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    January 12, 2021 7:26 AM | With information from EFE and DPA 15 minutes. A federal judge in the United States (USA) suspended the execution scheduled for Tuesday of Lisa Montgomery, the only woman on death row, pending a jurisdiction hearing on the case. As reported by CNN, Judge James Hanlon ordered the suspension with the aim that this hearing can take place, for which there is still no date. This measure suspends the execution by lethal injection of this woman. It was scheduled for Tuesday at the Terre Haute Federal Correctional Complex in Indiana. Montgomery, 52, was convicted in 2007 of strangling a 23-year-old woman who was 8 months pregnant in 2004. He did it to take his baby, who was later recovered safe and sound by the authorities. Proceeding of, this would be the first execution of a woman in the US in almost 70 years. In addition,...
    Detained in a federal penitentiary in Terre-Haute, Indiana, Lisa Montgomery, 52, was to receive a lethal injection on Tuesday evening, 16 years after killing a pregnant woman in order to steal her fetus. But Judge James Hanlon of the Southern District of Indiana on Monday ordered a stay of his execution. Attorneys for the convict argued that Lisa Montgomery was not in a mental state compatible with her execution. She suffers from mental disorders as a result of gang rape and violence suffered as a child. “The information presented to the court contains ample evidence that Ms Montgomery’s current mental state is so far removed from reality that she cannot rationally understand the government’s motive for her execution,” the judge wrote in his ruling . Judge Hanlon said the court would set a date for a subsequent hearing to assess Lisa Montgomery’s mental state. In 2004, unable to have...
    (CNN)A federal judge granted Lisa Montgomery, the only woman on federal death row, a stay of execution pending a competency hearing -- just hours before she was scheduled to die.Judge James Hanlon of the US District Court for the Southern District of Indiana wrote in the order granting the stay, "Ms. Montgomery's motion to stay execution is GRANTED to allow the Court to conduct a hearing to determine Ms. Montgomery's competence to be executed."A date has not yet been set for the competency hearing.Montgomery, 52, was scheduled to die by lethal injection on Tuesday, January 12 at the Federal Correctional Complex in Terre Haute, Indiana.Federal death row inmates execution delayed because of attorneys Covid-19 diagnosisProsecutors have filed a notice to appeal the judge's ruling.Read MoreMontgomery's attorneys, family and supporters have pleaded with President Donald Trump to read their clemency petition and make an executive decision to commute her sentence to...
    Jacob Anthony Chansley, the 33-year-old heavily-tattooed Trump supporter who sported horns, a fur hat and face paint as he occupied the Senate dais at the U.S. Capitol last week, has made his first appearance in a Phoenix federal courtroom on Monday by video link.  Chansley, 33, who is also known as Jake Angeli, was arrested on Saturday and is being held in a quarantine section of a federal detention facility.  Chansley, who is from Phoenix, turned himself in to the FBI after returning from Washington, D.C. on Saturday morning and according to his mother, has not eaten since being detained because the detention facility won't feed him all organic food. Jacob Anthony Chansley, the heavily-tattooed Trump supporter who sported horns, a fur hat and face paint as he occupied the Senate dais, was arrested on Saturday and appeared in court in Phoenix by video-link on Monday Chansley is pictured...
    Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer has asked the federal government if the state can go to Pfizer Inc and directly buy 100,000 more doses more of the coronavirus vaccine. On Monday, Whitmer sent a letter to Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Alex Azar requesting permission to purchase doses straight from the pharmaceutical company.  'This direct purchase will fill a two week lag in supply and ensure that we can continue to ramp up our vaccination efforts across Michigan,' she wrote. 'It is also consistent with Operation Warp Speed's commitment to deliver a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine to Americans as quickly as possible.' However, data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) still has more than 500,000 doses sitting unused on shelves.  Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer (left) sent a letter to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar (right) on Monday. In the letter, Whitmer asked to buy...
    Raphael Bostic, president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.Christopher Dilts | Bloomberg | Getty Images Interest rates could rise sooner than forecast as the economy recovers more quickly than expected from the throes of the Covid-19 damage, Atlanta Federal Reserve President Raphael Bostic said Monday. While most of his colleagues don't see a rate hike coming through until at least 2023, Bostic said that he thinks the emergency measures the Fed has taken to combat the pandemic can start to be rolled back within the next two years if not sooner. "I do think there is some possibility that the economy could come back a bit stronger than some are expecting," he said during a virtual Q&A session before the Atlanta Rotary Club. "If that happens, I'm prepared to support pulling back and recalibrating a bit of our accommodation and then considering moving the policy...
    A man who allegedly fired five shots into a Portland, Oregon, federal courthouse was arrested two days earlier at a Salem, Oregon, “Stop the Steal” rally, court documents filed Sunday stated. Cody Levi Melby, 39, allegedly climbed over the temporary security fence put into place this summer to keep rioters outside the federal courthouse before opening fire on the building on Friday, Oregon Public Broadcasting reported. KPTV reported that several bullets were fired into the building’s exterior. No injuries were reported during the attack. Then, two courthouse security officers spotted him on a closed-circuit security camera and then approached him. The U.S. attorney’s office said Melby told the officers he was armed and was taken into custody without further incident. Melby is facing charges of trespassing, unlawful use of a weapon, first-degree criminal mischief, four counts of discharging a firearm in city limits, and possession of a loaded firearm, according to records...
    Capitol Police failed to bring in reinforcements the day the US Capitol was overrun by MAGA mob rioters despite the FBI warning of potential violence, federal agents visiting right-wing extremists and a slew of social media posts planning the anarchy.  Missed warnings and details of botched security efforts continue to emerge in the aftermath of last week's chaos at the Capitol that left five dead in what law enforcement officials have already slammed as a catastrophic failure to prepare.  Local and federal law enforcement officials have spent the last few days shifting the blame after the riots were described as one of the gravest security lapses in recent US history.  Evidence has also emerged of glaring warnings from some hardline Trump supporters who vowed on social media to inflict violence and storm the Capitol.   Capitol Police have faced the brunt of the scrutiny for misjudging the security threat given they are in...
    Washington (CNN)Twenty federal criminal defendants related to last week's deadly pro-Trump riot at the US Capitol have been rounded up across the country since the insurrection, with the allegations showing the danger of the mob.Some of the defendants are accused of bringing weapons and bombs to Capitol Hill, indicative of the extremism of parts of the crowd. Others were photographed ransacking the building, smiling while posing with congressional items such as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's lectern or at her staffer's desk, or publicly bragged about the crowd's violent and destructive joyride. Weapons and bombs brought to DCThe most unsettling of the allegations so far appear to be those against Lonnie Coffman, an Alabama man charged after authorities found 11 homemade bombs, an assault rifle and a handgun in his truck parked two blocks from the Capitol. The truck had sat there all morning during the pro-Trump rally, and Coffman was...
    Reuters January 11, 2021 0 Comments Dozens of supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump have been criminally charged in connection with the violent storming of the U.S. Capitol building earlier this week, and many more cases are expected. Five people died as a result of the riot, including a Capitol Police officer. No one has been charged yet in connection with any of those deaths. Several different criminal statutes and theories of liability could be used against the rioters, legal experts said. Here is an overview of some of the potential charges, including seditious conspiracy and felony murder. What criminal charges have been filed so far? Some of the more than 50 defendants in the federal district and superior courts have been charged with gun-related offenses. There are federal laws against carrying a gun in the Capitol building, and possessing an unregistered firearm or unlicensed ammunition in the District...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump and impeachment (all times local): 4 p.m. Citigroup is pausing all federal political donations for the first three months of the year in light of Wednesday’s deadly siege on the U.S. Capitol by supporters of President Donald Trump. In a memo to employees Friday, Citi’s head of global government affairs Candi Wolff said, “We want you to be assured that we will not support candidates who do not respect the rule of law.” “We support engaging with our political leaders even when we disagree, and our PAC is an important tool for that engagement,” Wolff wrote, adding that the company previously donated $1,000 to the campaign of Republican Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri in 2019, who represents a state in which Citi has a lot of employees. Unlike other companies which have announced pausing donations to the 147 Republicans who opposed...
    Proud Boys leader Nicholas Ochs, who shared an image of himself smoking while inside the Capitol last week, has been arrested in Hawaii but claimed that he took part in the MAGA raid as a 'professional journalist'. Shortly after supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the Capitol building on Wednesday, Ochs shared the photo of himself smoking with another man.  'Hello from the Capital[sic] lol,' the caption reads. Ochs was arrested Thursday evening after he landed at Honolulu's Daniel K. Inouye International Airport.  Proud Boys leader Nicholas Ochs (right), who shared an image of himself smoking while inside the Capitol last week, has been arrested in Hawaii Ochs was arrested Thursday evening after he landed at Honolulu's Daniel K. Inouye International Airport. Ochs (circled) is seen inside the Capitol on Wednesday  On Friday, the Justice Department unsealed a criminal complaint against Ochs, charging him with unlawful entry into...
    Justin Sullivan | Getty Images The Powerball jackpot just jumped again. With no ticket matching all six numbers drawn Saturday night, the top prize has vaulted to $550 million for Wednesday night's drawing. And Mega Millions' jackpot, meanwhile, is even higher: an estimated $600 million for Tuesday night's drawing. Of course, the advertised amounts are not what winners would end up with. Lottery officials are required to withhold 24% of big wins for federal taxes. And that's only the start of what you would pay to Uncle Sam and, typically, state coffers. More from Personal Finance:Some newlyweds face a marriage tax penaltyHere are three of my worst money mistakesAvoid mistakes when divvying up assets in divorce For Powerball's $550 million jackpot, the cash option — which most winners choose instead of an annuity — is $411.4 million. If there's a winner, the 24% federal withholding would shave $98.7 million off...
    Dozens of people have already been arrested and prosecutors across the U.S. have vowed to bring to justice those who stormed the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, sending lawmakers into hiding as they began their work to affirm President-elect Joe Biden’s victory. The top federal prosecutor for the District of Columbia has said “all options are on the table” for charging the rioters, many of whom were egged on by President Donald Trump’s speech hours earlier at a rally over his election loss. Investigators are combing through photos, videos and tips from the public to track down members of the violent mob. A Capitol Police officer died after he was hit in the head with a fire extinguisher as rioters descended on the building and many other officers were injured. A woman from California was shot to death by Capitol Police and three other people died after medical emergencies during the...
    Loading the player... According to the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Jacob Anthony Chansley also known as “Jake Angeli,” the man in viral photos and videos dressed in horns, and a bearskin headdress with red, white, and blue face paint, has been arrested. Chansley, who is now in federal custody, was arrested in Phoenix on charges of “knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, and with violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds,” according to a press release from the Department of Justice. NEW: Jake Angeli has been arrested and charged. pic.twitter.com/YHjniLyrUQ — Brian Tyler Cohen (@briantylercohen) January 9, 2021 ABC News reported that Chansley voluntarily contacted the FBI on Thursday, according to the U.S. Attorney’s office. They also noted, “Chansley stated that he came as a part of a group effort, with other ‘patriots’ from Arizona, at the request of the President that...
    The US Attorney for Washington DC has launched a federal excessive force investigation into the death of the Trump-supporting Air Force veteran who was shot dead when rioters breached the US Capitol. The office of Michael Sherwin, the Acting US Attorney for the District of Columbia, confirmed a formal probe is underway into the shooting death of 35-year-old Ashli Babbitt, according to the New York Times.  Sherwin has assigned his civil rights division to lead the case, which is currently under investigation by both the FBI and the DC Metropolitan Police Department.  Babbit, from San Diego, was shot in the chest by a Capitol police officer while she tried to climb through a window into the congressional chambers as part of the violent mob that broke into the Capitol Wednesday.  She died in hospital several hours later. The US Attorney for Washington DC has launched a federal excessive force investigation into...
    By Sam Hoober,  Alien Gear Holsters As most are aware, there is a new and improved HR 38, a proposed bill that would enact national concealed carry reciprocity. The bill was introduced by Rep. Richard Hudson (R-NC) and is currently in the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security. The bill itself is a recalibrated take on the last HR 38, likewise a bill that was intended to establish national concealed carry reciprocity. Does this mean the national nightmare of having to memorize what states you can carry in is closer to being over? Not to be the bearer of bad news, but I wouldn’t hold my breath. Not only is it not likely to pass in the current climate, but there are a number of legal issues that would be waiting in the wings if it were to. Unfortunately, it isn’t always as simple as just passing a law...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – The Allegheny County Health Department will be allowed to pursue its case against a diner that disregarded some COVID-19 mitigation rules. According to our news partners at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, a federal judge allowed the case to proceed against The Crack’d Egg in Brentwood. The county health department ordered the diner to close but the owners argued that the closure should be folded into their bankruptcy case. However, a bankruptcy judge denied that argument. The case has been sent back to the county’s court of common pleas.
    The prosecutions of the Capitol rioters—including the person or persons who murdered Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick by bludgeoning him with a fire extinguisher—need to be immunized against Trump’s pardon power through joint local and federal prosecutions. While it’s a no-brainer that the rioters committed federal crimes–they were on federal property assaulting federal officers—it’s also a no-brainer that Trump has no qualms against pardoning violent crimes, including murder. His recent pardon of the Blackwater contractors who had been convicted of murdering unarmed civilians in Iraq makes this plain. But Trump’s pardon power extends only to federal crimes, which is why these cases need to be brought jointly with local jurisdictions like the District of Columbia, as well as nearby Virginia and Maryland, where many of the rioters may have been staying, as well as the home states of rioters farther away from D.C.
    Federal prosecutors around the country are pledging to prosecute the domestic terrorists who stormed the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, with Washington, D.C., U.S. Attorney Michael Sherwin taking a position that should make Team Trump pretty nervous. “We are looking at all actors, not only the people who went into the building,” Sherwin said Thursday. Asked specifically about Donald Trump, who urged the crowd to march on the Capitol, Sherwin didn’t say no. ”We’re looking at all actors,” he said. “If the evidence fits the elements of a crime, they’re going to be charged.”  Sherwin also sounded very annoyed with the police who let the mob just leave the scene of the crime. “Hundreds of people flooded the Capitol and were not [handcuffed] by police,” he said. “I don’t want to be Monday morning quarterbacking to say why they didn’t do it, but it made our job more difficult.” Sherwin said his office has...
    The U.S. government was subject to one of the largest cyberattacks on record for months before software company SolarWinds discovered in December their information technology program Orion — used by government agencies — had been compromised. The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) announced in a Dec. 17 statement that the breach “poses a grave risk to the federal government and state, local, tribal, and territorial governments as well as critical infrastructure entities and other private sector organizations.” The intelligence community formally blamed Russia for the attack in a statement Tuesday, stating that hackers had been launching attacks on federal networks for nearly nine months before first being detected. (RELATED: Trump Says Things Are ‘Under Control’ After Latest US Government Hack. Just How Bad Is It?) SolarWinds said 33,000 of its customers used the program and around half downloaded the malicious code, according to The New York Times. Joint statement...
    US airlines and law enforcement agencies bolstered security at the two big Washington-area airports on Thursday after supporters of President Trump stormed the US Capitol, and a top lawmaker urged authorities to ban them from flying. The beefed-up security at Dulles International and Reagan National airports comes as supporters of the president return home from the nation's capital. Most of those who stormed the Congressional building on Wednesday have yet to be arrested and federal law enforcement officials are seeking the public's help in identifying the suspects. As of Thursday night, 82 people were arrested in connection with the storming of the US Capitol, with 60 of them booked for violating DC Mayor Muriel Bowser's 6pm curfew. Another 37 have been arrested on suspicion of unlawful entry.  Homeland Security police patrol at Washington's Dulles International Airport in Dulles, Virginia, in this November 24, 2020, file photo. Security has been...
    The top federal prosecutor in the country and the Washington DC Attorney General have hinted that President Trump, Donald Trump Jr. and Rudy Giuliani may all come under investigation for inciting the MAGA mob that terrorized the Capitol Building on Wednesday.   Speaking on Good Morning America, AG Karl Racine said his office was in the process of identifying dozens of people who were seen breaching the Capitol, but said: 'The fault lies with the capitol hill police... even Trump now is critical of them.  'But the real question is how far up does it go? Clearly the Capitol was ground central in all of this mob's behavior. 'Donald Trump Jr, Giuliani, even the president of the United States were calling on their supporters and hate groups to go to the Capitol and in the words of Rudy Giuliani 'exercise combat justice'. 'We're going to investigate not only the mobsters but...
    Today in D.C.: Headlines to start your Friday in D.C., Maryland and Virginia US Capitol: What we know about the 5 deaths in the pro-Trump mob that stormed the building The Best Way to Pay Off $250,000 in Student Loans Anyone who graduates with a massive pile of student debt has some tough choices to make. Refinance to a seemingly cheaper private loan? Keep your federal student loan and pay it off in the standard way? Take advantage of forbearance to put payments off? A look at three new doctors, each facing $250,000 in debt, highlights some shocking differences between each choice. © Provided by Kiplinger SEE MORE Joe Biden’s Student Loan Plan: What’s in It for You? As their cases illustrate, oftentimes the best option isn’t the most obvious, and one repayment method could save almost $200,000 over the life of the loan. Load Error ...
    A federal judge earlier this week declined to block the Trump administration from issuing leasing permits for oil production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The first-ever oil lease sale took place on Wednesday, according to Alaska Public Media, which reported on the ruling by U.S. District Court Judge Sharon Gleason, a Barack Obama appointee: It’s a win for the Trump administration, which has pushed to lock in drilling in the refuge in its final weeks, before President-elect Joe Biden takes office and can try to stop it. The Trump administration is offering 10-year leases to 22 tracts of land that cover about 1 million acres in the northernmost slice of the refuge, known as the coastal plain. Gleason’s decision Tuesday came in three lawsuits filed this fall by an array of groups, including environmental organizations and the Gwich’in Steering Committee.In court documents, the groups argue that the federal government failed...
    The Justice Department is bringing 55 criminal cases related to the storming of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, according to a top prosecutor who told reporters “this is just the beginning” promised “all actors” involved would be investigated. Acting U.S. Attorney Michael Sherwin, the federal prosecutor in the nation’s capital, told reporters Thursday afternoon that 15 cases had been filed with the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia while 40 cases have been brought before the D.C. Superior Court. He said charges include unlawful entry, assault, firearms possession, property theft, pilfering, and one arrest where a person had 11 Molotov cocktails “ready to go.” Sherwin also confirmed that the pipe bombs found near RNC and DNC offices are believed to have been working explosives before they were rendered safe by the FBI. Sherwin said that “all options are on the table” — potentially including further charges...
    Police in Washington, D.C., on Thursday released photos of about two dozen people they say are persons of interest in Wednesday's riot inside the Capitol.  All but one of the images depict apparent supporters of President Trump inside the Capitol and suspected of unlawful entry. One shows a person outside the building, suspected of receiving stolen property. The person is holding a broken shard of what appeared to a wooden sign reading "Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi." The FBI is also seeking the public's help identifying those who stormed the building Wednesday after Mr. Trump gave a speech nearby. The Justice Department has said a policy introduced last year to press sedition charges against those who damage federal buildings may be invoked in some cases stemming from Wednesday's chaos. The Metropolitan Police Department arrested 68 people Wednesday and early Thursday morning, primarily for violating a curfew imposed by...
    US President Donald Trump arrives to speak to supporters from The Ellipse near the White House on January 6, 2021, in Washington, DC.Brendan Smialowski | AFP | Getty Images President Donald Trump has told aides in recent weeks that he is considering issuing himself a federal pardon, The New York Times reported on Thursday, citing two sources with knowledge of the matter. The conversations took place after the Nov. 3 election, but it is not clear if they have continued since the D.C. riots on Wednesday, which have reinvigorated calls for his immediate removal from office. The prospect of a president issuing himself a pardon is unprecedented in U.S. history and has never been tested by the legal system. Scholars are divided on whether such an act would be permissible. Even if the pardon were lawful, it would only apply to federal crimes. The White House declined to comment. ...
    U.S. Capitol police officers point their guns at a vandalized door in the House Chamber during a joint session of Congress on Wednesday after pro-Trump rioters breached the building to stop Joe Biden from ascending to the presidency. Self-professed supporters of President Donald Trump waved confederate flags, wore QAnon-themed costumes and ski masks, bore various far-right insignia, and wielded improvised chemical weapons when they stormed the U.S. Capitol Complex on Wednesday and sent the nation’s seat of government into chaos. Collectively, they scuttled plans to count Electoral College votes on the day mandated by federal law for the process to occur. Legal experts immediately likened the unprecedented scene to an instance of outright sedition committed by stalwart followers of the 45th president and implicitly supported by Trump himself. “Impeach him again, and indict him for conspiracy to incite a riot and sedition,” suggested national security attorney Bradley P. Moss. ...
    Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) released a statement following the violence that took place at the United States Capitol on Wednesday, telling President Donald Trump to accept the election results and “quit misleading the American people.” In opening his statement, Cotton stated that those who “attacked the Capitol today should face the full extent of federal law”: Last summer, as insurrection gripped the streets, I called to send in the troops if necessary to restore order. Today, insurrectionists occupied our Capitol. Fortunately, the Capitol Police and other law-enforcement agencies restored order without the need for federal troops. But the principle remains the same: no quarter for insurrectionists. Those who attacked the Capitol today should face the full extent of federal law. It’s past time for the president to accept the results of the election, quit misleading the American people, and repudiate mob violence. And the senators and representatives who fanned the...
    (CNN)The chaotic federal response to the Trump rally Wednesday, which was overwhelmed by rioters who stormed the US Capitol, stood in sharp contrast to the heavily-armed presence of thousands of federal authorities during summer protests in Washington, DC, following the police killing of George Floyd.Mobs broke through police barricades and rampaged through the Capitol, vandalizing offices and prompting the evacuation of lawmakers just after 2 p.m. ET Wednesday. By dusk, the building was still not secured and a woman had been shot dead."Everything. Everything went wrong," one Capitol Police officer on the scene said.The law enforcement response that allowed a typically heavily secured federal landmark to fall under attack, with rioters breaking through windows and into lawmakers' offices and gathering places, came from a hesitant federal bureaucracy after early assurances from DC and Capitol law enforcement agencies. Agencies that had law enforcement that could help Wednesday waited to be asked.JUST...
    For the first time in a decade, Democrats will have unified control of the federal government. Democrats on Wednesday won control of the Senate, a major victory that will give President-elect Joe Biden unified control of the federal government and a better chance at passing his first-term agenda. Both NBC News and ABC News made the call as a mob of Donald Trump supporters broke into the Capitol, violently breaking past barriers and law enforcement officers to enter the building, forcing it into lockdown. Control of the chamber came down to two runoff elections in Georgia, where GOP Sens. David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler had to hold onto their seats in order for Republicans to maintain their grip on the Senate.
    “Rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic” is an overworked cliché, but it certainly applies to California’s Employment Development Department. The name itself is a farce. There’s no evidence that EDD ever developed any jobs, other than employing thousands of bureaucrats to pay out unemployment insurance benefits — and that’s been a titanic disaster. This week, EDD suspended payments to many Californians in its latest effort to deal with massive fraud that erupted when Congress pumped many billions of dollars into the unemployment insurance system for workers who lost jobs due to COVID-19. “As part of ongoing efforts to fight fraud, EDD has suspended payment on claims considered high risk and is informing those affected that their identity will need to be verified starting this week before payments can resume,” the agency tweeted on Sunday. The suspensions were ordered a few days after EDD’s much-criticized director, Sharon Hilliard, abruptly retired —...
    Right-wing attorneys Sidney Powell and Lin Wood at the so-called Stop the Steal rally. Right-wing attorneys Sidney Powell, Lin Wood, and the rest of the so-called “Kraken” counsel seeking to overturn the 2020 presidential elections should face proceedings to be disbarred, the city of Detroit told a federal judge on Tuesday. “We have been horrified by the inappropriate actions of these attorneys and the plaintiffs themselves, and we have intended to seek any sanction the court can order,” Detroit’s counsel David Fink told Law&Crime in a phone interview, adding that the court has “inherent power” to refer disbarment or suspension proceedings to the chief judge. In December, an early draft of the sanctions motion filed by Detroit became public, proposing a wide range of possible penalties against Powell, Wood, and their allies, including fines, a ban from the Eastern District of Michigan and referral for grievance proceedings. The city sent...
    More On: schools Teaching ‘white fragility’ is bad for kids of color Chicago schools to rename 30 buildings with slaveholder names Fear factor: How cancel culture keeps COVID-19 lockdown doubters silent Biden formally announces education secretary nominee Education reformers breathed a sigh of relief when it became clear that President-elect Joe Biden wouldn’t tap a teachers-union leader as his secretary of education, contrary to the post-election rumor mill. Instead, Biden nominated Connecticut Education Commissioner Miguel Cardona. Compared to teachers-union leaders, Cardona appears moderate. But Biden’s Department of Education transition team looks as though it came straight off the field of a National Education Association versus American Federation of Teachers softball game. It seems all but certain that on education, Biden will govern to the left of his ex-boss, President Barack Obama. During the campaign, Biden railed against President Trump’s policies on everything from charter schools to Title IX reform....
    Reuters January 5, 2021 0 Comments President Donald Trump may have broken a U.S. federal law and a Georgia law against election tampering by pressuring the state’s top election official to “find” enough votes to overturn his loss to President-elect Joe Biden in the state, according to some legal experts. The experts also outlined a potential legal defense for Trump and predicted that a prosecution of him arising from Saturday’s telephone call with Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, a fellow Republican, would be unlikely. Trump told Raffensperger during the call: “All I want to do is this: I just want to find 11,780 votes, which is one more than we have,” according to a transcript of the call released by the Washington Post on Sunday. The White House declined to comment on the call. Here is an explanation of the potential legal violations by Trump, based on interviews...
    NEW YORK (CBSDFW.COM/AP) — For the first time in several years more than 170 new applicants have won approval to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program for immigrants brought to the U.S. as young people. Information revealed in a U.S. government court filing Monday showed 171 new applications were approved from Nov. 14 through the end of 2020 while 121 applications were denied and another 369 were rejected. The report submitted by the Department of Homeland Security to Brooklyn federal court has a total of 2,713 initial applications submitted. U.S. District Judge Nicholas Garaufis had ordered the federal government to post public notice that it would accept applications under terms in place before President Donald Trump ended DACA in 2017, saying it was unconstitutional. A demonstrator holds a small American flag and sign during a DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) demonstration. (credit: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – New York is now one of four states that has a confirmed case of the COVID variant that’s even more contagious. That word comes as both New York and New Jersey are ramping up their vaccination efforts. As CBS2’s John Dias reports, with that lofty goal of administering one million doses of the COVID vaccine to New Yorkers by the end of the month, Mayor Bill de Blasio is telling the federal government it better be ready to deliver. More: New York Has First Confirmed Case Of New, Highly Contagious Strain Of COVID Tuesday morning, there’s a call to Washington from New York City: Pick up the pace. In a letter to Vice President Mike Pence, de Blasio outlines what the city needs from them, including more supply of the vaccine. “We’ve administered more than 100,000 doses, but that’s not fast enough,” de Blasio wrote in...
    By Jan Wolfe (Reuters) - President Donald Trump may have broken a U.S. federal law and a Georgia law against election tampering by pressuring the state's top election official to "find" enough votes to overturn his loss to President-elect Joe Biden in the state, according to some legal experts. The experts also outlined a potential legal defense for Trump and predicted that a prosecution of him arising from Saturday's telephone call with Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, a fellow Republican, would be unlikely. Trump told Raffensperger during the call: "All I want to do is this: I just want to find 11,780 votes, which is one more than we have," according to a transcript of the call released by the Washington Post on Sunday. The White House declined to comment on the call. Here is an explanation of the potential legal violations by Trump, based on interviews with five...
    As the U.S. passes the grim milestone of 20 million COVID-19 cases, much of the world is bracing for a stunning surge in the virus’ spread, courtesy of millions who ignored public health recommendations and traveled for the recent holidays. The deadly virus didn’t stop more than 7 million people from flying during the week before Christmas, and that’s just in the United States.  Those numbers represent just a fraction of typical holiday travel numbers, back in the days before COVID-19. Airlines, of course, are bleeding money, and their employees have faced reduced hours, layoffs, furloughs, and buyouts for the better part of a year. Concurrently, denial of the absolutely-real pandemic is rampant, particularly among the Trumpian right, who have seen their soon-to-be ousted leader and his acolytes politicize and ridicule the wearing of facial coverings to help thwart spread of the novel coronavirus.  With these facts in mind, it should come as no surprise that many...
    Column One: The U.S. finally has a system to prevent deadly rail accidents. It took 50 years Niger presidential favourite wins first round, heads for runoff Whats the Maximum Social Security Tax in 2021? The Social Security program is funded primarily by payroll taxes. That means the taxes that today's workers are paying will help fund current retirees' benefits, and once you start collecting Social Security, younger workers will be funding your monthly checks. © Provided by The Motley Fool What's the Maximum Social Security Tax in 2021? How much you'll pay in Social Security taxes depends on your income, but there are limits to how much you can owe. But the taxes don't stop once you begin claiming benefits -- in some cases, you may still owe taxes on your Social Security benefits even after you retire. © Getty Images Social Security card with assorted bills How much...
    (CNN)A group of three judges on the DC Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Friday that a lower court judge was wrong when he vacated an execution date for Lisa Montgomery, the only woman on federal death row.The order says the director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, Michael Carvajal, was acting under the "governing regulation," which allowed him to reschedule the execution because the original execution date had not passed.Montgomery's execution had been scheduled for December 8, but a judge postponed it after her attorneys said they were diagnosed with Covid-19 after flying from Texas to visit with Montgomery at the Federal Correctional Complex in Terre Haute, Indiana. On November 23, Carvajal rescheduled Montgomery's execution for January 12 and because he set it at that date, the order said he was acting under the law, clearing the way for her execution later this month. Montgomery's attorney, Meaghan VerGow, said in...
    Zach Gibson / Getty Images The covid vaccination rollout has not been as fast as expected, and public health officials like Dr. Anthony Fauci and Operation Warp Speed chief scientific advisor Dr. Moncef Slaoui have publicly acknowledged as much. Earlier predictions were that the U.S. would be able to administer the first round of vaccine doses to 20 million people by the end of 2020. The most recent update from the CDC — as of the morning of December 30th — was 2.79 million doses administered. Even factoring in a sizable backlog in the reporting, it falls very short of the projections. On Friday, Senator Mitt Romney put out a lengthy statement saying the lack of a comprehensive federal plan on vaccine distribution is “inexcusable.” “It was unrealistic to assume that the health care workers already overburdened with Covid care could take on a massive vaccination program,” Romney said. “So...
    A Mexican national who got stuck on the border wall in California had to be rescued by border agents as he tried to enter the US illegally.  After trying to scale down the wall, the 25-year-old man became suspended from a section of the wall which juts out into the Pacific Ocean and was found by patrollers at Imperial Beach on Tuesday.   He was hanging above the water line and Mexican authorities were able to free him from the fence.  US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents then escorted him to safety and he was taken to a nearby hospital where he was treated for hypothermia and knee pain.  A 25-year-old man was hanging from the border wall in California after he became stuck and was found by border patrollers in California (pictured) The agency took the opportunity to warn of the dangers human trafficking but did not confirm if...
    Trump with HHS Secretary Alex Azar. Joe Biden is coming into office with a recession that tops that of 2009, a pandemic that’s the worst in a century, and a nation where a significant number of people believe that Donald Trump was chosen by God to fight a war against Chinese troops being smuggled into Maine. If George W. Bush drove the nation into a ditch, Donald Trump has tossed America down a well. And he’s still throwing crap on top. With so many tasks ahead, restoring trust in federal agencies after Trump has devoted four years to taking them apart, dismissing actual experts, and shoving sycophants into every possible nook and cranny may seem like quite an ask. It’s also completely vital. That may nowhere be as true as all the various components of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Trump’s attacks on the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Centers for...
    The only woman on federal death row was set to be executed by lethal injection on Jan. 12, but Lisa Montgomery, 52, got a brief reprieve when, on Christmas Eve, a federal court pushed the date back. The court claimed the January date violated federal regulations that establish procedures for carrying out capital punishment Kelley Henry, one of the convicted killer’s attorneys, told Fox News she contracted the coronavirus in November when visiting Montgomery behind bars, setting back the preparation required to argue her last-minute clemency case. The legal team argues Montgomery suffers from a mental illness induced by a childhood of rampant rape and abuse. "I have only been able to speak with [Lisa] on the phone [since contracting COVID-19]. Her illness is such that it waxes and wanes, and she is trying the best she can," Henry, a Nashville public defender who has taken on Montgomery's case along with Amy Harwell, told Fox...
    A doctor has slammed the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for not approving AstraZeneca-University of Oxford's coronavirus vaccine. On Wednesday, Great Britain became the fist country in the world to grant authorization to the COVID-19 jab. The vaccine holds great appeal because it's inexpensive - costing $3 to $4 per dose - and can be stored in refrigerators for up to six months rather than at ultra-cold temperatures required for other vaccines. However, a top Trump administration official has said Americans will likely not receive AstraZeneca's coronavirus shot before April - three months after the U.K.'s green light. Dr Marty Makary, a professor in the School of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, took to Twitter to blast the decision and said the FDA's slow-moving 'bureaucracy' - not worries over safety - are the real reason for the delay.   Johns Hopkins professor Dr Marty...
    Dr. Anthony Fauci has said spreading out more first doses of the vaccine by using second doses held in reserve is now 'under consideration' while Surgeon General Jerome Adams has admitted that public and state health departments 'are chronically underfunded' as the nation prepares to dismally fail its 2020 COVID-19 vaccination target when the clock strikes midnight tonight.  The nation's top health experts who have been at the forefront of the coronavirus pandemic waded into the vaccine rollout chaos Thursday, as both state and federal authorities point the blame at each other.  Fauci admitted on the NBC Today Show Thursday that the rollout of the vaccine has so far been 'disappointing' and said the federal government needs to 'support the local groups, the states and the cities' to ramp up the pace.   While Adams also admitted state health departments need more funding and resources on Good Morning America Thursday morning, he...
    ^ Keep Westword Free Support Us I Support Local Community Journalism Support the independent voice of Denver and help keep the future of Westword free. Support Us FCI Englewood, a federal prison in Jefferson County that's the site of one of the worst COVID outbreaks in Colorado, will experience another kind of outbreak on December 31, when activists plan to hold a "New Year's Eve Noise Demo" outside the facility. An outbreak of sound. "You can anticipate abolitionist, anti-prison and leftist chanting," explains Mary Reeves, an organizer affiliated with Denver Communists. "You can participate with noisemakers of any kind. There will probably be confetti. The typical things you would expect at a New Year's Eve party. But this is not a party, because there's nothing really to celebrate in a country like this."Related Stories FCI Englewood Has Become a COVID-19 Hot Spot How Soon-to-Be-Freed Rod...
    WASHINGTON -- Words matter. But numbers tell stories, too.Presidential historians and others will plumb them as they assess President Donald Trump's legacy,Trump's presidency is reflected in a broad range of numbers representing everything from the U.S. death toll during the coronavirus pandemic to the miles of his "big, beautiful wall" along the border with Mexico to the tens of thousands of tweets he sent during four years in office.Some of the numbers that are part of Trump's legacy:325,000 and counting: Number of U.S. deaths attributed to COVID-19.6: Coronavirus vaccines being developed and-or distributed under Trump's Operation Warp Speed program.2: Coronavirus vaccines - by Pfizer and BioNTech, and a separate one by Moderna - that U.S. regulators approved in 2020 for emergency use.0: Comprehensive health care overhaul plans Trump introduced despite repeated promises to replace the Obama-era Affordable Care Act with a plan that would cover everyone at a lower cost.3:...
    Alpine skiing-Double Olympic champion Mayer wins Bormio downhill Things You Should Never Buy at Target Here are 9 fascinating facts to know about BlackRock, the worlds largest asset manager popping up in the Biden administration © AP BlackRock Chief Executive Larry Fink was reportedly under consideration by 2016 presidential candidate Hillary Clinton to run the Treasury Department. AP The world's biggest fund manager, BlackRock, has become an increasingly influential player in Washington, DC.  The firm's global head of sustainable investing is set to head Biden's National Economic Council, and a former advisor to BlackRock Chief Executive Larry Fink will serve as a top official at Treasury. Here's a rundown of fast facts you need to know about BlackRock.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. BlackRock, the world's largest investment manager, has become an increasingly influential Wall Street player in Washington, DC as a poster child of...
    By Tina Bellon (Reuters) - U.S. emergency medical personnel are getting quick access to COVID-19 vaccines in some parts of the United States while fire chiefs in other areas forecast a delay of weeks or months, highlighting the chaotic nature of a rollout that relies on states and counties to plan and administer distribution. A lack of detailed federal guidelines has forced U.S. states and counties to create their own plans for distributing initially limited doses of COVID-19 vaccines in hopes of curbing a raging pandemic that has killed more than 332,000 Americans. All states have prioritized nursing homes and frontline healthcare workers, following federal guidelines. But the federal plan does not define frontline health workers, and local decisions sometimes differ on whether the United State's roughly 430,000 emergency medical technicians, or EMTs, are included. Missouri's firefighters and EMTs do not expect vaccination before the end of January or February...
    The former girlfriend of the man who blew himself up in a Christmas morning suicide bombing in downtown Nashville warned law enforcement more than a year ago that he was “building bombs in the RV trailer at his residence.” But neither local or federal authorities were able to search the vehicle. According to a report in the Tennessean, the bomber’s girlfriend had notified Nashville metro police back in August 2019 about his bomb-making, and federal authorities were subsequently alerted as well. But in the days after the attack, the state’s bureau of investigations claimed the bomber was “not on our radar” prior to blowing up a city block and injuring three people. After the girlfriend warned officers in a live interview at her home, her then-lawyer, Raymond Throckmorton III, likewise raised alarms, saying his client “frequently talks about the military and bomb making,” and “knows what he is doing and is capable...
    Democratic Congressman-elect Jamall Bowman of New York, took to twitter to call for defunding the police Tuesday, following the announcement by the Justice Department that the officers involved in the 2014 shooting of 12-year old Tamir Rice will not face federal charges. "We're fighting in your memory, Tamir. You won't be forgotten," Bowman tweeted. "A system this cruel and inhumane can't be reformed. Defund the police, and defund the system that's terrorizing our communities," he added. TRUMP PARDONS MARYLAND POLICE OFFICER IMPRISONED AFTER RELEASING CANINE ON SUSPECT Police were called on Nov. 22, 2014 after someone reported that a "guy" was pointing a gun at people, adding that the weapon could be a "fake" and the man in question could actually be a juvenile – the additional information was not passed along to the officers. Officer Timothy Loehmann and his partner Frank Garmback were called to the scene, where the 12-year old had been...
    The two Cleveland police officers involved in the 2014 killing of Tamir Rice won’t face federal criminal charges because the video quality of the incident was too poor to make a conclusive decision, the Department of Justice announced Tuesday. 12-year-old Rice’s death energized the Black Lives Matter movement and called attention to the policing of minorities and children, the Associated Press reported. The decision did not excuse the officers’ actions but ruled that the cumulative evidence wasn’t enough to support a federal criminal civil rights prosecution. Rice was fatally shot by Officer Timothy Loehmann while playing with a pellet gun outside of a recreation center on Nov. 22, 2014, the AP reported. Officers responded to a 911 call from a man who was drinking beer while waiting for a bus who said a man was pointing a gun at people. The man who made the 911 call told the dispatcher...
    A senior U.S. District judge called Donald Trump a “criminal” during a phone call with the Associated Press as he discussed the 45th president’s recent pardons of political allies who were convicted in former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation. Senior U.S. District Judge Robert W. Pratt, a Bill Clinton appointee who had been the Chief Judge of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Iowa before assuming senior status in 2012, said it was no surprise that Trump was pardoning criminals like himself. “It’s not surprising that a criminal like Trump pardons other criminals,” Pratt was quoted by the AP on Monday. “But apparently to get a pardon, one has to be either a Republican, a convicted child murderer or a turkey,” the judge quipped. Less than one week ago and in consecutive days, President Trump issued pardons to corrupt former GOP congressman who endorsed him,...
    The New York Times reports that Obamacare has worked pretty well during the pandemic: State Medicaid enrollment, according to one report, had an 11 percent increase between February and September in the 36 states that have released data…Sign-ups for plans in marketplaces run by the federal government are up 6.6 percent compared with last year, according to a new federal tally. It is the only year during the Trump administration when enrollment increased, and amounts to a half-million more people seeking coverage from the federal marketplace. The Commonwealth Fund has surveyed the health coverage scene recently and reports that being uninsured is up only slightly in 2020: All things considered, that’s not bad considering the severity of the downturn. Someday, perhaps, Americans will finally come around to the idea that anything above zero is unacceptable.
    (CNN)Boy, I did not see this one coming!On Monday, Texas Republican Rep. Louie Gohmert sued Vice President Mike Pence in federal court in a, um, wacky attempt to transform the vice president's purely ceremonial role in presiding over the announcement of the Electoral College results in Congress into a power broker position in which the VP could effectively hand the election to President Donald Trump."We continue to hold out hope that there is a federal judge who understands that the fraud that stole this election will mean the end of our republic, and this suit would insure that the Vice-President will only accept electors legitimately and legally elected," Gohmert said in a statement on Monday. "There must be an opportunity for a day in court when fraud was this prevalent."It's probably worth noting here that there has yet to be any proof of the widespread fraud that Gohmert, Trump and...
    This is a food line. One food line. In two months many of these same families will not have homes to go back to. Although the pandemic rescue package finally signed by a pouting Donald Trump last night extends the federal moratorium on evicting renters who cannot make their payments, it’s only a temporary reprieve. The House and Senate-passed bill extends the eviction moratorium by only one month. We're right back here in February, albeit with a new president not permanently sidelined by his own narcissistic delusions. And the underlying problem is not going away. After the bungling incompetence of government responses from March onward, we are in a new pandemic surge. One in every thousand Americans has died from the virus. Without more lockdowns, the death toll will double in coming months; vaccines simply cannot be manufactured and distributed fast enough to prevent it. And all that means that those...
    Jeffery Epstein (pictured) was extorted by prisoners and believed the government was 'trying to kill him', according to fellow inmates A suicidal Jeffery Epstein was extorted by prisoners and believed the government was 'trying to kill him', according to fellow inmates in fresh details of his 'hellish' final days before he killed himself in a federal jail.  The millionaire pedophile's death at Manhattan's Metropolitan Correctional Center on August 10 last year was officially ruled as a suicide by hanging, despite murder conspiracy theories circulating widely online. But in interviews with Epstein's former inmates, obtained the Daily News, they reveal it was common knowledge in the prison that he was suicidal and cellmates warned him not to kill himself in their presence. One prison inmate claimed that Epstein was saying he was going to kill himself because 'the government is trying to kill him anyway'. Former inmates also revealed he was also...
            by Garland S. Tucker III  Former Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson issued a stern warning in last week’s Wall Street Journal: “A world-class financial system can’t exist in a country that fails to maintain the quality of its credit.” America’s debt problem was already wildly out of control for the past 20 years, but we now face truly unprecedented additional levels of debt issued by Congress in response to the pandemic. From 2000 to 2019, the federal debt rose from $5.6 trillion to $22.7 trillion, and it is expected to top $27 trillion by year’s end, a whopping 19 percent increase this year. Another trillion in virus relief spending now seems to be at the low end of spending estimates going into 2021. The average American has an intuitive feeling that this is not sustainable. It’s the kind of “kitchen table economics” that Margaret Thatcher used to talk about. Tax...
    Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Associated Press, Tennessee, holidays
    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Officials tell the AP federal investigators have identified person of interest in Christmas Day explosion in Nashville. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Saturday on MSNBC’s “Cross Connection,” Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA) insisted that the one-time $600 payment for COVID-19 relief was not enough and that congressional Republicans should green-light a $2,000-a-month cash payment to individuals through the end of the pandemic. “[W]e passed the HEROES Bill eight months ago that had $1,200 cash assistance in it,” she said. “Of course, Donald Trump and the Republicans would not support that. Speaker [Nancy] Pelosi and many members had been negotiating, myself included, some of the provisions in this bill so we could help people with their livelihoods and their lives. And so, I wanted quite frankly $2,000 a month — $2,000 a month until the end of the pandemic. Now Donald Trump comes up with $2,000. Well, great — we support that. Do you think Republicans supported that? No.  And so we’re going to keep working because, you know, people can’t afford to live like...
    More On: death penalty Truck driver Alfred Bourgeois executed for killing 2-year-old daughter in 2002 Brandon Bernard executed by federal government despite objections Truck driver who killed 2-year-old daughter to be executed Friday New rule could allow poison gas, firing squads for US executions A judge may force the Trump administration’s Justice Department to schedule the only woman on federal death row’s execution for when after President-elect Biden takes office. US District Court Judge Randolph Moss told lawyers representing Lisa Montgomery and the Justice Department that he was vacating an order from the Bureau of Prisons director rescheduling the execution for Jan. 12. That date was set by Moss in November, after Montgomery’s attorneys contracted coronavirus and asked for an extension in order to file a clemency petition. The problem, according to the federal judge, was that the rescheduling was done while a stay was in place, something...
    (CNN)The only woman on the federal death row may see her execution date pushed to when the administration of President-elect Joe Biden takes over, after a federal judge said Thursday the Department of Justice could not yet reset the date.Lisa Montgomery was scheduled to be executed on December 8 after she was convicted in 2004 of strangling to death a Missouri woman who was eight months pregnant, cutting the baby out and kidnapping it. The baby survived.The execution date this month was postponed by the court because two of Montgomery's lawyers, who were planning to seek clemency for her, fell ill with coronavirus. Lisa Montgomery in a booking photo released December 20, 2004 in Kansas City, Kansas. Montgomery is accused of murdering the pregnant Bobbie Jo Stinnett, cutting the fetus from her body, and claiming the live baby as her own.The Justice Department had said it sought to reschedule Montgomery's...
    The Trump administration has paid private executioners in cash and bought drugs from a secret pharmacy as part of a rush to execute the most federal prisoners since World War II, court documents obtained by ProPublica reveal.  The Justice Department, under Attorney General Bill Barr, has killed 10 federal inmates since July and plans to press ahead with three more before Joe Biden's inauguration next month.  The court records, which haven't previously been reported, shed light on how the Trump administration is hurrying to use its final days to execute the federal inmates.  Two inmates have been executed this month alone, including one that went ahead despite appeals and objections from the likes of Kim Kardashian.  It is the first time in more than 130 years that federal executions have occurred during a lame-duck period.  Among the details included in court records are that private executioners have been paid in...
    By MICHAEL BALSAMO | The Associated Press WASHINGTON — For a second night in a row, President Donald Trump issued a round of pardons and commutations in the final weeks of his presidency, giving full pardons to his former campaign chairman, his son-in-law’s father and another of his allies convicted in special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation. The list also included people whose pleas for forgiveness have been promoted by those supporting the president throughout his term in office, including conservative media personalities and Republican lawmakers. A look at the 29 people granted pardons or clemency on Wednesday. PAUL MANAFORT Manafort was Trump’s former campaign chairman and was among the first people to be charged in Mueller’s investigation, which examined possible coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia in the 2016 election campaign. He was released from a low-security federal prison in May to serve his sentence on home confinement due...
    SAN FRANCISCO — A federal operation aimed at curbing drug sales in the Tenderloin has led to the deportation of dozens of people, mostly Honduran nationals, despite city and state sanctuary laws intended to prevent such immigration crackdowns, a review of hundreds of court records by the Bay Area News Group has found. Known as the Federal Initiative for the Tenderloin, or FIT, the U.S. Attorney-led operation has led to 230 federal prosecutions to date, but also growing criticism that it is being used as a proxy for city police to engage in banned activities with immigration enforcement. The court records show dozens of FIT cases followed the same pattern: an undocumented person is arrested for selling a small amount of drugs — perhaps $20 worth —  to an undercover San Francisco police officer and ends up in federal custody, facing charges normally reserved for those who sell drugs by the...
    By MICHAEL BALSAMO, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — For a second night in a row, President Donald Trump issued a round of pardons and commutations in the final weeks of his presidency, giving full pardons to his former campaign chairman, his son-in-law’s father and another of his allies convicted in special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation. The list also included people whose pleas for forgiveness have been promoted by those supporting the president throughout his term in office, including conservative media personalities and Republican lawmakers. A look at the 29 people granted pardons or clemency on Wednesday. PAUL MANAFORT Manafort was Trump’s former campaign chairman and was among the first people to be charged in Mueller’s investigation, which examined possible coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia in the 2016 election campaign. He was released from a low-security federal prison in May to serve his sentence on home confinement due to...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — For a second night in a row, President Donald Trump issued a round of pardons and commutations in the final weeks of his presidency, giving full pardons to his former campaign chairman, his son-in-law’s father and another of his allies convicted in special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation. The list also included people whose pleas for forgiveness have been promoted by those supporting the president throughout his term in office, including conservative media personalities and Republican lawmakers. A look at the 29 people granted pardons or clemency on Wednesday. PAUL MANAFORT Manafort was Trump’s former campaign chairman and was among the first people to be charged in Mueller’s investigation, which examined possible coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia in the 2016 election campaign. He was released from a low-security federal prison in May to serve his sentence on home confinement due to concerns about the...
    The federal government began carrying out federal executions in July after the practice had been put on hold for years– and now the state of the death penalty in the U.S. has come down to firing squads, the electric chair, and a dangerous three drug cocktail. Executive Director of the Death Penalty Information Center Robert Dunham spoke to the Daily Caller’s Brianna Lyman about the recent string of federal executions, including one deep rooted issue within the system: racism. (RELATED: Texas Supreme Court Rules Man Who Wrongly Spent Almost 10 Years On Death Row Needs To Be Compensated) “It’s without question that race and the death penalty have an intertwined history, you can’t separate the two,” Dunham said, noting that there is a “white victim preference” when seeking the death penalty. WATCH: When it comes to actually carrying out the death sentence, defendants are typically given a three-drug cocktail...
    Actor Lori Loughlin, facing charges in a nationwide college admissions cheating scheme, is escorted to federal court in Boston, Massachusetts, in April 2019. REUTERS/Brian Snyder Dozens of wealthy people, including actors Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin, have been charged in the college admissions scandal. Federal prosecutors say parents paid about $25 million to get their students into elite schools like the University of Southern California, Stanford, and Yale as part of the scheme. Federal prosecutors have charged more than 50 people, some of whom have already pleaded guilty. Here's the full list of people who have been sentenced in the college admissions scandal. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Sentencings are ongoing for the college admissions scandal, in which federal prosecutors say parents paid about $25 million to get their students into elite schools like the University of Southern California, Stanford, and Yale. Court documents reviewed by...
    By DARLENE SUPERVILLE, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Words matter. But numbers tell stories, too. Presidential historians and others will plumb them as they assess President Donald Trump’s legacy, Trump's presidency is reflected in a broad range of numbers representing everything from the U.S. death toll during the coronavirus pandemic to the miles of his “big, beautiful wall” along the border with Mexico to the tens of thousands of tweets he sent during four years in office. Some of the numbers that are part of Trump's legacy: —322,000 and counting: Number of U.S. deaths attributed to COVID-19. —6: Coronavirus vaccines being developed and-or distributed under Trump's Operation Warp Speed program. —2: Coronavirus vaccines — by Pfizer and BioNTech, and a separate one by Moderna — that U.S. regulators approved in 2020 for emergency use. 0: Comprehensive health care overhaul plans Trump introduced despite repeated promises to replace the Obama-era Affordable...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Words matter. But numbers tell stories, too. Presidential historians and others will plumb them as they assess President Donald Trump’s legacy, Trump’s presidency is reflected in a broad range of numbers representing everything from the U.S. death toll during the coronavirus pandemic to the miles of his “big, beautiful wall” along the border with Mexico to the tens of thousands of tweets he sent during four years in office. Some of the numbers that are part of Trump’s legacy: —322,000 and counting: Number of U.S. deaths attributed to COVID-19. —6: Coronavirus vaccines being developed and-or distributed under Trump’s Operation Warp Speed program. —2: Coronavirus vaccines — by Pfizer and BioNTech, and a separate one by Moderna — that U.S. regulators approved in 2020 for emergency use. 0: Comprehensive health care overhaul plans Trump introduced despite repeated promises to replace the Obama-era Affordable Care Act with...
    A traitor, a con artist, and a crook Ever-shameless, Donald Trump is now using the pardon power to promote outright corruption. In a slew of pardons tonight, Trump used the power to sabotage convictions of private-contractor war criminals, an array of Republican elected officials caught using their office to engage in crimes, and two of Trump's own allies who pled guilty to lying to federal law enforcement officials in an effort to block special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation of communications between the Trump campaign and Russian officials during the 2016 campaign. Receiving pardons tonight—and surely, there will be many more coming—are George Papadopoulos and Alex van der Zwaan, who both pled guilty to lying to federal investigators probing Russian hacking and propaganda efforts on behalf of Trump. They join the previously pardoned Flynn, who pled guilty to lying as part of the same cover-up. Also receiving pardons are three Republican...
    (CNN)Just weeks after a federal court ordered that Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals be restored, a judge in Texas heard arguments in a case challenging the legality of the program, which shields hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants who came to the US as children from deportation. The case before Judge Andrew Hanen on Tuesday, brought by Texas and a coalition of states in 2018, marks the latest twist in years of legal back-and-forth over the Obama-era program.The Trump administration tried ending DACA in 2017, but the US Supreme Court blocked its attempt in June. In light of the Supreme Court ruling, acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf issued a memo that said new applications for DACA would not be accepted and renewals would be limited to one year instead of two amid an ongoing review. But a separate federal judge recently found Wolf's memo invalid and ordered the restoration...
    The federal stimulus package that lawmakers in Washington have agreed to is “very encouraging news” for California, Gov. Gavin Newsom said Monday as he outlined how much of the $900 billion federal package is likely to flow to the Golden State. “While it’s a lower number than we had hoped for, it is nonetheless significant,” the governor said. The package did not include aid for state and local governments that Newsom spent months lobbying for. He said Congress “will need to do more in the future.” But he didn’t dwell on that Monday, instead focusing on how a cash infusion estimated at about $50 billion — most of it for unemployment and direct stimulus checks — will help struggling Californians: “It’s money directly in your pocket,” he said. While he cautioned that the figures are initial estimates, Newsom said California expects to receive: $20 billion in unemployment assistance (based...
    Loading the player... I recently sat down with Amber Crowder, founder of Been Down Project, mother of a five-year-old, former special education administrator, Howard University graduate, and entrepreneur.  Amber was also sentenced to 13 months in federal prison and charged with mail fraud. She has been recently released and has founded the Been Down Project, a returning citizen’s brutally honest, yet comedic, account of how she went to federal prison for an email.  Her vulnerable and transparent account highlights the inequities and flaws of the federal criminal justice system and the hardships for women in the industrial prison complex.  Amber intends to use her platform to be a voice, a resource, and an advocate for women with recent federal indictments, women currently incarcerated, and women reentering society.  Read More: ‘Belly of the Beast’ doc exposes illegal sterilizations in California (Credit: Crowder) Christina Greer: You have been out for...
    Facebook co-founder, Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC.Yasin Ozturk | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images Before federal and state investigators filed sweeping antitrust claims against Facebook in federal court this month, the company's top lawyers reportedly extended an olive branch to show that it could foster competition. Facebook's lawyers told state and federal investigators it could help a new social network get off the ground by licensing its own code and users' webs of relationships to another firm, The Washington Post reported Tuesday. Investigators ultimately declined to take Facebook up on the suggestion, the Post reported, but the offer illustrates both what Facebook was willing to give up to get out of the lawsuits and what it was not. Facebook has denied claims of anticompetitive behavior. Part...
    Michael Reynolds/AP Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.Outgoing Attorney General Bill Barr on Monday said he saw no reason to appoint special counsels to investigate two of President Trump’s current obsessions: Hunter Biden and false claims of election fraud in the 2020 election. Barr also said that he agreed with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s assessment that Russia is behind the massive cyberattacks on US federal agencies, an indirect rejection of Trump’s efforts to downplay the attack.  “If I thought a special counsel at this stage was the right tool, I would name one, but I haven’t, and I’m not going to,” Barr said during his final press conference before leaving the Justice Department. Barr also said he saw “no basis” for the federal government to seize states’ voting machines in an...
    Sign up here to get our daily updates on coronavirus in Minnesota delivered straight to your inbox each afternoon. And go here to see all of MinnPost’s COVID-19 coverage. The $900 billion federal COVID relief package expected to pass Congress today has lots to like for state governments [PDF]. Two pieces in the proposed law in particular resolve spending issues debated before and during last week’s special session of the Minnesota Legislature. By extending federal unemployment insurance benefits by 11 weeks, the bill will negate the need for Minnesota to provide those benefits and cancel a plan to borrow up to $200 million from the federal treasury. That borrowing might have forced a future repayment by the state and the employers who pay into the state’s unemployment trust fund. The unemployment insurance provisions in the new bill will also add $300 per week on top of current state benefits through...
    And you thought Kanye West’s Oval Office meeting with President Trump was wacky. Today marks the 50th anniversary of what’s considered to be the unlikeliest White House powwow of all time: when Elvis Presley met with President Nixon. An image of the Dec. 21, 1970, meeting — with Nixon in a staid suit and the King of rock ’n’ roll in one of his wild getups — is still the No. 1 requested photo from the National Archives. This is our most-requested photo. Heres the story of how it happened: http://t.co/Co22Z8gTHq #Elvis80 #Elvis pic.twitter.com/jtAhLo12cw— US National Archives (@USNatArchives) January 8, 2015 The Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum is commemorating the occasion, and other artifacts include two family photos Presley gave Nixon, plus a series of handwritten notes from the rocker to the president on American Airlines stationary. Elvis told the commander in chief he wanted to...
    (CNN)The warehouse is like any other with row upon row of products stacked on top of one another with identifying barcodes.But it's unique in that it contains critical items to protect the United States in the event of an attack or disaster. And this year, the warehouse became a flashpoint in the Covid-19 pandemic. The Strategic National Stockpile dates back to 1999, when fears of a bioterrorism attack coinciding with the Y2K computer switch were front and center, and serves as the country's repository of emergency medical countermeasures. But hit with a global pandemic and nationwide demand for supplies, the stockpile, which is maintained by the Department of Health and Human Services, was deemed inadequate."The nation agreed: We weren't where we needed to be," said Steven Adams, acting director of the Strategic National Stockpile, adding there are ongoing discussions to better position the stockpile to respond to national need. Adams...
    The Georgia Secretary of State’s Office reported last week that nearly 76,000 new voters registered between the November 3, 2020 election and the voter registration deadline on December 7, 2020.  The latest numbers were released as Trump campaign attorney Lin Wood tweeted that the Georgia Secretary of State was ‘blatantly violating’ the Georgia Constitution and specifically a clause that prohibits voting in runoff elections if the voter was not registered ‘and eligible’ in the general election.   So, where does the true lie? The explanation can be found in the Constitution, state statute, and a Consent Decree signed as part of a judicial order in 2017.  In Georgia, our Constitution reads that “[a] run-off election shall be a continuation of the general election and only persons who were entitled to vote in the general election shall be entitled to...
            by Chuck Ross  President-elect Joe Biden says he is “not concerned” about a federal investigation into his son, Hunter, and accused his opponents of weaponizing the probe for political points. Biden said that Hunter, who has been involved in a string of high-profile personal and business controversies in recent years, as “the smartest man I know.” Hunter Biden announced last Wednesday that he is under investigation by the U.S. attorney’s office in Delaware over his “tax affairs.” A source familiar with the investigation told the Daily Caller News Foundation that the investigation began in 2018, before Joe Biden launched his presidential campaign. The Associated Press reported that prosecutors subpoenaed Biden for his records with more than two dozen businesses, including companies in China and Ukraine. Biden, who was interviewed by CBS’s Stephen Colbert, accused his political opponents of “foul play” by seizing on the investigation. “We have great...
    The U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has revealed that the recent hack of the Austin-based IT company SolarWinds was much worse than initially reported and “poses a grave risk to the federal government.” The National Nuclear Security Administration, which maintains America’s nuclear stockpile, has been targeted by the hack. CNBC reports that the scale of the recent cyberattack against the Austin-based IT firm SolarWinds is beginning to be understood and could be much worse than previously thought. In a summary on Thursday, the CISA said that the threat “poses a grave risk to the federal government.” The summary added that “state, local, tribal, and territorial governments as well as critical infrastructure entities and other private sector organizations” are also at risk. CISA believes that the attack could have begun as early as March, since then multiple government agencies have been targeted by the hackers with the Energy and Commerce departments confirming...
    Former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb took aim at the federal government on Friday for allegedly withholding Pfizer’s Covid-19 vaccine. “They are being throttled, and I think the government has admitted they’re doing that,” Gottlieb said in a morning interview on MSNBC. “In part, they say they want to hold back a second dose for everyone who receives a first dose. I think that’s not the right decision. I think they should be leaning forward and trying to get more doses in people now and have some confidence that the manufacturing is going to keep up.” Several governors complained this week that their states were not receiving shipments of Pfizer’s vaccine that they had expected, including those in Florida, Illinois, and Washington. Pfizer said in a Thursday statement that “millions” of doses of the vaccine were available, but that it had not received shipping orders from the federal government. Gottlieb,...
    Governor Andrew Cuomo giving a briefing on Friday Governor Cuomo has been accused of 'extortion' by closing NYC restaurants then asking the federal government to bail them out.  Cuomo last week ruled that indoor dining in New York City- which was only happening at a 25 percent capacity -  had to end suddenly to stop the spread of COVID-19.  Manhattan has the highest number of restaurants per square mile of any other borough in New York City and the lowest COVID test positivity rate but was subject to the rule.  Now, restaurant owners are only allowed to do outdoor dining but with frigid temperatures and snow on the ground, it is becoming impossible to lure customers.  The state has also tightened the restrictions to mean outdoor structures have to have to open airflows, which shields diners from the elements even less.  Cuomo's only explanation for it is that the...
    What is the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), the federal agency that reported widespread hacks of government agencies and private businesses? CISA recently reported a hack that compromised federal agencies and "critical infrastructure" in a sophisticated attack that was hard to detect and will be difficult to undo, the cybersecurity agency said in an unusual warning message Thursday.  Established under President Trump in 2018, CISA operates under the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) oversight.  Its activities are a continuation of the National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD). CISA was established when Trump signed the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency Act.  CISA’s mission is to "build the national capacity to defend against cyber attacks" and to work "with the federal government to provide cybersecurity tools, incident response services and assessment capabilities to safeguard the .gov networks that support the essential operations of partner departments and agencies." CISA is an independent arm...
    (CNN)As the days of the Trump presidency wind down, the picture of how his tenure in office compares with that of his predecessors is becoming clearer. It's long been known that President Donald Trump's actions in office have upended the norms of the presidency — from his use of social media to make major announcements to his use of the pardon power to the amount of turnover in his administration. The story of the Trump presidency cannot be fully told in numbers. But these numbers illustrate some of the many ways Trump and his administration defied the status quo of the executive branch. TweetsWhile Barack Obama was the first US president to fully harness the power of modern social media platforms, such as Facebook and Twitter, no American president has used social media — specifically, Twitter — like Trump.Read MoreTrump has continued to tweet more with each additional year in...
    (CNN)Two people are facing federal charges in the case of a two-year-old boy who was abandoned at a Mississippi Goodwill store earlier this week. Jeremy Fitzgerald, 34, and Turliscea Turner, 29, of Memphis, Tennessee, have been charged with kidnapping the child, the US Attorney's Office in Western Tennessee announced.The boy was dropped off Monday at a Southaven, Mississippi, Goodwill store with nothing but a bag of clothes and a note. Police say a bystander had called to report that a man wearing black jogging pants and a cowboy hat had left the child there.According to the criminal complaint, Fitzgerald offered to have Turner, who was posing as his sister, babysit the boy while Fitzgerald and the child's mother went to Nashville on Sunday. Fitzgerald then demanded that the mother work for him as a prostitute. When she refused, he left her in Nashville and did not answer her repeated calls....