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    Jason Lee | Reuters BEIJING — As the U.S. pumps trillions of dollars into its economy in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, economists are concerned about spillover effects in China, including the risk of "imported inflation." Worries about high inflation, or rapidly rising prices, hit U.S. markets last week. The U.S. Congress is reviewing a $1.9 trillion stimulus plan that critics say could cause inflation to soar, and add to debt levels that rose following last year's historic $2 trillion stimulus package. In China, economists are wary of risks to growth as the country tries to recover fully from the shock of the pandemic. "The large-scale issuance of U.S. Treasurys, and the rapid expansion of the Federal Reserve (balance sheet), have increased the spillover effect of U.S. macro policies," former finance minister Lou Jiwei said in an article published in the latest issue of the government-affiliated journal "Public Finance...
              Live from Music Row Thursday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed Tennessee Star National Correspondent Neil McCabe to the newsmakers line weigh on his recent exclusive at The Tennessee Star and the different stylings on foreign policy between the Biden and Trump. Leahy: We are joined by our good friend our longtime colleague the Washington correspondent for the Star News Network, which is The Tennessee Star, and five other state-based news sites. Neil McCabe with another breaking exclusive story on American foreign policy with the founder of the Gold Institute, Eli Gold. Neil, how do you keep getting breaking these exclusives? And what did Eli Gold tell you about Biden’s foreign policy? McCabe: Eli Gold is an amazing guy who started the...
    The Biden administration’s nascent foreign policy was dealt a major setback when Iran declined to join informal talks this week brokered by the European Union with the U.S., Russia, China, the U.K., Germany and France. Their purpose was to discuss starting new U.S.-Iran negotiations to bring the United States back into the 2015 nuclear deal with Iran, the JCPOA.    Iranian officials declined to attend the meeting, stating: "Iran does not consider this the time to hold an informal meeting with these countries," insisting that they do not want to hold talks with the U.S. until it first drops all sanctions on Iran.    Iran’s decision came just after a Washington Post story that America’s friends and allies are hedging their bets on supporting Biden’s new foreign policy because they believe the political pendulum could swing back in a few years with the reelection of Donald Trump or another Republican as president.   FRED FLEITZ: IRAN NUCLEAR DEAL – BIDEN RUSHING AHEAD FOR THESE 3 TROUBLING REASONS The Biden administration has mocked and tried to reverse President Trump’s successful "America First"...
    Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., accused one of President Biden's top Pentagon picks of having a "long record of volatile outbursts" and said he will oppose the nomination during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on Thursday. Colin Kahl, a former Obama adviser, is Biden's pick for undersecretary of defense for policy.  BIDEN PICK FOR TOP PENTAGON POSITION HYPED STEELE DOSSIER, TRUMP-RUSSIA COLLUSION CLAIMS Cotton accused Kahl of being wrong about Middle East policy for the last four years before questioning some of his social media posts about former President Donald Trump and Republicans. "When Mideast policy was your job at the Pentagon, you failed to foresee the rise of ISIS, which launched an actual war involving 30,000 Islamic insurgents conquering a quarter of Iraq," Cotton said. "Dr. Kahl, it seems to me that your judgments about matters of war and peace are almost always wrong." Cotton also took issue with some...
              The founder and president of the Washington-based Gold Institute for International Strategies told the Star News Network that President Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s foreign policy is doomed to fail, because unlike President Donald J. Trump, Biden treats the world as an extension of Washington’s Swamp. “What President Trump realized is that Washington and the way Washington works is really only acceptable – I didn’t say good – I said it is acceptable – is on domestic matters,” said Eli Gold, who worked for worked in Washington’s think tank world for more than 10 years, before launching the Gold Institute May 2019. “Trump realized that when you leave our shores and our borders, the rest of the world does not work in the same way Washington works,” Gold said. “By the way, Washington is broken domestically, too, but we can try to figure that out...
    Dr. Henry Kissinger, the former secretary of state for both Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford, likened President Donald Trump's Middle East diplomatic achievements to Nixon's opening of China in 1972. He also warned that the U.S. should continue the tough Trump policy on Iran.  "I think that one of the great successes of the previous administration was that they had lined up, that they had achieved, two things in the Middle East. One, to separate the Palestinian problem from all of the other problems so that it did not become a veto over everything else – and secondly, of lining up the Sunni states in actual or potential combination against the Shiite states, which is Iran," he said.  Kissinger, speaking at the kickoff of a series of foreign affairs talks – the Nixon Seminars – sponsored by the Nixon Foundation, called the Trump administration's Abraham Accords a breakthrough in Arab-Israeli relations. The accords established diplomatic ties between several Gulf states and Israel, as...
    Vice President Kamala Harris (2nd L) participates with President Joe Biden in a virtual bilateral meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (on screen), National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan (L), Secretary of State Antony Blinken (2nd R), and Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs Juan Gonzalez (R) in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on February 23, 2021. When Kamala Harris joined the Democratic ticket alongside Joe Biden, she brought with her unparalleled experience in law enforcement and a host of other domestic issues as the former attorney general and sitting senator of the most populous state in the nation. In many ways, she was an ideal counterpart to Biden, who had honed his foreign policy expertise through decades on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and trips to more than 50 countries as vice president in the Obama administration. But according to Politico, both President Biden and...
    Loading the player... Kamala Harris spent years working as a prosecutor which eventually led her to become California’s attorney general. In 2017, she became a senator and now, Harris is the first Black and first female Vice President.  As she settles into her new role, Harris is reportedly trying to expand her connections and focus more on foreign policy after spending years working on domestic issues, according to Politico.  Read More: Biden, Harris to address Black America in virtual Black History Month Celebration Biden reportedly encouraged Harris to speak with foreign leaders and try to “develop her own rapport with key U.S. partners,” according to publication. She also has the daunting task of trying to mend relationships that changed during the Trump administration. Biden has reportedly given Harris opportunities he did not receive as Vice President. On Tuesday, Harris was part of a bilateral meeting between U.S. and Canadian...
    It would be easy to dismiss President Joe Biden’s hopes for a return of bipartisanship as naive when one looks at the GOP record since he took office. Most GOP legislators still refuse to denounce their cult leader’s infamous Big Lie that the 2020 election was stolen, a lie he keeps promoting. They showed no serious interest in compromise on the critical COVID-19 relief bill, rightly Biden’s first priority. They are trying to curb voting rights in states across the country. So you might think Biden’s push for bipartisanship is an irrelevance in this viciously partisan era. You would be dead wrong. Not since the early post-World War II years, at the beginning of the Cold War with the Soviet Union, has bipartisanship in Congress been so strategically vital. This is especially true when it comes to foreign policy, and the deepening U.S. competition with China. Back in the late...
    Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo promised the crowd at the Conservative Political Action Conference Saturday that he was 'going to let it rip.'  'I'm not a diplomat,' he reminded the crowd as he took the Orlando stage.  This allowed him to critical of President Joe Biden's early moves on foreign policy, while touting what he viewed as successes during his time working under former President Donald Trump.  Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo spoke at CPAC Saturday afternoon, touting the fact that he could 'let it rip' because he's no longer America's top diplomat  Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo promised that he would 'let it rip' during his CPAC speech, which he used to tout former President Donald Trump's foreign policy achievements  Former President Donald Trump (left) is photographed on his West Palm Beach golf course Saturday alongside Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton (right) a...
    Is Vice President Kamala Harris starting to do President Biden's job for him?  That's the question Fox News host Sean Hannity asked while reviewing a report on Harris taking on foreign policy responsibilities, like solo meetings with foreign leaders. According to Politico, Harris is trying to carve out a specialty in in foreign policy. She also participated in the first bilateral meeting of the new administration between Canada and the United States. Biden reportedly didn't do the same as vice president in the Obama administration. "According to a new shocking Politico report, Vice President Harris is quickly being prepped to take the foreign policy reins from the Biden administration," Hannity said. DOZENS OF HOUSE DEMOCRATS WANT BIDEN TO GIVE UP SOLE AUTHORITY TO LAUNCH NUCLEAR CODES "Biden is now reportedly encouraging his vice president to engage directly with world leaders -- that would be his job -- and by the way, even develop her own rapport with U.S. allies. Harris...
    VIDEO3:4503:45Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's role in Khashoggi murder, U.S. strikes in SyriaThe News with Shepard Smith Brookings Institute senior fellow Michael O'Hanlon told CNBC's "The News with Shepard Smith" that President Joe Biden will not make Saudi Arabia "a pariah" because it would imply cutting off the economic and military relationship that the U.S. has with the Saudis. "The world economy still needs that Saudi oil even if we don't need it here in the U.S. per se, and the Saudis need our military protection, and we don't want them to lose a war against Iran," O'Hanlon explained during a Thursday evening interview. "We are not going to make the Saudis a pariah nation, if what you hear by that word, as I do, is North Korea or Iran itself or some other extremist government." In 2018 NBC News learned that the CIA concluded Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman...
    While the White House tackles domestic crises stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic, Vice President Kamala Harris is looking beyond U.S. boundaries to develop her foreign policy portfolio. Harris aides have declined to detail her top domestic areas of responsibility, but two top White House officials told CBS News she has at least two broad priorities that she plans to make her major focus on the international stage. The officials said Harris has her own particular interests, in addition to the administration's top agenda items. She plans to make her top two priorities cybersecurity and technology, and global health. Those close to Harris say both interests come, in part, from her days as California's junior senator and her experience as a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee. President Biden and Vice President Harris not only took office amid a deadly pandemic but also began their administration during a major cybersecurity breach....
    President Joe Biden’s nominee for CIA director spoke candidly on Wednesday about the Chinese government’s authoritarian bent, and its use of front groups to influence U.S. policy towards Beijing.  William Burns also faced questions about his tenure at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, which had a relationship with one of the Chinese government front groups.  Burns told the Senate Intelligence Committee that shortly after he took over at Carnegie in 2015, he severed ties with the China-U.S. Exchange Foundation due to “expansion of Chinese influence operations.” Despite the claim, Carnegie and the foundation maintained a relationship as late as 2017.  William Burns, the nominee for CIA director, called the Chinese government a “formidable, authoritarian adversary” during his Senate confirmation hearing on Wednesday, while facing questions about his tenure as president of a foreign policy think tank that received funding from a businessman and Chinese front group with...
    A majority of Americans have confidence in President BidenJoe BidenHoyer: House will vote on COVID-19 relief bill Friday Pence huddles with senior members of Republican Study Committee Powell pushes back on GOP inflation fears MORE’s ability to handle foreign policy, but more are confident in his ability to improve relations with U.S. allies than they are in his ability to deal effectively with China, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. Sixty percent of Americans have confidence in Biden’s handling of foreign policy issues, according to the Pew Research report released on Wednesday, less than the 74 percent who expressed confidence in former President Obama’s ability to handle foreign policy issues when he came into office. The figure is higher, however, than the  46 percent who held confidence in former President TrumpDonald TrumpRomney: 'Pretty sure' Trump would win 2024 GOP nomination if he ran for president Pence huddles with...
    House Republican Conference Chair Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyOvernight Defense: Rockets land in Iraq's Green Zone in third attack in week | US 'outraged' at attacks but won't 'lash out' Republican Arkansas governor says he would not support Trump 2024 bid Is the 'civil war' in the Republican Party really over? MORE (Wyo.) on Tuesday rejected the “America First” foreign policy that was the centerpiece of former President TrumpDonald TrumpFauci: U.S. political divide over masks led to half a million COVID-19 deaths Georgia bishop says state GOP's elections bill is an 'attempt to suppress the Black vote' Trump closer to legal jeopardy after court ruling on tax returns MORE’s global agenda. Speaking during a virtual event with the Reagan Institute, the No. 3 House Republican warned against policies of isolationism and said the U.S. must take a leading role on the world stage as part of efforts to push back...
    President Biden’s "radical" foreign policy agenda is "turning upside down our Middle East policy" and giving Iran an "out" to become a nuclear state with a return to the Obama-era nuclear deal, Rep. Mike Turner, R-Ohio, said Sunday. Turner told "Sunday Morning Futures" host Maria Bartiromo that the 2015 Iran nuclear deal was "terminally flawed," having an expiration to key provisions relating to Iran's nuclear program and allowing for the country to continue missile development. REPUBLICANS SLAM BIDEN'S MOVE TO DROP IRAN SANCTIONS PUSH "By this administration going back to this agreement, they’re really giving Iran the out to be able to pursue becoming a nuclear state," Turner said. Turner said that along with Iran, the Biden administration was "turning toward" China, which he described as another U.S. "adversary" that is "our greatest vulnerability for jobs, our greatest vulnerability for our economy." "This administration is turning its eye from our allies and to...
    As vice president, President Biden came to the role with a deep well of experience, particularly on foreign policy. Under Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris’s role is "more an apprentice position" than a Biden or Walter Mondale-like consigliere, according to Jack Lechelt, author of The Vice Presidency in Foreign Policy: From Mondale to Cheney. There are signs, however, that Harris is carving out her own growing diplomatic role. PRESS SHOP FUMBLES: PLAGUED BY DISTANCE FROM BIDEN'S INNER CIRCLE? Harris’s early one-on-one with Prime Minister Emmanuel Macron of France, a traditional and significant ally, suggests that she'll play an important role, said Joel Goldstein, author of The White House Vice Presidency: The Path to Significance, Mondale to Biden. “The relationship with France goes back to the Revolutionary War. And it's a country that is obviously a key member of NATO and a key European ally." “They are not having her...
    Washington (CNN)When President Joe Biden announced the US will end support for Saudi Arabia's offensive operations in Yemen, Rep. Ro Khanna felt the decision was a vindication of a fight he's been engaged in for years.In 2017, Khanna, a progressive Democrat from California, introduced a measure that came to be known as the Yemen War Powers resolution. It was intended to curtail US military support for the Saudi-led campaign in Yemen, which has created a humanitarian crisis in the country. At the time, there was very little support on Capitol Hill. Now, the policy appears to have been embraced by the White House. In an interview with CNN, Khanna called the move "a profound and historic shift" that marks a new chapter in the US relationship with Saudi Arabia. "We're being explicit and bold and open to the Saudis saying, 'no, this is not a war we support,'" the congressman...
    Whether he intends to or not, Joe Biden might well become a transformational president on issues of foreign policy and national security. Since taking office, Biden has prioritized the challenge of meeting four major largely domestic crises—COVID, the economy, racial divisions, and climate change. But the world seldom waits for a convenient moment to insert itself into the agenda, and for that and a host of other reasons, Biden already seems likely to have an international legacy of real consequence. Even in his very first forays into foreign policy, Biden has made an impact. On Friday, he participated via video link as a speaker at the Munich Security Conference. While his words might not have seemed out of place for a normal American president, they stood in striking contrast to those of his immediate predecessor. He emphasized the importance of America’s partnerships with our allies noting pointedly, “They’re not...
    Fox News host Greg Gutfeld said Friday that President Joe Biden was “breaking up with the American public” in favor of “hot new exotic partner, the world.” Gutfeld took a moment on “The Five” to lay out a series of foreign policy problems that Biden didn’t inherit because of the policies implemented by former President Donald Trump. (RELATED: ‘It Took Three Years To Finally Slay The Fine People Hoax’: Greg Gutfeld Flames Media For Reshaping Narratives) WATCH: “A new slogan for Joe, instead of ‘America First,’ it could be ‘America, you are not all that’, or ‘America, it’s not me, it’s you,’ because in a sense, Joe Biden is breaking up with the American public in favor of a hot new exotic partner, the world,” Gutfeld said. “It’s very alluring, it’s got an accent, it’s international, makes you feel cosmopolitan when you get to fly all over the...
    White House press secretary Jen Psaki said recently that the administration of President Joe Biden would not be “looking to the last presidency” as a model for foreign policymaking, but the priorities outlined by Biden thus far tell a different story.
    Miami : The United States (USA) officially returned to the Paris Agreement on climate this Friday, with the promise that the Joe Biden government will have the fight against global warming as a top priority. This reentry means that the Paris Agreement, again, includes virtually every country in the world, after Biden’s predecessor, Donald Trump, left the agreement arguing that it was unfair to the greater power. Moreover, in a speech to the Munich Security Conference, Biden called on European nations to redouble their commitments to combat climate change. He also assured that: “We can no longer delay or do the minimum to address climate change.” “This is a global existential crisis. We will all suffer the consequences “ Thus, the Secretary of State, Antony Blinken, stated in a statement that “climate change and scientific diplomacy can never again be ‘added’ to our foreign policy discussions.” “Addressing the real...
    By Andrew Latham President Joe Biden is so far maintaining his predecessor's tough China policy, which aims to curb China's international power both economically and politically. In the U.S. and Europe, China is widely recognized as a rising star that threatens Western power. But my research on the country suggests China may no longer see itself that way.[ READ: How China and Russia Spread Surveillance ]China's Rise In the three decades I've studied and taught Chinese foreign policy, I have witnessed three discrete eras in China's approach to international relations. After the death of the Communist Chinese leader Mao Zedong in 1976, Mao's successors, Deng Xiaoping and Jiang Zemin, introduced economic reforms that launched China on a path of phenomenal economic growth. The country rose from 11th to second place in the global GDP rankings between 1990 and 2020. The prevailing view in Western capitals in the 1990s was that China's economic...
    More On: joe biden US officially rejoins Paris Climate Accord Pompeo slams White House over desire to restart Iran nuclear talks US ready to talk about rejoining Iran nuclear deal President Biden takes another snow day — get your milk cartons ready WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden made his international debut on Friday with a speech at the G-7 Summit declaring the end of former President Donald Trump’s “America first” era. Administration officials previewed Biden’s virtual speech, which was closed to the press, saying he would touch on the coronavirus pandemic, the climate crisis, and unveil his plans to dramatically reshape the US foreign policy agenda. “Now he will get the opportunity as president of the United States early in his term to declare that America is back and the transatlantic alliance is back,” one official said Thursday evening. “He will look forward to driving home the core proposition...
    (CNN)When Joe Biden last addressed the Munich Security Conference two years ago, he made a promise to a packed-in crowd at the Hotel Bayerischer Hof."This too shall pass," Biden said in 2019, lamenting the isolationist turn the US took under then-President Donald Trump. "We will be back."On Friday, Biden will declare that "America is back" as he returns -- virtually -- to the annual security conference to reaffirm the US' position of global leadership, the power of its alliances and the resilience of democracy -- in the United States and abroad.Paired with his first virtual session of the Group of 7 a few hours earlier, Biden's back-to-back diplomatic engagements will center on his attempt to restore the transatlantic alliance after it became strained under Trump, who viewed Europe as a trade rival and often said he believed traditional US friends were harder to deal with than adversaries.And while officials, in...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden will make his first big appearance on the global stage as president on Friday, offering Group of Seven allies and other foreign leaders a glimpse into his plans to dramatically reshape U.S. foreign policy even as he deals with a number of international crises that are coming to a head . In advance of Biden’s virtual appearances at a G-7 meeting and the Munich Security Conference, the White House sought to underscore that the new administration will move quickly to reorient the U.S. away from Donald Trump’s “America First” mantra by announcing a pair of major reversals of Trump administration policies. The State Department announced Thursday that the U.S. stands ready to rejoin talks about reentering the 2015 multilateral Iran nuclear deal abandoned by the Trump administration. And White House officials said Biden would announce at the G-7 that the U.S. will soon begin releasing...
    By AAMER MADHANI, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden will make his first big appearance on the global stage as president on Friday, offering Group of Seven allies and other foreign leaders a glimpse into his plans to dramatically reshape U.S. foreign policy even as he deals with a number of international crises that are coming to a head . In advance of Biden's virtual appearances at a G-7 meeting and the Munich Security Conference, the White House sought to underscore that the new administration will move quickly to reorient the U.S. away from Donald Trump's “America First” mantra by announcing a pair of major reversals of Trump administration policies. The State Department announced Thursday that the U.S. stands ready to rejoin talks about reentering the 2015 multilateral Iran nuclear deal abandoned by the Trump administration. And White House officials said Biden would announce at the G-7 that the...
    Michael Pompeo, former Secretary of State and CIA director and Robert O’Brien, former National Security Adviser, will soon be regularly weighing in on foreign policy issues as co-chairs of a monthly roundtable discussion at the Nixon Foundation. “The Nixon Seminar will advance U.S. foreign policies based in conservative realism,” said a press release announcing the new seminar-style discussion, to consider and advance policies that maintain a balance among the world’s great powers favorable to America’s national interest. “We can think of no program more needed today than the Nixon Seminar, which we are honored to co-chair,” Pompeo and O’Brien followed up in a statement of their own. “President Nixon spent years setting out a vision for a more peaceful world. His example as the ultimate realist and foreign policy grand strategist is one to follow today, as the U.S. should seek to maintain a balance of power in its national...
    White House press secretary Jen Psaki made it clear Tuesday that President Joe Biden would not be taking foreign policy cues from the previous administration. Psaki said that the Biden administration was building its own independent foreign policy strategy and would not be basing new policies on those set by former President Donald Trump. (RELATED: White House Announces Largest Increase In Weekly Vaccine Distribution Since Biden Took Office) WATCH: Psaki responded to a question about the Biden administration’s plan to either move ahead with or remove tariffs that had been put in place under the Trump administration, saying that they would be charting their own foreign policy course. “I can assure you that the president, this president does not have — is not looking to the last presidency as the model for his foreign policy moving forward,” Psaki began. “President Biden has been working in the global arena...
    Former Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeCongress must step up to restore accountability to national security policy Iowa, New Hampshire Republicans grapple with setting post-Trump tone South Carolina GOP votes to censure Rep. Rice over impeachment vote MORE (R-Ariz.) said on CNN over the weekend that he has been in talks with President Joe BidenJoe BidenWinter storm batters southern US Biden pens Valentine's Day post to wife Biden plans to focus on coronavirus in first G7 meeting MORE’s administration about bipartisanship in foreign policy positions, but added that there have been “no specific talks” about a spot for Flake as an ambassador.  "You know, we used to say that partisanship stops at the water's edge. That needs to happen, and I think it can happen. But there's been no specific talks," Flake said. The conversation began due to reporting from Axios that the Biden administration could be considering Flake for...
            by Kaylee Greenlee  President Joe Biden should adhere to the agreement former President Donald Trump made with the Taliban to completely withdraw American forces from Afghanistan, a veteran of the war and foreign policy expert told the Daily Caller News Foundation Thursday. Biden should stick with the agreement because it is good for America and because he could face political backlash for making the war his own by keeping troops in Afghanistan, Foreign Policy expert at Stand Together William Ruger told the DCNF. Stand Together is a non-profit organization based in Arlington, Virginia. “I think President Biden should follow the agreement we have with the Taliban,” Ruger told the DCNF. “Unfortunately, we haven’t withdrawn before now. We have really punished the Taliban for its state support to Al Qaeda, we have decimated Al Qaeda in Afghanistan.” WATCH: @adamnoahwho urges Biden to resist pressure to unilaterally...
    (CNN)Former Arizona Republican Sen. Jeff Flake said Sunday he has been in touch with the Biden administration when asked about recent reporting that the administration is considering him for an ambassadorship, but said there have been "no specific talks.""All I've said is I would have an interest in making sure that President (Joe) Biden's foreign policy is bipartisan," Flake, a CNN political commentator, told CNN's Pamela Brown on "Newsroom.""You know, we used to say that partisanship stops at the water's edge. That needs to happen, and I think it can happen. But there's been no specific talks," said Flake, who has been an outspoken critic of former President Donald Trump and endorsed Biden in the 2020 election. Axios reported last week that Biden administration officials are weighing nominating prominent Republicans to ambassadorships, including Cindy McCain -- the widow of the late Arizona Sen. John McCain -- and Flake to highlight...
    WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden had managed to assemble his foreign policy team with remarkably little trouble — until this past week. His picks to lead the State and Defense departments, and to fill senior intelligence posts, drew little controversy and almost no Republican opposition. But a political crossfire erupted when the Biden administration announced the selection of Robert Malley to be its envoy for Iran. The choice of Malley, a longtime diplomat and conflict mediator, instantly resurrected a bitter Washington debate about the 2015 Iran nuclear deal abrogated by President Donald Trump and whether to restore it. It also inflamed the sensitive politics of Israel and, for good measure, served as a test case for the influence of progressives in Biden’s new foreign policy team. As Benjamin J. Rhodes, a former deputy national security adviser to President Barack Obama, joked: “Rob is a proxy for everything.” Sign up for...
    In the shadow of his predecessor’s impeachment trial, President Joe Biden is taking up the challenge of restoring America’s tarnished image in the world by making this case: The nation has survived an attack on its own democracy and actually emerged from it stronger, not weaker. This may sound like a rationalization, given his presidency is living now with a violent, abusive partner in the domestic opposition, but Biden actually is smart to be tackling the GOP elephant in the room. As former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial unfolds, our friends and foes abroad can see clearly we need to get our own house in order before we start telling other nations what to do. Only credible, effective policy can change public opinion at home and abroad, and Biden made a good start in the wake of the Jan. 6 insurrection in the U.S. Capitol. Even as he...
    Photograph: Ariel Leon/AP What adjective should describe “the American” active in foreign policy? Graham Greene chose “quiet”, as his character harmed a country he did not understand. Eugene Burdick and William Lederer used “ugly”. Robert D Kaplan, one of America’s most thoughtful chroniclers of foreign affairs, proposes “good” to describe Bob Gersony, who in “a frugal monastic existence that has been both obscure and extraordinary” has devoted his life to using the power and treasure of the US to serve others through humanitarian action. A son of Holocaust refugees, he never held a formal government position. He was instead a contractor for the state department, USAid or the United Nations. Yet his work improved the lives of millions, saving many, and corrected policies that might otherwise have been implemented by “ugly” or “quiet” figures who did not understand the countries in which they operated. Gersony’s method was simple: to...
    President Joe Biden should adhere to the agreement former President Donald Trump made with the Taliban to completely withdraw American forces from Afghanistan, a veteran of the war and foreign policy expert told the Daily Caller News Foundation Thursday. Biden should stick with the agreement because it is good for America and because he could face political backlash for making the war his own by keeping troops in Afghanistan, Foreign Policy expert at Stand Together William Ruger told the DCNF. Stand Together is a non-profit organization based in Arlington, Virginia. “I think President Biden should follow the agreement we have with the Taliban,” Ruger told the DCNF. “Unfortunately, we haven’t withdrawn before now. We have really punished the Taliban for its state support to Al Qaeda, we have decimated Al Qaeda in Afghanistan.” WATCH: @adamnoahwho urges Biden to resist pressure to unilaterally blow off US-Taliban agreement, leaving troops in Afghanistan...
    BERLIN (Reuters) - U.S. President Joe Biden has been invited to address a virtual edition of the annual Munich Security Conference on Feb. 19 and plans are being made for him to do so, a diplomatic source told Reuters on Thursday. Should Biden's address go ahead, it would be the first time he has spoken to an audience in Germany since he assumed office last month. "There are plans for the U.S. president to attend," the diplomatic source said. Biden attended the Munich Security Conference in 2009 and 2015 as U.S. vice president and met Chancellor Angela Merkel at the annual gathering. The Munich conference, the so-called 'Davos for Defence', is a major venue for transatlantic, foreign and security policy dialogue. Merkel has promised the new U.S. president greater German foreign policy engagement. (Reporting by Andreas Rinke; Writing by Paul Carrel; Editing by Mark Heinrich) Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters. Tags:...
    (CNN)Vice President Kamala Harris will have her first private lunch with Secretary of State Antony Blinken Wednesday, meetings that are expected to continue with regularity, according to two administration officials.The meetings, which will be worked around their schedules and Covid-19 regulations, continue a tradition of vice presidents in close collaboration with their administration's secretary of state. Then-Vice President Joe Biden was known to host meals with then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.Harris has told those close to her that she wants to shape her vice presidency after Biden's own tenure. Regular lunches with Blinken, a longtime Biden aide now serving as secretary of state, could benefit that mission. It also shows a deliberate progression of her on-the-job foreign policy education -- something sure to play a role in any future presidential campaigns. Biden declares America is back as he announces major foreign policy shiftsSources familiar with the vice president's thinking have...
    The report of an agency of the United States Congress on the sanctions against the Venezuelan government reflects that the institutions of power in Washington seek to agree on their position to most likely adopt a new policy on the matter, analysts point out. Miamimundo / VOA The non-partisan agency known as the United States Government Accountability Office, GAO for its acronym in English, determined that the sanctions imposed in the last four years on Madurismo “probably” aggravated the already accentuated economic crisis in Venezuela and hinder the operation of humanitarian associations in the country. His main recommendation to the Department of the Treasury was to systematically follow up on the requests made by telephone and email to its specific sanctions program and identify problems related to them. Luis Angarita, an expert in international economics at the Central University of Venezuela, valued the GAO report as unusual in terms of...
    President Biden is expected to make his first visit to the Pentagon as Commander-in-Chief on Wednesday alongside Vice President Kamala Harris. Biden and Harris are scheduled to meet with Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin and other senior military and civilian leadership. The duo are set to give remarks and hold meetings that will be closed to the press. PENTAGON SAYS EXTREMIST GROUPS 'AGGRESSIVELY' RECRUITING SOON-TO-BE VETERANS But one member of former President Barack Obama’s team who wasn’t too sure how Biden would handle foreign policy issues as Commander-in-Chief was Robert Gates, the former defense secretary. In a memoir, Gates alleged Biden had been "wrong on nearly every major foreign policy and national security issue over the past four decades." Gates said he stood by that statement when asked about it during a May 2019 interview with CBS’ Face the Nation. "I think I stand by that statement," Gates said. "He...
    Members of President Biden’s foreign policy brain trust are shifting back into the highest levels of government after spending the Trump era working together in many of the same powerful policy groups and lucrative business ventures. Why it matters: The overlap points to a more coherent ideological approach to foreign policy than was evident in President Trump’s notoriously fractious State Department. But there are some notable liabilities as well. Get smarter, faster with the news CEOs, entrepreneurs and top politicians read. Sign up for Axios Newsletters here. Think tanks that have employed senior Biden officials such as the Center for New American Security and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace accept large contributions from foreign governments and multinational companies that will undoubtedly be affected by Biden administration policy. And firms that have employed some of those officials, like business consultancies WestExec Advisors and the Albright Stonebridge...
    European High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Josep Borrell endured some bruising criticism of his visit from MEPs. – Reuters The EU’s foreign affairs chief has said he will call on the bloc to impose sanctions on Russia for the jailing of opposition leader Alexei Navalny and the Kremlin crackdown on protesters demanding his release. Josep Borrell faced calls to resign from MEPs in Brussels after a humiliating trip to Moscow, which ended with the expulsion of three European diplomats last Friday. “It will be for the member states to decide the next step, but yes this could include sanctions and I will put forward concrete proposals,” Mr Borrell said, as he attempted to draw a line under the fiasco. EU foreign ministers will discuss sanctions, which must be unanimously supported by all member states, at their next meeting on February 22. A number...
    More On: houthis Biden’s Yemen withdrawal will only embolden the terrorists Biden is ignoring all the signs that Iran can’t be bribed out of its murderous ways US to designate Yemen’s Iran-backed Houthis as terrorists Yemen rebels claim responsibility for drone attacks on Saudi oil sites Barely a month into his presidency and Joe Biden’s foreign policy already looks like a joke. On Sunday, 48 hours after removing Yemen’s Houthi rebels from a State Department terrorist blacklist and ordering an end to US support for the Saudi-led military effort against the Houthis, the Biden administration turned around and asked the Iran-backed group to stop committing acts of terrorism on civilians and cease military operations. The State Department considers it a master plan to end the war. It got the Saudis to endorse the idea of a negotiated settlement, then called on the Houthis to stop inflicting suffering —...
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    The Kremlin on Friday blasted President Biden’s comments about jailed dissident Alexei Navalny and Washington’s relationship with Moscow as “very aggressive rhetoric.” Biden promised Thursday a new era of US foreign policy in his first diplomatic address as president and said he had told President Vladimir Putin to expect a stronger approach to ties with Moscow. The president also demanded the release of Navalny, 44, who has been ordered to serve the remainder of his 3½-year prison sentence after a court ruled he violated terms of his parole. The fierce Putin critic was detained upon his return from Germany, where he’d been recovering for five months after being poisoned with the Soviet-era nerve agent Novichok. Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters Friday that Biden’s comments were disappointing. “This is very aggressive, unconstructive rhetoric, to our regret,” Peskov said. “Any hints of ultimatums are unacceptable to us. We have already said that...
    More On: mike pompeo Report of mass rapes in Chinese Uighur camps ‘deeply disturbing’ Mike Pompeo joins conservative DC think tank Chinese media reportedly blames US lab for COVID-19 China sanctions two dozen outgoing Trump officials, including Bannon, Pompeo Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo railed against President Biden’s newly announced “America is back” approach to diplomacy — saying the US can’t afford “eight more years of Barack Obama’s foreign policy.” Pompeo was asked to weigh in on Biden’s foreign policy changes on Fox News. “Does he mean back to when ISIS controlled a caliphate in Syria that was the size of Britain? I hope not,” Pompeo said Thursday. He continued, “When he [Biden] says ‘back,’ when America is back, does he mean back to letting China walk all over us, destroying millions of jobs in places like Kansas and South Carolina, that we know so well? I hope...
    (CNN)We still don't really know what "America is back" means yet.In his first major foreign policy speech as President, Joe Biden on Thursday took significant steps on pulling support for the war in Yemen, boosting LGBT rights and removing Donald Trump's draconian caps on refugees. But on the most nettlesome issues — Russia, China, how Biden will honor his vow to save global democracy and what he will do about nuclear programs in North Korea and Iran -- there's not much to go on.The new administration's only had two weeks in office. But the White House did bill Biden's speech at the State Department as a big deal — and it rarely tires of reminding everyone that he's got more foreign policy chops than any new president in decades. For now, it seems, talking tough on not "rolling over" to Putin and sending a destroyer through the Taiwan Strait will...
    In his first foreign policy address, US President Joe Biden on Thursday described China as the “most serious competitor” to the United States and vowed to confront Beijing on various fronts, including human rights, intellectual property and economic policy. Appearing at the State Department, Biden declared his administration would “take on directly the challenges posed [to] our prosperity, security and democratic values by our most serious competitor: China”. “We’ll confront China’s economic abuses [and] push back on China’s attack on human rights, intellectual property and global governance,” Biden said. Get the latest insights and analysis from our Global Impact newsletter on the big stories originating in China. The address comes as his administration faces early diplomatic tests, including Russia’s imprisonment of opposition leader Alexei Navalny and a coup in Myanmar that has resulted in a return to military rule. Relations with Beijing remain fraught, too, with Washington making critical statements...
    Presented by Steve Holland and Alexandra Alber WASHINGTON (Reuters) – US President Joe Biden on Thursday pledged a new era after the chaotic foreign policy of his predecessor Donald Trump, announcing that the United States was back on the international stage in its first foreign policy speech. During his speech from the State Department in Washington, D.C., the White House’s new democratic tenant signaled that he would take an aggressive approach toward China and Russia, urging the Burmese military. Saudi Arabia’s military intervention in Yemen announces end of US support, ending his regime change. Joe Biden said there was a need to respond to this new era of dictatorship progress, “including China’s growing aspirations to compete with the United States and Russia’s determination to damage and destabilize our democracy.” His Republican predecessor as President of the United States, Donald Trump, was outraged by the imposition of tariffs on European and...
    (CNN)In the first two weeks of the Joe Biden presidency, through the medium of Thursday's powerful speech, sweeping executive orders, a raft of phone calls to leaders on every continent, and an astonishingly, at time exhaustingly regular, series of press conferences, the first outlines of a Biden foreign and defense policy have begun to emerge. It is as total a reversal of the policies of his predecessor as are Biden's economic, Covid-19 and broad domestic agendas. David Andelman On Thursday, to cement and provide a foundation for these Herculean efforts of transformation from the scattershot, at times wild-eyed meanderings of Donald Trump's administration, Biden traveled to the State Department to meet his tireless, visionary Secretary of State Antony Blinken and personally thank foreign service officers for their service. "America is back, diplomacy is back at the center of our foreign policy," Biden said to the world. "America's alliances are...
    President Joe Biden promised Thursday that the United States would sharply increase its engagement around the world during his White House tenure, ending what he contended was the “past few years of neglect and abuse” of foreign relations by former President Donald Trump. “America is back,” Biden declared at the State Department in his first major foreign policy address as president. “America cannot afford to be absent on the world stage. Diplomacy is at the center of our foreign policy.” He said that “American alliances are our greatest assets,” while warning both Russia and China of American resolve. Trump, employing an “America First” credo, had often quarreled with traditional U.S. allies while taking a softer tone with authoritarian states. Biden said he told Russian President Vladimir Putin in a phone call last week that “the days of the U.S. rolling over” to Moscow “are over.” The U.S. leader called on...
    Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo reacted Thursday to President Biden's declaration that "America is back" by asking if the commander-in-chief meant "back to when ISIS controlled a caliphate in Syria that was the size of Britain." "I hope not. President Trump and our team took that down," Pompeo told "Fox News Primetime" host Trey Gowdy.  Biden made his first major foreign policy address at the State Department earlier Thursday, vowing to "course-correct our foreign policy and better unite our democratic values with our diplomatic leadership and adding "America cannot afford to absent any longer from the world stage." MIKE POMPEO: When he [Biden] says "back," when America is back, does he mean back to letting China walk all over us, destroying millions of jobs in places like Kansas and South Carolina, that we know so well? I hope that's not what he means by back. He talked about allies, when he...
    By Steve Holland and Alexandra Alper WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Joe Biden on Thursday promised a new era after the scattershot foreign policy of his predecessor, Donald Trump, declaring "America is back" on the global stage in his first diplomatic address as president. In his speech, Biden signaled aggressive approaches to China and Russia, urged Myanmar's military leaders to halt their coup, and declared an end to U.S. support for a Saudi Arabia-led military campaign in Yemen. "American leadership must meet this new moment of advancing authoritarianism, including the growing ambitions of China to rival the United States and the determination of Russia to damage and disrupt our democracy. We must meet the new moment ... accelerating global challenges from the pandemic to the climate crisis to nuclear proliferation," said Biden. Trump angered European and Asian leaders with tariffs, fracturing of global alliances, and threats to withdraw U.S. troops....
    Former Secretary of State Mike PompeoMike PompeoUS 'disappointed' by UN court decision on Iran case: State Department Ben Carson launches conservative think tank Belarus police arrest 160 protestors calling for president's ouster MORE admonished President Biden’s newly-announced diplomatic strategy during one of his first media appearances since the Trump administration ended. Appearing on Fox News Thursday evening, Pompeo gave his reactions to Biden’s announcement earlier that day in which he stated, “America is back, diplomacy is back at the center of our foreign policy.” “I don't think the American people can afford to go back to eight more years of Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaWhy we will oppose spending bills that repeal or weaken the Hyde Amendment Obama announces his presidential center will officially break ground in Chicago this year Psaki aims to clarify Biden comment praising 'vast majority' of FBI agents MORE's foreign policy. I hope they’ll move forward with...
    “America cannot afford to be absent any longer from the world stage,” President Biden declared on Thursday in his first foreign policy address since taking office. The big picture: Biden argued that by emphasizing democratic values, recommitting to alliances and investing in diplomacy, the U.S. could rebuild its global leadership and out-compete China. Support safe, smart, sane journalism. Sign up for Axios Newsletters here. “We will repair our alliances and engage with the world once again, not to meet yesterday’s challenges, but today’s and tomorrow’s. American leadership must meet this new moment of advancing authoritarianism, including the growing ambitions of China to rival the United States and the determination of Russia to damage and disrupt our democracy.” Biden Biden’s speech included a handful of announcements and intentions: Raise the U.S. refugee cap from 15,000 under Donald Trump to 125,000 in his first full fiscal year in office. ...
    Reuters February 4, 2021 0 Comments  U.S. President Joe Biden on Thursday promised a new era after the scattershot foreign policy of his predecessor, Donald Trump, declaring “America is back” on the global stage in his first diplomatic address as president.  In his speech, Biden signaled aggressive approaches to China and Russia, urged Myanmar’s military leaders to halt their coup, and declared an end to U.S. support for a Saudi Arabia-led military campaign in Yemen. “American leadership must meet this new moment of advancing authoritarianism, including the growing ambitions of China to rival the United States and the determination of Russia to damage and disrupt our democracy. We must meet the new moment … accelerating global challenges from the pandemic to the climate crisis to nuclear proliferation,” said Biden. Trump angered European and Asian leaders with tariffs, fracturing of global alliances, and threats to withdraw U.S. troops. He did...
    Photograph: Rex/Shutterstock Joe Biden has announced an end to US support for Saudi-led offensive operations in Yemen, as part of a broad reshaping of American foreign policy. In his first foreign policy speech as president, Biden signaled that the US would no longer be an unquestioning ally to the Gulf monarchies, announced a more than eightfold increase in the number of refugees the country would accept, and declared that the days of a US president “rolling over” for Vladimir Putin were over. “America is back,” Biden declared in remarks delivered at the state department, capping a whiplash fortnight of dramatic foreign policy changes since his 20 January inauguration. “Diplomacy is back at the center of our foreign policy.” Biden said the conflict in Yemen, which has killed more than 100,000 Yemenis and displaced 8 million, had “created a humanitarian and strategic catastrophe”. “This war has to end,” Biden. “And...
    President Joe Biden delivered his first major foreign policy speech at the State Department Thursday morning, offering some new details about his plans for American activities abroad but making the biggest impression by what he didn't do: behave like his predecessor. Then-President Donald Trump's first visit to a federal agency for high-profile remarks came in the days after taking office, when he stood in front of the CIA Memorial Wall – hallowed ground for those involved in U.S. intelligence-gathering – and criticized news outlets for what he considered their flawed reporting on the crowd size at his inauguration in a display that would partially define his four-year term. His remarks, and particularly the location of them, were widely panned as insensitive, uninformed and delivered without the sort of process that usually accompany comments by the commander in chief. [ READ: Biden Spends First Week Issuing Orders Reversing Trump’s Orders ]The lead-up...
    President Joe Biden promised Thursday that the United States would sharply increase its engagement around the world during his White House tenure, ending what he contended was “four years of neglect and abuse” of foreign relations by former President Donald Trump. “America is back,” Biden declared at the State Department in his first major foreign policy address as president. “America cannot afford to be absent on the world stage. Diplomacy is at the center of our foreign policy.” He said that “American alliances are our greatest assets,” while warning both Russia and China of American resolve. Trump, employing an “America First” credo, had often quarreled with traditional U.S. allies while taking a softer tone with authoritarian states. Biden said he told Russian President Vladimir Putin in a phone call last week that “the days of the U.S. rolling over” to Moscow “are over.” The U.S. leader called on Putin to...
    President Biden delivered a broad reset of America’s place in the world, putting diplomacy at the heart of his foreign policy on Thursday as he signaled to allies Washington is ready to resume its role as a global leader. If that wasn’t a clear enough repudiation of his predecessor’s "America first" approach, he also promised to stand up to Russia, raise limits on immigration quotas, and end American support for the Saudi-led military offensive in Yemen. In so doing, foreign policy experts said they saw a “Biden doctrine” that valued process, such as negotiation and alliance building, as the path to good outcomes. “We’re a country that does big things. American diplomacy makes it happen,” said Biden. “And our administration is ready to take up the mantle and lead once again.” In his first visit to the State Department as president, the former Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman also...
    US President Joe Biden delivered a speech tonight (Thursday) in which he presented US foreign policy for the next four years., Diplomacy is back. “Before the speech, the president announced: ‘We are going to rebuild our alliances. We will return to communicate with the world, and face the enormous challenges we face in dealing with epidemics and global warming, and stand up for democracy and human rights around the world. For more updates and to send your stories – visit the News Facebook page “We face great challenges, we are not alone. Our values ​​have been ignored in recent years. We have fought for our democracy here. We will find out what the situation is in Myanmar. In recent weeks I have spoken out for our benefit Friends – Britain, Australia and Japan to rebuild our relationship.” He did not mention Israel. “I made it clear to Putin that...
    Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden delivers remarks about the coronavirus outbreak, at the Hotel Du Pont, March 12, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware.Drew Angerer | Getty Images WASHINGTON –In his first foreign policy address since ascending to the nation's highest office, President Joe Biden vowed to repair alliances through diplomacy and restore Washington's leadership position on the global stage. "America is back, diplomacy is back," Biden said at the State department, adding that his administration would work toward "reclaiming our credibility and moral authority." "I want the people who work in this building and in our embassies and consulates around the world to know that I value your expertise, and I respect you. I will have your back," Biden told State Department employees. "This administration is going to empower you to do your jobs, not target or politicize you," he added, recognizing the depleted ranks at the Department...
    President Biden in a Thursday address from the State Department committed to rebuilding U.S. alliances and signaled a compete about-face from the Trump administration's norm-busting foreign policy, which antagonized NATO and other U.S. allies.  Biden emphasized the role diplomacy will play in achieving his aims, saying this had "atrophied" under Trump.  And he pledged to work with allies to promote democratic, battle climate change and work to counter Russia and China.  “America is back, diplomacy is back at the center of our foreign policy,” Biden said. “We will repair our alliances, engage with the world once again – not to meet yesterday’s challenges but today’s and tomorrow’s.” The president’s remarks were his first address to a government agency other than the White House and underscored his effort to turn the page on former PTrump’s “America First” agenda, which Biden has often criticized as leaving “America alone.” Biden also spoke of...
    By Nicole Gaouette, Jennifer Hansler and Kylie Atwood | CNN President Joe Biden announced ‘America is back’ and declared ‘diplomacy is back at the center’ of US foreign policy as he announced the US will end all support for offensive operations in Yemen and will appoint an envoy to focus on the long-standing conflict, one of several changes he announced in his first major foreign policy speech since taking office. Biden’s announcement at the State Department was just one of the significant changes he said he will make to US foreign policy, including a freeze on troop redeployments from Germany, and raising the cap for refugees allowed into the US. Biden delivered his speech after making less formal remarks to State Department employees, telling them “we’re going rebuild our alliances. We’re going reengage the world and take on the enormous challenges we face dealing with the pandemic, dealing with global...
    (Independent) President Joe Biden said his administration is working to rebuild “the muscles of democratic alliances that have atrophied from four years of neglect and abuse” following Donald Trump’s term in office. In his first visit to the US Department of State on Thursday, the president pledged to stand “shoulder to shoulder with our allies and key partners once more”, while stressing that “leading with diplomacy must also mean engaging our adversaries and our competitors diplomatically where it is in our interest and advances the security of the American people.” He said that he “made it clear to President Putin, in a manner very different from my predecessor, that the days the United States rolling over in the face of Russia’s aggressive action” – pointing to cyber attacks from the SolarWinds breach and the poisoning of opposition figure Alexei Navalny – “are over.” The US president said Mr Navalny...
    President Joe Biden said Russia needed to free Alexei Navalny 'immediately' as he said the United States will no longer 'roll over' to President Vladimir Putin 'like my predecessor.'  The tough and anti-Trump talk came Thursday when Biden made his first trip to a cabinet agency, the State Department, under the leadership of his longtime aide, Secretary of State Tony Blinken, and called for 'reclaiming our credibility and moral authority.'  'Much of which has been lost,' Biden uttered.  There, Biden also said he would 'take on directly' the challenges posed the the U.S.'s 'most serious competitor,' China.  President Joe Biden spoke at the State Department Thursday and demanded that Russia release Alexei Navalny 'immediately'  'We'll confront China's economic abuses, counter its aggressive coercive action [and] push back on China's attack on human rights, intellectual property and global governance,' Biden said.  'But we're ready to work with Beijing when it's...
    President Joe Biden targeted China and Russia and vowed to regain America’s “moral high ground” in his first major address on his administration’s foreign policy goals Thursday. Biden delivered the speech Thursday from the State Department, arguing that his administration will no longer “roll over” for Russia and will hold China accountable for its human rights and economic abuses. Biden argued President Donald Trump’s administration had caused America to forfeit its moral high ground on the global stage. He said he plans to regain that high ground with an executive order increasing the number of global refugees the U.S. can accept to 125,000 per year and by advocating for LGBT people internationally. (RELATED: Biden Freezes Trump’s Troop Withdrawal From Germany, Orders ‘Global Review’ Of Military) President Biden says that the days of the US “rolling over” in the face of Russian electoral interference are “over.” He adds, “We will not...
    WASHINGTON -- President Joe Biden will make clear Thursday that the world should expect a more diplomatically engaged United States moving forward, starting with him putting the brakes on Donald Trump's plan to withdraw thousands of U.S. troops from Germany.Biden will also announce in a speech at the State Department that the U.S. will stop supporting Saudi Arabia's military offensive in the long-running war in Yemen in hopes of ending one of the world's worst humanitarian crises, White House national security adviser Jake Sullivan said."We must meet this new moment of accelerating global challenges - from a pandemic to the climate crisis to nuclear proliferation - challenges that will only be solved by nations working together in common cause," Biden will say, according to excerpts of the speech released by the White House.Biden's most public diplomatic efforts of his young presidency will signal to the world that America's back after...
    WASHINGTON -- President Joe Biden will make clear Thursday that the world should expect a more diplomatically engaged United States moving forward, starting with him putting the brakes on Donald Trump's plan to withdraw thousands of U.S. troops from Germany.Biden will also announce in a speech at the State Department that the U.S. will stop supporting Saudi Arabia's military offensive in the long-running war in Yemen in hopes of ending one of the world's worst humanitarian crises, White House national security adviser Jake Sullivan said."We must meet this new moment of accelerating global challenges - from a pandemic to the climate crisis to nuclear proliferation - challenges that will only be solved by nations working together in common cause," Biden will say, according to excerpts of the speech released by the White House.Biden's most public diplomatic efforts of his young presidency will signal to the world that America's back after...
    WASHINGTON -- President Joe Biden will make clear Thursday that the world should expect a more diplomatically engaged United States moving forward, starting with him putting the brakes on Donald Trump's plan to withdraw thousands of U.S. troops from Germany.Biden will also announce in a speech at the State Department that the U.S. will stop supporting Saudi Arabia's military offensive in the long-running war in Yemen in hopes of ending one of the world's worst humanitarian crises, White House national security adviser Jake Sullivan said."We must meet this new moment of accelerating global challenges - from a pandemic to the climate crisis to nuclear proliferation - challenges that will only be solved by nations working together in common cause," Biden will say, according to excerpts of the speech released by the White House.Biden's most public diplomatic efforts of his young presidency will signal to the world that America's back after...
    [The stream is slated to start at 2:45 p.m. ET. Please refresh the page if you do not see a player above at that time.] President Joe Biden is set to give his first remarks on foreign policy and national security at the State Department Thursday. "His remarks are not going to be the totality of his foreign policy. They're going to be focused on his early decisions and actions," Jake Sullivan, Biden's national security advisor, said in a press conference earlier Thursday. Biden's early priorities will center on establishing "a position of strength" for the U.S., including revitalizing global alliances, Sullivan said. The president's remarks follow a speech to State Department employees. "Later today I'm going to go up on the eighth floor and send a clear message to the world. America is back," Biden told State Department staff. "Diplomacy is back." The president is expected to make a...
    President Biden will announce an end to U.S. support for offensive combat operations in Yemen, signaling a break with Saudi Arabia and a clear shift from the Trump administration's Middle East policy, when he delivers a major address at the State Department later on Thursday, according to his national security adviser. Jake Sullivan said Biden will unveil a five-point plan that would allow him to pursue a “foreign policy for the middle class.” Biden is also expected to deliver a morale boost to State Department staffers who were frequently viewed with suspicion by former President Donald Trump and top officials inside his White House. The timing of his visit (two weeks into his presidency) is deliberate, a nod to Biden’s long interest in foreign policy and his time as chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee an effort to signal to allies that he is breaking decisively with Trump’s "America...
    President Joe Biden will use his State Department visit on Thursday to highlight his promise to re-engage with the international community after Donald Trump's 'America First' policy.  In his remarks to staff, Biden will emphasize traditional American alliances while thanking career government officials for their service. Vice President Kamala Harris will join him on the visit, which is his first to a Cabinet department as president. By choosing Foggy Bottom as his first Cabinet stop - as opposed to the Pentagon or another department - Biden is making a heavily symbolic gesture to an agency suffering from morale problems in the wake of Trump's presidency.  White House press secretary Jen Psaki said during the trip the president will thank staff 'who are Foreign Service officers, civil servants, who are the heart and soul of that institution and, frankly, our government.' She said his remarks would not be a complete vision of his...
    WASHINGTON - U.S. President Joe Biden will set the tone for his foreign policy vision during his first major speech at the State Department on Thursday. While his remarks may not outline the specifics of a new U.S. approach to foreign adversaries including China, North Korea, Russia and Iran, Biden is expected to lay out his vision to ramp up outreach to allies to confront common global challenges. White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said during a briefing Wednesday that Biden will speak broadly but will not offer specifics on foreign policy. Psaki said the U.S. president believes the United States must work closely with allies on China.   State Department spokesman Ned Price echoed that sentiment during a press briefing later in the day.  "Our policy has not changed,” he told reporters, adding that policy is guided by the U.S.’s “One China policy.” FILE - U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken removes his face mask as he arrives to...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is sending a message to his messengers. Two weeks into the presidency, Biden on Thursday is visiting the State Department, the most senior of the Cabinet agencies, to underscore his promise to restore a multilateral approach to U.S. foreign policy and mark his administration’s reengagement with the international community. White House press secretary Jen Psaki, formerly the State Department’s top spokesperson, said Biden’s visit “is largely focused on his desire to thank the men and women who are Foreign Service officers, civil servants, who are the heart and soul of that institution and, frankly, our government.” Psaki added that Biden would “talk broadly about foreign policy,” but said it wasn’t intended to be his first major foreign policy address as president. Still, the trip is set to come in conjunction with a number of policy announcements meant to restore the nation’s place on...
    WASHINGTON - U.S. President Joe Biden will set the tone for his foreign policy vision during his first major speech at the State Department on Thursday. While his remarks may not outline the specifics of a new U.S. approach to foreign adversaries including China, North Korea, Russia and Iran, Biden is expected to lay out his vision to ramp up outreach to allies to confront common global challenges. Wednesday, White House press secretary Jen Psaki said during a briefing that Biden would speak broadly but would not offer specifics on foreign policy. Psaki said the U.S. president believes the United States must work closely with allies on China. State Department spokesman Ned Price echoed that sentiment during a press briefing later in the day. "Our policy has not changed,” he told reporters, adding that policy is guided by the U.S.’s “One China policy.” FILE - U.S. Secretary of...
    Washington (CNN)President Joe Biden will visit the State Department Thursday to thank a workforce repeatedly maligned under the previous administration and present his broad vision for a foreign policy re-grounded in alliances and multilateral institutions.By making his first Cabinet agency trip to the State Department and not the Pentagon or CIA, Biden is aiming to underscore his administration's renewed focus on repairing American alliances and using diplomacy as a tool abroad, an official said. Biden is not expected to offer concrete policy direction in his speech to America's oldest Cabinet agency, which will center on the theme of "restoring America's place in the world," one of his central campaign promises. However, he is expected to announce his intention to increase the number of refugees allowed to be admitted into the United States after years of historical lows under the Trump administration, two sources familiar with the plans told CNN, fulfilling...
    By MATTHEW LEE and ZEKE MILLER, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is sending a message to his messengers. Two weeks into the presidency, Biden on Thursday is visiting the State Department, the most senior of the Cabinet agencies, to underscore his promise to restore a multilateral approach to U.S. foreign policy and mark his administration's reengagement with the international community. White House press secretary Jen Psaki, formerly the State Department’s top spokesperson, said Biden’s visit “is largely focused on his desire to thank the men and women who are Foreign Service officers, civil servants, who are the heart and soul of that institution and, frankly, our government.” Psaki added that Biden would “talk broadly about foreign policy,” but said it wasn’t intended to be his first major foreign policy address as president. Still, the trip is set to come in conjunction with a number of policy announcements...
    WASHINGTON - U.S. President Joe Biden will set the tone for his foreign policy vision during his first major speech at the State Department on Thursday. While his remarks may not outline the specifics of a new U.S. approach to foreign adversaries including China, North Korea, Russia and Iran, Biden is expected to lay out his vision to ramp up outreach to allies to confront common global challenges. Wednesday, White House press secretary Jen Psaki said during a briefing that Biden would speak broadly but would not offer specifics on foreign policy. Psaki said the U.S. president believes the United States must work closely with allies on China. State Department spokesman Ned Price echoed that sentiment during a press briefing later in the day. "Our policy has not changed,” he told reporters, adding that policy is guided by the U.S.’s “One China policy.” FILE - U.S. Secretary of...
    President Joe Biden promised in an interview released Wednesday that members of his family would not be involved with government or foreign policy decisions. “No one in our family and extended family is going to be involved in any government undertaking or foreign policy,” Biden said in an interview with People magazine. The president pointedly noted that family members did not have an office at the White House either, presumably referring to former President Donald Trump’s daughter Ivanka Trump and son-in-law Jared Kushner occupying offices in the West Wing during his presidency. “Nobody has an office in this place,” he said. Biden’s assertion was a repeat of his campaign promise to keep members of his family out of foreign business deals while he was in office. “No one in my family will have an office in the White House, will sit in on meetings as if they are a Cabinet member,...
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Joe Biden will speak broadly about foreign policy when he visits the State Department on Thursday, but will not offer specifics on policy, White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki told a news briefing. Psaki reiterated that Biden believes the United States must work closely with allies on China, a relationship his Secretary of State Antony Blinken has said is arguably the most important Washington has in the world. (Reporting by Nandita Bose, Doina Chiacu, Susan Heavey and David Brunnstrom, Editing by Franklin Paul) Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters. Tags: vaccines, United States, coronavirus, education
    More On: myanmar Burma’s junta strikes again Viral video appears to show woman doing aerobics amid Myanmar coup Biden White House warns Myanmar military after coup Biden briefed on Myanmar situation, US ‘alarmed,’ White House says A military coup underway in Myanmar presents an early foreign policy test regarding China for President Biden, who campaigned on reasserting US leadership abroad. Myanmar, also called Burma, reportedly had a military takeover this week, ending a democratic transition that began when Biden was vice president. If Myanmar returns to its longtime military rulers, it’s expected to fall more heavily under the sway of China in the face of US sanctions. Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi met last month with US-sanctioned Army chief Min Aung Hlaing and reportedly praised the country’s infamous military for its “national revitalization.” The White House said Monday it was “alarmed” at the coup and threatened sanctions. Secretary of...
    By MATTHEW LEE, AP Diplomatic Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — A military coup in Myanmar and a mass crackdown on dissidents in Russia are presenting early tests for the Biden administration as it tries to reestablish American primacy as a worldwide pro-democracy leader. Having taken office with a pledge to restore ironclad U.S. support for human rights, freedom of speech and political openness, President Joe Biden is being confronted with two serious challenges in two disparate parts of the world that had either been neglected or the subject of inconsistent messaging during the Trump era. After investing decades of time, energy and money into promoting democracy in both Myanmar and Russia, the U.S. now faces challenges in each that could affect the global balance of power, with the Myanmar turmoil potentially strengthening China's hand. And, while neither situation can be directly tied to domestic political uncertainty in the United States, experts...