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    Seven Republicans voted Saturday to convict former President Donald Trump in the Senate impeachment trial. In a 57-43 vote, Trump was acquitted in the Senate. Hours before the vote, lead impeachment manager Democratic Maryland Rep. Jamie Raskin made a surprise request by suggesting witness had come forward with more information about the Jan. 6 riot. The vote was approved after five Republicans joined Democrats to allow the witnesses to appear. Within hours, Democrats backtracked on the call for witnesses as there was an agreement that followed new information from Washington Republican Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler that Trump rejected House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s call to demand that his supporters leave the Capitol during the Jan. 6 riot. The agreement made it so her letter and additional evidence was entered into the record instead of having her or any witnesses testify. After the agreement the trial entered four hours of closing arguments,...
    The Senate voted to acquit former President Donald Trump Saturday of charges that he incited an insurrection on January 6. The Senate voted 57-43, meaning that the chamber failed to clear the 67-vote threshold necessary to convict Trump of the charge that he incited an insurrection on January 6, when Congress was certifying the 2020 presidential election. Seven Senate Republicans voted to convict Trump of inciting an insurrection, including Sens. Bill Cassidy (R-LA), Richard Burr (R-NC), Susan Collins (R-ME), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Mitt Romney (R-UT), Pat Toomey (R-PA), Ben Sasse (R-NE). Today’s vote marks the second time that Trump has escaped conviction from the Senate after a House Democrat majority voted to impeach Trump. House Democrats voted to impeach Trump the first time, accusing him of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. The Senate impeachment trial took a dramatic turn Saturday morning as the Senate voted to have additional...
    WASHINGTON (CBS/AP) — The Senate on Saturday acquitted Donald Trump of inciting the horrific attack on the U.S. Capitol, concluding a historic impeachment trial that exposed the fragility of America’s democratic traditions and left a divided nation to come to terms with the violence sparked by his defeated presidency. The vote was 57-43, short of the two-thirds needed for conviction. Seven Republicans broke for their party to find Trump guilty. Pennsylvania Sen. Pat Toomey was one of seven Republicans to vote to convict Trump. RELATED: 35-Year-Old Man Facing DUI Charges After Crashing Into Occupied Ambulance In Dover, Police Say The quick trial, the nation’s first of a former president, showed how perilously close the invaders had come to shattering the nation’s deep tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power after Trump had refused to concede the election. RELATED: Gas Prices Go Up Again In New Jersey, Around Nation At...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 4:05 p.m. Former President Donald Trump is welcoming his second impeachment acquittal and says his movement “has only just begun.” Trump in a lengthy statement is thanking his attorneys and his defenders in the House and Senate, who he said “stood proudly for the Constitution we all revere and for the sacred legal principles at the heart of our country.” He is slamming the trial as “yet another phase of the greatest witch hunt in the history of our Country.” And he is telling his supporters that, “Our historic, patriotic and beautiful movement to Make America Great Again has only just begun” and that he will have more to share with them in the months ahead. While Trump was acquitted by the Senate, seven Republicans voted to convict him, making it the most...
            
    The Senate voted largely along party lines on Saturday to acquit former President Donald Trump of "incitement of insurrection," concluding a fast-paced trial defined by a series of dramatic and contentious moments up until the last remaining hours of the proceeding. In a 57-43 vote, the Senate failed to reach a two-thirds majority, or 67 senators, to convict Trump over his role in the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol. Most Republicans, including Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, maintained that the Senate didn't have the constitutional authority to try an ex-president who is now a private citizen. While the outcome of the trial was a mostly foregone conclusion – marked by some confusing and surprising moments – Seven Republicans senators broke with their party and joined all Democrats on conviction: Susan Collins of Maine, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Richard Burr of North Carolina, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt...
    (CNN)Seven Republican senators joined with Democrats in voting to convict and declare former President Donald Trump guilty at the conclusion of his second impeachment trial. Ultimately, there were not enough votes for conviction, meaning that Trump has been acquitted of inciting an insurrection at the US Capitol on January 6. The GOP defections nevertheless stand as a sharp rebuke of the former President.The Republicans who voted for conviction were: Richard Burr Bill Cassidy Susan Collins Mitt Romney Lisa Murkowski Pat Toomey Ben Sasse This story is breaking and will be updated.
    By LISA MASCARO, ERIC TUCKER and MARY CLARE JALONICK WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Saturday acquitted// Donald Trump of inciting the horrific attack on the U.S. Capitol, concluding a historic impeachment trial that exposed the fragility of America’s democratic traditions and left a divided nation to come to terms with the violence sparked by his defeated presidency. Barely a month since the deadly Jan. 6 riot that stunned the world, the Senate convened for a rare Saturday session to deliver its verdict, voting while armed National Guard troops continued to stand their posts outside the iconic building. The quick trial, the nation’s first of a former president, showed how perilously close the invaders had come to destroying the nation’s deep tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power after Trump had refused to concede the election. Rallying outside the White House, he unleashed a mob of supporters to “fight...
    After a disconcerting performance of his lawyers the day before in raising the curtain, the former president would have gone into a black anger. The presentation of the case against him began on Wednesday. Democratic prosecutors hope to ultimately convince 17 Republican senators to find Trump guilty of the criminal charges against him.
    Donald Trump's team completely freaked out when Democrats and five Republicans including Lindsey Graham voted to call other witnesses in his impeachment trial Saturday, according to a report. Insiders close to the former president were said to be 'floored' 'stunned, stupefied [and in a] total panic' as the Senate voted 55-45 to allow witnesses to be called in Trump's trial for 'inciting the insurrection' on the Capitol that left five dead. The trial took a dramatic turn Saturday when House Manager Rep. Jamie Raskin of Maryland spoke on the need for hearing from at least one witness - Herrera Beutler, a Republican from Washington state.  Rep. Kevin McCarthy told her about his phone call with Trump while the violent MAGA mob was rampaging through the Capitol.  Beutler said in a town hall this week and in an interview with CNN Friday that Trump told McCarthy: 'Well, Kevin, I guess these people are more...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 3:58 The Senate has acquitted Donald Trump of inciting the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol, bringing his trial to a close and giving the former president a historic second victory in the court of impeachment. Trump is the first president to be impeached twice, and he is also now twice acquitted as the majority of Republicans defended his actions. The Senate voted 57-43 that Trump is “not guilty” of incitement. Two thirds of the Senate, or 67 votes, was needed for conviction. House Democrats argued that Trump caused the violent attack by repeating for months the false claims that the election was stolen from him, and then calling on his supporters to “fight like hell” just before they laid siege to the Capitol. Democrats argued that Trump had “obvious intent” as...
    Loading the player... Enough senators have cast “not guilty” votes to acquit Donald Trump of inciting the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. The vote will give the former president a historic second acquittal in an impeachment trial. House Democrats, who voted a month ago to charge Trump with “incitement of insurrection,” needed two thirds of the Senate, or 67 votes, to convict him. Read More: Stacey Plaskett slams Trump’s impeachment defense: ‘Black women are sick and tired’ House impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., speaks about the motion to call witnesses during the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Saturday, Feb. 13, 2021. (Senate Television via AP) The Democrats argued in the short trial that Trump caused the violent attack by repeating for months the false claims that the election was stolen from him, and then...
    By LISA MASCARO, ERIC TUCKER and MARY CLARE JALONICK WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Saturday acquitted Donald Trump of inciting the horrific attack on the U.S. Capitol, concluding a historic impeachment trial that exposed the fragility of America’s democratic traditions and left a divided nation to come to terms with the violence sparked by his defeated presidency. The vote was 57-43, short of the two-thirds needed for conviction. Seven Republicans broke for their party to find Trump guilty. THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. AP’s earlier story follows below. WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats wrapped up their impeachment case against Donald Trump on Saturday after a tumultuous morning in which they gave up a last-minute plan for witness testimony that could have prolonged the trial and delayed a verdict on whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol insurrection. An unexpected morning vote in favor of hearing witnesses threw...
    WASHINGTON -- Sen. Mitt Romney, Sen. Bill Cassidy, Sen. Susan Collins, Sen. Ben Sasse, Sen. Richard Burr and Sen. Lisa Murkowski and Sen. Pat Toomey -- crossed party lines in voting to convict Trump alongside 50 Democrats.This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.Most every senator has pledged to listen to the evidence in Donald Trump's historic second impeachment trial, but most minds were likely made up before the trial began. Democrats would need a minimum of 17 Republicans to vote with them to convict Trump of incitement of insurrection, and that appears unlikely.Still, Democrats say they are holding out hope they will win over enough Republicans to convict the former president for his role in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, in which five people died. If Trump were convicted, the Senate could take a second vote to ban him from running for office...
    (CBS NEWS) – The Senate voted 57-43 to acquit President Trump of inciting the January 6 riot in his second impeachment trial. While a majority — with seven Republicans joining the Democrats — voted to impeach him, Democrats failed to get the two-thirds majority needed to convict. Earlier Saturday, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced that a deal has been reached to skip witnesses in the impeachment trial of former President Trump, not long after a vote to call witnesses threw the Senate into chaos. A statement from Congresswoman Jaime Herrera Beutler that led to the call for witnesses was read into the record rather than calling her to testify. The 55-45 vote for witnesses included four Republicans who could vote to convict Mr. Trump: Senators Susan Collins, Lisa Murkowski, Mitt Romney and Ben Sasse. And a fifth senator’s position came as a surprise. Senator Lindsey Graham, a close Trump...
    WASHINGTON -- Most every senator has pledged to listen to the evidence in Donald Trump's historic second impeachment trial, but most minds were likely made up before the trial began. Democrats would need a minimum of 17 Republicans to vote with them to convict Trump of incitement of insurrection, and that appears unlikely.Still, Democrats say they are holding out hope they will win over enough Republicans to convict the former president for his role in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, in which five people died. If Trump were convicted, the Senate could take a second vote to ban him from running for office again. A final vote is likely on Saturday.A look at the Republicans whom Democrats are eyeing as they make final arguments in the case:McConnell to vote to acquitSenate Republican leader Mitch McConnell will vote to acquit Donald Trump in the former president's impeachment trial.That's according to a...
    Former President Trump was acquitted in an unprecedented second impeachment trial on the charge of inciting an insurrection for the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, making him the first and only president to impeached and acquitted twice in history. A majority of senators found Trump guilty on Saturday in a 57-43 vote, but the number fell short of the supermajority needed to convict the president. Had Trump been convicted, the Senate would have moved to bar the 45th president from holding federal office ever again. The seven GOP senators who joined with all Democrats in finding Trump guilty were: Sens. Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania. The acquittal means that as of now Trump can leave the door open to another White House bid in 2024, though senators have hinted they may...
    Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.While campaigning in Iowa in early 2016, Donald Trump proclaimed, “I could stand in the middle of Fifth Avenue and shoot somebody, and I wouldn’t lose any voters, okay. It’s, like, incredible.” Trump essentially did that in the last days of his presidency. He promoted a January 6 rally for what he called a “wild” day in Washington. After an incendiary speech from Trump at that event, the crowd that he had assembled—which was full of white supremacists, neo-Nazis, QAnoners, Christian insurrectionists, and other extremists—turned into a murderous mob that followed Trump’s instruction to march on the Capitol to “fight like hell” and “stop the steal.” There his marauders attacked the citadel of American democracy, killing one police officer and seriously...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — 7 Republicans vote to convict Trump at Senate trial, most impeachment defections ever from a president’s party. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate acquits former President Donald Trump of inciting riot at US Capitol, ending impeachment trial. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    US senators agreed on Saturday to omit witness testimony and to pursue the impeachment of former President Donald Trump, as planned. The last-minute agreement avoided a lengthy trial and established that closing arguments from both parties will be heard moments later. Moments earlier, the trial had fallen into confusion after lawmakers voted to consider hearing witnesses, a step that could have extended the procedure and delayed the vote on whether the former president incited the deadly assault on the Capitol. Just a month after the five-dead assault, the final arguments of the historic trial against the former president were ready for when the senators met in an unusual session on Saturday, all under the supervision of the National Guard, which continues to guard the landmark building. Confusion about the next steps to take brought proceedings to an abrupt halt. Senators crowded the upper house as leaders spoke to employees...
    The Senate voted to acquit former President Donald Trump of the charge that he incited the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol, ending a week-long attempt by Democrats to block the former president from ever seeking higher office again. In a 57-43 vote, seven Republicans voted to convict the president in an historic second impeachment trial. But it was short of the 17 GOP Senators who were needed to join all 50 Democrats in order to convict Trump, with a two-thirds majority as required by the Constitution. Republican Sens. Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska, and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania voted to convict Trump. The vote followed a five day impeachment trial featuring riveting video evidence and a last-minute fight over whether to call new witnesses. But Democrats ultimately decided...
    The U.S. Senate voted Saturday to acquit former President Donald Trump in his impeachment trial. In a 57-43 vote, Trump was acquitted in the Senate. Hours before the vote, lead impeachment manager Democratic Maryland Rep. Jamie Raskin made a surprise request by suggesting witness had come forward with more information about the Jan. 6 riot. The vote was approved after five Republicans joined Democrats to allow the witnesses to appear. Within hours, Democrats backtracked on the call for witnesses as there was an agreement that followed new information from Washington Republican Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler that Trump rejected House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s call to demand that his supporters leave the Capitol during the Jan. 6 riot. The agreement made it so her letter and additional evidence was entered into the record instead of having her or any witnesses testify. After the agreement the trial entered four hours of closing arguments,...
    More On: Trump impeachment trial Senator jokes about impeachment trial wardrobe malfunction Trump lawyer ‘Philly-delphia’ threat sparks laughter, rebuke in Senate Here’s who could be called to testify at Trump’s impeachment trial Senate Democrats call for 11th-hour witnesses in Trump impeachment trial The Senate on Saturday acquitted former President Donald Trump of an article of impeachment that charged he incited the Jan. 6 Capitol riot. The 57-43 vote fell far short of the Constitution’s two-thirds requirement, with seven Republicans finding Trump not guilty and just 43 joining Democrats who all voted to convict. Trump attorney Michael van der Veen maintained in closing arguments that Democrats were hypocritical for impeaching Trump over a heated pre-riot speech and said the proceeding was unconstitutional. “Throughout the summer Democrat leaders including the current president and vice president repeatedly made comments that provided moral comfort to mobs attacking police officers,” van der Veen said....
    WASHINGTON -- The Senate voted 57-43 to acquitted former President Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial, meaning the Senate has not convicted the former president for inciting an insurrection.Though the majority voted "guilty," it takes a vote of two-thirds of those present (67 out of 100 if everyone is there) to convict.Seven Republicans -- Sen. Mitt Romney, Sen. Bill Cassidy, Sen. Susan Collins, Sen. Ben Sasse, Sen. Richard Burr and Sen. Lisa Murkowski and Sen. Pat Toomey-- crossed party lines in voting to convict Trump alongside 50 Democrats.Although Trump is no longer in office, this means he can run for a second presidential term.This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.House Democrats began wrapping up their impeachment case against Donald Trump on Saturday after a chaotic morning in which they gave up a last-minute plan for witness testimony that could have significantly prolonged...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 3:50 p.m. Enough senators have cast “not guilty” votes to acquit Donald Trump of inciting the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. The vote will give the former president an historic second acquittal in an impeachment trial. House Democrats, who voted a month ago to charge Trump with “incitement of insurrection,” needed two thirds of the Senate, or 67 votes, to convict him. The Democrats argued in the short trial that Trump caused the violent attack by repeating for months the false claims that the election was stolen from him, and then telling his supporters gathered near the White House that morning to “fight like hell” to overturn his defeat. Five people died when they then laid siege to the Capitol. Trump’s lawyers argued that the rioters acted on their own accord...
    Former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial ended on Saturday afternoon with him being acquitted of the single charge of inciting supporters to storm the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. The decision to acquit Trump came after five days of contentious proceedings, hours of edited videos, and a bizarre abandoned plan on Saturday to call witnesses on the House Democrats’ behalf. While impeachment managers provided a systematic breakdown on how Trump’s rhetoric throughout his four-year term culminated in his incitement of the Capitol riots, they failed to garner the 67 votes needed to convict. The outcome was hardly a surprise. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell told colleagues on Saturday morning he planned to join 43 other GOP senators who had already said the unprecedented trial was unconstitutional. Six Republicans had voted that the impeachment trial was constitutional—Sens. Susan Collins (R-ME), Bill Cassidy (R-LA), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Ben...
    Former President Donald Trump was acquitted by the U.S. Senate for a historic second time. The final vote offered few surprises, as only seven Republicans joined the entire Democratic caucus to vote to convict Trump, falling TK votes of the required two-thirds majority necessary. The basis for Trump’s second impeachment was the allegation that the former president incited the deadly insurrection carried out by his supporters on the Capitol building that occurred on January 6th.  The result of the vote was predictable, but the final day of the impeachment trial was not without a rollercoaster of twists and turns. The day opened with a surprise vote to call for witnesses, which as approved, looked likely to cause the trial to last a few more weeks. After a couple of hours of recess and backroom negotiations, a bipartisan agreement was found to enter reports of Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler into the...
    WASHINGTON -- House Democrats began wrapping up their impeachment case against Donald Trump on Saturday after a chaotic morning in which they gave up a last-minute plan for witness testimony that could have significantly prolonged the trial and delayed a vote on whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol insurrection.An unexpected vote in favor of hearing witnesses threw the trial into confusion just as it was on the verge of concluding. But both sides ultimately reached a deal to instead enter into the record a statement from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say established Trump's indifference to the violence.Republicans are anxious to get the trial over with and discussion of Trump and the Capitol invasion behind them. Democrats, too, have a motive to move on since the Senate cannot...
    DONALD Trump's impeachment trial could likely end today after a chaotic turn of events forced the trial to an abrupt halt on Saturday as Senators deliberated over allowing witness testimony. The trial resumed again over an hour later after the senators negotiated the impeachment trial's rules ahead of the legal teams' final arguments. 9The final vote would likely spill into next week as the Senate is due to convene at 10am todayCredit: Reuters 9Michael van der Veen, lawyer for former President Donald Trump, suggested that Trump using the phrase "peaceful and patriotic" to describe the riots during his speechCredit: Handout - Getty Trump is the first to be impeached twice and the first to face trial after leaving office. If he's convicted, which seems unlikely at the moment, the Senate could bar him from running for office again. By 1PM, Senate leaders were working on an agreement early Saturday...
    President Biden is spending the weekend at Camp David for the first time in his presidency as the Senate wraps up its second impeachment trial of his predecessor, former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE.  A White House official confirmed to reporters that Biden and his family were spending the weekend at the mountain retreat in western Maryland that has become a traditional getaway destination for U.S. presidents.  The official added that Biden was scheduled to meet with his national security advisers on Saturday.  Reuters reported that Biden arrived at the heavily-guarded compound operated by the U.S. Navy on Friday, and was joined by national security adviser Jake SullivanJake SullivanUS calls for Turkey to release jailed philanthropist Biden takes cautious tack...
    Lead House impeachment manager Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinTrump lawyers center defense around attacks on Democrats Democrats dismiss claims they misrepresented evidence during impeachment trial Democrats warn of 'whataboutism' ahead of Trump defense MORE (D-Md.) on Saturday invoked his late son, Thomas, in his closing arguments. As he was concluding his arguments during former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE's impeachment trial, Raskin detailed a conversation he had with his daughter, Hannah, about a man who said goodbye to his children before attending the events of Jan. 6. Raskin said that his daughter was able to see beyond the politics or legality of the situation, and saw the humanity of it. "Hannah saw through the legality of the situation,...
    WASHINGTON -- House Democrats began wrapping up their impeachment case against Donald Trump on Saturday after a chaotic morning in which they gave up a last-minute plan for witness testimony that could have significantly prolonged the trial and delayed a vote on whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol insurrection.An unexpected vote in favor of hearing witnesses threw the trial into confusion just as it was on the verge of concluding. But both sides ultimately reached a deal to instead enter into the record a statement from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say established Trump's indifference to the violence.Republicans are anxious to get the trial over with and discussion of Trump and the Capitol invasion behind them. Democrats, too, have a motive to move on since the Senate cannot...
    At this very fraught moment in history, America is facing dire emergencies related to public health, to the economy, and to the very moral fiber of our democracy. It is vital that our nation’s leaders address all these emergencies with every ounce of their will. This week, even as the new Biden-Harris administration continues to tackle the urgent crises of the pandemic and the economic travails, the U.S. Senate is taking time to attend to the equally pressing matter of trying former President Donald J. Trump of the United States on a charge of incitement to insurrection. Some may ask: if the votes aren’t there from the very get-go, if an acquittal seems to be a foregone conclusion, then why even go through with the impeachment trial? The answer is that even if we think we know how the impeachment trial of Donald Trump will end, we need to go...
    (CNN)On Saturday morning, Democrats appeared to score a coup: Winning a surprise vote on calling witnesses in the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump.On Saturday afternoon, Democrats agreed to end the trial without calling any witnesses.If that seems odd to you, well, you are far from alone. The Democrats' rapid backtrack left almost everyone not in the Senate scratching their heads, wondering why the party blinked when it appeared to be on the verge of getting more testimony that would shine a light on exactly what Trump knew and when he knew it during the January 6 riot at the Capitol.(Sidebar: Senate Democrats will point to the fact that they got a statement from Washington GOP Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler detailing her side of an angry call between House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and Trump on the day of the riot. Sure. But why not depose Beutler as a...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 3:15 p.m. A lawyer for Donald Trump says everyone acknowledges the horror of the deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol last month but that the former president wasn’t responsible for it. Michael van der Veen gave his closing arguments on the Senate floor on Saturday in the impeachment trial of Trump. He says there is no evidence that Trump incited an “armed insurrection” to “overthrow the U.S. government” and to think that Trump would have wanted that is “absurd.” He says the event on Jan. 6 was supposed to be peaceful but that a small group “hijacked” it for their own purposes. He also repeated the arguments from Friday that other politicians have engaged in incendiary rhetoric, though impeachment managers noted that none of those speeches precipitated an attack on the U.S. government....
    (CNN)After a brief Saturday morning surprise, when it appeared former President Donald Trump's unprecedented second impeachment trial could feature witnesses and drag on perhaps for weeks, senators rallied around the idea of wrapping things up instead.What We Expect Today This is the fifth day of Trump's second impeachment trial The Senate is on track for a final impeachment vote as Democrats mull calling witnesses Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell has told colleagues he will vote to acquit Trump Trump is widely expected to be acquitted of the single charge of inciting a riotous mob to attack the Capitol on January 6, an episode that interrupted the final tally of Electoral College votes that sealed Joe Biden's victory in the 2020 presidential election.Here are six takeaways as Trump's history-making trial nears its end:Offered an opening, Democrats let Trump offHouse Democrats forced Trump's second impeachment, presenting a compelling case that he...
    Washington (CNN)Senators voted on a surprise move by the House managers on Saturday to allow for witnesses in the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump.That created a long recess in which senators mingled as leadership, impeachment managers and lawyers for Trump discussed and agreed to add to the record the account of a phone call between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, as recounted by a House Republican congresswoman.However, the Senate controls the TV cameras in the chamber. The feed is turned off when the Senate is in recess, and when it is in session the cameras are most often kept with a tight focus on whomever is speaking. Artist Bill Hennessy has been in the chamber all week and was able to see what happened during the recess and beyond. Here are his latest sketches:Sen. Susan Collins, Sen. Lisa Murkowski, and Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (seated, left to...
    Lawmakers at the topsy-turvy impeachment trial have been waiting for the other shoe to drop — and sometimes it doesn’t quite match. Sen. Tina Smith (D-Minn.) noticed one of her flats was black, and the other gold, during an early-morning wardrobe malfunction. “Think I had a lot on my mind this morning,” she tweeted Saturday morning alongside a photo of her mismatched feet. Minutes earlier, Smith fired off a Tweet denouncing former President Trump’s lawyers over their arguments Friday. “It’s taken me a full night to get over the ridiculous display put on by Trump lawyers in the impeachment trial yesterday. It felt like high school, and I’m not talking civics class,” she wrote.
    By LISA MASCARO, ERIC TUCKER and MARY CLARE JALONICK WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats began wrapping up their impeachment case against Donald Trump on Saturday after a tumultuous morning in which they gave up a last-minute plan for witness testimony that could have significantly prolonged the trial and delayed a vote on whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol insurrection. An unexpected morning vote in favor of hearing witnesses threw the trial into confusion just as it was on the verge of concluding. But both sides ultimately reached a deal to instead enter into the record a statement from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say established Trump’s indifference to the violence. Republicans are anxious to get the trial over with and discussion of Trump and the Capitol invasion behind...
    More On: Trump impeachment trial Trump lawyer ‘Philly-delphia’ threat sparks laughter, rebuke in Senate Here’s who could be called to testify at Trump’s impeachment trial Senate Democrats call for 11th-hour witnesses in Trump impeachment trial Mitch McConnell tells fellow GOP senators he will vote to acquit Trump Lawmakers at the topsy-turvy impeachment trial have been waiting for the other shoe to drop — and sometimes it doesn’t quite match. Sen. Tina Smith (D-Minn.) noticed one of her flats was black, and the other gold, during an early-morning wardrobe malfunction. “Think I had a lot on my mind this morning,” she tweeted Saturday morning alongside a photo of her mismatched feet. Minutes earlier, Smith fired off a Tweet denouncing former President Trump’s lawyers over their arguments Friday. “It’s taken me a full night to get over the ridiculous display put on by Trump lawyers in the impeachment trial yesterday....
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has told fellow Republicans that he plans to vote to acquit Donald Trump on charges incitement of insurrection – a signal that the House-led effort to convict the former president will fail. McConnell made his position known on what could be the last day of the former president's impeachment trial. 'While a close call, I am persuaded that impeachments are a tool primarily of removal and we therefore lack jurisdiction,' McConnell said in the letter.   Although he had denounced Trump's actions in an emotional Senate floor speech immediately after the Jan. 6 MAGA riot in the Capitol, McConnell also did not act to hasten the impeachment trial while Trump was still in office. Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (middle - on the Senate floor today) has told colleagues he will vote to acquit Trump He voted along with 44 other Republicans that the...
    Washington (CNN)The Republican congresswoman who triggered a surprise call for witnesses in the waning hours of former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial has logged a decade in Congress -- at times breaking from her party and standing up to Trump.Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington state on Saturday was at the center of House impeachment managers' push to call witnesses in the Senate proceedings, following revelations that she had kept "copious notes" about a call between Trump and House GOP leader Kevin McCarthy on the day of the January 6 attack on the US Capitol. Herrera Beutler and other Republicans briefed on the conversation had confirmed to CNN that Trump commented the would-be insurrectionists cared more about the election results than McCarthy. The House managers and Trump's legal team ultimately agreed to insert a statement from the congresswoman into the trial record, rather than pushing for a deposition.Despite causing...
    The Senate voted Saturday to have additional witnesses testify during former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial. The Senate voted 55-45 to have additional witnesses testify during the second impeachment trial. Five Senate Republicans voted with Democrats to have more witnesses add their testimony to the trial. Sens. Susan Collins (R-ME), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Mitt Romney (R-UT), Ben Sasse (R-NE), and Lindsey Graham (R-SC) voted for more witnesses. Graham originally voted against additional witnesses but then flipped his vote right before the vote closed. Trump defense attorney Michael van der Veen said that if Democrats want more witnesses, then he needs to depose House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Vice President Kamala Harris. Van der Veen said he would need up to 100 depositions. He said he cannot depose both Pelosi and Harris “by Zoom.” He argued that he needs to depose those witnesses in “person, in my office, in...
    Sen. Joni Ernst (R-IA) said Saturday that the Senate voting for additional witnesses turned the impeachment trial into a “total shit show” and said that if Democrats want more witnesses, then Republicans will drag out the trial. Ernst spoke to a reporter after the Senate voted to approve witnesses for former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial. The approval of additional witnesses will likely delay the impeachment trial, which could have concluded on Saturday if the Senate did not want to subpoena additional witnesses. The Senate still has to decide on which witnesses it wishes to subpoena, which further complicates the Senate’s proceedings. “Total, total shit show,” Joni Ernst says when I asked about her reaction to this, calling it “a tool of revenge” against Trump. Adds: “if they want to drag this out, we’ll drag it out. They won’t get their noms, they won’t get anything.” — Emily Cochrane...
    Marjorie Taylor Greene lashed out at fellow GOP Representative Jamie Herrera Beutler on Saturday for turning on the Republican Party, calling her 'the gift that keeps on giving to the Democrats.' Taylor Greene is specifically referencing Herrera revealing details this week of a January 6 phone conversation between House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and former president Doanld Trump. 'First voting to impeach innocent President Trump, then yapping to the press and throwing @GOPLeader under the bus, and now a tool as a witness for the Democrats running the circus trial,' Taylor Greene tweeted on Saturday. 'The Trump loyal 75 million are watching.' Only 10 Republican congressmen and women voted to impeach Trump last month – exactly one week after the Capitol attack. Taylor Greene, who famously was booted from her committee assignments earlier this month for pushing QAnon conspiracies, said the impeachment is a 'sham.' 'Another sham impeachment trial WITHOUT...
    Roberto Schmidt/AFP, Getty Images Former President Donald Trump was caught on camera golfing through some of the most dramatic moments of his Senate impeachment trial for incitement of the Capitol insurrection. On Thursday, Democratic House impeachment managers presented compelling evidence that featured recordings of Trump supporters bragging that they were carrying out his will by staging the insurrection and a parade of Republican figures — including members of Trump’s own administration — condemning his role in the attack. All the while, Trump was hitting the links at the Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach. Despite tight security around the ex-president, Mediaite has obtained photos of Trump’s outing, in which the current defendant in the Senate impeachment trial can be seen through the palm trees in his familiar golf attire. Photo obtained by Mediaite And here’s another look. Photo obtained by Mediaite Mediaite has confirmed the date and location...
    Frustration spilled out on the Senate floor Saturday morning as Sen. Ron Johnson got into a heated conversation with Sen. Mitt Romney, as the Utah senator voted to allow witnesses at former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial. Johnson, R-Wis., turned to Romney in the Senate chamber during the vote visibly upset and even pointed a finger at Romney. The two Republicans were exchanging words back and forth as fellow GOP Sen. Dan Sullivan of Alaska acted as a buffer between them.   TRUMP IMPEACHMENT TRIAL CURVEBALL: SENATE WANTS TO HEAR FROM WITNESSES Johnson was overheard by a Fox News reporter in the Senate chamber telling Romney, "blame you." Their voices were raised.  Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, and Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., got into a dustup Saturday during a Senate impeachment vote on allowing witness testimony. (Reuters/FOX) Romney was one of five Republicans to join Democrats in a 55-45 vote to extend...
    Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Associated Press, Kentucky
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Senate agreed on Saturday to admitting a statement by Republican lawmaker Jaime Herrera Beutler into evidence in former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial. In the statement, the lawmaker said the top House Republican, Kevin McCarthy, had told her about a call he had with Trump on Jan. 6, during a riot when hundreds of Trump supporters stormed the Capitol, in which Trump said, "Well, Kevin, I guess these people are more upset about the election than you are." (Reporting by Richard Cowan; Writing by Makini Brice; editing by Diane Craft) Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters. Tags: United States, crime
    The House impeachment managers and team defending former President Donald Trump reached an agreement Saturday that will prevent additional witnesses from testifying. The agreement followed revelations from Washington Republican Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler that Trump rejected House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s pleas to demand that his supporters leave the Capitol on Jan. 6 and a subsequent, unexpected Senate vote to call witnesses. As a result of the agreement, the trial entered four hours of closing arguments, setting up a final vote later on Saturday. Instead of calling Herrera Beutler and additional witnesses, which the House managers supported, her letter and the relevant evidence will be entered into the trial record. Though Senate Democrats voted overwhelmingly to call additional witnesses to testify, they were reportedly caught off-guard by the late revelations and the subsequent calls for additional testimony. (RELATED: McConnell Says He’ll Vote To Acquit Trump) House Clerk Cheryl Johnson, Rep. Jamie...
    WASHINGTON - Concluding a morning of surprising changes, the U.S. Senate reached an agreement to avoid witness testimony in the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump. Earlier, five Republican senators voted with all 50 Democrats to hear testimony from witnesses.  The vote was a somewhat surprising development, as the Senate was expected to hear closing arguments from each side, followed by a vote later Saturday to acquit or convict Trump, bringing an end to the trial that began Tuesday. The vote to call witnesses came after Congressman Jamie Raskin, the lead House impeachment manager, announced Saturday that he wanted to subpoena Republican Congresswoman Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington state.  Beutler issued a statement late Friday that House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy told her Trump had expressed sympathy and admiration for the mob during a heated phone call between the two amid the unfolding attack on the Capitol. "When...
    House impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., speaks during the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump in the U.S. Senate, Feb. 11, 2021. Senate Television via AP Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.After winning a call for witnesses on Saturday morning, Democrats agreed not to call any and instead enter a statement from Republican Congresswoman Jamie Herrera Beutler detailing how Trump was asked by Kevin McCarthy to call off the mob and refused to do so. In so doing, Democrats chose not to prolong the trial even though their party controls the Senate, paving the way for a Trump acquittal Saturday evening.   House managers said the evidence they had presented over the course of the week had proved sufficient. Lead House impeachment manager Jamie Raskin quoted GOP Congresswoman Liz...
    And now, the senate will take a week off from all its hard work As the House Managers and Trump’s give their closing arguments, the end of the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump approaches its pre-ordained conclusion. The impeachment trial is being aired on major television news networks and streamed on their websites. Daily Kos will have continuing coverage. Saturday, Feb 13, 2021 · 6:57:48 PM +00:00 · Mark Sumner We’re back from the break forced by Mike Lee once again engaging in some kind of rule-breaking stunt. Rep. Madeleine Dean is up for the House managers, giving the closing argument recap of Trump’s incitement. First time we’ve had video in the closing arguments.
    I see that people are apoplectic on Twitter about the Democrats “caving” on witnesses after Lindsey Graham and a handful of other Republicans abruptly called their bluff and voted to allow them. But people shouldn’t be upset. That was the right move for Democrats for two reasons. First, witnesses or no witnesses, this is a foreordained reality show, so let’s just get on with it and get it ended. And second, to the extent that there is a hunger to get to the bottom of everything that happened on Jan. 6, and I hope that extent is considerable across the nation, there is a far better venue for doing so than an impeachment trial. Impeachment Covid-19 Cheat Sheet Politics Entertainment Media World Half Full U.S. News Scouted Travel Beast Inside Crossword Newsletters About Contact Tips Jobs Advertise Help Privacy Code of Ethics & Standards...
    After a disconcerting performance of his lawyers the day before in raising the curtain, the former president would have gone into a black anger. The presentation of the case against him began on Wednesday. Democratic prosecutors hope to ultimately convince 17 Republican senators to find Trump guilty of the criminal charges against him.
    Trump loyalist Sen. Ron Johnson shouted 'blame you' at Sen. Mitt Romney Saturday on the Senate floor and then called it 'grotesque' that reporters documented it.  Reporters in the Senate chamber observed that Johnson was visibly upset at Romney, even pointing at him, after Romney, along with four other GOP senators, agreed to allow witnesses to be called in former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial.  Head impeachment manager, Rep. Jamie Raskin, made the surprise request Saturday morning after new details came out about a call between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, which seemed to indicate that the president refused to call off the MAGA mob on January 6.  Sen. Ron Johnson, a top Trump ally, went after Sen. Mitt Romney Saturday morning, after Romney voted in favor of having witnesses at President Donald Trump's impeachment trial  Sen. Mitt Romney, who had also voted in favor of...
    Washington Republican Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler released a statement Friday night describing a Jan. 6 phone call between former President Donald Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy. After rioters had breached the Capitol, McCarthy got in touch with Trump and pleaded with him to tell his supporters to leave, according to Herrera Beutler. In response, Trump falsely blamed Antifa for the violence, and after being refuted by McCarthy, allegedly said, “Well, Kevin, I guess these people are more upset about the election than you are.” The Washington congresswoman, one of 10 Republicans who voted to impeach Trump in January, added that she had previously shared these details among her colleagues, local Republican officials and in her local paper. “To the patriots who were standing next to the former president as these conversations were happening, or even to the former vice president: if you have something to add here, now...
    Democrats and Donald Trump’s defense reached an agreement on Saturday that makes it possible to avoid the summons of witnesses and to advance in the trial, which should thus lead to a verdict within the day. The agreement was announced by the two parties in open session in the Senate, which has been judging the former Republican president since Tuesday for “incitement to insurrection”. Democratic prosecutors announced earlier today that they wanted to hear from Republican MP Jaime Herrera Beutler, which reportedly delayed proceedings. His testimony was finally read in session and entered into the file. Each party will now present its conclusions.
    By LISA MASCARO, ERIC TUCKER and MARY CLARE JALONICK WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats began wrapping up their impeachment case against Donald Trump on Saturday after a chaotic morning in which they gave up a last-minute plan for witness testimony that could have significantly prolonged the trial and delayed a vote on whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol insurrection. An unexpected vote in favor of hearing witnesses threw the trial into confusion just as it was on the verge of concluding. But both sides ultimately reached a deal to instead enter into the record a statement from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say established Trump’s indifference to the violence. Republicans are anxious to get the trial over with and discussion of Trump and the Capitol invasion behind them....
    (CNN)Marc Short, former Vice President Mike Pence's chief of staff, has been contacted about providing information to House impeachment managers about threats to Pence during last month's Capitol riot, a source familiar with the matter tells CNN.Short has not responded, said the source, who added that managers are also seeking information from Chris Hodgson, Pence's former head of legislative affairs, whom House managers believe was also with Pence that day.House managers unexpectedly asked the Senate Saturday morning to allow them to bring forward witnesses in former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial, in which the threat posed to Pence during the riot has been a central focus. The Senate and trial lawyers instead agreed hours later to insert the statement of a House Republican into the trial record, moving the trial toward a final vote later Saturday. Trumps second impeachment trial: Day 5A former Pence staffer tells CNN that on January...
    More On: capitol riot Trump lawyer ‘Philly-delphia’ threat sparks laughter, rebuke in Senate Here’s who could be called to testify at Trump’s impeachment trial Senate votes to accept surprise witness request in Trump impeachment trial Senate Democrats call for 11th-hour witnesses in Trump impeachment trial The Senate and lawyers for former President Donald Trump on Saturday reached a deal to avoid witness depositions in his impeachment trial — averting a potentially weeks-long drama sparked by an 11th-hour request by Democrats to depose a Republican congresswoman. The deal allowed for a statement by Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (R-Wash.) to be read into the record without the congresswoman or anyone else being deposed as a formal witness. The compromise allows for the trial potentially to end on Saturday as was initially expected. Trump is expected to be acquitted of inciting the Jan. 6 Capitol riot in a mostly party-line vote. Impeachment...
    Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Associated Press
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 1 p.m. Senators have resumed Donald Trump’s impeachment trial without calling witnesses after agreeing to accept new information from a Republican congresswoman about his actions on the day of the deadly Capitol siege. After a delay of several hours, the trial is back on track with closing arguments and Saturday’s session heading toward a vote on the verdict. Under the deal, Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler’s statement on a phone call between Trump and House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy as rioters stormed the Capitol was entered into the trial record as evidence. No further witnesses were called. Senators brought the proceedings to a standstill when a majority voted Saturday morning to consider potential witnesses. The information from Herrera Beutler sparked fresh interest on Trump’s actions that day. ___ HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW...
    Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceTrump lawyers say former president did not know Pence was in danger at the Capitol Key GOP senators question when Trump knew Capitol was breached The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump's lawyers begin oral arguments, hoping for a reset MORE has emerged as a key figure in former President Donald Trump's Senate impeachment trial, but those close to the former vice president say he has no intention of getting involved. Pence's name has been invoked repeatedly during the proceedings this week. The then-vice president was escorted out of the Senate chamber on Jan. 6 as pro-Trump rioters stormed the complex, and the timeline of events has left unanswered questions about when the former president knew Pence was in danger and what, if anything, he did to intervene. As the Senate mulls how to proceed, Pence has become something akin to what former national security adviser John BoltonJohn Bolton...
    More On: Trump impeachment trial Here’s who could be called to testify at Trump’s impeachment trial Senate Democrats call for 11th-hour witnesses in Trump impeachment trial Mitch McConnell tells fellow GOP senators he will vote to acquit Trump Democrats delay Trump impeachment trial with 11th-hour call for witnesses The Senate erupted in rare laughter Saturday when former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial defense attorney Michael van der Veen threatened to haul Democrats to his law office in “Philly-delphia” for depositions. Van der Veen, outraged at a surprise Democratic move for witnesses in the trial, scolded senators for laughing, apparently believing they found the substance of his legal argument humorous rather than his intended or errant slip of the tongue. The moment of levity came as the trial, which was expected to end after closing arguments on Saturday, drew heated as it was prolonged by the request for at least...
    Democratic Sen. Sheldon White House believes that Donald Trump’s impeachment trial should be suspended to make way for an investigation into his administration’s communications that took place amid the January 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. “Suspend trial to depose McCarthy and Tuberville under oath and get facts,” he wrote in a Friday Twitter thread. “Ask Secret Service to produce for review comms back to White House re VP Pence safety during siege. What did Trump know, and when did he know it?” The remark was part of a thread on the recent CNN report about Trump and House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy’s alleged heated phone call amid the Capitol chaos. Notably, McCarthy reportedly attempted to get Trump to call off his supporters. In response, the president allegedly brushed off the lawmaker’s pleas. Elsewhere, Republican Sen. Tommy Tuberville claimed that he spoke to Trump during a call with journalists and...
    A longer trial could slow down Democratic President Joe Biden’s efforts to put the controversies surrounding his predecessor behind him and push his own legislative agenda on COVID-19 relief and economic revival. Much of this week’s trial has focused on how much Trump knew about the insurgents’ actions when they swept through Congress on January 6 seeking to prevent lawmakers from certifying the victory of Democrat Joe Biden in the November election. Herrera Beutler, one of 10 people from his party who voted last month in the House of Representatives in favor of Trump’s impeachment, related in a statement late Friday the details of a call between Trump and the top Republican of the House, Kevin McCarthy. “‘Well Kevin, I guess these people are more upset about the election than you are,’” Beutler quoted Trump as saying. The representative said Trump had initially denied that his...
    Senate Democrats and Republicans cut a last-minute deal to avoid calling witnesses, agreeing to enter into the record a statement about House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s phone call with Donald Trump while the Capitol was under attack on Jan. 6. The deal averts what might have been an indefinite extension of the impeachment trial and a protracted fight over witnesses. The trial is now expected to wrap as early as Saturday evening. Instead of calling witnesses, lead impeachment manager Jamie Raskin read a statement from Rep. Jamie Herrera Beutler, a Washington Republican who disclosed her knowledge of the conversation between Trump and McCarthy, a California Republican. Beutler, in a statement Friday, said she has disclosed many times over the past month her knowledge of the McCarthy-Trump conversation. “When McCarthy finally reached the president on Jan. 6 and asked him to publicly and forcefully call off the riot, the...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 12:45 p.m. Senate leaders are working on an agreement that could end a standoff over calling witnesses in Donald Trump’s impeachment trial and allow it to proceed with closing arguments and a vote on whether he incited the deadly Capitol siege. Under the agreement being discussed, the information that a Republican congresswoman has made public about Trump’s actions on the day of the riot would be entered into the record of the trial in exchange for Democrats dropping plans to deposition testimony from the congresswoman, Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington No witnesses would be called to testify. That would allow the trial to resume Saturday with closing arguments and a vote on the verdict. A Democrat granted anonymity to discuss the private talks confirmed the pending agreement. The Senate came to a...
    By LISA MASCARO, ERIC TUCKER and MARY CLARE JALONICK WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate reached a deal on Saturday to skip witness testimony in the impeachment trial of former president Donald Trump. The agreement averts a prolonged trial and sets up closing arguments from both sides on Saturday. THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. AP’s earlier story follows below. WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate impeachment trial of Donald Trump was thrown into confusion Saturday as lawmakers voted to consider hearing witnesses, a step that could significantly extend the proceedings and delay a vote on whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol insurrection. The last-minute fight over witnesses followed Friday night revelations from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say establishes Trump’s indifference to the violence. Leaders were considering an arrangement...
    WASHINGTON -- No witnesses will be called to the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, ABC News has learned.The written testimony of Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler was admitted into evidence, and neither the Trump legal team nor the House Managers made any further motions for witnesses. The parties mutually came to the agreement to admit Herrera Beutler's statement and not request further witnesses.Closing arguments will begin shortly.This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.The Senate impeachment trial of Donald Trump was thrown into confusion Saturday as lawmakers voted to consider hearing witnesses, a step that could significantly extend the proceedings and delay a vote on whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol insurrection.The last-minute fight over witnesses followed Friday night revelations from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority...
    Watch live as the Senate conducts the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump.
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Closing arguments begin in Trump impeachment trial as Senate speeds toward final vote. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    WASHINGTON -- No witnesses will be called to the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, ABC News has learned.The written testimony of Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler was admitted into evidence, and neither the Trump legal team nor the House Managers made any further motions for witnesses. The parties mutually came to the agreement to admit Herrera Beutler's statement and not request further witnesses.Closing arguemnts will begin shortly.This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.The Senate impeachment trial of Donald Trump was thrown into confusion Saturday as lawmakers voted to consider hearing witnesses, a step that could significantly extend the proceedings and delay a vote on whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol insurrection.The last-minute fight over witnesses followed Friday night revelations from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority...
    House impeachment managers, former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE's legal team and top senators struck a deal on Saturday that will let the Senate bypass calling additional witnesses. The agreement comes after senators were caught flat-footed by a request from Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinTrump lawyers center defense around attacks on Democrats Democrats dismiss claims they misrepresented evidence during impeachment trial Democrats warn of 'whataboutism' ahead of Trump defense MORE (D-Md.), the House impeachment managers, to depose Rep. Rep. Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerTrump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report Here are the GOP lawmakers censured by Republicans for impeaching Trump Upton becomes first member of Congress to vote...
    WASHINGTON -- The Senate impeachment trial of Donald Trump was thrown into confusion Saturday as lawmakers voted to consider hearing witnesses, a step that could significantly extend the proceedings and delay a vote on whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol insurrection.The last-minute fight over witnesses followed Friday night revelations from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say establishes Trump's indifference to the violence.Leaders were considering an arrangement that would move the trial back toward a final vote, without live witnesses. If you want a delay, it will be a long one with many, many witnesses.— Lindsey Graham (@LindseyGrahamSC) February 13, 2021The proceedings came to an abrupt halt less than an hour after getting underway, with senators taken aback by the unexpected development huddling on the floor of the chamber...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate reaches deal to skip witness testimony in Trump impeachment case, allowing trial to proceed. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    More On: Trump impeachment trial Senate Democrats call for 11th-hour witnesses in Trump impeachment trial Mitch McConnell tells fellow GOP senators he will vote to acquit Trump Democrats delay Trump impeachment trial with 11th-hour call for witnesses Trump impeachment trial: Day 5 schedule, time and how to watch The sudden announcement by House impeachment managers that they want to subpoena Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler to testify in former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial potentially could open the floodgates for dozens of other witnesses. Herrera Beutler (R-Wash.) said Friday that she was present for a call between House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and former President Trump during the Capitol riot. It is not yet clear if she plans to fight the subpoena for her testimony and records. McCarthy has not yet commented on Herrera Beutler’s claims, which has led to calls for his own testimony. But there are many...
    Five Republican senators voted Saturday to allow witnesses at the Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump after the reported emergence of damning testimony from a Democratic representative. The Senate voted 55-45 to approve witnesses. Republican Sens. Susan Collins, Lindsey Graham, Lisa Murkowski, Mitt Romney and Ben Sasse voted in favor. The trial had been expected to end Saturday but could now continue for weeks. Lead impeachment manager Democratic Maryland Rep. Jamie Raskin unleashed the surprise request by suggesting an eleventh-hour witness had come forward and related a story about Trump telling House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy to calm down about the Capitol riot of Jan. 6. (RELATED: ‘As Painful As Possible’: Trey Gowdy Says Democrats Don’t Expect To Win Impeachment, Just Shame GOP) WATCH: “Last night Congresswoman Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington state issued a statement confirming that in the middle of the insurrection, when House Minority...
    Top senators, lawyers for former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE and the House impeachment managers are scrambling to try to cut a deal on witnesses, after a surprise vote to pave the way for calling them in the trial. The Senate voted 55-45 to allow for witnesses — a move that caught Trump world and senators off guard with both expecting that the impeachment trial would wrap up on Saturday. The vote threw the Senate into chaos and now senators say there is a behind-the-scramble to try to work out an agreement. "Well they're right now they're just trying to work out some agreement. And if it doesn't work out, then we can have several amendments to the...
    House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy told President Donald Trump that he had heard gunfire outside the House chamber, when the two leaders talked during the insurrection - a conversation that is now at the center of the Senate impeachment trial.  ABC News' Jonathan Karl reported Saturday that McCarthy had made a specific reference to shots being fired as he encouraged Trump to call off the MAGA mob.    On Saturday morning, the lead impeachment manager, Rep. Jamie Raskin, made a surprise announcement that the Democrats wanted witnesses on the heels of CNN's blockbuster Friday night report that included new details about Trump refusing to rein in his supporters who were attacking the Capitol on January 6.  New details about a call between President Donald Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (pictured) triggered chaos Saturday morning when Democrats announced they wanted witnesses for the impeachment trial. ABC News reported that...
    Why we're here With Lead House Manager Jamie Raskin announcing that they would indeed be seeking at least one witness, chaos and uncertainty reigns as people scramble to figure out what happens next. The one thing we know for sure at this point is that Donald Trump won’t be getting his pre-ordained acquittal today. Stay tuned.  The impeachment trial is being aired on major television news networks and streamed on their websites. Daily Kos will have continuing coverage. Saturday, Feb 13, 2021 · 5:33:50 PM +00:00 · Mark Sumner xIntense discussions involving all the key parties right now, per sources. They're having discussions and proposing ideas. There's talk about crafting a resolution that will draft rules for how to handle witness testimony. Or avoid witness testimony and submit evidence in record— Manu Raju (@mkraju) February 13, 2021 Saturday, Feb 13, 2021 · 5:34:06 PM +00:00 · Mark...
    Some Senate Democrats Friday said that they did not support subpoenaing witnesses and extending former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial beyond Saturday, yet all 50 Democrats voted in favor of Rep. Jamie Raskin’s surprise call to summon a GOP witness and her notes regarding a call between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy. The Senate trial will now continue indefinitely instead of wrapping up Saturday with an acquittal. A source familiar with a 9 a.m. conference call between Senate Democrats and House Democratic impeachment managers said Majority Leader Chuck Schumer “argued hard against witnesses.” But Schumer, the source said, “got rolled by his left flank and [impeachment] managers.” Schumer’s spokesman denied the claim. “That’s not true,” spokesman Justin Goodman told the Washington Examiner. Goodman pointed to interviews and public statements by the New York Democrat expressing support for witnesses if managers wanted to call them. Raskin, a Maryland...
    The Senate voted Saturday to allow witnesses to be called during former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial following a surprise request by Democratic House managers seeking to subpoena a GOP congresswoman for her testimony and notes. By a 55-45 margin, five Republicans joined all Democrats on a vote "to consider and debate under the impeachment rules any motion to subpoena witnesses and or documents." The Republicans supporting the vote included Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowksi of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, a loyal ally of the former president who changed his vote at the end. It was a stunning turn of events after Democrats signaled that they wouldn't press for witnesses and instead move straight to closing arguments and a final vote on whether to convict Trump for "incitement of insurrection." The accelerated trial was set to conclude on...
    Former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE’s legal team was shocked by the Senate vote to call witnesses in his impeachment trial, an 11th-hour twist at a trial they believed would wrap up Saturday with a vote to acquit. One source in touch with the legal team said that at least one aide assisting the defense had to scrap vacation plans scheduled to begin on Sunday, as Washington grappled with the new reality that the trial could drag on for days or weeks. “No one expected this on our side, people are universally stunned,” said the source. “Everyone was expecting to be done this afternoon.” House Democratic impeachment managers on Saturday morning said they wanted to subpoena Rep. Jaime...
    In a vote that sowed confusion within the upper house itself, all 50 Democratic senators and five Republicans, out of 100, voted in favor of a motion to allow witnesses to be called. The outcome which seemed the most probable, a rapid acquittal of the billionaire during the day thanks to the support of a strong majority of the elected Republicans, is thus called into question. And the greatest confusion reigned over the length of the delay, as the parliamentary mechanisms of these impeachment trials are rare and complex. Summons a Republican witness Senators resumed their debates as scheduled on Saturday at 10:00 a.m. (3:00 p.m. GMT). The head of the Democratic prosecutors who are bringing the charge against Donald Trump in his Senate trial, Jamie Raskin, announced on Saturday that he wanted to summon an elected Republican to testify, which could delay the vote on the verdict...
    Two Republican senators — Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonDemocratic group targets GOP senators with ads ahead of impeachment vote No. 2 GOP senator suggests he's open to censuring Trump GOP senators praise impeachment managers but say Trump will be acquitted MORE of Wisconsin and Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyThe Memo: GOP senators face defining vote on Trump  Lawmakers give standing ovation for Officer Eugene Goodman Senate passes bill to award Capitol Police officer Congressional Gold Medal MORE of Utah — got into a confrontation on the Senate floor Saturday after Romney voted with Democrats to allow witnesses in the impeachment trial of former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE. Reporters sitting in the Senate gallery said they saw a...
    At least two Senate Democrats have called for the chamber to suspend closing arguments in former President Trump’s impeachment trial so that witnesses could be called. “Suspend trial to depose [Rep. Kevin] McCarthy and [Sen. Tommy] Tuberville under oath and get facts,” said Rhode Island Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse in a tweet late Friday evening. “Ask Secret Service to produce for review comms back to White House re VP Pence safety during siege. What did Trump know, and when did he know it?” Whitehouse and other Dems were responding to news reports which alleged that during the height of the Capitol Hill insurrection, Trump told House GOP leader Kevin McCarthy, “Well, Kevin, I guess these people are more upset about the election than you are.” At the time time, Alabama Sen. Tommy Tuberville — a Trump diehard — stood by his account that he told the president by phone that...