitement of insurrection” just one week after a mob of violent Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol.  In a stunning break from Trump, at least 10 Republicans voted to impeach him.  IMPEACHMENT LATEST• Vote happening now• 215+ House Democrats and at least 8 House Republicans support impeachment• 218 votes needed to impeachLive blog: https://t.co/uYvM2lSkm1Live coverage: https://t.co/ukmX3rVsZl pic.twitter.com/kSZ4hAWrWq— NBC News (@NBCNews) January 13, 2021 Lawmakers moved with an unusual sense of urgency after the violence in the Capitol. On Monday, House Democrats unveiled their impeachment resolution, which read, “President Trump gravely endangered the security of the United States and its institutions of Government.” “He threatened the integrity of the democratic system, interfered with the peaceful...
    The House voted Wednesday to mpeach President Donald Trump for a second time for 'incitement of insurrection,' exactly a week after the MAGA mob stormed Capitol Hill.  The Democratic majority was joined by some Republicans, making the House's move bipartisan unlike Trump's first impeachment less than 13 months ago.   Earlier, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's spokesman confirmed that McConnell informed Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer that he wouldn't bring the Senate back before January 19, the day before President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration.  The revelation came after the House cleared procedural hurdles and debate had started on the article. IMPEACHMENT TIMETABLE Wednesday afternoon: House vote on single Article What happens next? Nancy Pelosi decides when to transmit Article to Senate. When she does, it must begin trial on the next sitting day and sit six days a week until it concludes  Tuesday January 19:  Earliest date Mitch McConnell has said trial can...
    (CNN)We're looking at a second impeachment of President Donald Trump. The process will be different this time, both for the lawmakers sitting in judgment of Trump and for the man himself. One thing we know: He'll stay in office and likely finish out his term, because it takes a Senate conviction to remove him.Get the latest impeachment coverage here.One big change. Here's a New York Times report that suggests Mitch McConnell, who protected Trump from impeachment in the Senate last time, is "happy" about it now. More from CNN's Manu Raju, Phil Mattingly, Jim Acosta and Kaitlan Collins: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has indicated that he believes that impeaching President Donald Trump will make it easier to get rid of the President and Trumpism from the Republican Party, according to a source with knowledge of the matter. Another person with direct knowledge told CNN there's a reason McConnell has...
    WASHINGTON (WJZ) — Maryland Rep. Jamie Raskin has been named the lead manager of the second impeachment trial of outgoing President Donald Trump, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office announced Tuesday. Raskin is one of nine representatives Pelosi named as impeachment managers. The others include: Rep. Diana DeGette (D-Colo.); Rep. David Cicilline (D-R.I.); Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Texas); Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-Calif.); Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Calif.); Rep. Stacey Plaskett (D-U.S. Virgin Islands) Rep. Joe Neguse (D-Colo.); and Rep. Madeleine Dean (D-Penn.). The latest impeachment effort comes days after a group of pro-Trump demonstrators stormed the U.S. Capitol. The ensuing riot left five people, including a police officer, dead and lead to dozens of arrests. Ahead of a visit to Texas Tuesday, his first public appearance since the riots, Trump said the latest impeachment is “causing tremendous anger,” CBS News reported. Read more on CBSNews.com.
    The U.S. House of Representatives introduced one Article of Impeachment against President Donald Trump on Monday, accusing the president of inciting insurrection at the Capitol on January 6, 2021. As the gears of government begin to turn in an effort to oust the president in his last days, questions as to both the procedure and substance of this eleventh-hour impeachment will be raised by Trump and those who support him. We have taken a look at the likely defenses Trump will raise in his defense case. First, let’s examine two important procedural objections Trump will certainly raise about the impeachment process. 1. A president cannot be impeached after he leaves office. This is perhaps Trump’s best procedural argument against impeachment, though that’s saying precious little about its validity. The chances of success for a Trump legal defense of “once I’m out of office, I’m immune from the impeachment process” would...
    (CNN)The overall impeachment process laid out in the Constitution is relatively simple: President commits "high Crime or Misdemeanor," House votes to impeach, Senate conducts a trial.Those overall contours are constant. But there's no such thing as a routine impeachment.The one President Donald Trump faces now, after inciting a riotous mob to attack the Capitol, is unprecedented in all sorts of ways, which means the process will feel entirely new and different from the one we saw in late 2019 around the Ukraine investigation.Specifically, this House impeachment vote is likely to be done this week, and the Senate trial will occur after Trump leaves office.Here's another look at the impeachment process as it is spelled out in the Constitution and how it applies to this second impeachment of Trump, in which a US President is accused for the first time of inciting violence against another branch of government.Read MoreWhat does the...
    (CNN)The next few days are going to be long, but by the end of Wednesday, we expect that President Donald Trump will be impeached a second time. The story over the upcoming days will continue to be not just what is happening on the floor, but how the Capitol and the members in it prepare for the next week as new threats and the inauguration looms.The US Capitol has become a fortress in Washington as Democrats -- keenly aware that a new President will be inaugurated in just eight days -- grapple with how to curtail the damage that could be done by the outgoing man in the White House. The jarring juxtaposition of Democrats beginning to prepare for their new power paired with the reality of the moment is starting to sink in. Still, there is no stopping impeachment now. House Democrats are there. Senate Democrats are working through...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Two Republican senators now say President Donald Trump should resign as support for the drive to impeach him a second time is gaining momentum in his final days in office after the deadly riot at the Capitol by a violent mob of Trump supporters. Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania on Sunday joined Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski in calling for Trump to “resign and go away as soon as possible.” Murkowski, who has long voiced her exasperation with Trump’s conduct in office, told the Anchorage Daily News on Friday that Trump simply “needs to get out.” Toomey said that even though he believes Trump committed impeachable offenses in encouraging loyalists in the Capitol siege on Wednesday, he did not think there was enough time for the impeachment process to play out. Toomey said that resignation was the “best path forward, the best way to get this person in...
    Donald Trump has started putting together a defense team for a second impeachment trial with Rudy Giuliani and Alan Dershowitz said to both be in the running. Two sources told CNN Giuliani, Trump's personal attorney and the man who spearheaded the president's failed legal efforts to overturn the presidential election, is expected to represent Trump if the unprecedented event of a second impeachment trial materializes. The sources said Trump is also considering hiring Dershowitz, the controversial celebrity attorney who represented him at his first impeachment trial in December 2019 for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Dershowitz, who has infamously worked on the defense teams for OJ Simpson, Jeffrey Epstein and Harvey Weinstein, said it would be an 'honor and privilege' to defend the president for a second time.  House Democrats will introduce their impeachment resolution on Monday charging Trump with 'incitement of insurrection' for his part in stoking up the...
    Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyGovernment used Patriot Act to gather website visitor logs in 2019 Appeals court rules NSA's bulk phone data collection illegal Dunford withdraws from consideration to chair coronavirus oversight panel MORE (R-Pa.), who has played a leading role in opposing efforts to throw out the results of the 2020 election, on Saturday said President TrumpDonald TrumpMcConnell circulates procedures for second Senate impeachment trial of Trump Trump suggests building own platform after Twitter ban Poll: 18 percent of Republicans support Capitol riots MORE has “committed impeachable offenses.”  “I do think the president committed impeachable offenses,” said Toomey said during an interview on Fox News’ “The Journal Editorial Report.” Toomey is the top-ranking Republican on the Senate Banking Committee. He plans to retire from Congress at the end of 2022 to return to the private sector. Toomey said he did not know whether the Senate will act on...
    On Friday, outgoing Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell circulated a memo to Republican senators that outlined the procedure for holding another impeachment trial for President Donald Trump. According to The Washington Post, which obtained a copy of the document, McConnell told his colleagues that proceedings would most likely occur after President-elect Joe Biden is inaugurated. If the Democratic-controlled House of Representatives impeaches Trump, McConnell told his colleagues, the articles would reach the upper chamber one day before Biden’s inauguration. The upper chamber will not reconvene for substantive business until then, although it is scheduled to hold two pro forma sessions next week. Absent agreement from all lawmakers, McConnell would not be able to begin the trial before Jan. 19, the memo stressed. “Again, it would require the consent of all 100 senators to conduct any business of any kind during the scheduled pro forma sessions prior to January 19, and...
    Outgoing Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell ousts Senate sergeant-at-arms after Capitol riots Capitol Police rejected offer for help from National Guard days before deadly riot: report Shellshocked GOP ponders future with Trump MORE (R-Ky.) on Friday circulated to colleagues a memo outlining the procedure for holding a second trial for President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police officer dies following riots Donor who gave millions to Hawley urges Senate to censure him for 'irresponsible' behavior Kellyanne Conway condemns violence, supports Trump in statement on Capitol riots MORE if the House impeaches him for a second time in just over a year.  The document, which was first reported by The Washington Post, lays out how the Senate would proceed if the House approves articles of impeachment and transmits them to the upper chamber before Jan. 19, when senators are scheduled to resume regular business after the January recess. McConnell’s memo notes that the...
    By Marco Aquino LIMA (Reuters) - Peru's Congress will debate on Monday whether to start a new process to remove President Martín Vizcarra from office over corruption allegations, a month and a half after he survived an impeachment trial. Lawmakers will weigh moving forward with impeachment proceedings at the request of a group of lawmakers over allegations that Vizcarra accepted bribes of about 2.3 million soles ($637,000) from two companies that won public works tenders when he was the governor of the southern region of Moquegua. Vizcarra has denied the allegations. To approve the start of a new impeachment process for "moral incapacity," Congress must gather at least 52 votes among its 130 members. If the process moves forward, Vizcarra would be invited to make his defense before Congress. Lawmakers would then need 87 votes to approve the ouster. "We are calm. What we must say is that we hope...
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