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    HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A group of Congressional Democrats is condemning a recent decision by the U.S. Department of Education that threatens to withhold federal funds over a Connecticut policy allowing transgender girls to compete against non-transgender girls in high school sports. The group of 28 lawmakers sent a letter Wednesday to Kenneth Marcus, the department’s assistant secretary for civil rights, questioning the motives and legal reasoning behind the May decision that found Connecticut’s policy is a violation of Title IX, the federal civil rights law that guarantees equal education opportunities for women. “Title IX was never meant to be used as a tool to threaten schools into discriminatory practices in order to preserve critically needed federal funds,” said Connecticut U.S. Rep. Jahana Hayes, a former national teacher of the year. The Office for Civil Rights ruled the Connecticut policy, which allows athletes to participate as the gender with...
    The Trump Administration's announcement last week that it would remove federal protections against health care discrimination for transgender patients hit Hyde Goltz hard. Goltz, a 39-year-old nonbinary transgender Minnesotan, remembers navigating the health care system before those protections were adopted in 2016.  "It was the seven years saving up to be able to afford phalloplasty on insurance. It was changing jobs so that I could get health insurance that would actually cover phalloplasty. It was the three months spent day after day after day on the phone, hours on hold each time, trying to get across to people, supervisors, to tell them, this is medically necessary," Goltz said. Trending News Video shows 10-year-old stopping basketball to hide from cop car FedEx "saddened and outraged" after driver reports racist abuse Atlanta police officer fired after fatally shooting black man Cuomo: U.S. government making "historic mistake" on virus advice Netflix CEO gifts $120...
    Shoes of those who died in Hurricane Maria, placed at the Capitol in San Juan. It has been 1,000 days since Hurricane Maria devastated the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico, and thousands of lives were lost. It has been 1,000 days and many of the living are still waiting for aid from the federal government to whom they pay taxes. During those 1,000 days, Puerto Rico received another gut punch: massive earthquakes that rocked the southern portion of the island, and the tremors continue. Add in the triple whammy of COVID-19, pressuring an underfunded health care system that was already inadequate to meet people’s needs.   The liar-in-chief in the White House and his stonewalling clansmen in the Senate, headed by Mitch McConnell, don’t give a damn about the 3.2 million U.S citizens living in Puerto Rico. Trump has told lie after lie about disaster funds sent to the island, and though Congress...
    New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said Wednesday that the federal government is making a "historic mistake" in advising some states to reopen despite rising numbers of coronavirus cases.  "The federal government is making a mistake… a historic mistake," Cuomo said at his daily press briefing. The governor noted that at least 19 states have seen cases have gone up in the last two weeks. Six states reported record increases on Tuesday. Cuomo said President Trump's claim that cases have increased because the nation's testing has ramped up is a false one. "That is just not true. As a matter of fact, as a matter of mathematics, as a matter of data, that is just not a true statement," Cuomo said.  Coronavirus: The Race To Respond Cuomo: U.S. government making "historic mistake" on virus advice Rare "super" antibodies could be key in COVID-19 vaccine race Coronavirus' return to Beijing disrupts life and rattles...
    The Department of Justice on Tuesday filed a complaint in federal court over former national security adviser John Bolton’s new book about his time in the Trump White House. The complaint argues that Bolton submitted his book, “The Room Where It Happened,” for publication without first getting permission from the government through the prepublication review process and that the book contains classified information. The Justice Department wants the court to issue an order to Bolton “to notify his publisher that he was not authorized to disclose "The Room Where It Happened" because he has not completed prepublication review and because it contains classified information” and for his publisher to delay the release of the book. The book is scheduled to hit shelves next week The Trump administration has long contended that a manuscript of Bolton’s memoir contained classified information, but that the way the material was woven into the narrative would...
    Writing in dissent from the majority decision in Bostock v. Clayton County, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito summed up the proper reaction to his colleagues’ rewriting of federal law to shoehorn “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” to the longstanding definition of sex: “There is only one word for what the Court has done today: legislation,” Justice Alito wrote, before penning more than 100 pages to prove his point. Since 1964, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act has guarded specific classes of people in the employment context from being treated worse than their fellow citizens on the basis of protected characteristics, including sex — a definition that has been universally understood as biological in nature until very recently. Rather than allowing Congress to decide the appropriateness of any changes through the proper legislative process,  the Supreme Court in Bostock decided to rewrite federal law. With Justice Neil Gorsuch writing a 6-3 decision for the...
    WASHINGTON - Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell warned Tuesday that the U.S. economy faces a deep downturn with "significant uncertainty" about the timing and strength of a recovery. He cautioned that the longer the recession lasts, the worse the damage that would be inflicted on the job market and businesses. In testimony to Congress, Powell stressed that the Fed is committed to using all its financial tools to cushion the economic damage from the coronavirus. But he said that until the public is confident the disease has been contained, "a full recovery is unlikely." The chairman warned that a prolonged downturn could inflict severe harm especially to low-income workers who have been hit hardest. Powell is delivering the first of two days of semi-annual congressional testimony, on Tuesday to the Senate Banking Committee before addressing the House Financial Services Committee on Wednesday. "The longer the downturn lasts, the greater...
    Washington — The Justice Department has set new dates to begin executing federal death-row inmates following a monthslong legal battle over the plan to resume the executions for the first time since 2003. Attorney General William Barr directed the federal Bureau of Prisons to schedule the executions, beginning in mid-July, of four inmates convicted of killing children. Three of the men had been scheduled to be put to death when Barr announced the federal government would resume executions last year, ending an informal moratorium on federal capital punishment as the issue receded from the public domain. The Justice Department had scheduled five executions set to begin in December, but some of the inmates challenged the new procedures in court, arguing that the government was circumventing proper methods in order to wrongly execute inmates quickly. Trending News Supreme Court rejects cases challenging immunity for police officers Trump to sign executive order...
    Attorneys filed a lawsuit against the NCAA in federal court Monday that seeks to prevent the association from limiting the amount of money athletes can make off their names, images and likenesses. The antitrust lawsuit by attorneys representing two current college athletes also seeks damages for potential past earnings athletes have been denied by current NCAA rules. Arizona State swimmer Grant House and Oregon women's basketball player Sedona Prince are the plaintiffs. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM They are suing the NCAA and the Power Five Conferences — the Atlantic Coast Conference, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12 and Southeastern Conference — for unspecified damages. The suit seeks class-action status. The latest legal challenge comes as the NCAA is the process of changing its rules to allow college athletes to earn money from third parties for things such as social media endorsements, sponsorship deals and personal appearances. The...
    WASHINGTON (AP) - The Justice Department has set new dates to begin executing federal death-row inmates following a monthslong legal battle over the plan to resume the executions for the first time since 2003. Attorney General William Barr directed the federal Bureau of Prisons to schedule the executions, beginning in mid-July, of four inmates convicted of killing children. Three of the men had been scheduled to be put to death when Barr announced the federal government would resume executions last year, ending an informal moratorium on federal capital punishment as the issue receded from the public domain. The Justice Department had scheduled five executions set to begin in December, but some of the inmates challenged the new procedures in court, arguing that the government was circumventing proper methods in order to wrongly execute inmates quickly. The department wouldn’t say why the executions of two of the inmates scheduled in...
    The Supreme Court on Monday refused to hear the Trump administration’s challenge to one of California’s “sanctuary city” laws, which limits state and local cooperation with federal immigration authorities. The move left in place a lower court ruling that upholds the law. The case took on the question of whether state and local governments could effectively grant sanctuary to undocumented immigrants who have been threatened with arrest or deportation. California passed the law in 2017, effectively barring state and local agencies from sharing certain information with federal immigration officials, such as an immigrant’s address or expected date of release from custody. The law also prevents state and local officials from transferring custody to federal immigration officials without a warrant. Then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions called the law “unconscionable,” and the Trump administration sued California on the grounds that the law purposefully “undermines” federal immigration enforcement. The law’s “conceded purpose to obstruct — and effect of obstructing — federal law through its own regulatory...
    FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — The U.S. Treasury Department is withholding $679 million in coronavirus relief funding for tribes while a challenge over its initial round of payments to tribal governments plays out in court. The money is part of $8 billion that Congress set aside for tribes. The federal rescue package was approved in late March with a deadline for the funding to be distributed to tribes by April 26. The payments were delayed as the Treasury Department grappled with methodology. It decided to use federal tribal population data for the initial $4.8 billion distribution to 574 federally recognized tribes in early May. Much of the remaining $3.2 billion based on tribes’ employment and expenditure data went out Friday, the department said. As part of the legal wrangling, the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation in Kansas argued it was shortchanged $7.65 million because the Treasury Department relied on federal population...
    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Federal prosecutors have charged a former U.S. Marine with impersonating a federal officer after the man was armed and wearing tactical gear as he stood alongside police at a protest in Las Vegas last month. Zachary Sanns was wearing plain clothes with a tactical vest, helmet and belt, a balaclava, a stun gun and two firearms, including an AR-15 style rifle, as he appeared near the front line with police on May 30 as they faced off with people protesting the death of George Floyd, according to a complaint filed in federal court last week. He has been charged with one count of false impersonation of an officer or employee of the United States. David T. Brown, an attorney representing Sanns, declined to comment Monday on the allegations. Sanns made an initial court appearance Friday but has not yet entered a plea. His next...
    WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court on Monday refused to hear the Trump administration's challenge to throw out California's sanctuary law that restricts state and local law enforcement agencies from cooperating federal immigration authorities.The justices' order leaves in place lower court rulings that upheld the law. Court documents show only Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel A. Alito Jr. voted to hear the appeal.The administration said the 2017 state immigrant-sanctuary measure conflicts with federal immigration law and makes it harder to deport people who are in the country illegally.RELATED: Local officials remind public of CA protections ahead of border agent deployment in 'sanctuary' citiesCalifornia argued that encouraging local police to participate in federal immigration enforcement is counterproductive because it makes people less likely to report crimes if they believe they'll be deported for doing so.The case is at the heart of long-running tensions between the state and the Trump administration over immigration...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve said Monday that it will begin purchasing corporate bonds as part of a previously-announced plan to ensure companies can borrow through the bond market during the pandemic. The program will purchase existing bonds on the open market, as opposed to newly-issued debt. The central bank said will seek to build a “broad and diversified” portfolio that will mimic a bond-market index. The bonds will have to be from highly-rated, investment-grade companies, or firms that fit that description before the viral outbreak struck. The announcement boosted the stock market, which was already rebounding from early losses. The Dow Jones rose 0.8% in afternoon trading. The Fed’s purchases should hold down corporate bond yields, making it cheaper for companies to borrow. But by also lowering the return from investing in those bonds, the Fed’s actions will likely encourage investors to shift money from corporate...
    When sex discrimination was originally added to the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1974, its introduction reportedly drew a round of howls in the lower chamber of the U.S. Congress. Based on several reports, Representative Howard W. Smith, a Virginia Democrat who opposed the bill, added it as a floor amendment to weaken and potentially kill support for the bill. The original text of the legislation banned employment based on race, creed, religion, or color. When Smith stood up to offer his amendment, he reportedly drawled, "After the word religion, insert sex," urging his colleagues to right "this grave injustice." According a New York Times reconstruction of the moment, the amendment prompted "laughter from his colleagues, who mockingly offered other suggested additions." As difficult as it was for many '60s-era lawmakers to embrace the idea that people of color shouldn't live a second class existence in America, the notion that...
    In 2000, Congress undertook the most ambitious environmental restoration project of its kind in the United States. The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) is a federal-state partnership to "restore, preserve, and protect" the Florida Everglades — the largest wetland in the Western hemisphere and a cornerstone of both South Florida's ecosystem and way of life. Until recently, the federal government never upheld its end of the bargain by providing adequate funding. "The funding plan was that the state and the federal governments would each contribute $200 million a year and over a 20 year period of time. We didn't live up to that," Steve Davis, senior ecologist and acting communications director of the Everglades Foundation, told Fox Nation. FOR LIMITED TIME, RECEIVE 25% OFF NEW PURCHASE OF A YEARLY FOX NATION SUBSCRIPTION Twenty years after the passage of the CERP, the partnership has not completed a single major project. But the Trump administration has given new...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday rejected the Trump administration’s bid to throw out a California immigrant-sanctuary law that limits local police cooperation with federal immigration authorities. The justices’ order leaves in place lower court rulings that upheld the law. Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas voted to hear the administration’s appeal. The administration said the 2017 state immigrant-sanctuary measure conflicts with federal immigration law and makes it harder to deport people who are in the country illegally. California argued that encouraging local police to participate in federal immigration enforcement is counterproductive because it makes people less likely to report crimes if they believe they’ll be deported for doing so. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Fox News recently highlighted that Moscow Mitch is totally against the “defund the police” movement: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Monday slammed the growing liberal momentum behind the “defund the police” movement as “outlandish.”   His comments referenced the growing left-wing movement in cities such as Minneapolis — where George Floyd died last month in police custody — New York City and beyond.   “We’re already seeing outlandish calls, ‘defund the police,’ ‘abolish the police,’ take root within the left-wing leadership class,” McConnell, R-Ky., said on the Senate floor Monday.   Minneapolis’ left-leaning City Council members on Sunday announced a veto-proof push to disband the Minneapolis police, even as the mayor made clear he did not support abolishing the department. “The president of the city council in Minneapolis proclaimed she can imagine a future without the police,” McConnell continued Monday. “I’m all for social work and mental health. Call me old fashioned, but...
    The United States Supreme Court ruled Monday that federal law protects LGBT and transgender employees from discrimination. Justices Neil Gorsuch and John Roberts joined the court’s four liberal judges in a landmark ruling that involved a 1964 civil rights law that barred discrimination of employees based on sex, according to USA Today. The Supreme Court had examined whether the statutory protections should be understood to include both sexual orientation and gender identity. Justices Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas and Brett Kavanaugh all dissented, the publication reported. (RELATED: This Pro-Life, Female Democrat’s Law Is At The Heart Of Upcoming Supreme Court Abortion Case) “Those who adopted the Civil Rights Act might not have anticipated their work would lead to this particular result,” Gorsuch wrote in the majority opinion. “Likely, they weren’t thinking about many of the Act’s consequences that have become apparent over the years, including its prohibition against discrimination on the basis of motherhood or its ban on the sexual...
    By a 7-2 vote, the Supreme Court voted on Monday to refuse to hear the Trump administration's challenge to the legality of California's "sanctuary state" laws. The ruling means that the Ninth Circuit's decision upholding the laws will stand. Only Justices Thomas and Alito voted to hear the administration's appeal, which means that both of Trump's appointees — Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh — voted against granting certiorari in the case. The court's order announcing the denial of certiorari did not comment on the reasons for denial other than to note that Alito and Thomas would have voted to grant the government's petition. The government had argued that three different provisions of California law violate the Constitution by interfering with federal enforcement of immigration law. Those included California Senate Bill 54 (also known as the California Values Act), which was passed in 2017; certain provisions of Assembly Bill...
    By Ted Hesson | Reuters WASHINGTON  – The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday handed President Donald Trump a defeat in his legal showdown with the most-populous U.S. state, declining to hear his administration’s challenge to “sanctuary” laws in California that protect immigrants from deportation. The justices left in place a lower court ruling that upheld the bulk of three laws in the Democratic-governed state that limit cooperation with federal immigration enforcement authorities. The Trump administration had appealed that ruling to the high court. Trump, seeking re-election on Nov. 3, has made his hardline immigration policies a focus of his presidency, including a crackdown on legal and illegal immigration. His administration sued California in 2018 in federal court, accusing the state of unlawfully obstructing enforcement of federal immigration law and saying the measures violate the U.S. Constitution’s provision that federal laws take precedence over state laws.reuterreuter The California “sanctuary” laws in...
    Washington (CNN)Federal civil rights law protects gay, lesbian and trangender workers, the Supreme Court ruled Monday.The landmark ruling will extend protections to millions of workers nationwide and is a defeat for the Trump administration, which argued that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act that bars discrimination based on sex did not extend to claims of gender identity and sexual orientation.The 6-3 opinion was written by Justice Neil Gorsuch and joined by Chief Justice John Roberts and the court's four liberal justices. This story is breaking and will be updated.
    Washington — The Supreme Court declined Monday to wade into a legal battle over a California sanctuary law that restricts when state and local law enforcement can assist federal authorities with immigration enforcement activities.  In rejecting the Trump administration's request to hear the case and sidestepping another politically charged showdown over President Trump's immigration policies, the measure will remain intact. Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito said they would have taken up the case. The California law at the center of the dispute was enacted in 2017 and lays out the circumstances under which state and local authorities can assist with federal immigration enforcement actions. The statute, known as Senate Bill 54, prohibits state officials from notifying U.S. immigration officers of when immigrants are going to be released from custody and providing federal officials with other information. Trending News "Bye-bye Tucker Carlson!" major advertiser says Veepstakes: Handicapping Biden's pick for...
    Washington (CNN)The Supreme Court on Monday left in place a lower court opinion upholding one of California's so-called sanctuary laws that limits cooperation between law enforcement and federal immigration authorities, a measure that the Trump administration says is meant to "undermine" federal immigration enforcement. The Trump administration had asked the court to step in and review the law and the court declined to do so. Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito, two of the Court's conservative members, supported taking up the case. The law -- and others like it -- have ignited a firestorm between the federal government, which has made immigration enforcement a top priority, and some states that say they are within their rights to determine how best to use their own resources. During his State of the Union speech last January, President Donald Trump lamented California's effort, which he classified as an "outrageous law."
    (CNN)No one in a position of authority is regularly talking to the American people about the coronavirus. The national leadership has decided that the best way to inform the public on the daily death toll is to leave the task to private institutions, state and local officials, educators and news anchors. Merrill BrownIt is a small step in the right direction that the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention held their second briefing in the past two weeks on Friday. However, during the conference officials dodged questions on outbreak trends and limited the discussion to "safety matters." This lack of transparency and information remains what may be the greatest abdication of communication responsibility of a US government amid a crisis in modern history. Meanwhile, the nation's politicians, even opponents of the Trump administration, seem indifferent to holding public briefings, with the exception of some governors like New York's...
    HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) - Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont is not willing to lose federal education dollars over a state policy that allows transgender athletes to participate as girls in high school sports, he said Thursday. The Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights last month said the Connecticut policy, which allows all athletes to participate as the gender with which they identify, violates the civil rights of non-transgender girls and threatened to withhold federal funding from some school districts. The governor’s office said it has had multiple discussions about the issue with the Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference, the board that oversees high school athletics. TOP STORIES Mass. college deeply sorry for letting police officers use restroom: It will not happen again Bigger than life: George Floyd known for big heart, good works, struggles with drugs, crime Abraham Lincoln monument torched in Chicago: An absolute disgraceful act “I don’t...
    EXCLUSIVE: Two Republican lawmakers plan to introduce legislation on Thursday that would cut off federal funding to any school that does not reopen for in-person learning in the fall after being shuttered due to the coronavirus pandemic, Fox News has learned.Reps. Jim Banks, R-Ind., and Tom Tiffany, R-Wisc., will introduce the Reopen Our Schools Act Thursday amid concerns over the effectiveness of remote learning that has been implemented since the beginning of the public health crisis earlier this year. “We need to change the subject from ‘our schools might not reopen in the fall’ to ‘our schools will reopen in the fall and here’s what we need to do it,’” Banks said in a statement provided to Fox News. “America is the land of opportunity where education is guaranteed to all children. We’re not living up that guarantee at the moment.” The bill follows a report in the Wall Street Journal...
    Unrest in Seattle continues the question of whether President Donald Trump should send U.S. troops into American cities to restore order. “Take back your city NOW. If you don’t do it, I will,” Trump tweeted last night in response to the latest disturbance, in which protesters stormed city hall to demand the mayor’s resignation and seized six blocks of downtown which they declared a “Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone.” Seattle police apparently have ceded the area, evacuated the police station, and will not return except to respond to a 911 call. NEWT GINGRICH: DEMOCRATS MUST APOLOGIZE – HERE'S HOW THEY'VE FAILED AMERICA'S CITIES "This is not a game,” Trump warned  Washington Gov. Jay Inslee and the Seattle mayor. "These ugly Anarchists must be stooped IMMEDIATELY. MOVE FAST.” The Constitution and congressional acts give Trump the legal power to call up National Guard units or even active-duty forces to stop disturbances that prevent the enforcement of the law.  While...
    ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for The Big Story newsletter to receive stories like this one in your inbox. In scrambling to buy protective equipment for the coronavirus pandemic, federal agencies purchased up to $11 million worth of Chinese-made masks, often with little attention to manufacturing details or rapidly evolving regulatory guidance about safety or quality, a ProPublica review shows. Some agencies cannot say who made their masks at a time when thousands of foreign-made respirators appeared on the market, some falsely claiming approval or certification by the Food and Drug Administration. Some agencies bought the masks, known as KN95s, from companies that share a U.S. representative with another firm recently accused of fraud by the Justice Department. The contracts reflect the intense pressure federal agencies were under to procure protective equipment as the pandemic surfaced and rapidly spread in the U.S. Now, some experts worry...
    The Federal Reserve expects that as many as 15 million Americans will remain unemployed by year-end even as the economy continues recovering from the impact of the coronavirus. That assessment is more pessimistic than the Trump administration's sunnier forecast. In releasing their latest policy statement and economic projections on Wednesday, Fed officials predicted that the nation's jobless rate will drop from 13.3% to 9% this year, which would be near the peak during the Great Recession.  Just under 6 million Americans were unemployed as of January, before the pandemic crippled the economy. In April, that number soared to 23 million before receding to 21 million last month. Trending News Walmart knocked for locking up beauty products for black people Bon Appetit editor resigns over offensive Halloween photo Home Depot distances itself from Trump-supporting co-founder Business bankruptcies surge in the coronavirus recession After 1 billion robocalls, a record FCC fine on...
    Angela-Underwood Jacobs, whose brother Dave Patrick Underwood was killed recently in the line of duty during a riot in Oakland, California, asked Congress where the outrage was over her brother’s death. Underwood, 53, was a federal officer for the Department of Homeland Security and was guarding a federal courthouse in Oakland when he was shot multiple times by an unidentified person in a vehicle. It was most likely a targeted attack on police officers, according to Oakland Police. The FBI is currently investigating the incident.  “The heartbreak, and the grief, is unexplainable because it’s very very hard to articulate when your entire world has been turned upside down,” she said during her Congressional testimony Wednesday. “I do want to know, though, when I think about all of this, that my brother wore a uniform, and he wore that uniform proudly. I’m wondering, where is the outrage for a fallen officer...
    HOUSTON (AP) — A federal judge has temporarily stopped President Donald Trump’s administration from expelling a teenager to Honduras under a policy enacted during the coronavirus pandemic that didn’t give the teen the chance under federal law to stay in the United States. According to the American Civil Liberties Union, the 16-year-old had been scheduled to be expelled Wednesday, six days after he entered the U.S. to reunite with his father. The ACLU says the boy fled because gang members threatened him after he saw one of them kill someone in his neighborhood. U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan late Tuesday issued an order preventing the government from expelling the teenager, who was not identified by name in court papers, through the end of the day Wednesday as litigation is pending. The case is the first known challenge of the Trump administration’s expulsion of hundreds of immigrant children at...
    ALLENTOWN, Pa. (AP) - Unfilled potholes, uncollected trash, un-mowed grass and, most significantly, fewer police on the street are some of what Allentown says it’s contemplating unless Washington helps it plug a multimillion-dollar budget hole left by the coronavirus pandemic. Pennsylvania’s third-largest city, with a population of over 120,000, Allentown has largely fended for itself amid sharply falling tax revenue. It’s one of thousands of smaller cities and counties across the U.S. that were cut off from direct aid in the $2 trillion coronavirus relief package passed by Congress in late March. Local officials in those left-out places are now pleading for a massive cash infusion from the federal government to help them stave off financial calamity. “We represent the average city. If cities like Allentown begin to crumble, that’s how America crumbles,” said City Council member Ce-Ce Gerlach. “So something needs to be done. We need help.” TOP STORIES...
    The U.S. government will try to stop a company's planned salvage mission to retrieve the Titanic's wireless telegraph machine. In a legal challenge filed before a federal judge in Virginia late Monday, U.S. attorneys argue the expedition would break federal law and a pact with Britain to leave the iconic shipwreck undisturbed. The expedition is expected to begin by the end of August. The Atlanta-based salvage firm RMS Titanic Inc., said it would exhibit the telegraph while telling the stories of the operators who broadcast the sinking ship's distress calls. The company plans to recover the radio equipment from a deck house near the Titanic's grand staircase. The mission could require an underwater vehicle to cut into the rapidly deteriorating roof if the submersible is unable to slip through a skylight. The bow of the Titanic as it was seen for the first time in 73 years.  Robert Ballard/National Geographic...
    The FBI has launched an investigation into whether the fatal shooting of a Santa Cruz police officer is connected to a separate incident in Oakland that left a federal protection officer dead and another critically hurt.  READ MORE: Philadelphia police inspector applauded by colleagues after turning himself in for assault on protester Sgt. Damon Gutzwiller, 38, was ambushed and killed in the line of duty Saturday afternoon. Law officials are now looking into possible connections between this case and the death of federal officer Dave Patrick Underwood, who was gunned down on May 29, KRCA.com reports.  Investigators said both cases involved a shooter in a van. The suspected driver and gunman is U.S. Air Force sergeant Steven Carrillo who is believed to have been motivated by his support of Black Lives Matter.  “They were ambushed with gunfire and multiple improvised explosives,” said Santa Cruz County Sheriff Jim Hart.  Carrillo, 32,...
    COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — The U.S. 8th Circuit Court of Appeals dismissed a lawsuit Tuesday filed by a member of the Satanic Temple against a Missouri abortion law. At issue is a law requiring women, before they can get an abortion, to receive a pamphlet that states: “The life of each human being begins at conception. Abortion will terminate the life of a separate, unique, living human being.” An anonymous woman, Judy Doe, sued, arguing the law violates her religious freedom as a Satanic Temple member. The Satanic Temple doesn’t believe in a literal Satan but sees the biblical Satan as a metaphor for rebellion against tyranny. A federal district judge last year ruled against Doe, and the appeals court agreed. The court wrote that the case demonstrates why Missouri wasn’t wrong to promote viewpoints on life that Doe argued align with the Catholic religion. “Any theory of...
    TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Enbridge has produced legally acceptable plans for dealing with a potential spill from oil pipelines that cross a Michigan channel linking two of the Great Lakes, according to a federal appeals court. A panel of the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals last week overruled a district judge who had agreed with an environmental group that the pipeline company’s plans failed to adequately consider potential harm to fish and wildlife in the Straits of Mackinac. Enbridge, a Canadian company based in Calgary, Alberta, developed the strategy as required under the Clean Water Act in case of failure of its Line 5. The pipeline carries oil and natural gas liquids used in propane from Superior, Wisconsin, to Sarnia, Ontario. A four-mile (6.4 kilometer) segment divides into two pipes that lie across the bottom of the straits, which connect Lakes Huron and Michigan. Enbridge says the 67-year-old...
    (CNN)The Department of Health and Human Services said Tuesday that it is taking additional steps to provide federal coronavirus relief funding to health care providers and hospitals that care for the poor and uninsured.The agency, which has come under fire in recent weeks for delays in distributing the $175 billion in federal support that Congress authorized in late March and April, expects to dole out about $15 billion to providers that participate in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program but have not yet received payments from the relief fund that Congress authorized. The money is intended to compensate those that lost revenue or had increased expenses because of the coronavirus pandemic.The agency will launch a portal Wednesday that will allow eligible Medicaid and CHIP providers to report their annual patient revenue, which is used to determine their share of the $15 billion fund. This will allow the agency to...
    The Mueller report hasn’t been in the headlines much in 2020, a year that has found reporters heavily focused on the Ukraine scandal, President Donald Trump’s acquittal on two articles of impeachment, the coronavirus pandemic, former Vice President Joe Biden’s surge in the Democratic presidential primary and — most recently — the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis on May 25. But the Mueller report is still a compelling read, and a federal judge is demanding some answers after confirming, on June 8, that he has read an unredacted version of the lengthy document. U.S. District Judge Reggie Walton, according to Law & Crime’s Matt Naham, has ordered the U.S. Department of Justice to answer questions “regarding certain redactions of the Mueller Report” at a hearing now set for July 20. In the past, Walton has been critical of Attorney General William Barr’s response to the Mueller Report, asserting that...
    United States Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy is reportedly now “open” to changing the names of 10 federal bases named after Confederate leaders of the Civil War. Defense Secretary Mark Esper is also now amenable to discussing the change, Army spokesman Col. Sunset Belinsky told Politico Monday. As recently as February, military officials told the Army Times that there were “no plans to rename any street or installation, including those named for Confederate generals.” Ballerinas Kennedy George, 14, and Ava Holloway, 14, pose in front of a monument of Confederate general Robert E. Lee after Virginia Governor Ralph Northam ordered its removal after widespread civil unrest following the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Richmond, Virginia, U.S. June 5, 2020. REUTERS/Julia Rendleman The Army has dismissed the issue in the past, arguing that the bases named after generals like Braxton Bragg and John Bell Hood commemorate the individual...
    NORFOLK, Va. (AP) - The U.S. government will try to stop a company’s planned salvage mission to retrieve the Titanic’s wireless telegraph machine, arguing the expedition would break federal law and a pact with Britain to leave the iconic shipwreck undisturbed. U.S. attorneys filed a legal challenge before a federal judge in Norfolk, Virginia, late Monday. The expedition is expected to occur by the end of August. The Atlanta-based salvage firm RMS Titanic Inc., plans to recover the radio equipment from a deck house near the ship’s grand staircase. The operation could require a submersible to cut into the rapidly deteriorating roof if the vehicle is unable to slip through a skylight. TOP STORIES Obama administration was corrupt, more and more evidence reveals daily Riots spurred by death of George Floyd take heavy toll on black lives, communities Speedway declares race a protest to skirt coronavirus rules, draws 2,000 ...
    NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — The U.S. government will try to stop a company’s planned salvage mission to retrieve the Titanic’s wireless telegraph machine, arguing the expedition would break federal law and a pact with Britain to leave the iconic shipwreck undisturbed. U.S. attorneys filed a legal challenge before a federal judge in Norfolk, Virginia, late Monday. The expedition is expected to occur by the end of August. The Atlanta-based salvage firm RMS Titanic Inc., plans to recover the radio equipment from a deck house near the ship’s grand staircase. The operation could require a submersible to cut into the rapidly deteriorating roof if the vehicle is unable to slip through a skylight. U.S. attorneys argue the company can’t do that. They say federal law requires the firm to get authorization from the Secretary of Commerce before conducting research or salvage expeditions “that would physically alter or disturb the wreck.” The...
    New regional surges in coronavirus cases forced the Environmental Protection Agency to put on hold some of the earliest planned returns of federal employees to their offices, while the first volunteers at a few other federal agencies are quietly going back to their desks. The Trump administration’s guidance, called “Opening up America Again,” lays out specific conditions for calling workers back, like 14 straight days of downward-trending cases in an area. But there have been complaints that the administration is moving too quickly. On Monday, small numbers of Energy Department headquarters staff were returning to offices in Washington, D.C., and Germantown, Tennessee, spokeswoman Jessica Szymanski said. Less than 4% of the agency’s 7,000 federal and contractor workers were expected to return to work in this first phase of the administration’s plans, Szymanski said. This initial phase allows for voluntary returns of staffers. The State Department said Monday that it expects...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) - Millions of protective masks will soon be on their way to California after the manufacturer paid by the state to make them finally won U.S. federal certification, the governor’s office announced Monday. It came more than a month after the masks had originally been set to start arriving. Gov. Gavin Newsom’s administration signed a nearly $1 billion contract with BYD, a Chinese company with California offices, in April for hundreds of millions of protective masks for health care workers and others amid the coronavirus. The deal included both tight-fitting N95 masks ideal for health care workers and looser-fitting surgical masks. The surgical masks started arriving last month, but the critical N95 masks were twice delayed as BYD failed to win certification from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Now that the company has approval, the state expects to receive the first shipment in...
    The Manhattan US attorney ripped Prince Andrew on Monday after the royal’s lawyers claimed that their client has been offering to talk to the feds about his pedophile pal Jeffrey Epstein, to no avail. “Today, Prince Andrew yet again sought to falsely portray himself to the public as eager and willing to cooperate with an ongoing federal criminal investigation into sex-trafficking and related offenses committed by Jeffrey Epstein and his associates, even though the Prince has not given an interview to federal authorities, has repeatedly declined our request to schedule such an interview, and nearly four months ago informed us unequivocally – through the very same counsel who issued today’s release – that he would not come in for such an interview,” US Attorney Geoffrey Berman said in a blistering statement. “If Prince Andrew is, in fact, serious about cooperating with the ongoing federal investigation, our doors remain open, and...
    When Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders named Ohio State professor Darrick Hamilton to Biden’s economic “unity taskforce,” few people noticed outside of academia and far-left circles of influence. That needs to change. Hamilton might not be a household name, but he is highly influential and radical. Even prior to being named to Biden’s unity taskforce, Hamilton’s policy ideas had seeped into the campaign platforms of numerous Democrat presidential candidates. As the uber-left Mother Jones publication noted in a glowing profile of Hamilton published in February, “Over the past two years, Hamilton’s scholarship has made its way from that stage into the bloodstream of the Democratic Party. Several White House hopefuls have turned his research and its policy corollaries into key planks of their platforms, and Hamilton has been a willing collaborator with the campaigns.” NEWT GINGRICH: DEMOCRATS WANT TO STEAL NOVEMBER ELECTION – HERE'S HOW Hamilton’s most popular idea among socialists and progressives...
    Proposals to standardize police practices across the U.S. just don't make sense, U.S. Rep. Guy Reschenthaler, R-Pa., said Saturday. The congressman voiced his concerns ahead of an upcoming House Judiciary Committee hearing on the topic police brutality during an appearance on "Fox Report Weekend." Reschenthaler, 37, who represents Pennsylvania's 14th Congressional District in the Pittsburgh area, is a member of the House panel. "Wednesday that Judiciary Committee is going back in for a hearing," Reschenthaler told anchor Jon Scott. "And I'm sure we're going to hear a lot of different ideas. But some of the troubling ones is a push to have a standardized use of force, a federal standard all across the United States. There's also a troubling idea, and that is to remove qualified immunity from individual police officers. DC READIES FOR SATURDAY PROTESTS AS POLICE CHIEF SAYS IT MAY BE 'LARGEST WE'VE HAD IN THE CITY' "I think any attempt...
    The delayed action of Minnesota leaders to quell growing unrest in the shadow of George Floyd's tragic death resulted in mass rioting across the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. Now, the leaders want federal taxpayers to partially foot the bill for damage caused by violent protesters. According to the Minneapolis Star Tribune, more than 200 buildings across the Minneapolis-area have been destroyed or damaged in the riots, which will require at least $55 million in repairs. However, that number will likely be much higher — up into the "hundreds of millions," Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey, a Democrat, said this week. "We will do everything we can as we shift to recovery mode," Frey said. "We're recovering from crises sandwiched on top of each other, from COVID-19 to the police killing and then the looting which took place afterward." Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz...
    FORT WAYNE, Ind. (AP) - A lawsuit alleging that a northeastern Indiana sheriff violated a teenage boy’s constitutional rights during an altercation last year at a festival has been transferred to federal court. The lawsuit against Allen County Sheriff David Gladieux was filed by the parents of a 15-year-old boy in a county court, but it was moved to U.S. District Court in Fort Wayne after Gladieux’s attorneys filed a notice of removal. The suit claims that Gladieux injured the teen and violated his rights under the Fourth Amendment during a July 2019 altercation. Removal to federal court is common when constitutional questions are raised, The Journal Gazette reported. TOP STORIES Lincoln Memorial, WWII Memorial defaced by vandals in rioting Obama administration was corrupt, more and more evidence reveals daily Van Jones: Forget the KKK, its the white, liberal Hillary Clinton supporter we should worry about Brad and Erin...
    A Trump donor who grabbed up $13.4 million in COVID-19-linked contracts from the Department of Veterans Affairs has a fraught history with the agency—and a newfound affection for President Donald Trump and his fellow Republicans.  Since late March, the VA has inked 21 deals with Tennessee entrepreneur Troy Mizell’s AVMedical to supply everything from masks to thermometers to blood gas analyzers, according to records gathered by ProPublica. Of those 21, federal records show the department bid only four through a competitive process.  In fact, the contracts came in spite of the two-year-old firm having never done business with the federal government before and even though Mizell’s former company, AvKare, waged a two-year legal battle against the VA after an internal investigation at the agency determined it had provided false information about its business operations.  Mizell did not respond to a request for comment. His LinkedIn indicates he moved full-time to...
    (CNN)On Monday after dark, as federal forces took control of parts of the capital city showing the scars from days of protests that at times devolved into looting and defacement of historic monuments, Attorney General William Barr patrolled the streets.Surrounded by servicemen in camouflage fatigues and striding alongside the country's top military officials, the attorney general observed the results of the crackdown he'd called for.One night before, he'd watched from the Justice Department headquarters on Pennsylvania Avenue as pictures streamed in of fires and broken glass just steps from the White House. He'd later describe the disorder with terms from the battlefield: concrete dug up and thrown as "projectiles" at law enforcement, the need for a "tactical plan" and a redrawn "perimeter." Barr's show of force on Monday stemmed from the administration watching a weekend of protests, some of which turned violent and destructive, that stretched across the nation as...
    Days after Attorney General William Barr vowed to crack down on violence and illegal acts committed during protests against police brutality, the Justice Department has charged dozens of people with federal crimes, according to a report. Among those charged was a man accused of brandishing a handgun before being tackled by a protester and three right wingers who allegedly planned to incite violence during peaceful protests, Politico reported. The AG said in a press conference Thursday that extremists were capitalizing on the protests that followed the police custody death of George Floyd, noting that 51 people have been arrested for federal crimes tied to violent behavior. “There are some groups that don’t have a particular ideology other than anarchy, there are some groups that want to bring about a civil war,” Barr said. “So we are dealing with, as I say, a witch’s brew of a lot of different extremist...
    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) - A $33 billion Louisiana operating budget that would keep most programs and services from cuts in the upcoming financial year thanks to federal coronavirus aid started advancing Friday in the House of Representatives. The spending proposal backed by the House Appropriations Committee doesn’t account for millions of dollars in business tax breaks that lawmakers are considering in their ongoing special session, which could siphon dollars away from the treasury that the budget anticipates spending. The 2020-21 budget proposal charts spending for the financial year that starts July 1, following plans largely recommended by Gov. John Bel Edwards. After making modest changes from the Democratic governor’s recommendations, the committee agreed to the bill without objection, sending it to the full House for debate Wednesday. TOP STORIES Biden says 10 to 15 percent of Americans are just not very good people Portland, Oregon: No more school resource...
    The Democratic mayor of Washington, D.C., penned a letter to President Donald Trump requesting that he "withdraw all extraordinary federal law enforcement and military presence" from the city. Muriel Bowser added in her letter, dated Thursday, that since the city's curfew and state of emergency are over — and protesters have been "peaceful," and the city is "well equipped to handle large demonstrations and First Amendment activities" — the troops are no longer needed.'Inflaming demonstrators' Bowser also said she's "concerned that unidentified federal personnel patrolling the streets ... pose both safety and national security risks" — and that they're "inflaming demonstrators and adding to the grievances of those who, by and large, are peacefully protesting for change and for reforms to the racist and broken systems that are killing black Americans." She also said when federal personnel mix with city police, it "can breed dangerous...
    Washington D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser on Friday unveiled the newly minted "Black Lives Matter Plaza" near the White House in an apparent tribute to the protesters who have advocated against police brutality and racism in the city over the past several days in the wake of the death of George Floyd. Bowser tweeted a photo of what appeared to be a city worker affixing a street sign to a light pole on a section of 16th Street in the nation's capital. NATIONAL GUARDSMEN HOSPITALIZED AFTER LIGHTNING STRIKE NEAR WHITE HOUSE: REPORTS "The section of 16th street in front of the White House is now officially 'Black Lives Matter Plaza,'" she said. From her personal account, Bowser also tweeted a video of "BLACK LIVES MATTER" painted in giant yellow letters on the street near the White House. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP The dedication of the plaza comes as there has...
    Jack L. Rozdilsky, York University, Canada and Heriberto Urby, Jr., Western Illinois University In the wake of the killing of George Floyd, American cities are coping with strife and civil unrest comparable to 1968. In an apparent attempt to divert attention from a lacklustre White House effort to counter the COVID-19 pandemic and a tone-deaf approach to racial injustice, President Donald Trump has entered into another of his many quagmires where he seems to have spoken first and contemplated later. Despite Trump’s specious symbolic display involving clearing a park of protesters to pose to take photos in front of an empty church, the president’s words at his June 1 news conference were consequential. He specifically named the Insurrection Act of 1807 as a possible remedy to the current crisis. Surprisingly, due to that obscure act, Trump may indeed have the power to send federal troops into states without a request...
    (CNN)Washington, DC, Mayor Muriel Bowser requested Friday that President Donald Trump remove all additional federal law enforcement and military presence from the city, arguing that the units are "inflaming" and "adding to the grievances" of people protesting over the death of George Floyd.Read her letter to the President here: Bowser-Letter (PDF)Bowser-Letter (Text)
    Attorney General William Barr said on Thursday that federal law enforcement officials have evidence that Antifa and other extremist groups have been involved in instigating and participating in acts of violence that have rocked the nation for days as riots have broken out following the death of George Floyd. “While many have peacefully expressed their anger and grief, others have hijacked protests to engage in lawlessness — violent rioting and arson, looting of businesses and public property, assaults on law enforcement officers and innocent people, and even the murder of a federal agent,” Barr said at a news conference. “Such senseless acts of anarchy are not exercises of First Amendment rights; they are crimes designed to terrify fellow citizens and intimidate communities.” “As I told the governors on Monday, we understand the distinction among three different sets of actors. The large preponderance of those who are protesting are peaceful demonstrators...
    A federal jail inmate in New York City died Wednesday after correctional officers sprayed him with pepper spray, the Bureau of Prisons said. Officers sprayed Jamel Floyd, a 35-year-old black man, after he barricaded himself in his cell at Brooklyn's Metropolitan Detention Center and broke a cell door window with a metal object, the agency said. "He became increasingly disruptive and potentially harmful to himself and others," the agency said in a statement. "Pepper spray was deployed and Floyd was removed from his cell." Floyd's mother said her son suffered from asthma and diabetes and that jail officials were aware of his health conditions. "They maced my son," Donna Mays told the Daily News. "They murdered my son." Members of the jail's medical staff checking on Floyd later found him unresponsive, the agency said. They started life-saving measures and called an ambulance. He was pronounced dead at a hospital. The...
    Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, says he's hearing that Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser plans to evict at least 1,200 National Guard troops from city hotels after she clashed with President Trump over the handling of George Floyd unrest in the city. If the reports from his sources are true, he won't be happy, Lee told “Fox News @ Night.” “I find this very strange,” Lee said. “They [the soldiers] came here at the request of their country and now, in the middle of it, in the middle of a deployment, in the middle of their fourth consecutive all-nighter, they’re being told they’re not welcome there. That is unpatriotic; that is unacceptable.” REP. WALTZ: NATIONAL GUARD MUST DEPLOY TO ALLOW POLICE TO KEEP ORDER, STOP LOOTERS Bowser has spoken out against the need for federal troops in the city. “We are examining every legal question about the president’s authority to send troops, even National Guard, to the...
    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The federal government must revoke its approval of a widely used weed killer that has damaged other crops and turned neighbor against neighbor in some farm communities, a federal appeals court in California ruled. Dicamba is used on tens of millions of acres of soybeans and cotton nationwide “but its toxicity is not limited to weeds,” the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Wednesday, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. Companies that make dicamba were licensed in 2016 and the Environmental Protection Agency renewed the license for two years in 2018. The approval involved a newer version designed to be sprayed on genetically modified soybeans and cotton. Environmental and food safety groups had sued to block approval. The EPA approval came with restrictions on when dicamba could be sprayed to avoid it being carried by wind or other conditions onto neighboring fields where crops couldn’t...
    (CNN)A 35-year-old black man in federal prison in New York City died after he became "disruptive" and guards used pepper spray, the Justice Department said.Jamel Floyd, who had been at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn since October 2019, was barricaded inside his cell and was "breaking the cell door window with a metal object," the department said in a press release. "He became increasingly disruptive and potentially harmful to himself and others," the release said. "Pepper spray was deployed, and staff removed him from his cell." Medical staff determined that Floyd was unresponsive and "instantly initiated life-saving measures," the department said. Floyd was transported to a local hospital and pronounced dead by hospital staff. The release states that there is no indication his death was related to Covid-19.Read MoreCalls for independent investigationThe matter is under investigation, and US Marshals and the FBI were notified, according to the release. Organizations...
    WASHINGTON -- The American Civil Liberties Union sued the Trump administration Thursday, alleging officials violated the civil rights of protesters who were forcefully removed from a park near the White House by police using chemical agents before President Donald Trump walked to a nearby church to take a photo.The lawsuit, filed in federal court on Washington, comes as Attorney General William Barr defended the decision to forcefully remove the peaceful protesters, saying it was necessary to protect officers and federal property.The suit argues that Trump, Barr and other officials "unlawfully conspired to violate" the protesters' rights when clearing Lafayette Park on Monday. Law enforcement officers aggressively forced the protesters back, firing smoke bombs and pepper balls into the crowd to disperse them from the park.The lawsuit was filed on behalf of the group Black Lives Matter D.C. and individual protesters who were present. It is filed by the ACLU of...
    Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., became emotional on the Senate floor Thursday after Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., held up legislation that would make lynching a federal hate crime punishable by up to life in prison. The Emmett Till Antilynching Act overwhelmingly passed the House of Representatives, 410-4 in February. The Senate unanimously passed virtually identical legislation last year, but the House vote renamed the measure for Till -- a 14-year-old black boy who was lynched in Mississippi in 1955 -- forcing the bill back to the Senate. EMMETT TILL MEMORIAL GETS EXTRA LAYER OF PROTECTION AFTER ACTS OF VANDALISM Paul has claimed the measure is written too broadly, saying Thursday that it would "allow altercations resulting in a cut, abrasion, bruise, or any other injury no matter how temporary to be subject to a 10-year penalty." The Republican also noted that murdering someone because of their race is already a federal hate crime and urged the Senate to make other reforms,...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The two black SUVs travel from checkpoint to checkpoint, each guarded by federal drug enforcement agents alongside members of the National Guard. Just down the street from the White House, acting Drug Enforcement Administrator Timothy Shea hops out to greet his agents who have been working 12- to 14-hour shifts to prevent any more of the violence that has erupted in Washington during protests over the police death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. The more than 100 DEA agents who have been deployed in the district are part of a massive federal response by the Trump administration aimed at quelling the violence. Scores of heavily armed federal officers in tactical gear have been on the streets for days, after demonstrators set fires, broke store windows and stole items from the shelves and left police officers injured. “We have to respect protesters, but we can’t tolerate...
    Washington — Attorney General William Barr defended his decision to order the forceful removal of protesters from a park near the White House earlier this week, saying the move to expand the perimeter around the White House was planned well before President Trump decided to walk across the park and pose for photos in front of a historic church. Speaking at a press conference alongside the heads of all five Justice Department law enforcement agencies on Thursday, Barr said the massive federal response to protests in the nation's capital was justified after days of violent confrontations over the weekend. He said President Trump tasked him with coordinating efforts by thousands of law enforcement officers from various agencies and departments in the district. "This is the federal city. It's the seat of the federal government," Barr said at the virtual press conference. "When you have a large-scale civil disturbance that is...
    (CNN)Washington, DC, Mayor Muriel Bowser said she wants out-of-state military troops out of the nation's capital after they were called in to handle the protests over the death of George Floyd."The very first thing is we want the military -- we want troops from out-of-state out of Washington, DC," Bowser said at a press conference Thursday.In Washington and cities across America, protesters have gathered to demand justice for Floyd, who was killed last week while in custody of the Minneapolis police.On Monday, the DC National Guard was activated to assist the city's Metropolitan Police Department with the protests and rolled onto the White House complex with military trucks. As of Thursday, more than 4,500 National Guard Members had been deployed to DC -- with several states, including Florida, Indiana, Maryland, Missouri, Mississippi, New Jersey, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee and Utah, sending their Guard troops at the request of Defense Secretary...
    Washington — The death of George Floyd in Minneapolis last week has drawn thousands of protesters to the streets of the nation's capital, leading President Trump to direct his administration to boost the number of federal law enforcement officers on the ground. But photos of unidentified, armed officers donning face shields and protective gear standing guard near the White House have raised concerns among Democrats, who are warning that the dearth of insignia and identifying information could deny victims the ability to hold officers accountable if they engage in misconduct. "This is unacceptable that you have armed uniformed security, with no identification," Senator Chris Murphy, a Democrat from Connecticut, told reporters on Capitol Hill. "It allows for really dangerous potential mischief. When things go wrong you need to be able to identify who it was that punched a reporter or took a club to a protester, and without identification, there's...
    Washington — A group of Democrats in the House and Senate are demanding answers from Attorney General William Barr about unidentified federal law enforcement officers seen near the White House as part of the federal response to protests in the nation's capital sparked by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Senators Cory Booker and Elizabeth Warren and Congressmen Hakeem Jeffries and Raja Krishnamoorthi sent a letter to Barr on Thursday requesting information about the security forces. A Justice Department spokesperson said they were from the Bureau of Prisons, the lawmakers said, though their affiliation was not clearly displayed. "The use of federal security forces to oversee protests without specific agency identifiers or badge numbers runs counter to the need for accountability, transparency, and oversight that is sorely needed in the local and national response to the peaceful domestic protests that followed the unjust killing of George Floyd by a...
    Washington D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser made it clear Wednesday that the Metropolitan Police report to her, and that she does not believe National Guardsmen are needed in the nation’s capital to assist in maintaining order during the George Floyd protests. “We are examining every legal question about the president’s authority to send troops, even National Guard, to the District of Columbia,” Bowser said during a news conference. “Another way to put it is, does the President have the legal authority to request [National] Guard from other states?” Bowser asked reporters. “I have the authority to request guards from other states.” Bowser said she has not asked any National Guardsmen from other states to assist in the capital, but she has requested 100 D.C. National Guardsmen to line the perimeter of the White House, in a limited role and unarmed. The mayor’s comments come after President Trump announced from the White House Monday...
    (CNN)President Donald Trump's message of law and order has manifested itself in Washington, DC, in a way he's threatened to do in states but has not been able to achieve.In the nation's capital, Trump has been able to more easily direct troops and a range of federal authorities positioned across the city to respond to protests stemming from the death of George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, in the custody of Minneapolis police officers. The city's status as a district, not a state, allows the President, and in turn the federal government, more leeway. Combined, at least 5,800 troops, agents, and officers have taken to the streets of the District. Among them are personnel from the national guard, US Secret Service, US Park Police, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Drug Enforcement Agency, US Marshals Service, Bureau of Prisons, Customs and Border Protection, Immigration and...
    PORTLAND, Maine (AP) - Maine is in the final year of funding for a project that seeks to better protect endangered whales in the Gulf of Maine from entanglement in fishing gear. The Maine Department of Marine Resources is using the project to collect data about vertical line fishing in the gulf, and develop a model to determine the fishing industry’s current use of the lines. The department is also hoping to use the model to predict the conservation benefits of new proposed regulations. The state is slated to receive more than $200,000 in federal funds for the project this fiscal year, bringing the total federal money it has received to more than $700,000, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said in a statement. TOP STORIES Chattanooga police chief tells officers OK with George Floyd death to turn in badges Lay down your arms: Prominent veterans urge troops to defy...
    NEW YORK (AP) - The true number of COVID-19 infections among inmates at Manhattan’s federal lockup was likely about seven times what the Bureau of Prisons has previously publicly reported, a government lawyer conceded Tuesday. The bureau’s website says five inmates at the Metropolitan Correctional Center have had the virus. But Assistant U.S. Attorney Jean-David Barnea, representing the MCC’s warden at a court hearing, said at least 34 inmates had been quarantined with symptoms because they were believed to have it. Barnea made the revelation at a federal court hearing for a lawsuit that seeks court oversight over conditions for the nearly 800 inmates at the MCC. Despite conceding the number of virus cases was probably much higher than five, Barnea fought claims that the caseload could’ve been more than a few dozen. TOP STORIES President of law and order: Trump takes aim at Lowlife & Scum as riots rage...
    (CNN)President Donald Trump pledged Monday to use the Insurrection Act of 1807 to deploy United States armed forces against protesters who have taken to the streets after the killing of George Floyd and the long history of racialized police violence against African Americans. Gautham RaoThe way in which Trump made this announcement -- against the backdrop of tear gas and militaristic action taken against protesters on his doorstep exercising their First Amendment rights -- is itself a manifestation of unprecedented use of presidential power. From a historical perspective, the act, which aimed to provide the mechanism for the federal government to quell an insurrection, is (along with its later amendments) one of the earliest and most significant accumulations of presidential power, dating back to the first years of the republic. But especially since the end of the Civil War, presidents have largely avoided invoking the act. Since the 19th...
    (CNN)President Trump's brandishing of the US military this week -- particularly his threat Monday to invoke the Insurrection Act of 1807 -- proves his cowardly and undemocratic proclivities.Instead of working with governors and other domestic leaders to address the obvious anger and hurt throughout the country, he would prefer to hide in the White House, spewing aggressive rhetoric behind the uniforms of men and women who signed up for foreign duty -- none of whom surely wish to find themselves pointing their weapons at their fellow citizens. Jeremi SuriWhen the Constitution describes the president as "commander-in-chief," it refers to his ability to deploy military force against foreign enemies. The Constitution severely constrains the president's use of military force against domestic adversaries. The Insurrection Act of 1807 creates a presumption that state leaders will consent, and in fact request, federal military assistance, when necessary. If state leaders do not request federal...
    Members of the National Guard block an intersection after a demonstration on June 1, 2020 in Washington, DC. Joshua Roberts/Getty Images) The Pentagon has ordered forces and bases in the Washington D.C. area to "Force Protection Condition Charlie," a threat condition that indicates "likely" targeting of military forces and or terrorist action and the second highest alert level available. The state of higher alert was ordered as of 7:30 a.m. Tuesday morning for the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia. The order follows a rapidly moving and confusing set of statements and threats coming out of the White House in the previous 24 hours. During this period, President Donald Trump has threatened state governors with federal intervention, and appointed Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Army Gen. Mark Milley as the commander of federal forces—a legally questionable order. Under the law, the chairman serves as the principal military...
    TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) - Kansas’ Republican attorney general plans to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to allow the state to require new voters to provide papers documenting their citizenship when registering. Attorney General Derek Schmidt announced Tuesday that he will appeal a 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision in April that said the state could not enforce a proof-of-citizenship law. An appeals-court panel said the law violated the U.S. Constitution’s guarantee of equal legal protection as well as a federal voter registration law. The law was championed by former Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, a hard-right conservative, as a way to combat voter fraud. But both the appeals court and a federal judge in Kansas concluded that Kobach could show only a small potential for fraud that didn’t justify such restrictions on voting rights. TOP STORIES Chattanooga police chief tells officers OK with George Floyd death to...
    WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump's warning that he would deploy the United States military to any state that refuses to take aggressive action against rioting rests on a longstanding presidential power that gives wide latitude to the White House, legal experts said.But a decision to do so would be met with likely legal opposition and strong opposition from governors seeing it as an overreaction."If a city or state refuses to take the actions that are necessary to defend the life and property of their residents, then I will deploy the United States military and quickly solve the problem for them," Trump said during a Rose Garden address as cities across the country grappled with property destruction, looting and violent police clashes in the week since the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.Legal experts say the president does indeed have the authority under the Insurrection Act of 1807 to dispatch the...
    Nearly 26,000 nursing home residents have died and more than 60,000 were infected as the coronavirus tore through U.S. facilities within recent months, according to a government report on Monday. The partial numbers released by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found the virus also infected 34,000 staff and killed more than 400. The numbers only included about 80 percent of the country's 15,400 nursing homes in the report meaning they are likely to rise going forward. “This data, and anecdotal reports across the country, clearly show that nursing homes have been devastated by the virus,” wrote Medicare and Medicaid Administrator Seema Verma and CDC Director Robert Redfield. MOST STATES, NURSING HOMES FAIL TO MEET WHITE HOUSE CORONAVIRUS RECOMMENDATIONS A patient is wheeled into Cobble Hill Health Center by emergency medical workers in the Brooklyn borough of New York on April 17, 2020. A...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump’s warning that he would deploy the United States military to any state that refuses to take aggressive action against rioting rests on a longstanding presidential power that gives wide latitude to the White House, legal experts said Monday. But a decision to do so would be met with likely legal opposition, and strong opposition from governors seeing it as an overreaction. “If a city or state refuses to take the actions that are necessary to defend the life and property of their residents, then I will deploy the United States military and quickly solve the problem for them,” Trump said during a Rose Garden address as cities across the country grappled with property destruction, looting and violent police clashes in the week since the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Legal experts say the president does indeed have the authority under the Insurrection Act...
    WASHINGTON — President Trump’s warning that he would deploy the United States military to any state that refuses to take aggressive action against rioting rests on a longstanding presidential power that gives wide latitude to the White House, legal experts said Monday. But a decision to do so would be met with likely legal opposition, and strong opposition from governors seeing it as an overreaction. “If a city or state refuses to take the actions that are necessary to defend the life and property of their residents, then I will deploy the United States military and quickly solve the problem for them,” Trump said during a Rose Garden address as cities across the country grappled with property destruction, looting and violent police clashes in the week since the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. TOP STORIES D.C. bishop blasts Trump over church photo op, abuse of sacred symbols Celebrities blasted...
    LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) - A federal judge on Monday upheld Arkansas’ execution process, ruling that the state can continue to use a sedative in lethal injections that other states have backed away from and rejecting claims that its use amounts to cruel and unusual punishment. U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker ruled the use of midazolam in lethal injections is constitutional and dismissed claims that less painful methods of execution are available. Attorneys for the inmates have said those alternatives include a firing squad and a barbiturate commonly used in physician assisted suicide. “The Court cannot conclude that plaintiffs have proven that the Arkansas Midazolam Protocol entails a substantial risk of severe pain as a result of the use of a 500-mg dose of midazolam as the first drug in the three-drug protocol,” Baker wrote in the 106-page ruling. TOP STORIES Medical examiner: George Floyd died of homicide, had drugs...
    Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer is expected to slam the Trump administration for "confusion" in the early days of the coronavirus pandemic in coordinating the allocation of personal protective equipment (PPE) from the federal government, according to prepared remarks obtained by CBS News.  Michigan was hit particularly hard by the coronavirus pandemic, with over 57,000 cases since the pandemic began. During the height of the pandemic, Whitmer became nationally known as she enforced some of the strictest lockdowns in the country.  Whitmer is scheduled to testify remotely before a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee with Colorado Governor Jared Polis, a Democrat, and Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson, a Republican. The hearing comes as the House recently passed the Health and Economic Recovery Omnibus Emergency Solutions (HEROES) Act, the latest stimulus package that includes $500 billion to assist states navigate the fiscal impact due to COVID-19. Michigan, along with other states, face looming budget shortfalls, Whitmer...
    Military Police stand in riot gear as they block protesters across from the White House on May 30, 2020 in Washington DC, during a protest over the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man, who died after a Minneapolis police officer kneeled on his neck for several minutes. ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images In a period of less than 72 hours, National Guard units in 15 states and the District of Columbia mobilized over 7,000 troops in response to protests and demonstrations across America, the largest deployment of military forces in what are called "civil disturbance operations" in over 30 years. That number is expected to double by Monday night. The federal government has additionally directed thousands of law enforcement and intelligence officers—from the FBI and various components of the Department of Homeland Security—to assist state and municipal authorities. "Our coronavirus response program, which has been stabilizing and...
    A police car burns during protests in Atlanta, Georgia on May 29, 2020. Elijah Nouvelage/Stringer Welcome back to On The Street. A terrible week. Protests over the killing of George Floyd by police in Minneapolis broke out all over the country. Meanwhile, President Trump declared war on Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, threatened Minneapolis demonstrators—on —and, in person, continued to hammer China. And still the stock market persisted: The S&P 500: up 3.2 percent for the week. Here's what I've got: Moocher Nation? Given the unrest in the country—and the high number of unemployed—you'd think extending jobless benefits would be a no-brainer for Congress. But you would be wrong. While there are signs of compromise, the rumpus over enhanced unemployment assistance continues. As you may know, the extra $600 a week benefit—on top of state unemployment payouts— ends July 31. Democrats in Congress want to extend and the Republicans don't....
    The violent rioters that left at least three dead, dozens injured, hundreds arrested and buildings and businesses in charred ruins should be prosecuted as foreign terrorists, former federal prosecutor Francey Hakes said Sunday. "There is really not much difference between foreign terrorists and domestic terrorists," Hakes told "Fox & Friends." "It is just a matter of where they’re from. Their actions are equally repugnant and equally criminal," she added, "and they should be treated just the same." Protests over the May 25 death of George Floyd, a black man who died after Minneapolis cop, Derek Chauvin was seen kneeling on his neck in a viral video, turned increasingly violent, culminating in a weekend of carnage. GEORGE FLOYD DEATH: THE CITIES WHERE PEOPLE ARE PROTESTING AND RIOTING On Sunday, President Trump blamed Antifa for the escalation, announcing the government's designation of the far-left group as a domestic terrorist organization. "Someone needs to be prosecuted," Hakes said. "This is taking the murder of George Floyd and exploiting...
    Many states have yet to spend the federal funding they received more than a month ago to help with soaring costs related to the coronavirus crisis, complicating governors’ arguments that they need hundreds of billions more from U.S. taxpayers. The Associated Press reviewed plans from governors or lawmakers on how they plan to use the money from the coronavirus relief bill and found that at least a dozen states have started distributing the money. But far more have not. The reasons vary. Some governors want permission to use the federal aid to plug budget holes after business closures and stay-at-home orders eroded the tax revenue that pays for government operations. Others are holding back because they fear a resurgence of the virus could mean another wave of expenses. And in other states, governors and lawmakers are wrestling over who controls the spending decisions “If I knew today that another billion...
    OAKLAND, Calif. (KGO) -- Patrick Underwood from Pinole, Calif has been identified as the Federal Protective Service officer who was shot and killed Friday night in Oakland, a source confirms to ABC7 News.The family and friends of the protective security officer killed at the Federal Building in Oakland also confirmed the victim's identity to ABC7 I-Team's Dan Noyes.According to the 53-year-old's loved ones, he worked for the same company that has a contract with the Department of Homeland Security for nine years. His sister, Angela Underwood Jacobs, confirmed Underwood died on Friday night. Angela Jacobs posted on her Facebook page saying,"My brother, Dave Patrick Underwood, a federal officer, was murdered 5/29/20 in Oakland California, while on duty during the riots. This Violence Must Stop." This image shows Patrick Underwood of Pinole, Calif., who was ID'd by an ABC7 source as the Federal Protective Service officer who was killed in Oakland,...
    The woman who allegedly threw a lit Molotov cocktail into an NYPD car full of cops early Saturday has been slapped with a federal charge of damaging a police vehicle — a far cry from the attempted murder charges sought by the NYPD. Samantha Shader, 27, of Catskill, New York, allegedly tossed the makeshift explosive into the marked police vehicle parked at Eastern Parkway and Washington Avenue in Crown Heights, Brooklyn around 1:12 a.m, as a night of destructive protests over the killing of George Floyd winded down, federal prosecutors said. The bottle shattered two of the vehicle’s windows as four cops sat inside — but the gas inside did not ignite, the feds said in a criminal complaint released early Sunday. The complaint cites a single charge against Shader: Causing Damage by Fire and Explosives to a Police Vehicle. Prosecutors obtained a witness video they said showed Shader hurl...