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    Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/AP For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.Artist and prop-maker Dara Williamson visited the gynecologist for the first time when she was 25, after realizing that her health coverage on her mother’s high-quality insurance plan was set to expire on her 26th birthday. Williamson, now 34, says that an ultrasound that day in 2012 revealed “two giant cysts where my ovaries should have been”—so large that her doctor feared she could suffer ovarian torsion, in which the ovaries painfully twist around on themselves. A team of doctors decided that she needed a laparoscopic cystectomy, and she had the surgery just days before her insurance lapsed. Williamson was able to stay on her mother’s plan as long as she did in part because she lived in Illinois, which had passed a law in 2008 requiring insurance companies to...
    The truth about rats and car engines How To Build A Fat Fender Hot Rod Do you know these lucrative Social Security secrets? Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/7 SLIDES © Provided by Best Life If You Don't Have This in Common, Your Relationship Might Not Last They say "opposites attract," and that may be true of extroverts and introverts, reserved people and more adventurous ones, or someone who's anxiety-prone versus someone a bit more laid-back. But it turns out, opposites don't necessarily attract in the case of food preferences. You may think that not having the same taste in what you eat couldn't possibly be enough to cause a real rift in a relationship, but recent research found that for many people, it is. In fact, rather than pass judgment on your...
    Thanksgiving and Christmas are just around the corner, but like most everything else this year, these events will likely look a bit different than normal as the holiday season coincides with the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Many may be wondering: Is it safe to see friends and family? Should I travel? How can we include grandparents and other older family members in the celebrations this year while keeping them safe? When speaking specifically to Thanksgiving earlier this month, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert, said people will have to make “their individual choice” when it comes to how to go about celebrating the holiday this year. “I think we need to realize things might be different this year, particularly if you want to have people who are going to be flying in from a place that has a lot of infection — you’re going to an airport that...
    Dr. Anthony Fauci has been reluctant to support a federal mask mandate. “A national mandate probably would not work,” he said on Sept 15 during a news conference with Vermont Gov. Phil Scott. Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has been urging Americans to use masks for months. “I have trust in the American people that if we put a strong emphasis on the importance of wearing masks, that we will come around and do that and get that percentage up above the relatively low percentage of people that are using masks,” Fauci said on July 21 on NPR’s Morning Edition. But he has said before that he doesn’t think a federal law would be the way to go. “I don’t like to be authoritarian from the federal government, but at the local level, if governors and others essentially mandate the use of masks...
    By KELLY MEYERHOFER, Wisconsin State Journal MADISON, Wis, (AP) — A small but steady stream of masked UW-Madison students stopped by voter registration tables outside the unions last week to perform their civic duty. Madison City Clerk’s office employees helped them through the paperwork, sanitized their used pens and talked among themselves as they waited for the next students to filter into the fairly empty tents. The vibe at Wisconsin’s largest university in this battleground state just 20 days out from the Nov. 3 election bore little resemblance to the campus atmosphere in the lead-up to the 2018 election when organizers passed out puppies, arranged celebrity visits, installed a bouncy house on Library Mall and wore costumes drawing attention to voter registration tables. The barrage of activities and outreach two years ago paid off. Census data show turnout among voters ages 18-24 in the state nearly doubled from the previous...
    Dr. Cameron Webb and Dr. Nancy Goroff aren't just candidates who trust experts, they are experts. After four years of a government run by people who hate climate science, environmental science, medical science, and just … science, it might be nice to have someone in office who doesn’t just respect science but understands science. That’s why 3.14 Action actively recruits candidates with a science and medical background and helps them get the training they need to run for office. That includes seven members of the House who took office in 2018. In the 2020 election, there may be more candidates that you realize aren’t just respectful of science, but can genuinely lay claim to the title “scientist.” On the Senate side, there’s the obvious science candidate in Arizona’s engineer, aviator, and astronaut Mark Kelly. However, Kansas Senate candidate Barbara Bollier is actually Dr. Barbara Bollier—potentially the first woman physician to take a seat in the Senate. Up...
    (CNN)For the longest time in this pandemic, coronavirus had infected and killed more African Americans in Mississippi than White people, which experts explained in part by pointing to racial health disparities in one of the most impoverished states.Early on, Black Mississippians accounted for roughly 60% of the state's cases and deaths, the state health department says.But the tide has turned in the Magnolia State.Just as the country is seeing a resurgence in Covid-19 cases, Mississippi is, too -- but now with cases among White people leading the way.Whites surpassed African Americans in Mississippi's overall reported Covid-19 death toll around September 21 for the first time since the state health department started publishing data by race in June.Read MoreThe same happened with total Covid-19 cases around October 14. Both categories, then, are aligning closer to the state's overall population: 59.1% White and 37.8% Black.Mississippis governor mandated masks in August in public...
    The companies were quick to state that their policies prohibit bigoted material. Spotify said it bars music that “expressly and principally” sparks hate and violence. Apple said it had “strong editorial guidelines” banning this content. YouTube, meanwhile, said there was no room for hate on its service. None of the providers said how the hateful music reached their platforms despite those policies, however. While Spotify said it was “continuously” refining its content monitoring process, the findings come three years after multiple services pulled hate music following racist marches and violence in Charlottesville, Virginia. Clearly, any automated filtering is still limited. This is problematic for fuelling hate, of course, but there’s also a danger that susceptible people might be lured into racist or homophobic culture. Streaming algorithms (themselves under scrutiny) might inadvertently suggest the songs to people who weren’t explicitly looking for them. These services might not be hate-free until there’s...
    (CNN)If it hadn't been for the 1997 Ryder Cup, Jon Rahm might never have tried golf.Although his father Edorta was a big fan of sports, Edorta tended to lean more towards extreme sports such as free rock climbing, parasailing and free skiing.But, after he suffered some accidents in those high-risk sports, and when the Ryder Cup came to Spain and he saw Spanish great Seve Ballesteros lead Europe to victory, Edorta and a young Rahm took an interest in the slower-paced game. That's when he stepped onto a golf course for the first time.Rahm's parents began taking him to lessons after school and once he got a feel for the game, he knew he was destined for great things."Pretty much since I was 13 or 14, I think I told my coach I was going to be best player in the world at some point," Rahm told CNN Living Golf's...
    How the Dodgers acquired Justin Turner, Max Muncy for nothing and turned them into stars Gifts for 3-Year-Olds Theyll Love to Unwrap This Year Do you know these lucrative Social Security secrets? Ad Microsoft Incredible Blanket Puts Humans In A Deep Sleep, Melting Stress Away Ad Microsoft The 23 Hottest Gadgets of 2020 Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/30 SLIDES © Malochka Mikalai / Shutterstock.com The U.S. is slogging through one of the toughest periods of its existence. The pandemic has brought whole...
    ICE: Suspect in Houston officers killing in US illegally We’re Stealing Sophia Loren’s Easy Grocery Store Hack for Bag-Free Eyes Mickelson worries about risk of fans at last Masters tuneup Five-time major winner Phil Mickelson said Wednesday he worries about the US PGA Tour allowing spectators at an event the week before the Masters and might skip it for a 50-and-over tournament. © JAMIE SQUIRE Five-time major winner Phil Mickelson says he might skip the Houston Open the week before the Masters because limited crowds of 2,000 people might be allowed to attend and raise the risk of contracting Covid-19 ahead of the major showdown at Augusta National The 50-year-old American left-hander, a three-time winner of the green jacket, expressed support for the tour's Covid-19 precautions. But Mickelson worried about the extra risk of allowing a limited crowd of 2,000 people at the Houston Open only days before players...
    As Chicago proposes making Pilsen the citys largest landmark district, residents fear more displacement Robot cooks and virtual kitchens: How the restaurant industry looks to technology for help Smart Money Podcast: Sudden Retirement and Finding Lost Money © NerdWallet Welcome to NerdWallet’s Smart Money podcast, where we answer your real-world money questions. This week’s episode starts with a discussion of “sudden retirements,” or older people getting pushed out of the job market during the pandemic, and whether radical downsizing might be an option to cope. Then we pivot to this week’s question from Denali. They write, “I got a letter stating that I had a 401(k) that was still with an employer that I worked for about 10 months over 20 years ago. I’ve tried searching in lost money sites, and tried to contact the company itself with no luck. Would you know of a way for me to...
    By Juarawee Kittisilpa, Patpicha Tanakasempipat and Chayut Setboonsarng BANGKOK (Reuters) - "They think arresting the leaders will stop us. It's no use. We are all leaders today," 24-year-old Pla said as she addressed thousands of protesters at Bangkok's Victory Monument on Sunday. Despite the arrest of many of Thailand's most high profile protest leaders over the past week, demonstrations have grown, with ever louder calls for the ousting of Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha and reforms to King Maha Vajiralongkorn's monarchy. Partly borrowing from the Hong Kong protest playbook and partly working things out for themselves, previously unknown protesters have thwarted police efforts and demonstrated the greatest public support for change in decades. It was designed that way. "Get your megaphones ready, your protective gear on, because everybody is a leader," the Free Youth group protest announced in a Facebook post on Sunday. Before he was arrested on Saturday, well-known face...
    In case you haven't heard of the Health At Every Size movement (HAES), Lauren has you covered. So what is HAES? According to its website, "Health at Every Size is the new peace movement. It is an inclusive movement, recognizing that our social characteristics, such as our size, race, national origin, sexuality, gender, disability status, and other attributes, are assets, and acknowledges and challenges the structural and systemic forces that impinge on living well." Pseudo-Intellectual host Lauren Chen's interest was piqued when she came across the YouTube channel of Dr. Lindo Bacon. Lauren hoped a scientist and self-proclaimed HAES activist like Dr. Bacon could offer a scientific perspective on obesity and health. Lauren found more flaws in Lindo's theories than accurate scientific data. According to Dr. Bacon, epidemiology studies point to a truth that the medical community has been ignoring: that it's not unhealthy to be fat, and...
    Trump reverses course and grants Californias wildfire disaster declaration request 6 Pizza Chains Quietly Vanishing This Year These Grow Lights Might Be the Secret to Keeping Your Plants Alive © Courtesy of [Modern Sprout](https://www.modsprout.com/){: rel="nofollow"} Brooklynite Maria Failla used to refer to herself as a “plant killer” until she saw the light—grow lights, that is. She now has five of them in the Brooklyn apartment she shares with her fiancé, and she’s graduated to “plant lady.” Plants are white-hot, in case you didn’t notice: Houseplant sales in the U.S. increased by 50% to 1.7 million in the last three years, according to 2019 figures from the National Gardening Association. And it seems the pandemic triggered a “botanic boom” as people snatched up any plants they could find to have something to nurture—along with themselves—through hard times. But just buying the first plant that catches your eye and putting it...
    Apple’s decision to no longer include wall chargers and earbuds in its new iPhone 12 boxes is good for business, but just how good it will be for the planet is harder to see. The move saves the company money, but some of the environmental benefits could be offset by people buying earbuds and chargers separately. Environmental benefits could be offset by people buying earbuds and chargers separately Apple made the announcement during its October 13th event. Unlike previous models, the iPhone 12 will come with only a USB-C to Lightning cable. The company said that excluding the wall charger and earbuds would lead to less mining, packaging, and planet-heating carbon dioxide emissions associated with making the products. The company also got kudos from some environmental groups for cutting back on e-waste, a growing problem that Apple contributes to with its constant stream of new gadgets. This week’s announcement is...
    Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.) told constituents that President TrumpDonald John TrumpFeds investigating if alleged Hunter Biden emails connected to foreign intelligence operation: report Six takeaways from Trump and Biden's dueling town halls Biden draws sharp contrast with Trump in low-key town hall MORE's response to the COVID-19 pandemic and alienation of voters could result in a "Republican blood bath" within the Senate in November, according to the New York Times. “I’m now looking at the possibility of a Republican blood bath in the Senate, and that’s why I’ve never been on the Trump train,” Sasse said, according to the Times. “It’s why I didn’t agree to be on his re-election committee, and it’s why I’m not campaigning for him.” He said Trump's defeat in November “looks likely,” and warned “we are staring down the barrel of a blue tsunami,” according to the Times. For nine minutes on the Wednesday call, Sasse lambasted Trump's foreign policy, stating the president has...
    Late last month, 38 members of the University of Denver swimming and diving crew were suspended from team activities through the fall quarter for allegedly attending a large party in violation of COVID-19 safety protocols. But a source tells Westword that some of these athletes have continued throwing bashes so large and boisterous that the Denver Police Department has been notified. The DPD says it has received such complaints but is unable to confirm whether the incidents involved DU students, let alone swimmers or divers. The university can't verify that, either, but a statement provided to Westword contains heavy threats against anyone who might engage in such activities. Meanwhile, the Denver Department of Public Health & Environment reveals that it has imposed quarantines on seven DU Greek houses and hit one sorority with a criminal summons over a get-together that is said to have included several people with the virus.Related Stories Dear...
    World Health Organization (WHO) Chief scientist Soumya Swaminathan on January 12, 2020 in Geneva.FABRICE COFFRINI | AFP via Getty Images Healthy young people might not get an the coronavirus vaccine until 2022 as public health officials focus on immunizing the elderly and other vulnerable groups first, top officials from the World Health Organization said Wednesday. Dr. Soumya Swaminathan, WHO's chief scientist, said health workers, frontline workers and the elderly will likely be offered a vaccine first, though prioritization details are still being worked out by the WHO and its advisory groups. And, of course, a vaccine for the virus has yet to be deemed safe and effective by the WHO, the European Union or the United States. "People tend to think that on the first of January or the first of April, I'm going to get the vaccine, and then things will be back to normal," Swaminathan said. "It's not...
    RIVERHEAD, New York (WABC) -- Freddie Gray, George Floyd, and Breonna Taylor are only a few of the names displayed on symbolic gravestones in front of the First Baptist Church of Riverhead.10 headstones memorialize 10 Black lives lost to police violence, while in police custody, or as a result of racial profiling.Pastor Charles A. Coverdale had received the idea of honoring these lives from a dream he had. He wanted to create a space where these names would never be forgotten and provide a space where people in the community can come pay their respects."I hope that after this experience we are creating to allow any individual that witnesses it that something might be stirred up in them," said Coverdale. "They might leave saying I need to do something to benefit myself and the world I live in."Members of the congregation gathered from a distance to honor these 10 lives,...
    Ballots are arriving at homes across Colorado this week. The state has had all-mail ballot elections since 2014, which has resulted in record turnout and, this year, many sighs of relief from people who do not have to vote in person during a pandemic (though vote centers will be open in every Colorado county for those who like the personal touch, lost their ballot...or even want to register on election day, as you can if you've lived in this state for 22 days by November 3). But this year, you’ll want to have plenty of time to consider your ballot, and maybe a few beers on hand (as well as the 2020 State Ballot Information Ballot, aka the “Blue Book,” that also arrived through the mail) as you dig deep into the issues. In addition to the contests between congressional candidates (the race for the U.S. Senate between Cory Gardner...
    Governor Jared Polis's October 13 press conference on the state's response to COVID-19 focused on new approaches to help restaurants survive and thrive during the winter months. But this sunny and upbeat message was undermined by numbers that are the worst since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. Polis revealed that two of the past three days have gone over 1,000 positive cases; on October 12, 1,048 were recorded. The state had never before crossed the 1,000 threshold. Deaths in the state specifically from the disease are now at 2,009, and the COVID-19 positivity rate has averaged 5.4 percent per 100,000 people over the last three days, hitting 6.4 percent on October 13. The World Health Organization considers a positivity rate over 5 percent as a cause for alarm, as well as an indication that some restrictions that had previously been loosened might need to be put back in place....
    An art teacher at TOPS at Seward School in Seattle, Washington, told her eighth-grade students that the concept of peace is “racist,” and that President Donald Trump is divisive, adding that some of her own art projects are “racist” and derived from “white privilege.” The teacher added that art history comes from a “European, euro-centric ‘white supremacist’ point of view.” Her rambling monologue was captured by a student who recorded the class Zoom session. After tasking her students with creating a pen and ink drawing that incorporates the theme of peace, art teacher Suzanne Wakefield began talking about how she believes President Trump is standing in the way of world peace, according to a report by KIRO-FM. “I might have been coming from a racist perspective with that whole theme,” said Wakefield of her own assignment. On a recording of the Zoom class made by a student, the teacher then began ranting...
    CORONAVIRUS cases are rising in the UK and it's important that you know the symptoms so that you can self isolate if you catch the bug. The NHS states that a high temperature, a new persistent cough and a loss of taste or smell are the key symptoms that you should look out for. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 7A new persistent cough is a key sign but experts have warned that there are also other common symptomsCredit: Getty - Contributor Experts have previously warned that the list should be extended to include symptoms such as a headache, which has been seen in many patients. Researchers at King's College London also previously said that symptoms in children differ from what adults will experience. Data from the Covid Symptom Tracker app revealed that the top symptom in children is fatigue. Other symptoms in...
    Dear Amy: My fiance wants to invite “James,” his old college buddy, to our wedding. Columnist Amy Dickinson (Bill Hogan/Chicago Tribune)  James and I had a silly drunken fling prior to my relationship with my fiance. He knows about this and we have come to terms with it. Still, I regret my fling with James. What’s more, I think he is a mean-spirited meddler. Years ago, he referred to me as “sloppy seconds” to my fiance. Is it unreasonable for me to say that he can’t come to the wedding? I don’t want to act like a Bridezilla. Hopeful Related Articles Ask Amy: My girlfriend makes me cry and she doesn’t seem to care Ask Amy: Is it true this is how ‘young people’ behave? It feels rude to me. Ask Amy: The bride excluded her, and she doesn’t know why Ask Amy: My...
    North Korean dictator Kim Jong-Un made a rare show of emotion after he broke out in tears while apologizing to the country for the struggles that it was facing, according to The Guardian. Jong-Un was speaking at a massive military parade in Pyongyang to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the Worker’s party, when he removed his glasses to wipe away tears as he spoke to the citizens of the country. “Our people have placed trust, as high as the sky and as deep as the sea, in me, but I have failed to always live up to it satisfactorily,” a translation of his statement read. “I am really sorry for that,” he added. Experts say that the rare display of emotion might be evidence that he is facing mounting pressure as the leader of the country. “Underneath his message, one can sense that Kim is feeling a lot of pressure...
    Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group/Long Beach Press-Telegram via Getty Images Ultra-processed foods are designed to be eaten quickly, whether as a cheap packaged snack or a ready-to-heat meal. Public health researchers are starting to discover that people who eat more of these convenience foods tend to die quicker, eat more, and contract more diseases. Their hearts are also not as healthy.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Ultra-processed foods are designed to be cheap, convenient, and keep us energized and full until the next meal. But increasingly, health experts are discovering these foods aren't great at keeping us satisfied, or even alive, long-term. A new study from researchers at the Centers for Disease Control suggests that many Americans are relying on junk foods to stay alive, and it's damaging their hearts. It may be the case that the more factory-made ultra-processed food we eat — like granola bars that...
    It’s another Sunday, so for those who tune in, welcome to a diary discussing the Nuts & Bolts of a Democratic campaign. If you’ve missed out, you can catch up at any time: just visit our group or follow the Nuts & Bolts Guide. For years I’ve built this guide around questions that get submitted, hoping to help small-race candidates field questions. I’ve been grateful to so many campaign managers, field directors, communication directors, and volunteers for sharing their experience, which has continued to be a big part of the story presented every week in this series. Around the country, mailboxes are being stuffed with political advertising. Slick ads that tout the successes of their candidates, and big mailings that decry the failures of their opponents. These ads can be effective, sure, but most consultants—even print consultants—will tell you the goal is to have something that the recipient can quickly decipher because they are...
    A sheriff in Michigan has proposed that the alleged militiamen charged with plotting to kidnap Governor Gretchen Whitmer may have been planning to make a legal citizen's arrest. Barry County Sheriff Dar Leaf in May took the stage at an anti-lockdown rally with William Null, who with his twin brother Michael Null is among the 13 charged in the kidnapping plot. 'It's just a charge, and they say a 'plot to kidnap' and you got to remember that. Are they trying to kidnap?' Leaf told WXMI-TV on Thursday. 'Because a lot of people are angry with the governor, and they want her arrested. So are they trying to arrest or was it a kidnap attempt? Because you can still in Michigan if it's a felony, make a felony arrest,' Leaf said.  Barry County Sheriff Dar Leaf has proposed that the alleged militiamen charged with plotting to kidnap Governor Gretchen Whitmer may...
    Google’s Meet videoconferencing service is getting breakout rooms, but they’ll only be available to Google Workspace Enterprise for Education customers at first, according to a Google blog post (via 9to5Google). With the feature, teachers and educators will be able to break their classes into smaller groups for things like projects or focused discussions. Google will let you make up to 100 breakout rooms in a single call. Once you’ve decided how many breakout rooms you want, Google will randomly group up the people on the call into rooms, but moderators can manually add people to other rooms if they want. Meeting moderators can also hop between rooms to check in on groups. If breakout rooms are something you might want to try out, but you aren’t an Enterprise for Education customer, you might be able to use them sometime soon — the feature will be coming to other Google...
    A GREAT partner, knockout friendships and good health are the big-ticket items, the things we all hope for. But let’s not overlook the fact that life is also about the tiny, the small, the reduced. David Titlow/Camera Press 6 Claudia Winkleman is grateful for the small joys in life Those little things that are easily overlooked — and might even sound trivial to someone else — but that can really make your day. You will have your own list. If you haven’t already written it down, I think you should. Right now. It’s always good to know, and to have to hand, what makes you happy, even just in the short term, on a Tuesday in February when you think you might be coming down with something. While you’re thinking about it, here’s mine. Alamy 6 You can’t beat a good newspaper, says Claudia Newspapers I DON’T...
    Antonio Guillem/Shutterstock For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.Every day, I open up my phone and stare at photos from the lives of people I hardly know until I start to feel bad about myself. That’s because I use Instagram, the highly addictive photo-sharing app founded 10 years ago today. Facebook gets a lot of flack for propagating disinformation and collecting highly personal information about its users. But Instagram, which Facebook owns, is the same beast in a different disguise. The Instagram algorithm feeds me stories and posts from the users whose accounts I interact with most often; when I hate-stalk college acquaintances who live in mansions or flout social distancing guidelines, the app remembers, and provides me with the content I loathe. It knows my location and my browser history and hits me with targeted ads that are...
    Dr. Anthony Fauci issued some advice to young people in a new interview: "Be on the right side of truth." During an interview with Axios during which he received the Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medals from the Partnership for Public Service, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases doled out some advice as the United States continues to fight the coronavirus pandemic. "Whenever you walk into the White House, or to a congressional chamber, tell yourself that this might be the last time that Im walking into that place ... I might have to say something thats going to get people to not like what theyre hearing, and might have them not ask me back.," Fauci said. "So, would I rather be on the right side of the truth, or would I like to be asked back because I told somebody something that they...
    On March 1, 2019, back when few mainstream politicians used the term "systemic racism" while discussing law enforcement aimed at people of color, Boulder Police Officer John Smyly starred in a viral video that captured his over-the-top harassment of Zayd Atkinson, a Black student at Naropa University he rousted for picking up trash on his own property. Smyly subsequently resigned in advance of likely suspension or firing, and Boulder agreed to pay Atkinson a reported $125,000 settlement over the episode. Nonetheless, Smyly is still earning a paycheck from Boulder. According to the Boulder Daily Camera, he remained an official employee of the city's police department until February 2020 as a result of vacation time, administrative leave and sick days he'd collected prior to his supposed exit. Moreover, he was hired in January for what the paper described as "a two-year term position as a civilian training and development coordinator" in...
    Late-night hosts Seth Meyers, Trevor Noah, and Stephen Colbert blasted President Donald Trump for telling his followers not to be afraid of Covid-19 right before getting discharged from Walter Reed Hospital. “I will be leaving the great Walter Reed Medical Center today at 6:30 P.M,” Trump tweeted to his 87 million followers. “Feeling really good! Don’t be afraid of Covid. Don’t let it dominate your life. We have developed, under the Trump Administration, some really great drugs & knowledge. I feel better than I did 20 years ago!” After giving his viewers a rundown of Trump’s coronavirus timeline, Meyers ripped into the president for his tweet, calling him out for having “the best tax-payer funded medical care in the world.” “Remember, he might get better from Covid, but he will never get better as a person,” Meyers warned. “I mean, of course you can say ‘don’t be afraid of Covid.’ You have the best taxpayer-funded...
    Burger fans didn't hesitate to dish up opinions about the imminent arrival in Denver of California fast-food chain In-N-Out Burger. Social media lit up with exclamations of both joy and disgust — but the discussion wasn't limited to the quality of the food. During a fierce and ugly presidential election season, people are also paying attention to the politics of restaurant owners. "’Bout time we get another conservative company out this way!!" said one fan on Facebook, while someone not quite as excited countered with "Mediocre christian burgers," a reference to the company's habit of printing Bible verses on its packaging. Talk of In-N-Out boycotts fired up in 2018, when media outlets reported that some of the company's executives were generous GOP contributors. Since In-N-Out had not publicly endorsed a specific candidate or party, did it matter who its management might support? Should private individuals steer clear of political statements...
    (CNN)News that Donald Trump tested positive for Covid-19 was met Friday morning by experts quick to emphasize that the President will likely make a full recovery. But it's worth noting that Trump is among those at greater risk of severe illness or complications from the coronavirus: He's 74 years old and is considered obese based on his height and weight. And he takes a statin to help control his cholesterol. Trumps positive Covid-19 test throws country into fresh upheavalThe President had "mild symptoms," White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows told reporters Friday. Other people who interacted with him Thursday said his voice sounded hoarse, though some assumed he'd strained it during recent campaign rallies. Trump will surely receive the best medical care available, but his diagnosis has raised a flurry of questions over what treatment he might receive. "Chances are the President will make a complete recovery," said Dr....
    The cannabis vote, a bloc largely made up of young people who might not vote otherwise, is still coveted in election season, even in Colorado. Several local ballots (those of Lakewood, Littleton and Broomfield, in particular) will include questions about allowing recreational cannabis sales, and both the presidential and congressional elections will have an impact on the future of federal pot legalization. For the Cannabis Voter Project, though, the plant is just the tip of the iceberg. A nonprofit that informs and registers people who are interested in cannabis issues, the Cannabis Voter Project uses pot legalization to encourage potential voters to take part in all of their democratic duties on election day, not just the weed-related ones. The organization is currently running campaigns in the five states voting on cannabis legalization this year — Arizona (recreational), Mississippi (medical), Montana (recreational), New Jersey (recreational), South Dakota (medical and recreational) — to increase...
    (CNN)The run-up to flu season in the US has been fraught with fear. Health experts worry that fighting Covid-19 and influenza simultaneously could burden the health care system's ability to treat both infections. Flu season in the Southern Hemisphere, though, came and went with so few cases that there was "virtually no influenza circulation," according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC experts believe that efforts like social distancing, mask-wearing and school closures might have critically crippled flu season in countries in the Southern Hemisphere. Yes, you can have Covid-19 and the flu at the same time. Heres what that could do to your bodyThe Northern Hemisphere -- particularly the US, where as many as 56 million people might have been infected with the flu last season -- can learn from the Southern Hemisphere's response to Covid-19, which might have prevented a massive flu outbreak, CDC experts...
    Latinas in this state faced a huge wage gap. Then came coronavirus. Spice Up Pumpkin Spice Season With These 7 Custom Starbucks Drink Orders 3 Reasons We Might Be in a Housing Bubble and 3 Reasons We Arent © Provided by Millionacres 3 Reasons We Might Be in a Housing Bubble and 3 Reasons We Aren't 2020 has without a doubt been a year of confusion, doubt, and general hesitation, leaving many at a loss about what to do or what's to come. And real estate is no exception. During a time of high unemployment and economic uncertainty, we are seeing record home prices across the country. Some experts are warning that we are in another housing bubble while others are confident we're not. Let's dive into some of the details to see how each side has plenty of data to support their claims.3 reasons we are in a...
    How much money do NFL referees make? Salaries & pay structure for game officials in 2020 As A Middle-Eastern Muslim American, Ms. Marvel Isn’t Something I Dreamed Would Exist What Is Phrogging? © Provided by Millionacres What Is Phrogging? Have you ever had the feeling a ghost lives in your home? Maybe you've noticed open cabinets when you know you always close them. Perhaps you see the oven door ajar -- but you never cook. Or maybe you hear strange "house settling" sounds. What is going on? Is this a ghost? Maybe, or you could have a phrogger.What is phrogging?Phrogging is a person secretly living in another person's home. The word is pronounced "frogging" and gets its name because phrogs, as the people who engage in this activity are called, tend to "hop" around from house to house, as a frog might do on a lily pad.Preventing phroggingIf you've...
    Julio Cortez / Associated Press For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.There was a key moment that you might have missed in Tuesday’s presidential debate. It happened early on, before President Donald Trump told a neo-fascist militia to “stand by,” invented an endorsement from an Oregon sheriff, and trampled on the memory of Joe Biden’s dead son. Trump, after being criticized by Biden for his ongoing efforts to blow up the Affordable Care Act, tried to change the subject by talking about all the work he’s doing to bring down the cost of prescription drugs. “I’ll give you an example,” he said. “Insulin—it was destroying families, destroying people, the cost. I’m getting it for so cheap it’s like water, you want to know the truth. So cheap.” So cheap it’s like water. I did a double-take when I heard...
    NORTH TEXAS (CBSDFW.COM/CNN) – Healthcare workers across the country are stressing the importance of getting vaccinated for influenza this year, saying that it will not only help prevent the flu and save lives, but also reserve health resources needed to continue the COVID-19 fight. Even if you aren’t coming into contact with anyone else in your daily life, experts generally advise leaving your bubble to get a flu shot. “I understand the desire for social distance, but I think it’s also important to get a flu shot this year,” CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta said. “It’s important to get one every year, but perhaps even more important this year because we’re probably going to have a convergence of both flu and coronavirus this fall. So, anything we can do to reduce flu I think is going to be really important.” Getting a flu shot is a safe, inexpensive...
    During a recent podcast appearance, Sami Zayn — who became a two-time Intercontinental Champion at Sunday’s Clash of Champions pay-per-view — revealed that he had a reputation for being an “annoying” person away from the ring until WWE officials talked to him about his behavior. As quoted by WrestlingNews.co on Monday, Zayn appeared on the latest edition of The New Day: Feel the Power, where he looked back on how he used to frequently insert himself into other people’s conversations. This was an issue that had been raised through the years by a number of wrestlers, though as Zayn admitted, WWE ultimately “made [him] aware” of these actions. He added that even if he was in his late 20s at the time he signed with the company, he still had some growing up to do as his colleagues would see him in a different way than how he saw himself....
    Maybe you never wondered if there was a brand of religious zealotry out there that includes all the secretive ultra-conservative Catholicism of Opus Dei, then slathers on the anti-rationality, ready condemnation, and baked-in misogyny of extreme fundamentalist evangelicism. It doesn’t matter if you’ve thought about this worst-of-both-worlds stew, because exactly that combination seems set to remold American law for a generation or more.  With multiple news organizations reporting that on Saturday, Donald Trump will officially name 48-year-old Amy Coney Barrett as his replacement for the seat of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, it’s worth noting that Barrett is a lifelong member of “People of Praise.” This group, springing from a Catholic charismatic movement of the 1970s which seemed intent on capturing the energy Catholics saw in the surging fundamentalist movement, has, among other things, a very strict view of gender roles. Not only does this include refusing to allow women to hold positions of leadership...
    Matthew Dahl September 25, 2020 10:57PM (UTC) This article was originally published on The Conversation. As President Donald Trump looks to fill the Supreme Court seat left open by the death of Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, he and other Republicans want to secure a reliable conservative majority on the nation's highest court for many years to come. They have tried to do this in the past, but it hasn't worked out, because Republicans have repeatedly nominated justices who have drifted to the left after they were confirmed. : My analysis of the judicial records of 26 people currently serving as judges on Trump's list of proposed nominees suggests that this time will be different. What predicts ideological drift Psychologists have devised a way to quantify a person's flexibility and tendency to change, and previous political science research has shown that this type of measurement can accurately predict a...
    Night Owls, a themed open thread, appears at Daily Kos seven days a week At UnDark magazine, Katheryn Houghton writes—In Montana, Tracking Long-Term Health Effects of Wildfire Smoke: [...] Forest fires had funneled hazardous air into Seeley Lake, a [Montana] town of fewer than 2,000 people, for 49 days. The air quality was so bad that on some days the monitoring stations couldn’t measure the extent of the pollution. The intensity of the smoke and the length of time residents had been trapped in it were unprecedented, prompting county officials to issue their first evacuation orders due to smoke, not fire risk. Many people stayed. That made Seeley Lake an ideal place to track the long-term health of people inundated by wildfire pollution. So far, researchers have found that people’s lung capacity declined in the first two years after the smoke cleared. Chris Migliaccio, an immunologist with the University of Montana,...
    Also: Several states take steps to tackle climate change, and Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death sparks a wave of financial donations to progressive causes. This week, Americans flocked to register on National Voter Registration Day, the House of Representatives unveiled legislation to curb presidential abuses of power, and the baby panda at the National Zoo had its first check-up. Read on to see what else you might have missed this week in the news. Registration soars on National Voter Registration Day The nonpartisan group Vote.org saw twice as many people register to vote Tuesday on National Voter Registration Day compared to registrations on the same day during the 2018 election, CNBC reported.
    In a Friday commentary piece for Raw Story, Dean Baker, founder of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, argued that United States governors might be killing people in a bid to help Donald Trump’s re-election campaign. “A simple test for the governors is to look at their positive test rates for the coronavirus,” he wrote. “Test rates are a good measure of how serious the governors are in trying to bring the pandemic under control. While they can take measures to limit the actual spread, such as longer and stronger lockdowns and mask requirements, many factors determining the spread are outside their control.” Per CNN, Trump has notoriously pushed for slowed pandemic testing, noting that more tests mean more coronavirus cases logged in America. Although the White House claimed the president was joking, the head of state later contradicted them and said he was serious. As noted by Baker,...
    One of the most jarring aspects of watching Fox News or One America News Network is the mental gymnastics President Donald Trump’s supporters must perform in his defense. Being a Trump supporter often means defending the indefensible. Journalist Anne Applebaum describes those extremes in an article published in The Atlantic on September 25, stressing that their defenses of the president require a total defiance of logic and reason. Applebaum cites Trump loyalist William B. Crews as one of the wildest examples. Crews, Applebaum notes, was an employee of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which is headed by expert immunologist Dr. Anthony Fauci. Crews, the Daily Beast’s Lachlan Markey recently reported, was angry because Fauci’s messages on the coronavirus pandemic sometimes conflicted with what Trump had to say — and Crews responded by attacking Fauci on the Red State website using the pen name “Streiff.” As “Streiff,” Applebaum...
    John Legend said that he and his wife Chrissy Teigen are so “exhausted” and “embarrassed” by Donald Trump’s leadership that they’ve considered leaving the country — and other people might need to do the same if he wins a second term in office. The EGOT member spoke with Cosmopolitan UK about the current administration, who he said could eventually present a threat to the fabric of democracy. “If America chooses to be that place then people will have to start thinking about going somewhere else. It is truly disturbing and concerning,” Legend told the magazine. He explained that every once in a while, he and Teigen, with whom he is expecting their third child, consider moving out of the United States. “We were born and raised here, all of our families are here. It would be hard to leave. But I don’t know what one’s supposed to do when you...
    A new report has revealed new details on the recent COVID-19 outbreak that broke out at WWE’s Performance Center (PC) and reportedly forced the company to temporarily pause training activities at the facility. On Thursday night, PWInsider‘s Mike Johnson wrote that several sources behind the scenes believe the outbreak had started after an unnamed NXT wrestler threw a party that was attended by their fellow trainees. This reportedly might have led to an asymptomatic transmission of the coronavirus, which then resulted in multiple people at the PC falling ill. Johnson added that there have been “a number” of individuals who tested positive for COVID-19 this week. Prior to the new update, rumors had suggested that the virus might have been spread by a coach who had interacted with other people at the Performance Center. “As part of ongoing testing protocols, WWE completed its second round of weekly COVID-19 testing on...
    Night Owls, a themed open thread, appears at Daily Kos seven days a week At The Guardian, Tom Burgis writes—What $2 trillion in possible corrupt activity reveals about Kleptopia: [...] This week we’ve caught a fresh glimpse of Kleptopia. The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists published the FinCEN files, details of more than 2,000 leaked suspicious activity reports that banks had filed to the US Treasury. They show that, even when bankers have doubts about the provenance of their clients’ money, the financial secrecy system goes on serving its primary purpose. That purpose is not simply to accentuate the concentration of wealth, to abet corruption, or to shift the proceeds of crime, important though all those functions are. No, it is to accelerate a project that had been gathering momentum since the end of the cold war: the privatisation of power itself. Back when it became clear that the Soviet...
    14 raccoons confront father and son ‘like out of a movie’ Art is good for your kids—and here’s the science why What the post-coronavirus workplace might look like What will the post-Covid workplace look like? Steelcase is one of the largest manufacturers of office furniture — desks, chairs, storage products and office pods — and they have a lot of ideas. © Provided by CNBC A computer-generated image from interiors contractor Portview shows how office space may be segregated as people go back to the workplace after the coronavirus lockdowns are eased. They are partnering with MIT to better understand how air circulates in an office environment. Load Error "Well, we know that the six-foot rule is not as simple as that," CEO Jim Keane told me. "The science shows that particles travel through the air, depending on whether they're larger particles or smaller particles, based on models...
    Maryland released new data from its contact tracing operations Wednesday, shedding some light on the activities people participated in — from going to work to visiting casinos — that may have led to them being infected with Covid-19. Between July 10 and Sept. 19, 26% of the Maryland residents who tested positive and completed questionnaires said they went to work outside the home within 14 days of experiencing symptoms or receiving a positive test result. About 13% said they attended a social gathering of more than 10 people. Of the more than 44,000 respondents, a little more than 18,000 — or 41% — said they visited a “high-risk location” within 14 days of becoming infected. From those 18,000, more than 54.6% said they went to work outside the home, 36.9% said they went shopping indoors, 20.8% said they ate indoors at a restaurant, 18.6% said they ate outdoors...
    Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images A collection of leaked audio recordings have provided a new look into Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s struggle to address the political and free speech challenges surrounding his social media platform. The Verge obtained a multitude of audio recordings and posts from company insiders, many of which shed light on how Facebook contended with the coronavirus pandemic and sociopolitical events throughout the summer of 2020. The trove of audio also delves into Facebook’s internal conversations on public image concerns, political pressures, and their efforts to deal with misinformation and election interference. Many of the contents originated from a series of company Q&As Zuckerberg held weekly, during which, employees would ask him questions and he would livestream his answers to the ones that got the most demand. According to The Verge’s reporting though “his weekly Q&As now regularly spill over with outrage and dissent.” “Throughout the...
    The Wall Street Journal recently shared the story of a couple who is struggling because the pandemic has upended their jobs and income. To make matters worse, they’re dealing with a massive amount of consumer debt. The article says: “The Denton, Texas, couple pay $4,400 a month on their mortgage, four car loans and leases, and student debt, Ms. Scott-White said. Minimum required monthly credit-card payments total about $700. The debt was manageable pre-pandemic, she said. “She deferred lease payments on her Infiniti QX60 for three months and started paying again with unemployment benefits. Her husband traded in his Ford F-150 in August for a lower-cost car and reduced his original monthly payment of $820 by about $100, and his income covers the $2,100 mortgage.” (Emphasis added.) The Ford F, +0.29%  F-150 payment stuck out to me for a couple of reasons. Maybe it’s because I live in Michigan, but...
    Dan Froomkin September 23, 2020 10:00AM (UTC) This article was co-produced with Press Watch, a new website that monitors and critiques American political coverage. Please consider supporting Press Watch by making a donation. There are so many ways that Donald Trump has fallen short in his response to the COVID-19 pandemic — so many things he could have done differently that would have saved countless lives. Most of them, however, were never even remotely possible because of his appalling character flaws and the complete lack of a rational White House decision-making process. That's why this one really stings: The U.S. Postal Service, it turns out, was about to send five face masks to every household in America — in April! — until someone at the White House nixed it. They even had a draft press release ready to go. : I can't think of any one act that might have changed the pandemic...
    The Food and Drug Administration is expected to soon announce new, higher standards for an emergency authorization of a coronavirus vaccine, lowering the chances that a vaccine might be cleared before the Nov. 3 election, the Washington Post reported on Tuesday. The agency is issuing the guidance to boost transparency and public trust as health experts have become increasingly concerned that the Trump administration might be interfering in the approval process, the newspaper said. According to the report, the FDA is expected to ask vaccine manufacturers seeking an emergency authorization to follow trial participants for a median of at least two months after they receive a second vaccine shot. It also said the agency is asking that trials identify a specific number of cases of severe COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, in patients treated with a placebo. Few vaccine developers were expected to have definitive trial results before...
    The Care19 mobile app, which the governors of North Dakota and South Dakota have asked residents to download to assist in contact tracing during the global outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), is seen on a phone, April 24, 2020.Dave Paresh | Reuters Despite "aggressive" efforts to ramp up contact tracing, health departments are struggling to get people to participate in outbreak investigations, according to a study published Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that focuses on two counties in North Carolina. Contact tracing is the process through which trained personnel contact those who have tested positive for the virus and identify who they might have exposed to the virus. Health officials then provide potentially infected people with information and encourage them to isolate in order to stop the spread of the virus. Along with social distancing and mask wearing, contact tracing is one of the only proven...
    VIDEO3:0803:08Fundamentally bullish because fundamentals will continue to improve: YardeniSquawk on the Street Stock strategist Ed Yardeni told CNBC on Tuesday that the U.S. economy may be able to improve enough this fall to render another round of large coronavirus stimulus unnecessary.  Appearing on "Squawk on the Street," the president of Yardeni Research contended that remnants of earlier Washington stimulus continue to make there way through the nation's economy, which had been devastated by the pandemic.  "I reckon that there is still enough of this government stimulus that will keep the economy growing, probably through September, October, maybe November," Yardeni said. "And hopefully along the way we'll see employment continue to pick up so the economy can grow on its own without necessarily needing another, or at least another big, stimulus package."  Lawmakers in Washington had been negotiating another round of fiscal stimulus after many of the key provisions in the March...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — Contract tracers aren’t the only ones tracking where you got coronavirus. A local private investigator is using social media and public records to help employers prove their employees didn’t get COVID-19 at work. From grocery stores to restaurants, there is no shortage of jobs, or places, where people might be exposed to coronavirus. A new law intended to protect California workers now classifies COVID-19 as an “injury” under workers’ compensation if you contracted it within 14 days of an outbreak at work. An outbreak is defined as four employees with COVID-19 for a small business (under 100 employees) or 4% of all employees at a larger business (more than 100 employees). The law assumes people contracted the virus at work unless their employer can prove otherwise and that’s where private investigator Chris Champlin comes in. “There is a lot of information out there that people love to...
    U.S. to put murderer to death as federal executions spree continues This Popular Steakhouse Chain Is Filing for Bankruptcy 6 Signs Your Parent Might Be Gaslighting You (and What to Do About it) © SDI Productions/getty images 6 Signs Your Parents Are Gaslighting You 1. They Make You Question Your Recollection of Past Events It’s normal for you and your parent to remember events, specifically from your childhood, a little differently. Maybe you could’ve sworn it was your fifth birthday party that was Power Ranger-themed instead of your sixth, or that your favorite backpack was the Barbie one, not the Barney one. It veers into gaslighting territory, though, when your parent tries to act like something that had a profound effect on you didn’t happen. Let’s say you remember a time when you were bullied in middle school. You might try to bring it up,...
    New research suggests that a lack of exposure to sunlight does not cause a person to feel more depressed. A Dutch study, involving 5,282, people found that those participants who already have a tendency to experience negative emotions were the only ones to be affected by the change in sunlight. The other participants who do not have high neuroticism were almost completely unaffected by the end of the summer sun, The Times reports.  A new Dutch study claims that a lack of sunlight does not influence a person's mood (stock image) Neuroticism is one of the big five high-order personality traits in the study of psychology. Those who score highly on neuroticism are more likely to be moody and experience anxiety. Wim Winthorst, from the University of Groningen, is one of the authors of the study. He said he was only able to speculate why those participants high in neuroticim...
    A new study from Cleveland Clinic found getting vaccinated for the flu does not increase your risk of contracting COVID-19 or your chances of complications or death from the disease. The study, published in the Journal of Clinical and Translational Science, also revealed the seasonal flu vaccine is an important tool to protect your health during the upcoming "twindemic" —the collision of the flu and COVID-19. According to Science Magazine, scientists compared 13,000 patients who tested for COVID-19 at Cleveland Clinic and found those who had the 2019 vaccine had no variance in incidence or severity than the patients who were not vaccinated. "Our findings suggest that we should proceed as usual with our vaccination strategy from global influenza this flu season," said Dr. Joe Zein, a pulmonologist and one of the researchers. "Getting the flu vaccine remains the best safeguards against the influenza — both for yourself and people...
    FOR the last seven months I have lived in fear that if I get Covid, it will kill me. The message has been clear, if you are vulnerable and you get it, you die. 5As a cancer patient, I've spent the last seven months terrified of coronavirus So we locked ourselves away for months, to flatten the curve and stop the spread. It worked really well for a bit. But now, after lockdown eased and infections have started to creep back up, we are facing the threat of more restrictions. The reality is we might have to live like this until a vaccine is found - and that might not be until next year. All that makes sense, it’s not much to sacrifice is it? For the sake of a few months? Sure, but some people don’t have the luxury of a certain future. Some of us are already living...
    Six months in quarantine. Six weeks until election day. How are you doing? Are you holding on? Feeling you might have missed a major story? Stay calm my friends, I’ve got you covered. Here’s what you might have missed. Armed vigilantes set up rural checkpoints in Oregon as ‘antifa fires’ hoax inflames social media By David Neiwert  As firefighters and law-enforcement officers along the rural West Coast scramble to keep the public safe amid the rampaging wildfires that so far have burned 4.6 million acres, destroyed several towns, and killed 35 people, they’ve been forced to make multiple pleas to the public to stop spreading false rumors that the fires have been set by nefarious “antifa arsonists.” Of course, this cause wasn’t helped when an Oregon sheriff’s deputy was caught on video loudly amplifying the hoax. The primary wellspring of the rumors has been social media, particularly Facebook—which responded Saturday...
    Chris Hogan, a financial expert on helping students with private student loans, and Dave Ramsey, presenter of ‘The Dave Ramsey Show’. Author’s note: Cash expert Dave Ramsey Ramsay is the CEO of Solutions. He has authored seven best-selling books, including “Total Cash Makeup.” His radio show “The Dave Ramsey Show” is listened to every week by over 16 million listeners on 600 radio stations and many digital platforms. Each week he answers a question about personal finance in his “Dave Chase” column. Dear Dave, I find it difficult to save money. Do you have any practical advice to save when you have an average income? Nikki Dear Nikki, One thing I have learned over the years is that people will only start saving money when they learn healthy money habits such as living on a written, monthly budget, and let their future needs be more important than their current...
              It looked like the release of a new iPhone. Across Virginia, hundreds of people lined up outside polling places on the first day of early voting on Friday. The Virginia Public Access Project is reporting that already, over 600,000 more Virginians have requested mail-in ballots than in 2016. However, political pundits warn that large increases in early voting might not affect final results that much. Pundit Ben Tribbett told The Virginia Star, “It tends to be that people that vote the earliest also have the strongest views, so I don’t think the people that were lined up for three hours to vote yesterday at the early vote centers were people that were going to be persuaded later in the election.” “The reality is that in voting by mail, you don’t pick up any votes unless it’s somebody that wouldn’t have otherwise voted in...
    What can we do for our deeply stressed country right now, when a pandemic has us in its grip and we suddenly have to worry that our votes won’t be counted and our own president won’t so much as wear a mask to keep us safe or talk about one nation indivisible, rather than red states versus blue? Sometimes in the constant static of us and them, it’s so hard to remember the all of us. So I am grateful for the reminder that came my way recently from one of our newest citizens. On Aug. 20, one day after her 65th birthday, Clemencia Isabel Morales, born in Guatemala, put on a polka dot dress and went downtown to the federal building to take a citizenship test that had been twice canceled, leaving her in tears, during the pandemic. She’s been in the country for 19 years now. She followed...
    As much as half of the world's population may have some immunty to coronavirus, a small but growing body of research suggests.  Tests done on donated blood in the US found that about 50 percent of the samples had immune T cells that reacted to coronavirus, suggesting that the donors' bodies might have the natural ability to fight of the deadly virus.  Similar results have been found in the UK and Sweden.  COVID-19 is thought to be so deadly in part because it's an entirely new virus to  which humans have no natural immunity.  And while that is clearly the case for many people, British Medical Journal associate editor Dr Peter Dosh wrote on Thursday that the evidence is beginning to suggest that some people may possess some protection against the virus.  Some people may have immune T cells to other coronaviruses that could fight SARS-CoV-2, recent research suggests ...
    The best player for each of the 32 NFL franchises 8 Amazing Side Effects Of Eating Avocados Every Day Savvy Americans do this to earn an extra $1,394 per month in retirement Ad Microsoft Wearing This 30 Mins/Day Reverses Years Of Bad Posture & Back Pain Ad Microsoft 23 Gadgets That Could Sell Out Before the Holidays Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/31 SLIDES © AleksandarNakic / Getty Images More than 55 million Americans have filed for unemployment since the beginning...
    Virtual reality has long been positioned as a technological tool for bridging ideological chasms. If you can live inside somebody else's skin and see things as they do, proponents say, you might more clearly understand that person’s view of the world. A group of filmmakers—along with some marquee stars from Marvel's superhero films—have turned to VR in a new attempt to evoke these kinds of empathetic reactions from across society’s dividing lines. After slipping on a VR headset and dropping into a scene of a Black man getting pulled over and interrogated by the police, you might better empathize with those who are policed more forcefully than you. After watching up close as a woman is sexually harassed in her place of work, you might gain more understanding of the power imbalance between genders. Though there are only two episodes so far, the series—called The Messy Truth: The VR...
    Republicans are ratcheting up criticism of some Democrats -- including vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris -- who have cast doubt on the safety of a potential coronavirus vaccine amid a persistent push by President Trump to accelerate the development of the vaccine and suggestions by Trump one could even be approved before the presidential election. Both Harris and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden have made clear that they support a vaccine and believe having one is critical to defeating the coronavirus. But each has made comments suggesting Trump may push an unsafe coronavirus vaccine on the American people despite procedural safeguards and assurances from experts. Harris earlier this month made, perhaps, the most controversial comments on the issue. She said on CNN that public health experts will "be muzzled, they’ll be suppressed, they will be sidelined, because he’s looking at an election coming up in less than 60 days, and he’s grasping for...
    Awful people will use technology to do awful things. This is a universal truth that applies to almost any technology that facilitates communication and interaction, no matter how well intentioned it might be. Something as innocuous as Google Drive can be a vector for harassment. As we’ve recently discovered, so can video conference platforms like Zoom. Just in the past few weeks, high school classes in North Carolina and Texas, along with an NAACP meeting in California, were interrupted by racist and misogynist video, images, and text. With remote classes again ramping up all over the country, we can only expect more harm—but how much is Zoom to blame? Last April, “Zoombombings” hit our university, and a colleague described the disturbing disruption to her online classroom, where trolls got around Zoom’s poor privacy protocols in order to screen-share pornography and scream racist and sexist slurs. Even obvious precautions, like not...
    LONDON — British scientists are beginning a small study comparing how two experimental coronavirus vaccines might work when they are inhaled by people instead of being injected. In a statement on Monday, researchers at Imperial College London and Oxford University said a trial involving 30 people would test vaccines developed by both institutions when participants inhale the droplets in their mouths, which would directly target their respiratory systems. IS THERE A LINK BETWEEN CORONAVIRUS AND GUILLAIN-BARRE SYNDROME? Larger studies of the Imperial and Oxford vaccine are already underway, but this study aims to see if the vaccines might be more effective if they are inhaled. “We have evidence that delivering influenza vaccines via a nasal spray can protect people against flu as well as help to reduce the transmission of the disease,” said Dr. Chris Chiu of Imperial, who is leading the research. He suggested that might also be the case with COVID-19. “It is critical...
    From the images of cloudy chest scans and gasping patients hooked up to ventilators, we’ve been conditioned to think of Covid-19 as a respiratory disease. But it’s not just about the lungs. Even from the early days of the pandemic, doctors were finding that a novel coronavirus infection could ravage other parts of the body, including the brain, blood vessels, and heart. Data from initial outbreaks in China, New York City, and Washington state suggested that 20 to 30 percent of patients hospitalized with Covid-19 showed signs of cardiac injury. Everything You Need to Know About the CoronavirusHeres all the WIRED coverage in one place, from how to keep your children entertained to how this outbreak is affecting the economy. That these patients tended to get sicker and died more often than patients without cardiac complications didn’t set off immediate alarm bells. These were, after all, people with serious cases of...
    LONDON — British scientists are beginning a small study comparing how two experimental coronavirus vaccines might work when they are inhaled by people instead of being injected. In a statement on Monday, researchers at Imperial College London and Oxford University said a trial involving 30 people would test vaccines developed by both institutions when participants inhale the droplets in their mouths, which would directly target their respiratory systems. Larger studies of the Imperial and Oxford vaccine are already under way, but this study aims to see if the vaccines might be more effective if they are inhaled. “We have evidence that delivering influenza vaccines via a nasal spray can protect people against flu as well as help to reduce the transmission of the disease,” said Dr. Chris Chiu of Imperial, who is leading the research. He suggested that might also be the case with COVID-19. “It is critical we explore...
    LONDON (AP) — British scientists are beginning a small study comparing how two experimental coronavirus vaccines might work when they are inhaled by people instead of being injected. In a statement on Monday, researchers at Imperial College London and Oxford University said a trial involving 30 people would test vaccines developed by both institutions when participants inhale the droplets in their mouths, which would directly target their respiratory systems. Larger studies of the Imperial and Oxford vaccine are already under way, but this study aims to see if the vaccines might be more effective if they are inhaled. “We have evidence that delivering influenza vaccines via a nasal spray can protect people against flu as well as help to reduce the transmission of the disease,” said Dr. Chris Chiu of Imperial, who is leading the research. He suggested that might also be the case with COVID-19. “It is critical we...
    by Nicole Hassoun, Binghamton University, State University of New York There is strong scientific evidence that wearing a mask reduces the risk of transmitting the coronavirus. Both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization recommend wearing them. Indeed, many people believe it is important to take precautions to reduce the risks we pose to others and wear masks. They conclude that wearing a mask is the right thing to do. As a professor of philosophy working on global health ethics, I believe the conflict between mask wearers and non-wearers raises some important ethical questions: Is it acceptable to comment on others’ apparent irresponsibility when they choose not to wear a mask or try to shame them into wearing one? Is this approach effective? Moral outrage There is psychological evidence to show that people express moral righteousness – act from an outraged sense of justice –...
    A Harvard University professor claimed that states use “Stand Your Ground” as a way in which the state might “outsource its violence to individual citizens,” adding that they are “disproportionately white or white-passing, disproportionately male-identified, and usually a person with some kind of property,” and that the United States has been based on “different mythologies of neutrality.” As Campus Reform reports, speaking at a virtual event titled, “Race, Guns, and the Politics of Self-Defense,” Caroline Light, the senior lecturer on women, gender, and sexuality at Harvard University, stated of “Stand Your Ground laws,” “In many ways, I see those laws, which have spread now to 33 states in some kind of version, as a way in which the state might outsource its violence to individual citizens who are marked as ‘law-abiding citizens.’” “Now, in spite of that facially neutral invocation of the armed citizen or the law-abiding citizen, ultimately the way...
    Dear Amy: During the pandemic, I started exploring my genealogy and recently found out that I have a half-sister, “Barb.” We have the same father. Columnist Amy Dickinson (Bill Hogan/Chicago Tribune)  Barb was put up for adoption as an infant. Our father passed away without divulging her existence. Barb and I have been in touch and are sharing information about our lives. I recently discovered letters written by Barb’s biological mother to our father during her pregnancy. Most of the letters are very loving, and detail what seems like a caring relationship between two very young people who were teenagers and impoverished students who were not ready to raise a child. I have shared some information in the letters and would like to share more — however, the letters are not all good. Adoption was not the first plan for this pregnancy, if you get what I mean. Related Articles...
    After a blowout quarter, Peloton is considering ways to make its expensive, high-tech workout equipment more affordable and accessible to a larger audience, according to its CEO.  One way it might go about that is by renting out its pricebikes and treadmills in the future, CEO John Foley told CNBC's "Squawk Box" Friday morning, on the heels of Peloton's eye-popping earnings report.  Five or 10 years from now, Foley said he'd be "surprised" if Peloton didn't have a rental option in place for its gear. "It's not something you are going to see in the next year. ... But I love moving in that direction," he said. "It's all in the name of affordability for our members and making sure they feel incredible about the value."  In theory, this initiative could allow more people to try Peloton's products for a few months before they decide to buy. Peloton currently offers a 30-day...
    Chinese dictator Xi Jinping staged a splashy awards ceremony in Beijing on Wednesday, attended by hundreds of high Chinese Communist Party (CCP) officials, in which he bestowed medals upon citizens who helped face the “extraordinary and historic test” of the Wuhan coronavirus pandemic. Considerable public anger greeted the conspicuous omission of Dr. Li Wenliang, a whistleblower doctor in Wuhan who died of the coronavirus at age 34 in early 2020, a time when the CCP was eager to conceal the extent of the threat posed by the disease. The snub of Li might have been a surprise to some since the young doctor’s reputation was posthumously rehabilitated and he was declared a hero of the Communist Party. The Party persecuted Li for attempting to sound an early warning about the coronavirus, detained and subjected to humiliating disciplinary measures for spreading “rumors” and “false information” to other doctors in the city of...
    Hollywood, you’re swinging so far left you’re bumping into your own a**!’ When it comes to summing up Tinseltown’s latest attempt to promote absurd wokery, I can’t put it any better than actress Kirstie Alley, long-standing star of the much-loved TV sitcom Cheers. Remember Cheers? An international staple of the 1980s, it was made in a time when movies were designed to be Saturday night entertainment rather than Sunday morning sermons. The target of Ms Alley’s fury was the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the body in charge of awarding Hollywood’s Oscar awards. In a jaw-dropping statement yesterday, it announced that from 2024, films will be nominated for an Oscar only if they meet certain criteria on diversity. To put it simply, a film can win Best Picture – the most coveted Oscar of all – only if it meets at least two of four criteria, including having...
    A 31-year-old man in the final weeks of his life has been praised for writing an honest and emotional blog about the prospect of dying - and the things he won't get to do.  Elliot Dallen, who lives in London, posted a 'call to arms' on his blog, The Cortisol Diaries, to raise money for one of his favourite charities, Trekstock, which supports young people with cancer. The former Barclays employee was diagnosed with adrenal cortical carcinoma (ACC), a rare and aggressive cancer, after a 'massive' tumour was found on his adrenal gland two years ago - after months of symptoms including a bloated face, problems sleeping and bladder issues.  In the heart-wrenching post, entitled The Switch and Call to Arms, which was also published in the Guardian, he discusses how he's pondered during lockdown the life that he might have had, including getting married and having children.   Scroll down for...
    ♈ ARIES March 21 to April 20 As Mars about-turns in your personal sign, you can react in love and life in unexpected ways, digging deep into your true self. Yes, mood swings can be a part of this . . . but believe you are strong enough to survive these. Because you are! Showing love and loyalty works better than merely talking about them. 1 ♉ TAURUS April 21 to May 21 All those parts of yourself you try to keep hidden are ready to be shared, even if you might not feel it. An ability to go with the flow is strong in your chart for the next few weeks and the real you is the right you. Love is firmer than you think and a shared address is coming closer. Luck is triangle-shaped. ♊ GEMINI May 22 to June 21 Surrounding yourself with the...
    Deadly deceit HAD China come clean about Covid from the off, Peter Attwood might be alive today. So might many of our 41,586 victims and hundreds of thousands worldwide. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 3Peter Attwood might still be alive today if China had come clean about Covid from the offCredit: Louis Wood - The Sun Some scientists believe the disease erupted in Wuhan as early as last October. China’s instinct was to lie, to cover it up, to play it down, to silence whistle-blowers. An early global warning might have seen Peter, an 84-year-old heart patient, self-isolate for his protection. It might even have persuaded Public Health England to grasp Covid’s seriousness, which it shamefully failed to do. PHE was still minimising the dangers and bragging about its preparations at the end of February. By then Peter had...
    Civil rights activist Rev Al Sharpton says defunding the New York Police Department is something a 'latte Liberal' in the Hamptons might support but that proper policing on the ground is necessary.  Sharpton made the comments during an appearance on MSNBC's Morning Joe on Tuesday amid a wave of rising crime in New York City and a gun violence filled Labor Day weekend.  He pushed back at recent calls to defund the NYPD and other police departments across the country, saying that policing needed to be re-imagined instead.  'To take all policing off is something I think a latte liberal may go for as they sit around the Hamptons discussing this as some academic problem,' he said.  Al Sharpton made the comments during an appearance on MSNBC's Morning Joe on Tuesday amid a wave of rising crime in New York City and a gun violence filled Labor Day weekend 'People...
    Famous people weve lost to the coronavirus 13 Best Home Improvement Projects To Tackle This Fall Celtics Stevens: Lowry might be NBAs most underrated player Ahead of Monday's pivotal Game 5, Boston Celtics head coach Brad Stevens had some high praise for Toronto Raptors guard Kyle Lowry. © Douglas P. DeFelice / Getty Images Sport / Getty "He's an All-Star but he might be the most underrated player in the league ... he does everything you need to win," Stevens said, according to TSN's Josh Lewenberg. "Somehow he's been underappreciated, but I think the more people watch him in these settings the more people appreciate him." Lowry shook off subpar performances in Game 1 and 2 to help Toronto even up the second-round series at two games apiece. The six-time All-Star is averaging 26.5 points, 8.5 boards, 7.5 assists, and two steals across the past two contests. His willingness...
    The cartoon archetype of a drunk person is a disheveled mess, with droopy eyelids, an erratic gait, and bubbles coming off their head—for some reason. If only it were so easy to tell if someone’s blitzed out of their mind. If a cop pulls you over, they can only objectively determine intoxication on the roadside with a breathalyzer: In the lungs, ethanol is transferred from the blood into air, so the device can detect alcohol in your exhalation. Even then, one person at the US federal legal driving limit of .08 breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) might act perfectly normal, while another person would be trying unsuccessfully to fish a slice of pizza out of a gutter. But scientists are working on what might be a new way to determine intoxication, by returning to a stereotypical characteristic of the drunk that’s actually true: that soused walk. No matter how well you...
    Tell me he doesn't look like a human poop emoji. He does. He is the poop emoji. You can't convince me otherwise. Folks, we’ve got less than two months left until the election. How did that happen? Will the news cycle ever let up from now until we get Trump out of office? The answer, of course, is no. So let’s make sure we give him the boot and let’s take down a bunch of Senate Republicans while we’re there, yeah?  Until then, here’s what you might have missed this week.  Facebook announces new preelection rules for political ads and claims—but will it follow through? By Hunter Facebook, the gargantuan and nation-bending social media behemoth, today announced a collection of new actions intended to make it look Slightly Less Bad in the final weeks of the 2020 elections. Facebook has been harshly criticized as one of the top venues, in any medium,...
    In California, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed legislation protecting residents from eviction related to COVID-19 through Feb. 1, 2021. "COVID-19 has impacted everyone in California," Newsom said in a statement on Monday, "but some bear much more of the burden than others, especially tenants struggling to stitch together the monthly rent, and they deserve protection from eviction." The governors of Nevada and Oregon issued executive orders on Monday to protect tenants. Oregon Gov. Kate Brown extended a foreclosure moratorium through Dec. 31, 2020, saying the action "will ensure that more Oregonians do not lose their homes this year, and that businesses can continue to provide vital goods and services to our communities." Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak extended a residential eviction moratorium for an additional 45 days, through Oct. 14, 2020. In a statement, Sisolak said he was aiming to "keep people in their homes while we are still battling this pandemic."...