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    President Trump’s Sunday night decision to sign the combination COVID relief/government spending plan averts a shutdown tomorrow night. The government was funded through 11:59 p.m. Monday. But Mr. Trump’s signature means the government is now funded through September 30, 2021. The President railed against the combination package last week – even though the final plan was negotiated by the top four bicameral, bipartisan Congressional leaders and his own point man Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin. The plan passed with 359 votes in the House and 92 votes in the Senate. SUPERMARKET CHAIN GIVES $200K IN GIFT CARDS TO STRUGLLING RESTAURANTS AMID CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC President Trump objected to foreign aid provisions which he deemed "pork" in the spending provision of the combination measure – even though the president requested much of that money in his budget request sent to Congress earlier this year. Many Republicans opposed any stimulus checks. But after wrangling, the sides settled...
    Donald Trump was going to sign the new COVID-19 relief bill in a Christmas Eve ceremony from his Mar-a-Lago resort, but the plan was abruptly scrapped, a new report claims. Trump has come under intense scrutiny for throwing the latest pandemic stimulus deal into chaos when he made a surprise announcement late in the week that he did not support several aspects of the measure, including the size of the $600 direct payments to Americans. Democrats backed his idea and held a vote for the larger amount, but it was thwarted by Republicans. He has still not signed, which has allowed extended unemployment benefits to expire. As CNN reported, Trump did have plans on signing but apparently changed course. “On Christmas Eve, staff at Mar-a-Lago made preparations for President Donald Trump to sign the Covid-19 relief package and government funding bill, a holiday gift of relief to millions of Americans...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — President Donald Trump has yet to sign off on the COVID relief bill, creating a ripple effect that could shut down the government and leave millions without money. It’s estimated about 12 million Americans could lose their unemployment benefits Saturday. That is money that could be used to support struggling restaurants and nearby businesses. It’s money out-of-work Broadway sound engineer Wallace Flores is running out of. “I am coming to the end of all of that,” Flores told CBS2’s Cory James. The unsigned COVID relief bill leaves millions of others like Flores in need of financial help. “You’re playing games with lives, with human lives, and that’s not fair. That’s not fun,” Flores said. CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC Ask CBS2’s Dr. Max Your Vaccine Questions COVID Vaccine FAQ From CDC Find A New York City Testing Site Near You Check NYC Testing Wait Times Explanation Of N.Y.’s...
    PRESIDENT Donald Trump is reportedly continuing to consider vetoing the new coronavirus relief bill—with $600 checks he says are too small—as the top Republican calls it “tainted.”  On a House GOP conference call on Wednesday afternoon, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said he spoke to Trump, according to New York Times White House correspondent Maggie Haberman. 6President Donald Trump is apparently still thinking about vetoing the $908billion Covid relief bill Credit: White House 6House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy reportedly called the Covid relief bill 'tainted'Credit: ALL RIGHTS RESERVED “POTUS hasn’t committed to a veto of the stimulus bill yet. Still deciding,” Haberman tweeted.  She added that “McCarthy, per person on the call, said that [Republicans] need to address the president's concerns and keep parts of the bill they think are good, but that POTUS hasn't committed either way.” Haberman tweeted that the unnamed person on the call said that McCarthy...
    President-elect Joe Biden on Tuesday outlined the basics of what he plans to request from Congress in a new round of COVID-19 relief once he takes office, including a new round of stimulus checks, calling the just-passed aid bill a "down payment" in addressing the pandemic. Speaking to reporters at a news conference in Delaware, Mr. Biden also warned Americans that the "darkest days in the battle against COVID-19 are ahead of us," even as health care workers across the country begin to receive the first vaccines. The president-elect's comments come hours after the House and Senate passed a $900 billion COVID-19 relief package, ending months of congressional inaction. Any proposal would have to be negotiated with Congress, where Democrats enjoy a slim majority in the House and control of the Senate remains undetermined. "Leaders in both House and Senate, both parties deserve credit for making the hard compromises...
    US President-Elect Joe Biden delivers remarks before the holiday at The Queen in Wilmington, Delaware on December 22, 2020.Alex Edelman | AFP | Getty Images President-elect Joe Biden will push for a third round of stimulus checks in the next Covid-19 relief bill, he said on Tuesday. The former vice president said at an event in Wilmington, Del. that his plan will call for direct payments to Americans, but declined to specify how large they would be, calling that a matter for negotiation. "I think you're seeing that there is a clear understanding that these issues go beyond any ideology," Biden said. "People are desperately hurting, and the Republicans are hurting as badly as Democrats."  Biden praised his former rival for the Democratic nomination, Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, as well as Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., for pushing for direct payments in the latest Covid-19 relief package, which was passed...
    RICHARDSON, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – President Donald Trump is expected to sign the Coronavirus Relief Bill Tuesday, Dec. 22 after it passed both the House and Senate. The $900 billion measure will help those most impacted financially by the pandemic. The legislation will provide direct payments to Americans depending on their income. It won’t be as much as the relief earlier this year. The government will send individuals $600 for individuals making up to $75,000, and $1,200 for married couples who file jointly and make up to $150,000. It’s a sliding scale after that and will be phased out completely at $87,000 for individuals and $174,000 for couples. The government will send $600 for each dependent child under the age of 17. How much the government sends depends on your income on your 2019 federal income tax return. “It all depends on if you already have a direct deposit setup,” said...
    Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) walks back to her office after opening the House floor following an agreement of a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) aid package the night before on Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C., December 21, 2020.Ken Cedeno | Reuters Congress plans to pass a mammoth coronavirus relief and government spending package Monday night, injecting long-delayed aid into the fight against a once-in-a-century health and economic crisis. The House will vote on the more than $2 trillion legislation first, and the Senate will follow in a vote that will likely drag late into the night. Congressional leaders attached $900 billion in pandemic aid to a $1.4 trillion measure to fund the government through Sept. 30. At the same time, lawmakers are set to prevent a government shutdown that would start at 12:01 a.m. ET on Tuesday. The bill would send needed help to Americans for the first time since...
    A for rent sign in San Diego, California.Dunzl | Ullsted Bild | Getty Images The $900 billion economic relief plan in Congress carves out a slice for renters and landlords, but some economists and industry experts claim it is not even close to enough. The eviction crisis still looms large, as renters owe billions in back rent, and landlords are struggling to make their own payments on the homes and apartment buildings. According to summaries issued by lawmakers, it will provide $25 billion in rental assistance to states and local governments through the Coronavirus Relief Fund. The funds can be used for payment of rent, rent arrears, utilities and home energy costs, as well those arrears. "It will be channeled through the states. The states are much better at executing this than having another federal program," said Treasury Secretary Steven Mnunchin in an interview on CNBC's "Squawk Box" Monday, as lawmakers readied...
    Getty A roll of stimulus checks being prepared. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell raised hopes on Sunday, December 20, that a compromise on a second COVID-19 stimulus relief package was finally at hand. “We’re winnowing down the remaining differences … I hope and expect to have a final agreement nailed down in a matter of hours,” McConnell said on December 20, according to CNBC. The plan would likely include $600 stimulus checks for qualifying Americans as well as $300 in weekly enhanced unemployment benefits, although those details could change. For months, Republicans and Democrats in Congress have been unable to reach agreement because they were so far apart on the overall cost of the plan. However, a $908 billion bipartisan compromise proposal may have changed that. Here’s what you need to know: McConnell Said Citizens ‘Need This Waiting to End’ I think both sides agree: Our around-the-clock...
    Getty A roll of stimulus checks being prepared. Congress is expected to vote on a new COVID-19 stimulus relief plan on Sunday, December 2020. And yes, if passed, it’s expected to include a second round of stimulus checks, although they would be half the amount as last time. There are hopes that it could pass despite months of stalemates; a bipartisan compromise plan totaling $908 billion is on the table. It would include $600 in stimulus checks for qualifying Americans as well as $300 in enhanced unemployment benefits. The debate over stimulus relief has been drawn into the larger debate over governmental funding to thwart a shutdown. That’s close in hand, as Congress approved a two-day stopgap measure on Friday, December 19 to avoid just such a shutdown. A measure to pass $1,200 checks by unanimous consent was foiled by a Republican Senator on Friday, December 18....
    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) speaks after the Senate Republican GOP leadership election on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. November 10, 2020.Erin Scott | Reuters Congress had only hours to prevent a government shutdown Friday as lawmakers tried to put the finishing touches on a massive coronavirus rescue package. Leaders on Capitol Hill have said for days they are close to a deal on a $900 billion relief proposal that would accompany a $1.4 trillion spending bill. However, some new disputes have prevented Washington from sending fresh aid to struggling Americans for the first time in nearly nine months. Congress has little time left to act. Funding will lapse at 12:01 a.m. ET on Saturday. "The talks remain productive," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Friday morning. "In fact, I am even more optimistic now than I was last night that a bipartisan, bicameral framework for a...
    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell speaks during a news conference after the Republicans' weekly senate luncheon at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., December 8, 2020.Sarah Silbiger | Reuters Congress tried to put the finishing touches on a coronavirus relief deal Thursday as Washington drew closer to letting the government shut down and allowing millions to lose unemployment benefits. Leaders on Capitol Hill say they have come close to an agreement on sending $900 billion in aid to Americans. Lawmakers have run short on time to pass a government funding and pandemic rescue package before federal funding lapses at 12:01 a.m. ET on Saturday. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., held a series of talks with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin into Wednesday night as Democrats and Republicans try to hammer out final details, according Pelosi's spokesman Drew Hammill. He said they would speak...
    (CNN)Congressional leaders in both parties expressed growing confidence Tuesday evening that Washington will be able to cut a last-ditch deal to provide relief to Americans hit hard by the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic after setting aside months of partisan finger-pointing and bickering. Democrats and Republicans sounded upbeat following the conclusion of in-person talks on Tuesday between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer and House GOP leader Kevin McCarthy. Nothing has been finalized yet and the details are scarce about what may be agreed to, but all signs are pointing to the likely announcement of a deal that will include provisions with widespread bipartisan support, including an extension of jobless benefits, loans for hard-hit small businesses and money for vaccine distribution. Lawmakers may also extend the federal eviction moratorium and defer student loan payments. While Hill leaders would not confirm what they...
    Sign up here to get our daily updates on coronavirus in Minnesota delivered straight to your inbox each afternoon. And go here to see all of MinnPost’s COVID-19 coverage. An emergency COVID-19 relief package adopted by the Minnesota Legislature Monday created a set of winners and losers that might be awkward for lawmakers — especially DFL lawmakers — to explain to constituents. By adopting the aid package, Senate File 31, the Legislature voted to send $216 million to businesses and nonprofits hurt by the latest closure orders by Gov. Tim Walz. Depending on the number of employees, recipients of the money — restaurants, bars, gyms, bowling alleys and other businesses closed or limited last month — will get grants of up to $45,000 from taxpayers. The same package will also extend by 13 weeks state unemployment insurance for about 120,000 Minnesotans who will run out of benefits later this month....
    Reuters December 13, 2020 0 Comments The U.S. House of Representatives’ No. 2 Democrat, Steny Hoyer, suggested on Sunday his party might be willing to accept a coronavirus relief deal without the state and local aid that Democrats have been insisting should be part of it. Democrats “are not going to get everything we want. We think state and local (aid) is important. And if we can get that, we want to get it. But we want to get aid out to the people who are really, really struggling and are at grave risk,” Hoyer, the House majority leader, told CNN. Congressional negotiators have been trying for months to reach agreement on a new coronavirus aid bill, after Congress approved $3 trillion in relief earlier this year. Leading lawmakers would like to attach the COVID-19 aid package to a massive bill funding the government that needs to be done...
    Charday Penn | E+ | Getty Images Small business owners with battered finances might be in line for additional funding from the Paycheck Protection Program. On Wednesday, lawmakers from both sides of the aisle circulated a summary of their $908 billion emergency Covid relief package. The proposal sets aside $300 billion for the Small Business Administration, the federal agency responsible for overseeing the Paycheck Protection Program – a forgivable loan that was created through the CARES Act. The measure, known as the Bipartisan Emergency COVID Relief Act of 2020, also would provide $300 in weekly supplemental unemployment payments, as well as an extension of student loan forbearance through the end of April 2021. The funding would bolster the PPP and make more money available to firms that have suffered the most. Generally, borrowers are eligible for PPP loan forgiveness if they apply at least 60% of the proceeds to payroll....
    U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill, in Washington, U.S., December 10, 2020.Erin Scott | Reuters Few signs of progress toward a coronavirus relief deal emerged Thursday as Congress inches closer to letting millions of Americans fall deeper into financial peril. They will have to wait longer for Washington to figure out how to help them. After votes Thursday, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., told representatives the chamber would adjourn until at least Tuesday pending an agreement on pandemic aid and full-year government funding. Congressional leaders continue to stress the importance of crafting a rescue package in the coming days to prevent about 12 million Americans from losing unemployment benefits and stop families across the country from getting tossed out of their homes. Despite a flurry of activity to try to reach a deal, lawmakers still have not resolved disputes that...
    VIDEO4:5604:56We're the only game in town, we're getting very close: Sen. Joe Manchin on stimulus billThe News with Shepard Smith Senator Joe Manchin (D-WV) is leading a bipartisan group of lawmakers who are trying to broker a $908 billion stimulus plan. He told "The News with Shepard Smith" in an interview Wednesday that "this is truly an emergency package," as Americans wait another day for the federal government to pass a critical relief bill amid the coronavirus pandemic.   "This is an emergency to get us through the first quarter, which will be the most difficult quarter that we've ever had," Manchin said. "We finally have moved everybody to say it takes $900 billion to get us through the most challenging times." The $908 billion bipartisan framework includes a $300 a week boost in unemployment benefits, and ensures that expanded benefits don't get cut off at the end of 2020. It...
    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell attends a news conference with Republican leaders at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., December 8, 2020.Kevin Dietsch | Reuters Congress has hit a wall again in efforts to send help to Americans during a coronavirus outbreak that has killed thousands of people a week and left millions waiting in food lines. After days of trying to reach a relief deal, lawmakers as of Wednesday afternoon had not resolved a range of issues preventing an agreement. A Congress that has failed for months to send aid to desperate people will now have to quickly resolve disputes to prevent millions of people from losing unemployment insurance or housing. Democratic leaders have called bipartisan talks toward a $908 billion relief bill the best chance to craft a plan that can get through a divided Congress. Lawmakers have not yet finalized the legislation because of disagreements over...
    A display is seen as bipartisan members of the Senate and House gather to announce a framework for fresh Covid-19 relief legislation at a Capitol Hill news conference on Dec. 1, 2020.Kevin Lemarque | Reuters Congress aims to scrape together a coronavirus relief package this week and prevent a lapse of benefits that could send millions of Americans spiraling further into financial peril at the end of the year. A bipartisan group of lawmakers hopes to release a more detailed outline of its $908 billion aid proposal on Monday as it prepares legislative text. Democratic leaders have backed the plan as the basis for an emergency relief bill as a sustained Covid-19 infection surge stresses hospitals across the country. Lawmakers aim to pass both pandemic aid and spending legislation before the government shuts down on Saturday. They will have to quickly resolve several sticking points to meet the...
    VIDEO4:0704:07It would be better if families got the $1,200, and that may still be in play: BidenClosing Bell President-elect Joe Biden on Friday said that another round of coronavirus stimulus checks for U.S. families "may be still in play." "I think it would be better if they had the $1,200 [payments to families]," Biden said when asked at a press conference to respond to criticism about a new Covid relief plan revealed this week as a starting point for the latest round of negotiations on Capitol Hill. Biden added: "And I understand that may be still in play. But, I'm not going to comment on the specific details. The whole purpose of this is, we've got to make sure people aren't thrown out of their apartments, lose their homes, are able to have unemployment insurance [that] they can continue to feed their families on as we grow back the economy."...
    Getty A roll of stimulus checks being prepared. There’s a new bipartisan stimulus relief plan gaining momentum in Congress. However, does it include a second round of $1,200 COVID-19 stimulus relief checks (or $3,400 for a family of four)? The answer is, no. The bipartisan plan, unlike other proposals previously on the table, does not contain direct payments to Americans – in any amount. The $1,200 for one person and $3,400 for a family of four were figures that made it into previous proposals. The bipartisan plan does include $160 billion to help state, local, and tribal governments deal with the pandemic’s costs. Here’s what you need to know:A Growing Number of Republican Senators Are Expressing Interest in the Bipartisan Plan GettyChuck Grassley The bipartisan plan comes as Republicans and Democrats in Congress have deadlocked for months over the pricetag of a second relief plan for...
    House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPressure builds for coronavirus relief with no clear path to deal Top GOP senator warns government funding deal unlikely this week Houston will send residents checks of up to ,200 for pandemic relief MORE (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerMcConnell: COVID-19 relief will be added to omnibus spending package Overnight Health Care: Moderna to apply for emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine candidate | Hospitals brace for COVID-19 surge | US more than doubles highest number of monthly COVID-19 cases The five biggest challenges facing President-elect Biden MORE (D-N.Y.) on Wednesday threw their support behind using a bipartisan, compromise plan as the basis for COVID-19 relief talks. “While we made a new offer to Leader McConnell and Leader McCarthy on Monday, in the spirit of compromise we believe the bipartisan framework introduced by Senators yesterday should be used as the basis for immediate bipartisan,...
    Washington — Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin signaled White House support for a narrow coronavirus relief plan proposed by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, telling reporters on Wednesday that President Trump would sign McConnell's bill. Mnuchin did not say whether the president would support a separate, bipartisan $908 billion plan proposed by lawmakers on Tuesday. "The president will sign the McConnell proposal he put forward yesterday, and we look forward to making progress on that," Mnuchin said at the Capitol before a hearing before a House committee. McConnell's framework is similar to legislation he proposed earlier this year, which was a targeted $500 billion bill which focused on providing funding for small businesses, schools and liability protections. Senate Democrats twice blocked this bill, arguing that it did not go far enough to help struggling Americans. McConnell has advertised his proposal as a stopgap which would not address all problems, but would...
    (CBS Detroit) — With Democrats and Republicans far apart on a second stimulus package, centrist lawmakers from both parties have announced a $908 billion plan to address coronavirus relief. The plan would help state and local governments, small businesses and individuals. State and local governments would receive $160 billion to offset steep declines in revenues. Small businesses would be allocated $288 billion, at least partially through the Paycheck Protection Program, which loans money to businesses to keep employees on staff during the economic downturn. And the unemployed would be paid an additional $300 per week in federal unemployment benefits for four months, totaling $180 billion. A second round of stimulus checks is not currently part of the plan. An additional $82 billion would be earmarked for education and another $16 billion for vaccine development and distribution. The details are still being worked out. >>READ: Stimulus Package Update: What Will A...
    By ANDREW TAYLOR, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Top Senate Republican Mitch McConnell said he's largely sticking with a partisan, scaled-back COVID-19 relief bill that has already failed twice this fall, even as Democratic leaders and a bipartisan group of moderates offered concessions in hopes of passing pandemic aid before Congress adjourns for the year. The Kentucky Republican made the announcement Tuesday after President-elect Joe Biden called upon lawmakers to pass a downpayment relief bill now with more to come next year. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi resumed talks with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin about a year-end spending package that could include COVID relief provisions. Key Senate moderates rallied behind a scaled-back framework. It’s not clear whether the flurry of activity will lead to actual progress. Time is running out on Congress' lame-duck session and Donald Trump’s presidency, many Republicans won’t even acknowledge that Trump has lost the election and good...
    WASHINGTON – Top Senate Republican Mitch McConnell said he's largely sticking with a partisan, scaled-back COVID-19 relief bill that has already failed twice this fall, even as Democratic leaders and a bipartisan group of moderates offered concessions in hopes of passing pandemic aid before Congress adjourns for the year. The Kentucky Republican made the announcement Tuesday after President-elect Joe Biden called upon lawmakers to pass a downpayment relief bill now with more to come next year. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi resumed talks with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin about a year-end spending package that could include COVID relief provisions. Key Senate moderates rallied behind a scaled-back framework. It’s not clear whether the flurry of activity will lead to actual progress. Time is running out on Congress' lame-duck session and Donald Trump’s presidency, many Republicans won’t even acknowledge that Trump has lost the election and good faith between the two parties remains...
    (CNN)Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is circulating a new relief plan as part of a last-ditch effort to pass a bill to prop up the struggling economy before year's end, moving to lock down Republican support even as a number of his own members and Democrats push for a different approach.For days, McConnell has been in private discussions with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, getting a clear sense of what President Donald Trump is willing to sign into law in his final days in office. As McConnell drafts a new bill based on those conversations, Democratic leaders are making their own counteroffer to jumpstart the talks while House Speaker Nancy Pelosi spoke Tuesday to Mnuchin for the first time since late October.The flurry of activity was a sign of the growing pressure facing party leaders to respond to...
    More On: Coronavirus North Carolina county reports 34 cases of COVID-19 reinfection  El Paso mayor blames virus spike on ‘COVID fatigue,’ big box shopping UK bars, cinemas may require proof of COVID-19 vaccination to visit Member of Hungary’s ‘anti-gay’ government quits after orgy bust A bipartisan COVID-19 stimulus proposal unveiled Tuesday seeks to end a long-running Capitol Hill stalemate on pandemic relief, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s insistence that Republicans agree to a massive all-or-nothing deal. The $908 billion bipartisan proposal was unveiled by five Senate Democrats alongside Senate Republicans and House members of both parties. “Today is a victory for the American people and a victory for common sense,” said Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.) at a press conference unveiling the plan. “It builds upon President Trump’s commitment to get something done.” The proposal would partially revive at $300 per week a federal unemployment supplement, down from $600 a...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan group of lawmakers is putting pressure on congressional leaders to accept a split-the-difference solution to the protracted impasse over COVID-19 relief in a last-gasp effort to ship overdue help to a hurting nation before Congress adjourns for the holidays. The group includes Senate centrists such as Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., and Susan Collins, R-Maine, who hope to exert greater influence in a closely divided Congress during the incoming Biden administration. In Wilmington, Delaware, President-elect Joe Biden called on lawmakers to approve a down payment on COVID relief, though he cautioned that “any package passed in lame-duck session is — at best — just a start.” The proposal hit the scales at $908 billion, including $228 billion to extend and upgrade “paycheck protection” subsidies for businesses for a second round of relief to hard-hit businesses like restaurants. It would revive a special jobless benefit, but at a...
    WASHINGTON -- A bipartisan group of lawmakers is putting pressure on congressional leaders to accept a split-the-difference solution to the months-long impasse on COVID-19 relief in a last-gasp effort to ship overdue help to a hurting nation before Congress adjourns for the holidays.The group includes Senate centrists such as Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., and Susan Collins, R-Maine, who hope to exert greater influence during the incoming Biden administration.The proposal hit the scales at $908 billion, including $228 billion to extend and upgrade "paycheck protection" subsidies for businesses for a second round of relief to hard-hit businesses like restaurants. It would revive a special jobless benefit, but at a reduced level of $300 per week rather than the $600 benefit enacted in March. State and local governments would receive $160 billion, and there is also money for vaccines.SEE ALSO: Why you shouldn't expect a second stimulus check this yearEMBED More News Videos...
    By ANDREW TAYLOR, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan group of lawmakers is putting pressure on congressional leaders to accept a split-the-difference solution to the months-long impasse on COVID-19 relief in a last-gasp effort to ship overdue help to a hurting nation before Congress adjourns for the holidays. The group includes Senate centrists such as Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., and Susan Collins, R-Maine, who hope to exert greater influence during the incoming Biden administration. The proposal hit the scales at $908 billion, including $228 billion to extend and upgrade “paycheck protection” subsidies for businesses for a second round of relief to hard-hit businesses like restaurants. It would revive a special jobless benefit, but at a reduced level of $300 per week rather than the $600 benefit enacted in March. State and local governments would receive $160 billion, and there is also money for vaccines. Earlier, larger versions of the proposal...
    Getty If you had trouble receiving an economic impact payment last time, things like setting up direct deposit for you next tax return may help. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says there is “no reason” that a second COVID-19 stimulus relief plan shouldn’t pass by the end of the year. “There is no reason – none – why we should not deliver another major pandemic relief package to help the American people through what seems poised to be the last chapters of this battle,” McConnell said on the Senate floor, according to Fox Business. A second plan is likely to include such things as a second COVID-19 stimulus check and enhanced unemployment benefits. The concept of a second plan has bogged down in endless recriminations between Senate Republicans and House Democrats. With control of the Senate to be determined by two Georgia Senate runoffs, it’s possible that...
    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer wants state legislators to approve a $100 million COVID-19 relief plan when they return to session during December. The Democratic governor sent a letter to leaders of the Republican-controlled Legislature asking for the state-based stimulus program that she said “will provide direct financial support to the families and small businesses that have been hit hardest by the pandemic.” Whitmer’s request comes as legislators are scheduled for a return to session on Tuesday until Dec. 17 and Congress has been deadlocked in negotiations over potentially billions of dollars in emergency COVID-19 assistance. “Michigan families are hurting, and while we must continue to advocate for meaningful support from the federal government, we simply cannot afford to wait,” Witmer wrote in Wednesday’s letter. Whitmer acknowledged that development of the program will be complicated by tax revenue losses that have state government facing a potential $1...
    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer wants state legislators to approve a $100 million COVID-19 relief plan when they return to session during December. The Democratic governor sent a letter to leaders of the Republican-controlled Legislature asking for the state-based stimulus program that she said “will provide direct financial support to the families and small businesses that have been hit hardest by the pandemic.” Whitmer’s request comes as legislators are scheduled for a return to session on Tuesday until Dec. 17 and Congress has been deadlocked in negotiations over potentially billions of dollars in emergency COVID-19 assistance. “Michigan families are hurting, and while we must continue to advocate for meaningful support from the federal government, we simply cannot afford to wait,” Witmer wrote in Wednesday’s letter. Whitmer acknowledged that development of the program will be complicated by tax revenue losses that have state government facing a potential $1...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Multiple hospitality groups in Minnesota are urging Gov. Tim Walz for emergency relief as the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting restrictions continue to devastate the industry. In the letter sent to the governor Thursday, the groups say that the hospitality industry was dealt a “devastating blow” when the new restrictions were announced Wednesday and that they expect his administration to present a “comprehensive relief plan” in the upcoming days. The groups include Hospitality Minnesota, Minnesota Licensed Beverage Association, Minnesota Craft Brewers Guild and Minnesota Events Coalition. “The hospitality industry is a key driver of economic activity and tax revenue, supporting 1 in 10 jobs in Minnesota. It cannot be allowed to collapse,” the letter said. Here are some of the ideas for the plan: – Relief should be targeted to “distressed” hospitality businesses – Establish a $200 million emergency grant fund – DEED no-interest...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Multiple hospitality groups in Minnesota are urging Gov. Tim Walz for emergency relief as the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting restrictions continue to devastate the industry. In the letter sent to the governor Thursday, the groups say that the hospitality industry was dealt a “devastating blow” when the new restrictions were announced Wednesday and that they expect his administration to present a “comprehensive relief plan” in the upcoming days. The groups include Hospitality Minnesota, Minnesota Licensed Beverage Association, Minnesota Craft Brewers Guild and Minnesota Events Coalition. “The hospitality industry is a key driver of economic activity and tax revenue, supporting 1 in 10 jobs in Minnesota. It cannot be allowed to collapse,” the letter said. Here are some of the ideas for the plan: – Relief should be targeted to “distressed” hospitality businesses – Establish a $200 million emergency grant fund – DEED no-interest...
    Getty If you had trouble receiving an economic impact payment last time, things like setting up direct deposit for you next tax return may help. The wars of words between Republicans and Democrats before the 2020 presidential election have continued after it. Now the Senate Majority Leader, Republican Mitch McConnell, is calling Democrats’ stimulus relief plan “unserious.” “House Democrats’ so-called ‘HEROES Act’ is so unserious that it was condemned by the Speaker’s own moderate Democrats the instant she put it out,” he tweeted. “Huge tax cuts for rich people in blue states, but no second round of the Paycheck Protection Program? Those are their priorities?” The networks have called the election for former Vice President Joe Biden, but that won’t matter to Democrats’ relief efforts if Republicans cling to their narrow lead in the U.S. Senate. That’s because the U.S. Constitution gives funding authority to Congress, not the...
    North Dakota got $1.25 billion in federal coronavirus relief through the CARES Act—money that’s supposed to go to “necessary expenditures incurred due to the public health emergency with respect to the Coronavirus Disease 2019.” Somehow, $16 million in fracking grants is getting wedged into that category. The fracking money, which is to go toward new oil wells at $200,000 a pop, is being repurposed from an earlier plan to plug and clean up abandoned well sites. That measure was intended to support between 300 and 550 jobs in the oil industry while reclaiming land for agricultural use, and the state categorized it as small business relief. The $66.7 million for that project was not even $20 million less than the state’s CARES Act spending on public health. The $16 million now intended for fracking is more than six times the amount the state dedicated to rental assistance, or just under half the amount the state...
    Getty The U.S. Senate is scheduled to go into a recess after its Monday, October 26 vote on Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination tot he U.S. Supreme Court. What does that mean for your chances of getting a second stimulus check? It means you’re highly unlikely to see a second round of checks approved before the November 3 presidential election. After that is anyone’s guess and likely depends on the victor. Some top Republican senators have made negative comments recently about the changes of a second stimulus relief package before the election. A second round of stimulus checks would likely be included in any such package, but Republicans and Democrats haven’t been able to agree on the overall price tag of a plan, even as they do agree conceptually that another round of direct payments to Americans would be a good idea. Here’s what you need to know:The...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Governor Tim Walz and Lt. Governor Peggy Flanagan on Monday announced a plan to support agricultural producers, meat processors and farmers impacted by COVID-19. The $7.7 million plan, funded through the federal CARES Act, will provide relief to farmers who have experience market disruptions recover from and purchase equipment necessary for COVID-19. “Market instability and unprecedented weather conditions put farmers in a tough place even before COVID-19. The work they’ve done to continue to feed Minnesotans and our nation throughout this challenging time is remarkable,” said Walz. “As someone who grew up on a family farm, I stand with our farmers and am proud to allocate this much-needed support.” On Monday, the governor will tour farms in southern Minnesota, visiting farmers and industry leaders in Northfield, Austin and Albert Lea to hear how they’ve been impacted by the pandemic. “Thanks to Governor Walz and Lieutenant Governor Flanagan,...
    WASHINGTON -- Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that he's scheduling a procedural vote on a GOP COVID-19 relief bill next week, saying aid to hard-hit businesses shouldn't be held up by gridlock involving other aid proposals.The Kentucky Republican says the first item of Senate business when the chamber returns next Monday will be a procedural vote on a scaled-back aid bill. Democrats filibustered a GOP-drafted aid bill last month and recent talks on a larger deal between Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., fell apart this past weekend, probably for good."Democrats have spent months blocking policies they do not even oppose. They say anything short of their multi-trillion-dollar wish list, jammed with non-COVID-related demands, is 'piecemeal' and not worth doing," McConnell said in a statement. "And she has worked hard to ensure that nothing is what American families get."McConnell's move appears unlikely to work....
    By ANDREW TAYLOR, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that he's scheduling a vote regarding a GOP COVID-19 relief bill for later this month, saying aid to hard-hit businesses shouldn't be held up by gridlock involving other aid proposals. The Kentucky Republican says the first item of Senate business when the chamber returns Oct. 19 will be a procedural vote on a scaled-back aid bill. Democrats filibustered a GOP-drafted aid bill last month and recent talks on a larger deal with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., fell apart this past weekend, probably for good. “Democrats have spent months blocking policies they do not even oppose. They say anything short of their multi-trillion-dollar wish list, jammed with non-COVID-related demands, is ‘piecemeal' and not worth doing," McConnell said in a statement. “And she has worked hard to ensure that nothing is what American families get." McConnell's...
    WASHINGTON – Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that he's scheduling a vote regarding a GOP COVID-19 relief bill for later this month, saying aid to hard-hit businesses shouldn't be held up by gridlock involving other aid proposals. The Kentucky Republican says the first item of Senate business when the chamber returns Oct. 19 will be a procedural vote on a scaled-back aid bill. Democrats filibustered a GOP-drafted aid bill last month and recent talks on a larger deal with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., fell apart this past weekend, probably for good. “Democrats have spent months blocking policies they do not even oppose. They say anything short of their multi-trillion-dollar wish list, jammed with non-COVID-related demands, is ‘piecemeal' and not worth doing," McConnell said in a statement. “And she has worked hard to ensure that nothing is what American families get." McConnell's announcement came as President Donald Trump...
    Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDemocratic poll shows neck-and-neck race brewing in Florida House district Sunday shows preview: Trump, top Republicans recover from COVID-19; stimulus bill remains in limbo Senate Republicans rip new White House coronavirus proposal MORE (D-Calif.) called President TrumpDonald John TrumpNorth Korea unveils large intercontinental ballistic missile at military parade Trump no longer considered a risk to transmit COVID-19, doctor says New ad from Trump campaign features Fauci MORE’s administration’s policies on coronavirus testing and tracing inadequate on Sunday as dozens of states report rising COVID-19 cases. The Speaker issued an update on coronavirus negotiations following the White House’s proposal of a $1.8 trillion coronavirus stimulus package and after more than 54,000 new COVID-19 cases were reported on Saturday. Saturday was the fourth day in a row in which more than 50,000 new cases were documented in the U.S. More than 7.7 million Americans have now contracted the virus...
    Getty House Democrats are in the process of drafting a roughly $2.4 trillion coronavirus relief bill. A new Democratic plan to break the logjam in COVID-19 stimulus relief negotiations has made it through the House. According to CNN, the House passed a $2.2 trillion coronavirus stimulus relief package on October 1. However, does it contain a second round of stimulus checks? If so, in which amount? Various amounts have been floated for stimulus checks two, including $1,200, $3,400, and $4,000. Also: What are the chances that the House plan goes into effect so Americans actually get the money? The answers: Yes, the new plan does include stimulus checks. They would amount to $1,200 per taxpayer. It’s still called the Heroes Act, just an updated version of it. According to the House Committee on Appropriations, the updated Heroes Act “provides additional direct payments, cushioning the economic blow...
    Getty House Democrats are in the process of drafting a roughly $2.4 trillion coronavirus relief bill. A new Democratic plan to break the logjam in COVID-19 stimulus relief negotiations would give people $1,200 in COVID-19 stimulus checks. However, according to Forbes, on September 30, Democrats delayed the vote on the plan to allow negotiations to continue. That’s because they need the Republican-controlled Senate for anything to get through. Washington Post reporter Jeff Stein tweeted that there seems to be some hope, “Oh boy twitter. (Treasury Secretary Steven) Mnuchin just now on talks with Pelosi: ‘We have reached an agreement that if there is a deal there will be direct payments’ — meaning the $1,200 stimulus checks. Still need the deal tho!” The plan would also include $600 in weekly unemployment benefits. The new Democratic plan faces challenges because it would need to make it through the Republican-controlled...
    WASHINGTON -- House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin planned to meet face to face for the first time in more than a month Wednesday in a last-ditch effort to seal a tentative accord on an additional round of coronavirus relief.The Democratic-controlled House, meanwhile, moved on a separate track to overrun GOP opposition and pass a $2.2 trillion COVID-19 rescue bill as one of their final acts before leaving Washington to campaign.Pelosi and Mnuchin were scheduled to continue negotiations in hopes of a deal that would permit another round of $1,200 direct stimulus payments, restore bonus pandemic jobless benefits, speed aid to schools and extend assistance to airlines, restaurants and other struggling businesses."We're going to give it one more serious try to get this done, and I think we're hopeful that we can get something done," Mnuchin said Wednesday morning on CNBC.Wednesday afternoon's meeting at the Capitol is...
    President Donald Trump urged his fellow Republicans Wednesday to go for "much higher numbers" in a coronavirus aid bill, as Washington remained deadlocked over economic relief from the crisis ahead of the Nov. 3 elections. Senate Republican reaction to Trumps appeal was mixed, but generally cautious. But House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said in a joint statement they were encouraged and hoped White House negotiators would now "meet us halfway." The standoff dates to mid-May, when the Democratic-majority House approved $3.4 trillion in new coronavirus aid, including unemployment benefits, money for schools, the U.S. Postal Service, and testing. Pelosi meanwhile offered to drop the demand to about $2.2 trillion. The Senates Republican leaders countered with a $1 trillion plan, but some of their own members balked at that. Last week they put a $300 billion bill up for a vote that Democrats blocked as insufficient....
    WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the Trump administration have informally agreed to keep a stopgap government-wide funding bill — needed to avert a shutdown at the end of this month — free of controversy or conflict. The accord is aimed at keeping any possibility of a government shutdown off the table despite ongoing battles over COVID-19 relief legislation, while sidestepping the potential for other shutdown drama in the run-up to the November election. That’s according to Democratic and GOP aides on Capitol Hill who have been briefed on a Wednesday conversation between Pelosi, D-Calif., and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. They required anonymity to characterize an exchange they were informed of but not directly party to. “House Democrats are for a clean continuing resolution,” said Pelosi spokesman Drew Hammil. The definition of “clean” tends to vary among those steeped in Capitol Hill jargon, but it would not...
    Getty Does Joe Biden support additional stimulus payments? Technically he does, but he has remained extremely quiet on the topic throughout his campaign for president. His decision to choose Senator Kamala Harris as his running mate could indicate how he feels about stimulus payments, as she has an outspoken stance in support of providing more economic relief to the American people. The Monthly Economic Crisis Support Act, introduced by Harris and two other senators in May, would send $2,000 per month to individuals and $4,000 to married couples who file jointly, along with an additional $2,000 per child, up to three children. Any individual earning under $120,000 would be eligible; the payments would be reduced for income over $100,000 for individuals or $200,000 for married couples. The payments would be phased out by 10% of any amount over these limits. But has Biden explicitly supported this plan? Here’s...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City While restaurants continue to struggle amid the backdrop of a global pandemic, Mayor Bill de Blasio said Friday there may not be relief in sight for those in need of indoor business out of fears of a possible resurgence of COVID-19 citing precedent abroad. As de Blasio has given in to outside pressure to allow gyms to open up Sept. 2 – provided they meet state guidelines – the mayor says he will not consider allowing restaurants to seat anywhere other than on sidewalks and curb space for the foreseeable future. “Indoor dining, there’s not a plan right now, de Blasio said in his Aug. 21 interview with Brian Lehrer on WNYC radio. “There’s not a context for indoor dining. We’re never saying it’s impossible. But we do not, based on...
    Republicans' $1 trillion coronavirus relief package was in trouble Tuesday as the party began to lose support for the measure from its own members while Democrats decried a billion dollar provision to build a new FBI building near President Donald Trump's Washington D.C. hotel. Republican Senator Ted Cruz of Texas said he expects 'significant resistance' from Republicans to the legislation, citing its hefty price tag. 'There is significant resistance to yet another trillion dollars. The answer to these challenges will not simply be shoveling cash out of Washington, the answer to these challenges will be getting people back to work. And as it stands now, I think it's likely that you'll see a number of Republicans in opposition to this bill and expressing serious concerns,' he told reporters on Capitol Hill. Republican Senator Ted Cruz of Texas said he expects 'significant resistance' from Republicans to the coronavirus relief legislation, citing its...
    McConnell seems to think there's all the time in the world. Expanded unemployment insurance (UI) benefits to the millions of Americans who lost their jobs in the coronavirus crisis expired at the end of last week. This week the moratorium on evictions in federally-financed housing units expires. Coronavirus is raging through the South and West and Republican senators and the White House wasted another weekend squabbling among themselves to figure out some kind of plan, knowing full well what they're going to put on offer will be rejected by House Democrats. Mitch McConnell was supposed to have released his big plan last Thursday, then postponed it to Friday. Now they're saying end of the work day Monday. The White House is attempting to carve out quicker UI fix to pass this week, but Democrats are adamant that they will not accept a piecemeal approach and have kept the HEROES...
    Fox News’ Chris Wallace spoke with Treasury Sec. Steve Mnuchin Sunday morning about the ongoing negotiations over the next round of covid relief and the arguing going on between the White House and Senate Republicans. Wallace noted how House Democrats passed their relief bill two months ago but “here we are the last week in July and the White House and Senate Republicans still can’t agree” on what they want, bringing up disagreements Republicans have aired privately and publicly about their issues with the White House proposal. And given how the ban on evictions ran out Saturday and temporary unemployment benefits are ending Friday and the Payroll Protection Program is running out soon, Wallace asked, “Won’t millions of Americans, and millions of businesses, pay the price, because the White house and senate Republicans can’t get your act together?” Mnuchin called that an “unfair characterization,” insisting that the White House...
    Yeah, he might hate Trump, but Romney's still a damned Republican. There is an awful lot of bad in the coronavirus relief package Sen. Mitch McConnell is struggling to put together with his divisive Republican conference. One bright spot seemed to be that the extremely bad idea from Donald Trump of a payroll tax cut has been finally put to rest. It seems that laying the groundwork for eventual big cuts to Social Security and Medicare by starving the trust fund in this bill was too controversial and too transparent for Republicans. So they decided to do it a much sneakier way. Sen. Mitt Romney has decided to show his true colors again. He might not like Trump, but he's still a Republican and he still wants Wall Street to steal our Social Security and Medicare, and he got help this time from not-really-a-Democrat Joe Manchin. The two have written...
    Fox News’ Chris Wallace said Friday that it’s going to hurt Republicans if they can’t “get their act together” sooner on the next round of stimulus to provide for people. Bill Hemmer spoke with Wallace about the arguing within the GOP over the next round of coronavirus relief and what to include. “That’s the point that we need to make. We are just talking about the Republican plan here. The plan between the White House and the Senate Republican majority,” Wallace said. “They were supposed to have that Wednesday, then they we supposed to have it Thursday. Now Mitch McConnell is talking about Monday. Meanwhile, the House Democrats passed their plan, a $3 trillion plan back in May and they’re saying, why the delay?” He noted how many of the benefits for Americans “lapse… by the end of the month” and so “if the Republicans are not even going...
    Getty There may be a second COVID-19 stimulus check. As Republicans negotiate a $1 trillion or more stimulus relief package that is expected to contain a second COVID-19 stimulus check in some form, a top Republican left the room, saying the room full of GOP Senators and officials had basically turned into bunch of “Bernie Bros.” That comment came from Rand Paul, the Republican Senator from Kentucky, who also compared Republicans grappling overs stimulus spending to “Socialist Democrats.” Paul’s comments didn’t single out a specific provision in a second relief package other than education spending. However, a second relief package could contain another stimulus check for Americans, expansion of the $600 extra per week for unemployment benefits, more small business grants, and a payroll tax cut, among other things. It’s the overall cost of that which had the Republican senator upset. Just came from Progressive Democrat, whoops, I’m...
    SEATTLE (AP) — The Seattle City Council has voted unanimously to authorize spending $86 million from Seattle’s emergency reserves to provide additional relief to residents and small businesses struggling to deal with the public health and economic crises caused by the coronavirus pandemic. It also on Monday unanimously approved a resolution laying out a detailed plan for more than $200 million per year in expected proceeds from a new tax on big businesses, allocating the lion’s share to affordable housing projects. The Seattle Times reports that COVID-19 relief bill and the spending plan for the big-business tax are linked, because the spending plan calls for the first $86 million raised by the tax next year to be used to replenish the emergency reserves. The council took the steps over objections from Mayor Jenny Durkan, who described them as fiscally, legally and economically risky. Council members celebrated the actions as essential...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — In an effort to prevent homelessness and help those struggling to pay rent during the COVID-19 pandemic, Gov. Tim Walz and Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan announced a housing relief plan Tuesday. Walz and Flanagan announced the state has received $100 million from the CARES Act to be allocated for rental relief for those struggling to afford housing amid growing unemployment. The aim is to prevent more people from experiencing homelessness as the state continues to grapple with the significant economic disruptions caused by the pandemic. Flanagan said that it’s a personal moment for her; as a child, her family relied on rent relief to make ends meet. This is a developing story. Check back with WCCO.com for further updates.
    Local governments in Georgia soon will get federal relief intended to help cover unexpected costs from mitigating the spread of COVID-19, Gov. Brian Kemp announced Monday. The disbursement of the $1.23 billion from the second federal coronavirus relief package will be a “phased, measured approach,” Kemp said. “It is also important that funding be disbursed equitably, but with the knowledge that some of our hardest-hit communities will need more assistance than others,” Kemp wrote Monday in a letter to local leaders. “I encourage cities and counties to work together to address expenses or challenges that cross jurisdictional lines.” The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act, which was signed into law by President Donald Trump in March, earmarked $4.1 billion for Georgia to cover COVID-19 expenses from March 1 to Dec. 1. Federal guidance called for 45 percent of the aid to be allocated to...
    The Events D.C. board of directors Friday unanimously approved an additional $15.2 million in coronavirus relief to support undocumented workers in the hospitality industry as well as 30 District’s cultural institutions. The two measures, adopted during a special meeting of the board, will direct $5.15 million to the D.C. Cares program, meant to provide financial assistance to undocumented workers who were excluded from federal stimulus payments, and $10.1 million to the Cultural Institutions Grant Program. The Greater Washington Community Foundation will serve as funds administrator of the newly created D.C. Cares. The mayor’s office will serve as program manager and provide overall strategy and coordination. Through a vendor, the community foundation will purchase pre-paid, $1,000 debit cards that will be distributed to five community organizations — Bread for the City, The Central American Resource Center, CentroNia, Latin American Youth Center, and Mary’s Center — designated… Read the full story...
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