Saturday, Mar 06, 2021 - 03:06:08
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    Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy hiding behind Donald Trump. It's really hard to wrap one's mind around how hapless House Republicans are, not to mention the astounding failure in leadership Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy represents. To review: McCarthy ran down to Mar-a-Lago to kiss Trump's ring and publicly enlist his help in retaking the House majority, while also failing to extract any promises from Trump not to target sitting members of their caucus. In other words, the GOP incumbents who voted to convict Donald Trump—at least a handful of whom hail from moderate/swingy districts—are on their own. Seven of the 10 Republicans who voted to convict have already attracted primary challengers. Now some House Republicans are revisiting the fact that McCarthy sold out his caucus, and they apparently regret the error. Control of the House could literally come down to a handful of seats, and Trump's vendetta tour is putting roughly...
    A handful of House Republicans are voicing concerns that proxy voting is giving Democrats a political advantage as they look to take back the majority in 2022. The topic was raised during a GOP conference meeting on Tuesday when Rep. Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyHouse passes sweeping protections for LGBTQ people GOP's Chip Roy vows to fight Equality Act in court Conservatives go after Cheney for Trump CPAC remarks MORE (R-Texas), who does not agree with proxy voting, noted multiple Republican lawmakers voted via proxy citing the pandemic while speaking at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Orlando, Fla., on Friday.  Rep. Don Bacon (R-Neb.), who represents a swing district, then made the case that changes by House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiRepublican Ohio Senate candidate calls on GOP rep to resign over impeachment vote Clinton, Pelosi holding online Women's Day fundraiser with Chrissy Teigen, Amanda Gorman What good are the...
    ORLANDO, Fla. – Former President Donald Trump attacked a litany of "establishment" Republicans in his Sunday keynote address at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), even as some in the GOP continue to deny that there is a civil war within the party.  "Now more than ever is the time for tough, strong and energetic Republican leaders who have spines of steel," Trump said in his first public address since leaving office. "We cannot have leaders who show more passion for condemning their fellow Americans than they have ever shown for standing up to Democrats, the media and the radicals who want to turn America into a socialist country."  Trump's comments came as many in the GOP are denying that there is a civil war in the party between the pro-Trump faction and the side of the party that wants to move on from his presidency.  Former President Donald Trump speaks at the Conservative...
    White House press secretary Jen Psaki defended President Biden’s decision to issue an airstrike against Iranian-backed forces in Syria in retaliation for recent attacks on American service members, saying it was a "proportional military response." On Thursday night, U.S. Armed Forces carried out an airstrike against Kait’ib Sayyid al Shuhada and Kait’ib Hezbollah — two Iraqi border-based militant Shia groups who are suspected of taking money from the Iranian Revolutionary Guard. "The Department of Defense briefed Congressional leadership before the action last night. The Administration has been briefing the Hill at the Member- and staff-level today," Psaki said in an official statement. "There will be a full classified briefing early next week at the latest."  US LAUNCHES AIRSTRIKE AGAINST IRANIAN-BACKED FORCES IN SYRIA During a gaggle aboard Air Force One on Friday, Psaki told reporters that the strike was intended to send an "unambiguous message" about how Biden will act to protect...
    Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell made a point of writing a Wall Street Journal op-ed Monday night defending his vote to acquit Donald Trump even though he believes Trump bears “moral responsibility” for the riots. McConnell voted with the majority of Republicans to acquit Trump. Afterwards he delivered a speech that excoriated Trump for his actions that spurred on the violent MAGA mob that stormed the Capitol. His Journal op-ed reiterates he firmly believes Trump pushed “unhinged falsehoods” but said, “Our job wasn’t to find some way, any way, to inflict a punishment. The Senate’s first and foundational duty was to protect the Constitution.” McConnell stood by the argument that “the Constitution presupposes that anyone convicted by the Senate must have an office from which to be removed,” and said there’s no “so-called January exemption” because of potential litigation down the road. Of course, one of the...
    Still joined at the hip. Senate Republicans, like almost all Republicans, stood strongly with Donald Trump through four years of chaos, incompetence, malice, and mayhem. They stood with him as he promoted his Big Lie, that he hadn’t lost decisively to an American electorate sick of his bullshit. They stood with him during certification of the vote, not just those who challenged the Arizona and Pennsylvania votes, but those who stayed quiet and refused to criticize their colleagues’ efforts to undermine democracy. And with seven notable exceptions, they stood by him during the impeachment vote by refusing to hold Trump accountable for his unprecedented efforts to destroy American democracy.  Now they want you to think that they really don’t stand with Trump, you know, just because.  There are only seven Senate Republicans with any credibility left on the matter of democracy—Richard Burr (NC), Bill Cassidy (LA), Susan Collins (ME), Lisa Murkowski (AK), Mitt Romney...
    MSNBC reporter Garrett Haake claimed that some Republican senators may vote to convict former President Donald Trump in his impeachment trial because they can’t “stomach” that he “left them for dead” in the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. Haake appeared Thursday on “The ReidOut” and was asked by host Joy Reid if it was true that some Republican senators met with Trump’s defense team amid the impeachment trial, which she pointed out “is something jurors don’t normally do.” (RELATED: ‘Do Your Damn Job!’: Chris Cuomo Tells Ted Cruz To Get ‘Off Trump’s Teat’) “That’s right. Yeah. Just another way in which this is not like a normal trial. Senators Graham, Cruz, and Lee met with the Trump defense team for quite a while after the arguments had wrapped up today to discuss legal strategy for tomorrow,” Haake responded. “Senator Cruz came out afterwards and told reporters,...
    House Republicans took what looked like their first baby steps away from former President Donald Trump in a conference vote this week, but party operatives say he remains a force to be reckoned with. Rep. Liz Cheney, a Wyoming lawmaker who is also the daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, beat back an attempt to depose her as chairwoman of the House Republican Conference over her vote to impeach Trump. The final vote wasn’t particularly close: 145 Republicans voted to retain Cheney, 61 backed her ouster, and one voted present. So-called "Never Trump" conservatives expressed cautious optimism afterward that this suggests the former president is on shakier ground in his upcoming Senate trial than many expect. Only 10 Republicans in the House voted to impeach, and just five GOP senators voted to proceed with the trial after a point of order was raised challenging the constitutionality of convicting a...
    After losing the 2020 presidential election to Democrat Joe Biden, former President Donald Trump reportedly told adviser that he would like to form his own political party. According to a new Hill-HarrisX poll, that would not be a bad idea. Released on Thursday, the poll — which was conducted online among 340 registered voters — found that 64 percent of registered Republicans would likely join Trump’s party. Notably, nearly 3 in 10 independents and 15 percent of Democrats said that they would also join the Trump-led effort. Overall, 37 percent of respondents said that they would likely join the party. According to Dritan Nesho, CEO and chief pollster at HarrisX, this suggests that Trump is still a powerful figure, despite the fact that his alleged incitement of the January 6 riots at the U.S. Capitol was widely condemned by politicians across the ideological spectrum. Both major parties, Nesho continued, have...
    Republican Illinois Rep. Adam Kinzinger said Wednesday that some Republicans have thanked him for criticizing former President Donald Trump over the Capitol riots. Kinzinger said on ABC’s “The View” that he’s faced backlash from the GOP as he expected, but that some have expressed gratitude for his stance. “There’s also been a whole lot of outpouring from people that you know just said thanks for saying it, right? I’ve heard it even amongst some of my colleagues, thanks for speaking up,” Kinzinger said. WATCH: The House voted 232-197 to impeach the former president on Jan. 13 again, charging him with a single article of “incitement of insurrection.” Kinzinger and nine Republicans voted in favor of impeaching the former president. (RELATED: GOP Congressman: ‘This Is A Coup Attempt’) Kinzinger said Sunday on “Meet the Press” that he’s begun the CountryFirst PAC, hoping it will trigger a movement, according to...
    President Biden publicly projected confidence some Republicans will back his coronavirus relief package, while privately telling Democrats the GOP's counteroffer was "too small." Prior to a White House meeting with Senate Democrats regarding his proposed $1.9 trillion "American Rescue Plan," Biden told reporters Wednesday in the Oval Office he believes "we'll get Republican support" for the bill. “I think we'll get some Republicans," he repeated from behind a face mask. Before reporters were ushered out, Biden jokingly welcomed the Democrats "home" to the White House. "Welcome all home. This is their new home, for a while anyway. And with a little bit of luck, the grace of God, and the goodwill of the neighbors, and the creek not rising, it's going to be longer than just four years," he said. Biden's Wednesday was dominated by meetings with Democrats concerning a relief package after speaking with Republicans earlier in the week....
    If Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, a Georgia Republican, is punished for hateful and conspiratorial social media posts made before she got to Congress, a Minnesota Democrat should face sanctions for comments made while in office that are anti-Israel and borderline anti-Semitic, a group of House GOP lawmakers say. Rep. Brian Babin offered a resolution Tuesday to remove Rep. Ilhan Omar from the Foreign Affairs Committee over a series of incendiary past remarks. The move by Babin, a Texas Republican, is a direct response to Democrats' threat to remove Greene from her committees if House Republican leaders fail to do so. Yes. If the Democrat Majority wants to go down this road, they should start by dealing with their own members who have been at this before and AFTER their election to Congress. https://t.co/YIRhoNOf8L pic.twitter.com/r0yBN2aGFx— Brian Babin (@RepBrianBabin) February 3, 2021 With Republicans in the minority, the resolution won't pass...
    On Monday evening, Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez took to Instagram Live for more than one hour to share more of her personal experience during the pro-Trump insurgency at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. A mob of Trump supporters stormed the Capitol less than a month ago, but with the current news cycle, time can feel both suspended and eerily fast. Even still, Ocasio-Cortez’s emotional, brave, and moving discussion about her experience brings viewers right back to the day we watched the violence unfold. If you missed her first Instagram Live on her experience, that one is well worth checking out, too. “I thought I was going to die,” the New York representative stated to more than 100,000 viewers. In the video captioned “What Happened at the Capitol,” Ocasio-Cortez also talked about being a survivor of sexual assault, compound traumas, spirituality, her belief that being told to “forget what’s happened” without...
    The Guardian Why Republicans won’t agree to Biden’s big plans and why he should ignore them The new president can achieve huge and vital reform and relief without the party of Trump – and they know it Joe Biden speaks to journalists before boarding Marine One at the White House. Photograph: Tom Brenner/Reuters If there were ever a time for bold government, it is now. Covid, joblessness, poverty, raging inequality and our last chance to preserve the planet are together creating an existential inflection point. Fortunately for America and the world, Donald Trump is gone, and Joe Biden has big plans for helping Americans survive Covid and then restructuring the economy, rebuilding the nation’s infrastructure and creating millions of green jobs. But Republicans in Congress don’t want to go along. Why not? Mitch McConnell and others say America can’t afford it. “We just passed a program with over $900bn in...
    Republican Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton dismissed Democratic New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s characterization of some Republicans as “white supremacist sympathizers” during an appearance on Thursday night’s “Fox News Primetime.” Speaking of the aftermath of the January 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol, Ocasio-Cortez on Wednesday called some Republicans “legitimate white supremacist sympathizers that sit at the heart” of the House GOP caucus. “I actually sense a profound difference between the Republican caucus of last term, the 115th Congress, and the Republican caucus that — of this term,” she told MSNBC’s “All In With Chris Hayes.” “And that difference was that it really felt that last term the Republican caucus was one of extreme fealty to Donald Trump.” “There were some that were true believers,” Ocasio-Cortez continued. “Others that simply remained quiet out of cowardice and out of fear of the president’s retribution. But this term there are legitimate white supremacist...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) dubbed members of Congress who want to protect themselves with firearms the “enemy” on Thursday, despite repeated calls for “unity” from Democrats. Pelosi said it may be necessary to seek additional fund for representatives to beef up security in the wake of the Capitol riot and anger over the 2020 election: After 30 members sent a letter asking to use congressional funds for security, Pelosi says, “We will probably need a supplemental for more security for members when the enemy is within the House of Representatives…in addition to what is happening outside” https://t.co/bM4co7aVpQ pic.twitter.com/mp4riI63Zc — CNN Politics (@CNNPolitics) January 28, 2021 “We will probably need a supplemental for more security for members when the enemy is within the House of Representatives, in addition to what is happening outside,” she said, referring to elected officials and protesters. Thirty members asked to use taxpayer funds to...
    In his first phone town hall since voting to impeach former President Trump, a voter told South Carolina Congressman Tom Rice his decision was "inexcusable." "Next time around, I don't think you're going to get elected," said his Myrtle Beach constituent, from the district Rice has represented since 2013. "I'm not happy with you. And I certainly won't vote for you again. So if you can figure out some way to redeem yourself, I'm all ears." But the next caller, an 80-year-old woman, commended Rice for the "tremendous courage" he showed by voting for impeachment.  "If you want a Congressman that is going to bow down to bullies… that'll go along with the crowd, 'Oh, everybody else on this side voted this way, so I better vote that way so people back home don't question me — if that's the guy you want, then I'm not your guy," Rice...
    HARRISBURG (KDKA) – A proposed Constitutional amendment to change the way Pennsylvania elects state judges may be on the spring ballot if some Republican lawmakers get their way. But the measure is controversial with not every Republican supporting the idea. Right now every Pennsylvanian gets to vote for 31 appellate court judges statewide, including all seven state Supreme Court justices. But Pennsylvania Rep. Russ Diamond, a Lebanon County Republican, wants to split the state into judicial districts so you vote for only one member of the state Supreme Court and the other appellate courts from your region. “Anytime you have one segment of Pennsylvania’s population overrepresented in any of the halls of government at the expense of the rest of Pennsylvania, you need to do something,” Diamond told KDKA political editor Jon Delano on Tuesday. Saying too many state judges come from the Pittsburgh area and Philadelphia, Diamond says state...
    CNN Analyst Rachael Bade said Tuesday that there is a divide among Democrats in the Senate over whether or not they should work with Republicans on a bipartisan basis to pass legislation, or if they should focus on driving a partisan Democratic agenda. Bade appeared on “Inside Politics” and was asked by host John King if Democrats in the Senate who want President Joe Biden to “go big and go bold” would be willing to give him “a little bit of grace” to work with Republicans on legislation, specifically a coronavirus relief package. (RELATED: Biden Chief Of Staff Dodges Question On Whether Administration Would Consider Tabling Minimum Wage Increase) “Clearly this tension is already sort of bubbling toward the surface, right. You have Democrats who want to move quickly and who are sort of rolling their eyes privately at President Biden when he talks about bipartisanship,” Bade responded. “Clearly...
    House Republicans are facing internal debate over whether to remove Representative Liz Cheney from her leadership post after she voted to impeach former President Trump for inciting the January 6th riot at the Capitol. The debate has grown so bitter that some Republicans are concerned it will prevent the conference from offering a unified front against new policies from President Biden.  Republican Representatives Matt Rosendale of Montana and Andy Biggs of Arizona are among the members rounding up support from their colleagues to vote for a resolution removing the Wyoming Republican as chairwoman of the GOP conference. Sources familiar with the effort claim that more than 115 of the 211 Republicans would vote to remove her, though they have declined to share the list.   One Republican staffer expressed skepticism about those numbers, telling CBS News, "I want to see the proof. Show me the list." Both House Minority...
    When Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said "now is not the time to worry about shrinking the deficit," during fall negotiations with Congress over COVID-19 relief legislation, many Democrats predicted Republicans would claim that time had come again as soon as President Trump no longer occupied the White House. Despite candidate Trump’s 2016 campaign promise to eliminate the national debt in eight years by growing the economy faster and eliminating wasteful spending, the nation’s borrowing increased by over $7 trillion during his term. Just as congressional Republicans harnessed the fury of the Tea Party and forced spending caps on President Barack Obama after he spent trillions on economic stimulus measures and ObamaCare, they are now returning from their holiday from fiscal restraint to confront President-elect Joe Biden’s ambitious agenda. Yet, Biden faces a Republican Party transformed by Trump, giving the incoming Democratic president an opportunity to find common ground with the...
    Democrats name-checked House Republican Conference Chair Liz Cheney at least 18 times during the debate on the article of impeachment against President Trump for inciting insurrection on Wednesday – emphasizing the high-ranking Republican's support for impeaching Trump after a mob of his supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol last week.  "On Jan. 6, 2021, a violent mob attacked the United States Capitol to obstruct the process of our democracy and stop the counting of presidential electoral votes. This insurrection caused injury, death and destruction in the most sacred space in our Republic," Cheney, R-Wyo., said in a statement announcing her intention to vote to impeach Trump. She was eventually one of 10 Republicans to vote that way as Trump became the only president to ever be impeached twice.  "The president of the United States summoned this mob, assembled the mob and lit the flame of this attack. Everything that followed was his doing," Cheney continued. "None of...
    The outcome was preordained. The Republican response was not. As the House spent the day speechifying, everyone knew that Nancy Pelosi had the votes to impeach Donald Trump -- ensuring, if nothing else, that he goes in the history books as the only president to twice suffer that fate. But there was a lingering question as to how many GOP lawmakers would follow the lead of Liz Cheney, the third-ranking Republican, who dramatically broke with her party to support impeachment with a blistering statement about Trump’s "betrayal" of his office.  That may have been personal in part -- her dad, Dick Cheney, called her in the cloakroom to say Trump had attacked her in his rally speech before the riot--and in part a matter of conscience. Majority Leader Steny Hoyer repeatedly quoted Cheney in his closing comments. In the 232-197 vote, 10 Republicans joined every Democrat in backing impeachment. That’s...
    For many Americans, the GOP lawmakers who objected to counting the Electoral College votes in Congress share some of the blame for the violence that occurred at the nation's Capitol. Nearly half — 47% — think some of these Republicans encouraged the violence that occurred. Most of those who hold these lawmakers responsible think there should be political consequences for their actions. Sixty-five percent of Americans who think they encouraged violence at the Capitol think they should be removed from office, and another 22% think they should be punished in some other way. Just 13% think there should be no action taken against them. But most of the rank-and-file members of the Republican Party see things differently, which highlights some of the political calculations some of these GOP lawmakers may be negotiating as they respond to recent events. Just one in five Republicans think these lawmakers were in part responsible...
    The House voted Wednesday to mpeach President Donald Trump for a second time for 'incitement of insurrection,' exactly a week after the MAGA mob stormed Capitol Hill.  The Democratic majority was joined by some Republicans, making the House's move bipartisan unlike Trump's first impeachment less than 13 months ago.   Earlier, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's spokesman confirmed that McConnell informed Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer that he wouldn't bring the Senate back before January 19, the day before President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration.  The revelation came after the House cleared procedural hurdles and debate had started on the article. IMPEACHMENT TIMETABLE Wednesday afternoon: House vote on single Article What happens next? Nancy Pelosi decides when to transmit Article to Senate. When she does, it must begin trial on the next sitting day and sit six days a week until it concludes  Tuesday January 19:  Earliest date Mitch McConnell has said trial can...
    (CNN)The decision to require members of Congress to walk through metal detectors in the wake of last week's deadly siege has further inflamed tensions on Capitol Hill, at times prompting shouting matches between Republicans and Capitol Police.Members of both parties expressed frustration Tuesday night at the long lines ahead of the entrance to the House floor. Many Republicans view the measure as invasive, but several Democrats called them necessary as they increasingly view their colleagues across the aisle as security threats.And it's all contributing to a sense of roiling fury in Congress ahead of a rancorous impeachment vote Wednesday.Metal detectors installed outside House floor as Democrats express safety concerns about their colleaguesColorado Rep. Lauren Boebert, a newly sworn-in Republican who ran in large part on a message emphasizing her commitment to Second Amendment rights and has bragged about her desire to carry a weapon on Capitol Hill, got into an...
    House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said Monday that some Republicans want to censure rather than impeach President Trump over the handling of Wednesday’s Capitol riot. McCarthy (R-Calif.) wrote in a letter to GOP colleagues that he opposes impeaching Trump for a second time, but that some Republicans favor the less-severe form of reprimand. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) plans to begin impeachment proceedings and a potential vote Wednesday. The Senate won’t hold Trump’s trial until after he leaves office on Jan. 20, but if he’s convicted in a Democrat-led body, he could be barred from holding office again. McCarthy’s letter indicates other Republicans may argue against impeachment on the grounds that Trump should be rebuked in a different form. “Personally, I continue to believe that an impeachment at this time would have the opposite effect of bringing our country together when we need to get America back on a...
    Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., took to Twitter early Tuesday to announce that she has been diagnosed with COVID-19, and excoriated several Republicans locked down with her during last week’s riot at the Capitol who did not wear masks.  Jayapal posted that she was "locked down in a secured room at the Capitol where several Republicans not only cruelly refused to wear a mask but recklessly mocked colleagues and staff who offered them one." CLYBURN ACCUSES RESIGNING TRUMP CABINET MEMBERS OF 'RUNNING AWAY' FROM 25TH AMENDMENT DUTY Her office issued a statement that said some members and staff were informed by Dr. Brian Monahan, the attending physician of the U.S. Congress, that those secured in that particular room had been exposed to "another occupant with coronavirus infection." She said they had been in the room for "multiple hours." She said there were over 100 people in the room and believes it...
    House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) said during a call with House Republicans Monday night that President Donald Trump told him he bears some of the responsibility for the Washington, DC riots. A source with knowledge of the matter confirmed to Breitbart News regarding McCarthy’s conversation with House Republicans. The subsequent chaos from the Capitol building riots led to calls for Trump’s ouster from both Republicans and Democrats. Republicans such as Sens. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) and Pat Toomey (R-PA) have called for Trump to resign from office. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) subsequently called for Vice President Mike Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office. After Pence would not remove the president, Pelosi and House Democrats have moved to draft Articles of Impeachment against Trump. McCarthy’s revelation to House Republicans follows the House GOP Leader sending a letter to the Republican...
    More On: capitol riot Facebook censors libertarian Ron Paul Two Capitol cops suspended, one law-enforcement member arrested in riot probe: pol Chad Wolf tells staff he is stepping down as DHS boss Biden says he’ll take oath outdoors as National Guard floods DC for inauguration House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said Monday that some Republicans want to censure rather than impeach President Trump over the handling of Wednesday’s Capitol riot. McCarthy (R-Calif.) wrote in a letter to GOP colleagues that he opposes impeaching Trump for a second time, but that some Republicans favor the less-severe form of reprimand. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) plans to begin impeachment proceedings and a potential vote Wednesday. The Senate won’t hold Trump’s trial until after he leaves office on Jan. 20, but if he’s convicted in a Democrat-led body, he could be barred from holding office again. McCarthy’s letter indicates other Republicans may...
    President Donald Trump accepted “some responsibility” for inciting the storming of the U.S. Capitol in a conversation with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, McCarthy reportedly said Monday. McCarthy reportedly made the statement on a call Monday with other Republican members of Congress on during a discussion of Democrats imminent attempt to impeach Trump. Multiple reporters on the call say McCarthy told Republicans he’d had a conversation with Trump in which the president made the admission. NEWS: McCarthy tells Republicans on a call just now that Trump told him he does bear some responsibility for the Capitol riots, per source. — Melanie Zanona (@MZanona) January 11, 2021 And @Olivia_Beavers has a second source who confirms this as well. — Melanie Zanona (@MZanona) January 11, 2021 Democrats and many Republicans have argued Trump was the central factor in inciting his supporters to storm the U.S. Capitol last week. the riot...
    Some of America's biggest corporate names — from Exxon to Facebook — said they are pausing their political donations in the wake of the deadly riot at the Capitol Building. Some of the businesses said they would halt donations specifically to the 147 Republicans who opposed the Electoral College count to certify President-elect Joe Biden's win. The corporate run for the exits began when Marriott and Blue Cross Blue Shield over the weekend said they would halt donations to the Republicans who opposed the Electoral College count in the wake of the deadly Capitol Building assault by supporters of President Donald Trump. The companies said the Republicans' vote against certification sought to undermine a legitimate election. Citigroup weighed in Sunday with a similar public statement. By Monday morning, the number of big businesses halting political donations had become a flood. Among them are American Express, Dow, Exxon, Facebook, Ford Motors, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan...
    Rep. Peter Meijer (R-Mich.) said while some GOP members of Congress "share responsibility" for misleading the supporters of President TrumpDonald TrumpKim says North Korean efforts will focus on bringing US 'to their knees' Pelosi urges Democrats to prepare to return to DC this week amid impeachment calls Ken Klippenstein: 'Ideological' blindspot kept law enforcement from urgently responding to Capitol riots MORE who stormed the U.S. Capitol last week, others feared physical violence if they opposed objections to the 2020 election results.  "They were being lied to. They were being misled," he said of the demonstrators. "Some of my colleagues in Congress, they share responsibility for that. Many of them were fundraising off of this Stop the Steal grift." But other Republicans, he argued in an interview with the libertarian magazine Reason, "had legitimate concerns about the safety of their families. They felt that that vote would put their families in danger."...
    NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump’s steadfast grip on Republicans in Washington is beginning to crumble, leaving him more politically isolated than at any other point in his turbulent administration. After riling up a crowd that later staged a violent siege of the U.S. Capitol, Trump appears to have lost some of his strongest allies, including South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham. Two Cabinet members and at least a half dozen aides have resigned. A handful of congressional Republicans are openly considering whether to join a renewed push for impeachment. One GOP senator who has split with Trump in the past called on him to resign and questioned whether she would stay in the party. “I want him out,” Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska told The Anchorage Daily News. “He has caused enough damage.” The insurrection on the heels of a bruising election loss in Georgia accomplished what other low...
    Loading the player... President Donald Trump’s steadfast grip on Republicans in Washington is beginning to crumble, leaving him more politically isolated than at any other point in his turbulent administration. After riling up a crowd that later staged a violent siege of the U.S. Capitol, Trump appears to have lost some of his strongest allies, including South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham. Two Cabinet members and at least a half dozen aides have resigned. A handful of congressional Republicans are openly considering whether to join a renewed push for impeachment. One GOP senator who has split with Trump in the past called on him to resign and questioned whether she would stay in the party. “I want him out,” Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska told The Anchorage Daily News. “He has caused enough damage.” Read More: An open letter to Betsy DeVos on resignation: You’re too late The insurrection on...
    NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump’s steadfast grip on Republicans in Washington is beginning to crumble, leaving him more politically isolated than at any other point in his turbulent administration. After riling up a crowd that later staged a violent siege of the U.S. Capitol, Trump appears to have lost some of his strongest allies, including South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham. Two Cabinet members and at least a half dozen aides have resigned. A handful of congressional Republicans are openly considering whether to join a renewed push for impeachment. One GOP senator who has split with Trump in the past called on him to resign and questioned whether she would stay in the party. “I want him out,” Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska told The Anchorage Daily News. “He has caused enough damage.” The insurrection on the heels of a bruising election loss in Georgia accomplished what...
      It wasn’t until President Trump had 14 days left in his term that some of his aides, advisers and allies reached the breaking point. From resignations to outraged tweets to talk about the 25th Amendment, some of those--in the media as well as politics--who have doggedly defended Trump have suddenly turned harshly critical. While these sentiments are fueled in part by anger and anguish over the siege of the Capitol by thousands of pro-Trump rioters, they also reflect a last-minute scramble to salvage personal reputations by scrambling off a sinking ship. Some clearly hope they can claim to have done the "right thing" once memories have faded. The damage done to our democracy was considerable, not to mention the loss of life, and Congress finally returned to a ransacked building and certified Joe Biden’s election after 3 a.m. yesterday. It was only then that the president--his account locked by Twitter--had...
    Getty DC National Guard guardsmen stand outside the U.S. Capitol on January 7, 2021. While Congressional members and staff were sheltering in place during the U.S. Capitol riot yesterday, some Republican Congressional members refused to wear masks even while in close quarters, according to reports. This has caused some to express concern that the riots might also lead to a COVID-19 outbreak among Congressional members.Some GOP Members Wouldn’t Wear Masks While Sheltering in Close QuartersRep. Susan Wild of Pennsylvania told CBS while sheltering in place that some Republican members sheltering with her refused to wear masks. Wild told CBS Philly while she was sheltering in place: “It’s what I would call a COVID super spreader event. About half of the people in the room are not wearing masks. Even though they’ve been offered surgical masks, they’ve refused to wear them. Some of the newer Republican members are openly...
    President Trump’s expected speech to the Republican National Committee’s annual winter meeting, which is being held this year in Florida, appears to have been scrubbed at the last minute. The president’s planned recorded address to the national Republican Party’s committee members, top officials, and leading activists, which was scheduled for Thursday, will not take place, Fox News chief White House correspondent John Roberts reported. SCHUMER CALLS FOR TRUMP TO BE REMOVED FROM OFFICE AFTER ATTACK ON CAPITOL The news comes as the president is reeling following the storming of the Capitol on Wednesday by Trump supporters who were encouraged by the president at a rally near the White House just hours earlier to march to the Capitol to protest as Congress was officially certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s Electoral College victory over the president. President Donald Trump arrives to speak at a rally Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)...
    As Republican lawmakers such as Reps. Matt Gaetz and Mo Books were quick to blame undercover antifa supporters for the violence that rocked Capitol Hill Wednesday, far-Right leaders made no attempts online to hide their support for the events that took place. Gaetz cited a Washington Times report in which an anonymous law enforcement official said facial recognition software identified antifa operatives "masquerading as Trump supporters." Brooks said another congressman warned him earlier this week that antifa "orchestrated [the] Capitol attack with clever mob control tactics." Law enforcement has yet to identify whether any of the 52 individuals the Metropolitan Police Department arrested Wednesday are connected to any political ideology, and the FBI said that it "is seeking to identify individuals instigating violence in Washington, D.C." But known Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio, who was arrested in Washington ahead of the protests, made no attempt to hide his support...
    U.S. President-elect Joe Biden looks at his watch as he arrives arrives to announce former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg as his nominee for secretary of transportation during a news conference at Biden's transition headquarters in Wilmington, Delaware, U.S., December 16, 2020.Kevin Lemarque | Reuters Republicans in the House and Senate objected to Arizona's Electoral College results minutes after Congress convened to confirm President-elect Joe Biden's victory over President Donald Trump. The first objection to electors' votes triggered a period of debate in the two chambers of Congress, which could last hours. Republicans are expected to object to other states as their electoral vote tallies are announced. Shortly before the joint session of Congress began at 1 p.m. ET, Vice President Mike Pence, who is presiding over the proceedings, said in a letter that he did not believe he has the unilateral power to reject Electoral College votes for...
    Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker criticized fellow Republicans on Monday, calling their efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election results “an affront to Democracy.” During a COVID-19 briefing, Baker said he believes that President-elect Joe Biden “won the election fair and square.” Watch today’s #COVID19MA update: ➡️ Tune in LIVE: https://t.co/ibXFLNxWW1 pic.twitter.com/NfMUyC9s4D — Charlie Baker (@MassGovernor) January 4, 2021 “For the life of me, I can’t figure out how people in my party can say all the other elections in which their folks barely won, were fine, and the only one they seem to have any concerns about is the one at the top of the ticket,” Baker said. Biden won the election with an electoral college victory of 306-232. Congress is expected to certify the election results Wednesday, but a large number of Republicans are expected to challenge Biden’s win. This includes at least 100 Republican representatives and around a dozen...
    AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — A group of Republican lawmakers plans to travel to the Maine Statehouse on Tuesday to call on their colleagues to return to session. Republicans protested in the summer and fall when the Legislature failed to reach a consensus for reconvening during the pandemic. The current plan is for committee work to begin in a few weeks. Republican Rep. Shelley Rudnicki, of Fairfield, said the group will gather in the House Chamber to make their point. “We are a co-equal branch of government and the governor is making decisions without any input from the Legislature. It’s time for us to get to work,” Rudnicki said. Republicans decried some of Democratic Gov. Janet Mills' executive orders imposed because of COVID-19, but the Legislature failed to reconvene when Republicans and Democrats couldn't agree on the scope of work to be conducted during the pandemic. The Legislature is currently in...
    A handful of Republicans, even some of Trump's closest allies, have offered negative views of his call with officials in the Georgia secretary of state's office, which was released on Sunday. The call involved Trump requesting Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger to look into the results of the 2020 election, urging him to find about 11,000 votes he believes he is owed. Sen. Marsha Blackburn, a staunch Trump ally, asserted that election integrity should be up to state officials and not those in power at the federal level. "This call was not a helpful call," Blackburn said Monday on Fox & Friends. "The states are the ones that are going to resolve this issue. We do not have federalized elections in this country. We do not want federalized elections in this country." Blackburn is among roughly a dozen Republican senators who vowed to object to certifying the election results...
    New York Magazine correspondent Olivia Nuzzi reported Friday on CNN that a Republican official told her the party establishment is frustrated with Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO) objecting to the certification of President-elect Joe Biden’s electoral college win in the Senate on January 6, because “he’s not some moron like Louie Gohmert.” Discussing Rep. Louie Gohmert’s (R-TX) lawsuit against Vice President Mike Pence, anchor John Avlon asked, “How seriously should anyone take Louie Gohmert?” Nuzzi said, “I think the general answer is not very.” She added, “I was talking to a Republican official a few minutes ago about Josh Hawley and what he’s doing and how establishment Republicans view what he’s doing right now. And this person said, I’m quoting, ‘He’s not some moron like Louie Gohmert.’ And the reason why people are being harsher in how they’re assessing what Josh Hawley is doing is because it seems so much more cynical, whereas in Washington,...
    The road to January 6, 2021 is being paved with increasingly desperate attempts by Republicans to try and overturn the election to hand it to President Donald Trump. There are some who may genuinely believe they will succeed, but others are being derided for engaging in showmanship for purely cynical, political purposes. Senator Josh Hawley — widely viewed as having 2020 ambitions — surprised a lot of people when he said this week he’s going to object to the results when Congress takes them up. Separately, Congressman Louie Gohmert is part of an objectively crazy lawsuit attempting to put the onus on Vice President Mike Pence to save the day, even though he absolutely cannot do that. (Not that it’s stopped the president from grousing about it in private.) On CNN Friday, New York Magazine correspondent Olivia Nuzzi reported on how people in Trump’s orbit have described him as isolated...
    VIDEO3:4003:40Republicans believe Trump is sabotaging the Georgia Senate runoff race: Axios co-founderSquawk Box Axios co-founder Mike Allen told CNBC on Thursday that some Republicans believe President Donald Trump is hurting the party's chances in next week's Georgia Senate runoffs. "There's a big strain of thought among Republicans that President Trump is sabotaging this race. He's done so much to be unhelpful to those candidates," Allen said on "Squawk Box," referring to GOP Sens. Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue. "I talk to Republicans and they look at what's happening, and they say, 'You know, he must be thinking, 'I want to send a message, If I'm not on the ballot,  Republicans are in trouble,'" added Allen, a longtime political reporter in Washington. Allen's comments come ahead of Tuesday's crucial runoff elections, which will determine the balance of power in the U.S. Senate. Loeffler is running against Democrat Raphael Warnock, while Perdue's opponent is...
    Former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden has been living in exile in Russia for several years and potentially faces a decades-long prison sentence for espionage after leaking American intelligence secrets in 2013. The impending conclusion of President Donald Trump’s term in office has stirred public debate among Republicans over whether Snowden is a traitor deserving punishment or a whistleblower worthy of clemency. Trump has already pardoned 42 people since the Nov. 3 election, according to the Department of Justice. Trump floated the idea of a Snowden pardon earlier this year. “There are a lot of people that think that he is not being treated fairly,” he told The New York Post. “It’s certainly something I could look at. Many people are on his side, I will say that. I don’t know him, never met him. But many people are on his side.” WATCH: His remarks were notable...
    By Jeremy Herb | CNN When Congress met to tally the results of the 2004 presidential election, then-Sen. Barbara Boxer stood alone on the Senate floor to object to President George W. Bush’s reelection victory in Ohio over Democrat John Kerry, forcing the House and Senate to vote for only the second time in a century on whether to reject a state’s Electoral College votes. It’s the same scenario that could play out next month with President Donald Trump publicly urging his supporters in Congress to object to President-elect Joe Biden’s victory in battleground states that expanded mail-in voting amid the coronavirus pandemic. A group of House Republicans is preparing to object, and they need at least one senator to join them to force the chambers to vote on the matter. While Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has privately urged Senate Republicans to steer clear, several senators have declined to...
    (CNN)When Congress met to tally the results of the 2004 presidential election, then-Sen. Barbara Boxer stood alone on the Senate floor to object to President George W. Bush's reelection victory in Ohio over Democrat John Kerry, forcing the House and Senate to vote for only the second time in a century on whether to reject a state's Electoral College votes.It's the same scenario that could play out next month with President Donald Trump publicly urging his supporters in Congress to object to President-elect Joe Biden's victory in battleground states that expanded mail-in voting amid the coronavirus pandemic.Congress has the next -- and final -- vote in the 2020 election. Heres how it worksA group of House Republicans is preparing to object, and they need at least one senator to join them to force the chambers to vote on the matter. While Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has privately urged Senate...
    (CNN)President-elect Joe Biden has been moving swiftly to fill out much of his Cabinet. Whether the Senate will do the same is another question. Biden faces the tricky task of navigating a narrowly divided Senate with competing factions within his own party, calls by conservative senators to bring the nomination process to a slow grind -- all with the added complication of the hotly contested Georgia runoff races making it impossible for the Senate to formally organize until the outcome is clear.Biden Transition Biden receives first dose of Covid-19 vaccine Biden poised to nominate Connecticut education chief Miguel Cardona as education secretary Here's which Biden Cabinet and other top roles haven't been announced yet MAP: Full presidential election results Moreover, some Republican senators have little interest in beginning the confirmation process in January with President Donald Trump refusing to concede the race, meaning Biden could have a difficult...
    Reuters December 15, 2020 0 Comments U.S. President Donald Trump is being urged by some advisers not to go ahead with his plan to veto a major defense bill because it is all but certain to be overridden by the U.S. Congress, a source familiar with the situation said on Tuesday. Trump has threatened to veto the annual National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), a $740-billion bill setting policy for the Department of Defense, because it does not repeal a law that protects social media companies from liability for what appears on their platforms. The defense bill has passed both houses of the U.S. Congress by veto-proof margins, meaning any veto by Trump would likely be overridden as he faces the end of his term Jan. 20. Some top advisers, both in and out of the White House, have privately counseled Trump not to veto the bill because he would...
    By Steve Holland WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump is being urged by some advisers not to go ahead with his plan to veto a major defense bill because it is all but certain to be overridden by the U.S. Congress, a source familiar with the situation said on Tuesday. Trump has threatened to veto the annual National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), a $740-billion bill setting policy for the Department of Defense, because it does not repeal a law that protects social media companies from liability for what appears on their platforms. The defense bill has passed both houses of the U.S. Congress by veto-proof margins, meaning any veto by Trump would likely be overridden as he faces the end of his term Jan. 20. Some top advisers, both in and out of the White House, have privately counseled Trump not to veto the bill because he would have...
    After the Electoral College presumably votes Monday to affirm Joe Biden's win, some Republican senators are reportedly preparing to acknowledge the de facto truth that never should have been in question: Donald Trump lost fair and square. Many Senate Republicans have viewed the Dec. 14 vote both literally and figuratively speaking as the moment of truth, according to CNN. After electors in state capitals across the country finalize the certified results, those same Republicans are realizing they may have to actually part ways with their whiny, rage-y, delusional Dear Leader.  "Trump's going to do what Trump is going to do," Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa told CNN on the question of whether Trump will concede. But regardless, Grassley views the Electoral College as being the final say on the matter.  In recent weeks, just six GOP senators had acknowledged Biden as president-elect: Mitt Romney of Utah, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Susan Collins...
    President Trump said Saturday he was "surprised there were so many" Republicans in the House and Senate who would acknowledge Democrat Joe Biden as president-elect.  The president was reacting to a report from the Washington Post, in which the newspaper claimed only 25 out of 249 congressional Republicans said Biden won the election. Fast Facts The Washington Post said in a survey it found only 25 out of 249 congressional Republicans believed Biden had won the election. "25, wow!." Trump tweeted. "I am surprised there are so many. We have just begun to fight. Please send me a list of the 25 RINOS. I read the Fake News Washington Post as little as possible!"  "25, wow!." Trump tweeted. "I am surprised there are so many. We have just begun to fight. Please send me a list of the 25 RINOS. I read the Fake News Washington Post as little as possible!"  The Post...
    President Donald Trump has refused to concede the 2020 presidential election, spending the past few weeks alleging widespread voter fraud. Some Republicans fear that his claims could depress the conservative base and allow Democrats to win full control of the U.S. Congress, according to a Friday report from The Washington Examiner. On Saturday, Trump will fly into Georgia and hold a rally to express support for Republican Senators Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue, who have to defend their seats in order for the GOP to keep control of the upper chamber. Both Loeffler and Perdue will have to fend off formidable Democratic challengers, so turnout could be crucial. In an open letter, 19 prominent Georgia Republicans warned that Trump could further depress conservative-leaning voters if he focuses on spreading baseless allegations of electoral fraud. “We have watched with increasing concern as the debate surrounding the state’s electoral system has made...
    Tallapoosa, Georgia (CNN)Sixty miles west of Atlanta, Haralson County sits a world away from Georgia's largest and booming metro area. Here, in the small towns that sit in the foothills of the Appalachian mountains, Republican roots run generations deep. In November, the county voted for Donald Trump over Joe Biden, 87% to 13% -- making it one of the most Republican-leaning areas in the state.In the heart of the half-mile downtown of Tallapoosa, diners waited outside two food trucks and chatted about the upcoming January 5 Senate runoffs. But the conversation about next month's election began with November's results. "I honestly think Trump did," said Ralph Horton, when asked who he thinks won the election, despite no legitimate evidence to support that belief. Horton is not alone -- all across Haralson County, his neighbors feed off each other's inaccurate theories."I believe there was a little something shady going on," Cheryl...
    'We are confident in the fairness and accuracy of Iowa's election system,' say Sens. Chuck Grassley and Joni Ernst. Republicans have promoted baseless claims of widespread voter fraud in the Nov. 3 general election for a month in refusing to admit Donald Trump lost — but now they're selectively accepting some election results and not others. Fearful of losing seats in the House of Representatives and the Senate, prominent Republicans are suddenly speaking up in defense of the election as free and fair, in some cases just days after promoting myths of voter fraud. Iowa Republican Sens. Chuck Grassley and Joni Ernst issued a joint statement Thursday in support of Mariannette Miller-Meeks' win in the state's 2nd Congressional District. After a statewide recount, Miller-Meeks' lead in the election dropped from double digits to single digits.
    Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., said President Trump had every right to contest the results of the 2020 election in an appearance on "America's Newsroom," adding all voter fraud allegations should be investgated. "Many Democrats, some Republicans, a lot of members of the media, have their bowels in an uproar because the president refuses to concede and he's gone to court," he said. "Everybody's entitled to their opinion. This is America. The president has every right to offer his opinion about the election. Number two, he has every right to go to court and contest the results of the election, and you have every right to disagree. But that doesn't degrade democracy. It elevates it." Kennedy said, unlike in authoritarian countries, the matter could be resolved in U.S. courts rather than with a "coup." While he said there was nothing "inherently fraudulent" about mail-in voting, he stipulated a lot more could go wrong with the practice. Trump has repeatedly claimed the election was "rigged" and President-elect Joe Biden could...
    (CNN)Joe Biden is facing dueling headwinds as he looks to fill out his Cabinet: Senate Republicans want the President-elect to consult with them and choose nominees who could win their support, while liberal Democrats are pushing him to name progressives who could shape the policies of his government. And Republicans, if they keep control of the chamber, are not committing to scheduling votes on nominees they consider out of the mainstream, nor are they vowing to quickly let Biden's picks get confirmed in the first days of his administration despite the private and public lobbying by top Democrats. What could delay deliberations further: President Donald Trump's refusal to concede, coupled with Republicans' reluctance to say Biden is the winner, meaning few them are ready to engage over the President-elect's choices or hold courtesy meetings as Democrats are beginning to do. As Biden moves quickly to fill key slots -- ranging...
    GOP officials fear Republicans will not turn out to vote in the runoff elections for Georgia's two Senate seats. Georgia Republicans are afraid Donald Trump's false claims about election fraud in their state and his harsh criticisms of state officials are damaging the reputation of the state's Republican Party. They fear that Republican voters will be discouraged and not turn out to vote in the runoff elections for Georgia's two Senate seats on Jan. 5, 2021. Neither Senate race in Georgia resulted in a winner last month. In the runoffs, incumbent Republican Sen. David Perdue will face Democratic opponent Jon Ossoff, while his fellow incumbent Kelly Loeffler runs against Democrat Raphael Warnock.
    Presidential elections that result in a transfer of power between Republicans and Democrats are notable in part because both parties face similar challenges and opportunities in a post-election landscape.
    (CNN)When President Donald Trump lost this year's election to Joe Biden, almost nobody around him said they could envision the losing incumbent attending his successor's inauguration.The image remains implausible for a President who will likely never concede and said Sunday that nothing would convince him he lost. Yet Republicans and aides to Trump are encouraging him to at least consider attending Biden's swearing-in, hoping his presence will both reflect well on his character and help preserve his future influence but also convince Americans the election was fair."I hope the President is there on Inaugural Day," Sen. Roy Blunt, the Missouri Republican who is responsible for overseeing January's inauguration, told CNN's Dana Bash on "State of the Union" on Sunday.Blunt, who declined to call Biden the president-elect, still said it was "likely" the former vice president would be sworn in on January 20. He said he was "continuing to work to...
    Former President Barack Obama said he believes President Trump garnered more than 73 million votes this election cycle, not because of policy but because some Republicans promote a narrative of “White men are victims.”  Appearing on the syndicated radio show "The Breakfast Club," Obama said Wednesday, “What’s always interesting to me is the degree to which you’ve seen created in Republican politics the sense that White males are victims.”  The country's 44th president continued noting, “They are the ones who are under attack – which obviously doesn’t jive with both history and data and economics. But that’s a sincere belief that’s been internalized, that’s a story that’s being told and how you unwind that is going to be not something that is done right away, it’s going to take some time.” Obama said during the interview that the Trump administration “has failed miserably in handling just basic looking after the American people...
    Fox News host Tucker Carlson has urged Republicans not to 'sit out' the Senate runoff races in Georgia, responding to threats from conservative voters to boycott the election to support President Donald Trump's claims of fraud. 'You're hearing some Republicans say, 'Well maybe we should let the Republicans lose,' because they're mad at the party in Washington,' Carlson said on Tuesday night. 'By the way, they have every reason to be mad at the party in Washington, They should be punished.' 'The problem is, the rest of us should not be punished,' he argued. 'So before you decide to sit this one out, you should think about what this might mean.' Implicit in Carlson's monologue was a concession that President-elect Joe Biden will take office in January. Republicans currently hold a 50-48 edge in the Senate, meaning that if both Georgia seats flipped Democrat, a Vice President Kamala Harris would...
    Journalists have been caught in a fierce post-election crossfire, accused by the president and his team of ignoring or condoning a massive wave of voter fraud. “The media is just as corrupt as the election itself,” Trump tweeted over the weekend. But news organizations that have insisted on reporting the facts are being vindicated as the Trump campaign’s arguments have so far failed in court and his legal team is undergoing an upheaval. This includes Fox News, which called the election for Joe Biden along with the other networks and has drawn the president’s wrath because he has valued the high-profile support of some of its opinion hosts. It’s possible that the president’s side will still produce widespread evidence of fraud, but in the wake of a scathing judge’s opinion in Pennsylvania, that seems increasingly unlikely.  TRUMP QUESTIONS WHY BIDEN FORMING CABINET AS HIS LEGAL TEAM CONTINUES VOTER-FRAUD FIGHT Chris...
    Republican legislators on Tuesday called for Louisiana to eliminate state income taxes while acknowledging that the chances of doing so anytime soon are slim at best. “We’re going to swing for the fences,” said state Rep. Thomas Pressly, a Shreveport Republican. Rep. Richard Nelson, R-Mandeville, said repealing personal and corporate income taxes would solve two problems at once by making the state more attractive to businesses and residents while dismantling a system in which most of the tax dollars flow through the State Capitol. “We put everything in Baton Rouge, and we all go to Baton Rouge to go fight to get all our money back,” Nelson said. “It’s just not a really great system.” Nelson and Pressly participated in an online questions-and-answers session hosted by the Pelican Institute for Public Policy, which advocates for lower taxes and reduced government spending. He said a better...
    President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenBrewery launches new Biden beer described as 'inoffensive and not too bitter' Deb Haaland says 'of course' she would serve as Interior secretary under Biden State Department won't give Biden messages from foreign leaders: report MORE has spoken to some Republican senators and Republican governors in recent days, his future White House chief of staff said Thursday, even as many GOP lawmakers defend President TrumpDonald John TrumpState Department won't give Biden messages from foreign leaders: report Arizona's GOP AG says people voted Republican, but not for Trump On The Money: Biden wins America's economic engines | Progressives praise Biden's picks for economic transition team | Restaurants go seasonal with winter shutdowns during pandemic MORE's refusal to concede the election. "Joe Biden has spoken to Republicans. He’s spoken to some Republican senators, some Republican governors," Ron Klain said on MSNBC. Klain would not specify who Biden had spoken...
    Although they didn’t get the blue wave they expected, Democrats narrowed the gap with Republicans in five of the most competitive and populous suburban counties in Texas. An analysis of the presidential vote in solidly suburban Collin, Denton, Fort Bend, Hays and Williamson counties, plus partly suburban Tarrant County, showed that Republicans went from an advantage of more than 180,000 total votes in those counties in 2016 to less than a thousand votes in 2020, according to the latest data. “This was not, on a whole, a good night for Democrats, it’s not what they hoped,” said Sherri Greenberg, a professor at the University of Texas at Austin’s LBJ School of Public Affairs. “But Democrats did see some gains and some success flipping areas in the suburbs.” After the good results in the 2016 midterm elections, Democrats had hoped to flip 10 congressional seats in 2020 as some experts predicted...
    DEMOCRATS will keep control of the House of Representatives for two more years. The Associated Press projected on Tuesday that Democrats won the House, beating out Republicans with a thin majority. 1House Speaker Nancy PelosiCredit: Reuters The party has nailed down at least 218 seats, per the AP's count, and could win a few others when more votes are counted. Democrats lost seats in the 435-member House and in the Senate. Democrats went into Election Day with a 232-197 House advantage, plus an independent and five open seats. A possible majority in the Senate depends on Georgia's two run-off races, votes for which will take place in January. Despite Democrat Joe Biden winning the presidential election, Republicans could control the Senate -- which would force Democrats to scale back their plans sweeping health care, infrastructure and other initiatives. They would instead need to meet compromises with the GOP. In...
    ATLANTA – Some Republicans renewed their attacks Monday on Democrat Joe Biden's lead over President Donald Trump in Georgia, with U.S. Sens. David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler taking the extraordinary step of calling for the resignation of Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, the state's chief elections officer and a fellow member of the GOP. Republicans laid out a strategy to investigate but still presented no evidence of large-scale voter fraud in the balloting, saying they were still looking into ways to overturn Biden's lead of 11,000 votes. Georgia is one front in a nationwide scramble by Trump forces to question his loss in multiple states, after The Associated Press and other news organizations declared Biden the victor Saturday when he surpassed the 270 electoral vote threshold with victories in Pennsylvania and Nevada. The AP has not yet called the presidential race for Georgia's 16 electoral votes. Perdue and Loeffler...
    Rep. Cedric RichmondCedric Levon RichmondDemocrats accuse Kushner of 'casual racism' over comments about Black Americans The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump combative, Biden earnest during distanced TV duel Cedric Richmond's next move: 'Sky's the limit' if Biden wins MORE (D-La.), co-chair of President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenMary Trump celebrates Biden-Harris victory: 'To America. Thanks, guys' Biden gives shoutout to Black Americans in victory speech: 'You always have my back, and I'll have yours' Biden vows to heal divided nation MORE’s campaign, said Sunday that the former vice president's lead in traditionally Republican states will give him increased leverage in negotiating with congressional Republicans. CBS’s Margaret Brennan asked Richmond on "Face the Nation" if the 71 million votes President TrumpDonald John TrumpMary Trump celebrates Biden-Harris victory: 'To America. Thanks, guys' Biden gives shoutout to Black Americans in victory speech: 'You always have my back, and I'll have yours' Biden vows...
    Mitch McConnell Republicans are divided on how to deal with Donald Trump’s attempts to steal the election by lying, encouraging his supporters to disrupt counting, and flooding the courts with baseless lawsuits. Some, like Sens. Lindsey Graham and Ted Cruz, are enthusiastically joining in, spouting their own versions of Trump’s anti-democratic lies. A very few, like Sen. Mitt Romney and former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, pushed back more or less immediately. Most chose silence and delay—though by Friday morning, some of the silence was breaking down. “Here’s how this must work in our great country: Every legal vote should be counted,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell tweeted, trying frantically to balance between Trumpian talking points and the appearance of seriousness. “Any illegally-submitted ballots must not. All sides must get to observe the process. And the courts are here to apply the laws & resolve disputes. That's how Americans' votes decide the result.”  Not...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Some Republican lawmakers are criticizing President Donald Trump’s unsupported claim that Democrats are trying to “steal” the election, saying Trump’s comments undermine the U.S. political process and the bedrock notion that all Americans should have their vote counted. Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania, whose state is a key battleground in the presidential election, said Friday he had seen no evidence to support Trump’s claim Thursday evening of fraud in balloting. “The president’s speech last night was very disturbing to me because he made very, very serious allegations without any evidence to support it,” Toomey told “CBS This Morning.” He added: “I voted for President Trump. I endorsed President Trump. I want the next president to be the person who legitimately wins the Electoral College and I will accept whoever that is.” Trump, who has complained for weeks about mail-in ballots, escalated his allegations late Thursday, saying at...
    By MATTHEW DALY, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Some Republican lawmakers are criticizing President Donald Trump’s unsupported claim that Democrats are trying to “steal” the election, saying Trump's comments undermine the U.S. political process and the bedrock notion that all Americans should have their vote counted. Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania, whose state is a key battleground in the presidential election, said Friday he had seen no evidence to support Trump's claim Thursday evening of fraud in balloting. “The president’s speech last night was very disturbing to me because he made very, very serious allegations without any evidence to support it," Toomey told “CBS This Morning.” He added: “I voted for President Trump. I endorsed President Trump. I want the next president to be the person who legitimately wins the Electoral College and I will accept whoever that is.” Trump, who has complained for weeks about mail-in ballots, escalated his...
    As President Trump gave a statement Thursday night where he falsely claimed victory and alleged election officials were trying to steal the election, there were some of his loyal Republican allies who continued to back him. But other Republicans have backed away from his claims.  "If you count the legal votes, I easily win," the president said, without evidence, on Thursday. "If you count the illegal votes, they can try to steal the election from us, if you count the votes that came in late, we're looking at them very strongly." On Thursday, two of the president's sons, Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump, tweeted out messages criticizing well-known Republicans and GOP officials for not being more vocal and standing by their father. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox Eric Trump told Republicans they need to "have some backbone" and "fight against this fraud."   "Our voters will...
    President Trump faced some pushback from his own party Thursday after warning about illegal voting and an attempt to "steal" the presidential election. Republican Gov. Larry Hogan of Maryland argued there was "no defense for the President’s comments tonight undermining our Democratic process. America is counting the votes, and we must respect the results as we always have before. No election or person is more important than our Democracy." After Trump's speech, Rep. Will Hurd, R-Texas, tweeted: "A sitting president undermining our political process & questioning the legality of the voices of countless Americans without evidence is not only dangerous & wrong, it undermines the very foundation this nation was built upon."  Hurd announced last year that he wouldn't seek reelection. Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., appeared to accuse Trump of spreading false information.  "We want every vote counted, yes every legal vote (of course)," he said. TRUMP CLAIMS DEMS ARE TRYING...
    Town hall that doubles as an Election Day polling site ordered to remove Black Lives Matter flags 4 Bakery Chains Quietly Vanishing This Year Battle for the House: Some House Democrats fall while the party fails to flip some key suburban districts House Democrats went into election night feeling good about expanding their majority, but haven't had the big gains they hoped for so far, with at least four Democrats in seats President Donald Trump won in 2016 losing and several top-targeted Republicans holding on to their seats, according to CNN projections Wednesday. © Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/AP Democratic Rep. Kendra Horn of Oklahoma lost the 5th District, CNN projected early Wednesday morning. House Democrats were shell-shocked after they watched their party lose seats, meaning they are poised to hold a smaller majority in the next Congress despite the bullish predictions of party bosses in the run-up...
    (CNN)House Democrats went into election night feeling good about expanding their majority, but haven't had the big night they hoped for so far, with at least two Democrats in seats President Donald Trump won in 2016 losing and several top-targeted Republicans holding onto their seats, according to CNN projections early Wednesday morning. Republicans ousted Democratic Rep. Kendra Horn, whose upset victory in Oklahoma's 5th District was a major surprise in 2018 after Trump won the district in 2016. Democrats had hoped that the suburbs outside of Oklahoma City were moving away from Republicans, and the race remained close until the end with both sides pouring in money. But state Sen. Stephanie Bice returned the seat to GOP hands, a notable win for Republicans who have been hoping to increase the number of women in the GOP conference. Republicans will gain another woman in the conference with Michelle Fischbach's defeat of...
    There are lots of ways to break ties in sports. Soccer eventually heads to a penalty kick shootout. The NHL eliminated ties at the end of the 2004 season. Teams now play a three-on-three overtime. The squads advance to a shootout if the match remains tied after the extra period. Major League Baseball outraged purists over the summer with an experimental rule change. Games still go to extra innings. But from the tenth on, each half-inning begins with a designated runner at second base. This innovation drives some in the sports world bonkers. But what happens if there’s a tie in the Senate? Such a scenario is certainly a possibility this fall. It’s even possible the Senate races aren’t settled until next year. You heard that right. Jan. 5. Two days after the 117th Congress convenes on January 3, 2021 Both of Georgia’s Senate races could go...
    In a number of swing states that will decide the presidential election, there’s now been enough early voting to give us a feel for who is turning out, and it doesn’t quite match the polling. Here’s what we do know… We know how many people requested mail-in ballots and what percentage of those requests came from Republicans, Democrats, and unaffiliated. We know how many early votes have been counted and what percentage of those votes come from Republicans, Democrats, and unaffiliated. We know that the conventional wisdom is that Democrats win the early voting and Republicans win Election Day voting. In other words, Democrats need to build a sizable early vote lead to beat the GOP on Election Day because Republicans prefer to vote in-person on Election Day. What’s more, Democrats have been placing more emphasis on early voting this year than ever before. I’m not sure how wise that...
    In a number of swing states that will decide the presidential election, there’s now been enough early voting to give us a feel for who is turning out, and it doesn’t quite match the polling. Here’s what we do know… We know how many people requested mail-in ballots and what percentage of those requests came from Republicans, Democrats, and unaffiliated. We know how many early votes have been counted and what percentage of those votes come from Republicans, Democrats, and unaffiliated. We know that the conventional wisdom is that Democrats win the early voting and Republicans win Election Day voting. In other words, Democrats need to build a sizable early vote lead to beat the GOP on Election Day because Republicans prefer to vote in-person on Election Day. What’s more, Democrats have been placing more emphasis on early voting this year than ever before. I’m not sure how wise that...
    Despite months of daunting poll numbers, many Republicans remain hopeful that the final presidential debate was only the beginning of a strong closing push by President Trump that will defy expectations and return him to the White House. “Best case, he wins 322 electoral votes,” said Republican strategist Mark Smith. “Worst case, 285.” “I think he'll win north of 300 electoral votes,” said Republican strategist Peter Hatzipetros, who wouldn’t rule out a popular vote triumph for the president. It’s the flip side to Democrats who are nervous that the polls don’t tell the whole story of this election after Trump’s surprise victory in 2016: Republicans who look at big crowds and their own gut instincts are unconvinced that the president is really trailing Democratic nominee Joe Biden by 7.9 points, as the RealClearPolitics national polling average currently shows, in the closing days of the campaign. “Oh my God, this means...
    (CNN)As President Donald Trump began a packed day of events Friday, he delivered an unusually somber message to seniors -- a group he won in 2016 and desperately needs to win back -- speaking of the pain and grief inflicted by the coronavirus pandemic. "My heart breaks for every grieving family that has lost a precious loved one," Trump said in Fort Myers, Florida, where he also promised the crowd that he would dedicate his life to seniors. "I feel their anguish and I mourn their loss. I feel their pain. I know that the terrible pain that they have gone through, and you lose someone, and it's nothing to describe what you have to bear. There's nothing to describe it." But it wasn't long before the President's surprising shift in tone -- one that might have actually helped him win back the many voters he has alienated -- was...
    (CNN)Democratic senators recognized early on that there was little they could do to stop Republicans from rushing to confirm Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett. So this week, they spent her hearings with an eye on Election Day, opting to avoid overly aggressive exchanges that could hurt their candidates, and cautioning over and over again that Barrett could undermine the Affordable Care Act, inserting their most potent political issue -- health care -- into the fight. But in the end, Democrats offered a mixed message over the process, with some top senators praising the handling of the hearings at the same time as characterizing it as a "sham." Four days of hearings culminated with the Senate Judiciary Committee's top Democrat, Dianne Feinstein, gushing over Chairman Lindsey Graham's "fairness" in the hearings. After the hearings concluded, Feinstein told Graham, who is in a tough race against Democrat Jaime Harrison, "This is...
    Some Republicans fear that President Donald Trump’s slide in the polls will result in the GOP losing control of the Senate, The Washington Examiner reported on Sunday. If Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden wins the presidency — which he is poised to do, polling suggests — Democrats will need to flip only three seats to gain control of the upper chamber. At least six incumbents are considered vulnerable. Senators Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, Joni Ernst of Iowa, Thom Tillis of North Carolina, Martha McSally of Arizona, Susan Collins of Main and Cory Gardner of Colorado are all struggling to fend off strong liberal challengers, many of whom are seeing a surge in campaign contributions. In addition, Democrats are going on the offense in several traditionally red states. In Kansas, Democrat Barbara Bollier is polling ahead of Republican Roger Marshall, according to latest research. Georgia Sen. David Perdue and Sen....
    (CNN)The 2020 election, as you may have heard, is 29 days away. And the Republican Senate majority, as you may have also heard, is in deep trouble.But something that happened on Monday that has absolutely nothing to do with the 2020 election has dire consequences for the long-term hopes of the Senate GOP.What happened is that Sen. Pat Toomey, a Pennsylvania Republican, announced that he will not run for another term in 2022. That is a BIG deal for Republicans. Why? Because Toomey, who was first elected in 2010 and then reelected in 2016, might be the only Republican who could have won the state in those two elections -- especially the latter race.  And he may well be the only GOPer who could have held the seat for Republicans in 2022. THE POINT -- NOW ON YOUTUBE! In each episode of his weekly YouTube show, Chris Cillizza...
    Joe Biden has staked his presidential campaign in a pledge to restore "normalcy" if he unseats President Trump in the November election, even as some Democrats pledge to make radical changes should they win control of the White House and both chambers of Congress. Biden has repeatedly pushed back against Republican efforts to tie him to the party's progressive wing — "I am the Democratic Party right now," he declared Tuesday night during the first presidential debate in Cleveland — yet other Democratic leaders have endorsed policies that have the potential to reshape the country, including eliminating the filibuster, granting statehood to Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C., and expanding the Supreme Court. "As far as the filibuster, I'm not busting my chops to become majority leader to do very little or nothing," Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said Wednesday during an interview with MSNBC. "We are going to get a whole lot...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Some Republicans are accusing Governor JB Pritzker of intimidation as Election Day and a vote on the proposed Fair Tax Amendment approaches.The ballot question to allow the state to adopt a graduated tax instead of the flat tax there is now has dominated the airwaves.Advertising blitz over Illinois progressive tax vote kicks off with Pritzker donationGovernor JB Pritzker proposed the amendment and has spent millions of dollars of his own money to support it. With a huge budget deficit combined with COVID-19 expenses, Pritzker said if the state does not shift from a flat tax to graduated tax based on income, resident could face an across-the-board income tax hike of 20% or a 15% cut in government services."The best direction we should go to deal with this is to make sure we are asking those most able to step up and pay, the wealthiest in state," Prtizker...
    WASHINGTON -- Congressional Republicans including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell pushed back Thursday after President Donald Trump again declined to commit to a peaceful transfer of power if he loses the Nov. 3 presidential election.Trump said during a Wednesday news conference, "We're going to have to see what happens," responding to a question. "You know that I've been complaining very strongly about the ballots, and the ballots are a disaster."But McConnell and other top Republicans had no hesitation in committing to an orderly transfer if Trump loses."The winner of the November 3rd election will be inaugurated on January 20th," McConnell said in a tweet. "There will be an orderly transition just as there has been every four years since 1792."Sen. Lindsey Graham, a Trump ally and chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, told "Fox & Friends" on Thursday, "If Republicans lose we will accept the result. If the Supreme Court...
    Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said he’ll consider major changes to the Senate, including an end to the filibuster, if Democrats take back the majority in November. “Everything is on the table,” Schumer, a New York Democrat, said Tuesday. “My Senate Democratic colleagues and candidates know America needs some change, and we're going to figure out the best way to do it.” Schumer is furious at the GOP for pledging to hold a vote on a nominee to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died Friday. Even though Republicans are not breaking any rules by taking up a nominee, Schumer said the Senate should honor Ginsburg’s dying wish that the seat be left vacant until the next president is sworn into office. Democrats are now threatening to pack the high court by expanding it beyond the current nine seats and filling them with their own nominees. To accomplish this...
    By Mark Sherman | Associated Press WASHINGTON — The prospect that President Donald Trump and Senate Republicans will fill Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Supreme Court seat before the year is out has ignited a call for major changes on the court, including expanding the number of justices. Some Democratic senators, who had been averse to increasing the size of the nine-member court, said in the wake of Ginsburg’s death that the Republican rush to fill the high court vacancy could be a breaking point. Massachusetts Sen. Ed Markey said on Twitter that if Republicans don’t allow the winner of the Nov. 3 presidential election to select the next justice, “we must abolish the filibuster and expand the Supreme Court.” But the sudden vacancy also is fueling tensions among Democrats. While some progressives are urging presidential nominee Joe Biden to embrace reforms including adding justices to the court, he has so...
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