Thursday, Feb 25, 2021 - 02:41:42
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Republicans control:

    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTeachers union launches 0K ad buy calling for education funding in relief bill No signs of breakthrough for stalemated coronavirus talks State aid emerges as major hurdle to reviving COVID-19 talks MORE (R-Ky.) warned Tuesday that he thought keeping control of the majority would be "tough." "What I'd tell you is, this is a tough fight, it could go either way. We're optimistic we can hold on," McConnell said during a Fox News interview, asked how he would handicap the battle for the Senate.  McConnell added there were approximately eight Senate races that he would compare to "a knife fight in an alley. They are tough challenges."  "This was always going to be a tough cycle for us. ...A lot of exposure around the country," he said.  McConnell didn't name what states he views as battleground races. But Arizona and Colorado, where GOP Sens....
    (CNN)Democrats know that if former Vice President Joe Biden wins the presidency, he'll need a Democratic-controlled Senate to accomplish a good part of his agenda. An examination of the Senate landscape reveals good news for them. The Democrats' chance of wresting control away from Republicans has increased over the last few months. They are clearer favorites to take back Congress' upper chamber, though the race for Senate control is still well within the margin of error. To gain a majority of seats, Democrats need a net pickup of between three seats (if Biden holds onto his lead over President Donald Trump, as his vice president would become the tie-breaking vote) or four seats (if Trump wins).Democrats now have a little more than a 7-in-10 (70%) shot to win at least 3 seats and a little more than a 6-in-10 (60%) chance of winning at least 4 seats. In early May,...
    Fox Business host Lou Dobbs blames Republicans for the treatment of Attorney General William Barr during a contentious House Judiciary Committee hearing on Tuesday. He told Arizona Rep. Andy Biggs, the chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, on Thursday that his "takeaway" from the oversight hearing, in which Democrats constantly interrupted Barr, was that he was "angry" with Republicans. "I was really very angry with you Republicans and with Paul Ryan, the speaker of the House, who actually sacrificed 40 seats and turned over control to a left wing that is as obnoxious and inept as one could imagine and corrupt," he said, referring to the so-called "blue wave" during the 2018 midterm elections in which Democrats flipped 41 seats. "This is disgusting, what the Republican Party did to good people like Attorney General Barr. And I don’t, by the way, I don’t see the fire amongst you Republicans,"...
    If November brings the type of major blue wave that Democratic strategists are hoping for, it would include not only former Vice President Joe Biden defeating President Donald Trump, but also, Democrats achieving a majority in the U.S. Senate, increasing their majority in the U.S. House of Representatives and enjoying victories in an abundance of state races. And the Cook Political Report is saying that according to its analysis, Democrats are now favored to retake the U.S. Senate. Cook’s Jessica Taylor reports, “With just over 100 days until Election Day, the political climate appears dire for Republicans across the board. President Trump is the decided underdog against former Vice President Joe Biden in our Electoral College ratings, and Democrats could end up expanding their House majority. That leaves the Senate as Republicans’ firewall — the final barrier to unified control for Democrats in 2021.” But that “firewall,” Taylor reports, could...
    Reuters July 14, 2020 0 Comments Democrats could take a step toward wresting control of the U.S. Senate from Republicans on Tuesday when voters in Maine, Texas and Alabama cast ballots in nominating contests. Maine Democrats pick a challenger to Susan Collins, one of the Senate’s most at-risk Republicans; Texas Democrats choose who will go up against Republican Senator John Cornyn in a Republican-leaning state analysts say has become more competitive, and Alabama Republicans pick a candidate to take on Doug Jones, widely considered the chamber’s most vulnerable Democrat. Republican President Donald Trump’s public approval has dropped as the coronavirus pandemic surged through the United States, killing more than 130,000 people and throwing tens of millions out of work. That is weighing on his fellow Republicans, dimming the re-election hopes of senators in Colorado, North Carolina and Arizona and leaving even senior Republicans in conservative stakes like Mitch McConnell’s...
    By Susan Cornwell WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Democrats could take a step toward wresting control of the U.S. Senate from Republicans on Tuesday when voters in Maine, Texas and Alabama cast ballots in nominating contests. Maine Democrats pick a challenger to Susan Collins, one of the Senate's most at-risk Republicans; Texas Democrats choose who will go up against Republican Senator John Cornyn in a Republican-leaning state analysts say has become more competitive, and Alabama Republicans pick a candidate to take on Doug Jones, widely considered the chamber's most vulnerable Democrat. Republican President Donald Trump's public approval has dropped as the coronavirus pandemic surged through the United States, killing more than 130,000 people and throwing tens of millions out of work. That is weighing on his fellow Republicans, dimming the re-election hopes of senators in Colorado, North Carolina and Arizona and leaving even senior Republicans in conservative stakes like Mitch McConnell's Kentucky...
    (CNN)Democrats in crucial Senate races across the country are swamping the airwaves with ads in the furious battle for control of the chamber, far outpacing Republican spending as their party grows more bullish about their prospects for retaking the majority.In battleground states nationwide, Democratic candidates and outside groups have been inundating the air with ads, promoting their records, seeking to distinguish themselves during their own competitive primaries and bashing the GOP senators whose seats they seek to occupy.In 12 races that will determine the next Senate majority, Democrats have spent roughly $30 million more on the airwaves than their Republican counterparts, according to a CNN review of data from Kantar's Campaign Media Analysis. In total, Democrats -- including campaigns and outside groups -- have spent $109 million on television, radio and digital advertisements, compared with $79 million for Republicans since the beginning of the election cycle last year, the records...
    By ALAN FRAM WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump’s June began with his Bible-clutching photo op outside a church after authorities used chemicals and batons to scatter peaceful demonstrators. It never got less jarring or divisive. By month’s end, he was downplaying a coronavirus pandemic upsurge that was forcing Western and Southern states to throttle back their partial reopening of businesses. And Republican strategists already straining to retain Senate control in November’s elections were conceding that Trump’s performance could make it harder to defend their majority. One said key Republicans were telling Trump they’re worried about his campaign and he should heed polls showing him in trouble. Another pointed to surveys showing diminished public optimism and many voters’ views that Trump is poorly managing the surging virus and languishing economy. Still another said Republicans worry the GOP brand of cutting taxes could be overshadowed by Trump’s drive to defend Confederate...
    By Alan Fram | Associated Press WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump’s June began with his Bible-clutching photo op outside a church after authorities used chemicals and batons to scatter peaceful demonstrators. It never got less jarring or divisive. By month’s end, he was downplaying a coronavirus pandemic upsurge that was forcing Western and Southern states to throttle back their partial reopening of businesses. And Republican strategists already straining to retain Senate control in November’s elections were conceding that Trump’s performance could make it harder to defend their majority. One said key Republicans were telling Trump they’re worried about his campaign and he should heed polls showing him in trouble. Another pointed to surveys showing diminished public optimism and many voters’ views that Trump is poorly managing the surging virus and languishing economy. Still another said Republicans worry the GOP brand of cutting taxes could be overshadowed by Trump’s drive to...
    By ALAN FRAM, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's June began with his Bible-clutching photo op outside a church after authorities used chemicals and batons to scatter peaceful demonstrators. It never got less jarring or divisive. By the time it ended, he was downplaying a coronavirus pandemic upsurge that was forcing Western and Southern states to throttle back their partial reopening of businesses. And Republican strategists already straining to retain Senate control in November's elections were conceding that Trump's performance could make it harder to defend their majority. One said key Republicans were telling Trump they're worried about his campaign and he should heed polls showing him in trouble. Another pointed to surveys showing diminished public optimism and many voters' views that Trump is poorly managing the surging virus and languishing economy. Still another said Republicans worry the GOP brand of cutting taxes could be overshadowed by Trump's...
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