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    BROCKTON (CBS) – As coronavirus cases go up across the state, nurses are preparing for the worst. For Kylie Meiggs, it’s all bringing back some painful memories from the spring. “It does take a toll on healthcare workers,” said Meiggs. “It’s very overwhelming.” When the pandemic began in the spring, Kylie was in her first year as a nurse at Brockton’s Good Samaritan Medical Center. She says no matter how seasoned a nurse you are, “it can’t really prepare for the amount of deaths that you were seeing on a daily basis.” More than 300 people have died from COVID-19 in Brockton despite the tireless efforts of frontline workers like Kylie. “You were kind of labeled as this hero,” Meiggs said. “But at the end of the day, you don’t feel like a hero. You feel kind of helpless.” Kylie Meiggs, nurse at Brockton’s Good Samaritan Medical Center (WBZ-TV) That...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — With Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine on track for approval as early as next month, Community Hospital in Munster could be among the first hospitals in Indiana to distribute the vaccine to frontline healthcare workers. The Indiana State Department of Health has identified five hospitals that will be the first to receive doses of the vaccine later this month, for distribution to healthcare workers once the treatment is approved: Community Hospital in Munster Clark Memorial Hospital in Jeffersonville Deaconess in Evansville Indiana University Health Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis Parkview Health in Ft. Wayne The hospitals were chosen based on their ability to store Pfizer’s vaccine, which must be stored at super subzero cold temperatures reaching -60° to -80° Celsius. Pfizer said Monday that human trials suggest its coronavirus vaccine is 90% effective at preventing COVID-19 infections in people not known to have had the virus already. The pharmaceutical giant said...
    North Dakota hospitals are reportedly at full capacity amid surging coronavirus cases and a shortage of healthcare workers. On Monday, Gov. Doug Burgum announced a new measure to address the dire situation, allowing COVID-19-positive healthcare workers who are asymptomatic to continue working on coronavirus patients, the Grand Forks Herald reported. The shortage in healthcare workers has translated to less available hospital beds, and staffing is made more complicated as COVID-19 patients usually require a separate set of nurses who are confined to coronavirus wards. About 20 percent of hospitalized patients in the state are being treated for coronavirus, the report said. A recent rise in patients without coronavirus has also contributed to the resource shortage. Another proposal touched on by Burgum to address the hospital staffing shortage is hiring EMTs and paramedics to operate COVID-19 testing centers, freeing up the nurses currently working at the sites. Hospitals in North...
    North Dakota hospitals are reportedly at full capacity amid surging coronavirus cases and a shortage of healthcare workers. On Monday, Gov. Doug Burgum announced a new measure to address the dire situation, allowing COVID-19-positive healthcare workers who are asymptomatic to continue working on coronavirus patients, the Grand Forks Herald reported. The shortage in healthcare workers has translated to less available hospital beds, and staffing is made more complicated as COVID-19 patients usually require a separate set of nurses who are usually confined to coronavirus wards. About 20 percent of hospitalized patients in the state are being treated for coronavirus, the report said. A recent rise in patients without coronavirus has also contributed to the resource shortage. Another proposal touched on by Burgum to address the hospital staffing shortage is hiring EMTs and paramedics to operate COVID-19 testing centers, freeing up the nurses currently working at the sites. Hospitals in North...
    DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – The rising number of COVID-19 cases in North Texas is having an impact on area hospitals. President and CEO of the DFW Hospital Council Stephen Love said right now, there are about 1,700 coronavirus patients in North Texas hospitals. This number accounts for hospitals throughout Collin, Dallas, Denton, Tarrant and Grayson counties. “That’s running about 85% of the highest level we ran in July,” he said. “So we’re definitely on the uptick.” In terms of ICU beds, about 33% are filled with coronavirus patients, but overall there’s still capacity. There’s also a good amount of PPE. Some healthcare workers however, are experiencing fatigue. That’s something Dallas County Health and Human Services Director Dr. Philip Huang touched on. “If we continue on the increasing rate and where we go and stress our hospital systems, I do not want to, at all, leave an impression that it’s not a...
    ANNAPOLIS, Md. (WJZ) — Gov. Larry Hogan is renewing his call for more healthcare workers to avoid shortages amid the coronavirus pandemic. Hogan is renewing his call for more health care workers to avoid shortages @wjz — Mike Hellgren (@HellgrenWJZ) November 5, 2020 In the spring, the governor issued an executive order to fast-track the licensing process to allow for out of state healthcare practitioners and expired medical licenses to be able to assist during the pandemic. CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE: TIMELINE: Coronavirus In Maryland, Tracking The Spread Latest coronavirus stories from WJZ Latest CDC Guidelines The executive order also instituted a program to allow medical students, nursing students and medical technician students from colleges and universities to be able to assist and be part of the medical relief effort. “More than 15,000 people signed up to be a part of this initiative from every single jurisdiction throughout the state,”...
    The rise in coronavirus cases across the US is again threatening the supply of masks for healthcare workers, according to a report. After an initial shortage at the start of the pandemic, many hospitals and healthcare workers started stockpiling the highest-standard N95 masks. But record levels of new infections have left many healthcare workers again resorting to re-wearing the vital protective item — and many healthcare authorities fearing they will run out, according to the Wall Street Journal. New Mexico said last week that nearly 90 percent of its hospitals were reusing N95 masks under emergency guidelines. And in Michigan, where the recommendation is to have a three-month supply ready, nearly two-thirds of health systems are reporting less than a three-week supply for masks and other protective equipment, the paper said. Some are reporting less than a week’s supply. “We would really like to beef up our stockpiles, but volume...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — It’s Purple Friday, and the Ravens are already working hard. This time, it’s off the field giving back to first responders. The Ravens Caravan stopped at five locations, all giving back to first responders and healthcare workers. After a stop at the Baltimore Police Northwest District, there was a huge celebration at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital. “We just want to focus on these first responders who not only take care of us every day, but the past couple months have been really tough on them as well, so we just want to celebrate them,” Katie Bollinger, of the Baltimore Ravens, said. The Ravens Caravan also stopped at the Baltimore Police Northeast District, where the men and women in blue got some hot coffee, posters and pictures with Poe. The Ravens take on the Pittsburgh Steelers Sunday at 1 p.m. You can catch all the action right here...
    BOSTON (CBS) –Tal Zaks, the medical director of the Cambridge-based biotech company Moderna, says “We’re ready.” “By the end of this year we expect to have approximately 20 million doses ready to ship in the US,” he said. The news came during a conference call Thursday morning, in which executives announced they’re ready to dole out the potential COVID-19 vaccine Moderna calls MRNA-1273. They said they’re in the last stages of a trial involving 30,000 volunteers. Is the public ready to line up for shots? “Most likely, yes,” said Brendan Lownsbury, of Natick. Others are hesitant. “I might tend to prefer to wait a little bit,” said Amy Stowe. While Moderna says it already has $1.1 billion in pre-order deposits, experts say the actual roll-out could take as long as a year. According to Massachusetts’ coronavirus distribution plan, the first doses would go to the elderly, to high-risk patients, and...
    When you buy through our links, we may earn money from our affiliate partners. Learn more. Colleen Sullivan/INSIDER O'Keeffe's Working Hands Hand Cream quenches the insatiable dry skin feeling I get after washing my hands. It doesn't leave behind any stickiness, so I can immediately move onto whatever task is at hand. The cream is also fragrance-free, making it ideal for people with skin sensitivities. I sent the product to two top NYC dermatologists for testing and they've joined the growing chorus of healthcare workers who love this product.  O'Keeffe's Working Hands Hand Cream $5.68 from Walmart I am a compulsive hand washer. Yesterday, I went to the sink 31 times. Yes, I counted. I was up for 17 hours, meaning I washed away the natural oils on my hands almost twice an hour.  The Center for Disease Control suggests we wash our hands before, during,...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- UCSF Medical Center is trying to determine how COVID-19 recently spread to five people at one of its units, prompting more than 40 additional employees and patients to be quarantined over the past week."We have not yet determined the original source or exact sequence of these infections," UCSF said in a statement. "However, we have isolated these patients and employees, and are working to identify, test and quarantine other individuals who may have been exposed to them, or who have symptoms."UCSF tells ABC7 News its investigation started when two patients who were sharing a room and three employees who cared for them tested positive for the virus.Those three health care workers are experiencing mild symptoms.The hospital says the two patients who tested positive do not have symptoms and had negative COVID-19 tests before being admitted."One unexpectedly tested positive on a routine discharge test. This launched an...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – Doctors say the spike in coronavirus cases is expected this time of year. One reason being schools have reopened, while some are just tired of the COVID-19 life. In the last two weeks, the average coronavirus deaths per day are up 10%, and this could increase as the flu season is just beginning. Also, cases in children are up 14%. You can see that with several schools having to make adjustments by moving to a hybrid learning model or going remote. “Schools are still reopening so I think that explains why the numbers are going up,” said Dr. Sunjay Mannan of Allegheny Health Network. “They can be a silent vector of the disease.” Local doctors say it’s crucial to continue wearing a mask and keep your distance from others. In Allegheny County, the new cases range in age from 3 weeks to...
    ANAHEIM (CBSLA) – It’s an effort to get free tutoring and babysitting to the children of healthcare workers engaged in the fight against COVID. Mina Bigdeli is Orange County director of Covid Child Care, an organization offering free childcare, tutoring and errand running to health care workers impacted by the pandemic. We’re basically a group of students, or just graduated, and we got home from our universities and we saw that “we have some extra time on our hands,” said Bigdeli. So she went to work coordinating some 300 volunteers with health care parents desperately need, help with childcare, online learning, and grocery shopping. Samantha Thomas, an RN at Loma Linda Children’s Hospital, says her job has made finding a babysitter tough “People don’t really want to watch your kid because they assume you are infectious,” she said. Covid Child Care paired Samantha with volunteer Andrea Uribe, a...
    By Gabriella Borter NEW YORK (Reuters) - New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said on Sunday that healthcare workers and high-risk populations, including some long-term care residents, would get priority in his state to receive a COVID-19 vaccine when one is approved and available. According to the five-phase preliminary plan for New York's vaccine administration program, some details of which Cuomo announced at a news briefing, healthcare workers in patient-care settings, long-term care facility workers and some long-term care residents would be among the first to receive a vaccine. In the second phase of vaccine rollout, first responders, school staff, other public-facing frontline workers and people whose health conditions put them at extreme risk would get priority for the vaccine. In Phase 3, it would be administered to people over 65. All remaining essential workers would receive the vaccine in a fourth phase, and healthy adults and children would receive it...
    NICE, France (Reuters) - French healthcare workers protested against exhausting working conditions during the coronavirus pandemic on Thursday and demanded the government hire more personnel. In the Riviera city of Nice, doctors and nurses gathered in front of a post office to send postcards detailing their grievances to President Emmanuel Macron, part of a day of nationwide protests planned by trade unions. Marching through the streets, some in scrubs and surgical masks, the healthcare workers called for an end to hospital closures, more staff for emergency rooms and nursing homes, and better pay. In a direct message to Macron, who announced nightly curfews in virus hotspots on Wednesday, the protesters wrote on one banner: "Hire more. Train more. We're exhausted." Macron said the curfews in the Paris region and eight other cities would drastically reduce the number of daily new coronavirus cases from the current 20,000 and ease the strain...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health Tuesday reported 790 newly confirmed coronavirus cases and 18 new deaths, bringing countywide totals to 283,750 cases and 6,790 deaths. Health officials said the number of new cases and deaths reflected a reporting lag over the holiday weekend. Of the new deaths reported, 11 people were over the age of 80, five were between the ages of 65 and 79 and two were between the ages of 50 and 64. Fifteen had underlying health conditions. Health officials also reported a sharp decline in the number of healthcare workers testing positive for COVID-19 from 704 new cases reported for the week of July 4 to 368 new cases reported last week. There have been a total of 16,080 cases reported among healthcare workers and first responders in Los Angeles County and 99 deaths. Nearly 70% of the cases were...
    An increasing number of U.S. doctors and healthcare workers have already relocated to New Zealand or plan to do so for at least a temporary period due to the island countrys impressive handling of the coronavirus pandemic, CNBC reported on Monday. A spokesperson for Global Medical Staffing, a recruitment organization that aids doctors in finding jobs worldwide, said that inquiries have risen about relocating to New Zealand from the U.S. and that more physicians who already moved to work there are extending their contracts. The most cited reasons among American doctors are New Zealands better performance in battling the pandemic and the countrys leadership in showing a greater respect for science and social guidance measures. New Zealand recently won worldwide praise by declaring victory over the virus by eliminating community spread for the second time. The country, which fills many of its medical openings with overseas workers, makes it relatively easy to...
    ORANGE, Ca. (CBS NEWS) — Saturday, October 10, is World Mental Health Day, which this year has a new sense of urgency for many. COVID-19 has taken a mental and emotional toll on healthcare workers across the U.S. At UC Irvine Medical Center in Southern California, therapy dogs Dexter and Monet have an important mission, to bring smiles and comfort to healthcare workers. The dogs are part of the hospital’s volunteer pet therapy program, visiting employees once a month. Brad Giafaglione oversees the program and says it’s more crucial than ever. CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE: TIMELINE: Coronavirus In Maryland, Tracking The Spread Latest coronavirus stories from WJZ Latest CDC Guidelines “We really needed a way to decompress and destress our staff,” he said. “We thought to ourselves, if it works well for the patients, why wouldn’t it work well for our staff?” Healthcare workers are vulnerable to burnout from their...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami)  — Saturday, October 10 is World Mental Health Day, which this year has a new sense of urgency for many.  COVID-19 has taken a mental and emotional toll on healthcare workers across the U.S but there is a program boosting the spirits of doctors and nurses on the frontlines. At UC Irvine Medical Center in Southern California, therapy dogs Dexter and Monet have an important mission, to bring smiles and comfort to healthcare workers. The dogs are part of the hospital’s volunteer pet therapy program, visiting employees once a month. Brad Giafaglione oversees the program and says it’s more crucial than ever. “We really needed a way to decompress and destress our staff. We thought to ourselves, if it works well for the patients, why wouldn’t it work well for our staff,” he says. Pet therapy dogs used to help healthcare workers destress (CBS4) Healthcare workers are vulnerable...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — About 200 technical healthcare workers for Allina Health began a two-day strike Monday morning, citing health and safety demands during the COVID-19 pandemic. Workers started picketing at 6 a.m. at the St. Francis Regional Medical Center in Shakopee and Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis. Allina Health Tech workers, members of SEIU Healthcare Minnesota union, authorized the two-day Unfair Labor Practice strike in September. The group is calling for better pay and safety for both workers and patients. The healthcare workers striking include medical lab technicians, sleep lab technicians, surgical techs and other technical positions. “Unlike their co-workers, who have protections to keep their pay and benefits if they have to quarantine from COVID-19 exposure, these workers currently have a temporary agreement for the first time they have to quarantine, but in the last month multiple workers have been forced to use their sick...
    President Donald Trump's planned Wisconsin rallies have been canceled after he and the first lady tested positive for COVID-19, while the state has decided to allow outside healthcare workers in to help amid a surge in virus cases.Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers issued a new executive order, allowing licensed healthcare professionals from out-of-state to help care for local COVID-19 patients.Wisconsin reported 2,892 new coronavirus cases, with 19 additional deaths Saturday. The state set a new record for COVID-19 deaths on Wednesday with 27.Wisconsin hospital officials report they're close to being overwhelmed by COVID-19 patients, forcing doctors to transfer patients to other facilities and build waiting lists. State health officials also reported a total of 7,588 COVID-19 patients were hospitalized as of Saturday.Over the course of the pandemic, 130,798 people have tested positive for the coronavirus. About 82% of those people have recovered, while over 24,000 have active infections and 1,372 have...
    (CNN) — The malaria drug hydroxychloroquine — which President Trump said he took in the hope of warding off COVID-19 — was found not to prevent infections among volunteers in a study released on Wednesday. The study, which was ended early, included 125 healthcare workers — some of whom took hydroxychloroquine daily for eight weeks while the others took a placebo. “There was no significant difference in infection rates in participants randomized to receive hydroxychloroquine compared with placebo,” the researchers wrote in the study, published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. Based on their findings, the researchers from the University of Pennsylvania wrote that they “cannot recommend the routine use of hydroxychloroquine” among healthcare workers to prevent COVID-19. Participants enrolled in the new study from April to July. It found that four of the 64 healthcare workers who were randomly given hydroxychloroquine ended up testing positive for COVID-19 and four of the...
    DETROIT (CBS Detroit) – Henry Ford Hospital employee, John King, received a new ride today. King said, “It’s a very kind act in today’s time.” This was part of a group effort with B4E Detroit, Henry Ford Health, and Detroit City Councilman Scott Benson. Benson said, “Since so many of our Detroit employees who are essential workers don’t have access to reliable transportation, we wanted to make sure that they had another reliable alternate way to get too and from work safely.” Councilman Benson says providing these free bikes to essential workers not only protects them from possible exposure to COVID-19 by using public transportation. It also provides them with a healthy, active lifestyle. Benson said, “This is a great way, ride to work, ride to the store.” In all 40 essential workers, from grocery store employees to healthcare providers, have received the free bikes. Today 22 bikes were...
    BOYLE HEIGHTS (CBSLA) — A teen mom who overcame incredible odds has become a role model for her community — paving the way for the next generation of registered nurses at a Boyle Heights hospital. At 18, Tanya Piazza became a single mother. Now, she’s in charge of the nurse residency program at White Memorial Medical Center. (Credit: Tanya Piazza) “You have good days, you have bad days,” Tanya Piazza, a nurse at White Memorial Medical Center, said. “But, we never have a wasted day.” That motto is one of the first lessons Piazza teaches each incoming class of nursing residents. She not only trains new nurses in patient care, she uses her own challenging path to help them navigate the journey. “I struggled a lot,” Piazza said. At 18, Piazza became a single mom desperate to provide for her newborn daughter. Living in California’s Central Valley, Piazza went to...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) – Food service workers who have been laid off by a Los Angeles International Airport concessionaire held a protest Thursday morning outside the airport, claiming that the company has refused to provide them with extended healthcare benefits. Food service workers protest outside Los Angeles International Airport. Sept. 17, 2020. (CBSLA) The protesters worked for Areas USA, an international food services corporation which employs about 700 workers at LAX alone. The union which represents the workers alleges that other concessionaires at the airport have continued to pay their laid-off employees their health benefits for several months after they were laid off. Like airports worldwide, LAX has seen a plunge in passenger traffic because of the coronavirus pandemic, which in turn has hurt shops and restaurants in the airport. According to its latest numbers, LAX saw a little over 1.52 million travelers in July, that’s a full 82% drop...
    By Karen Lema and Clare Baldwin MANILA (Reuters) - From across the Philippines, they gathered to pray by Zoom. They were praying to be allowed to leave: To be allowed to take up nursing jobs in countries where the coronavirus is killing thousands in hospitals and care homes. In recent months, these care workers have taken to calling themselves "priso-nurses." With infections also surging in the Philippines, the government in April banned healthcare workers from leaving the country. They were needed, it said, to fight the pandemic at home. But many of the nurses on the two-hour Zoom call on Aug. 20, organised by a union and attended by nearly 200 health workers both in the Philippines and abroad, were unwilling to work at home. They said they felt underpaid, unappreciated and unprotected. Nurses have been leaving the Philippines for decades, encouraged by the government to join other workers who...
    Nursing homes in the United States make up more than 40% of our country’s coronavirus-related deaths even though nursing homes make up less than 10% of the total documented coronavirus cases in the U.S. On the one hand, this isn’t that surprising as nursing home residents make up some of the members of our country’s population who are at the highest risk. Nursing homes, however, have seen intensely high numbers, and it turns out those numbers have not been equally dispersed across the country. Why? A study led by George Washington University professor Adam Dean published findings in Health Affairs on Sept. 10. In it, they found that even though nursing homes were hit hard by the 2019 novel coronavirus, facilities with unionized healthcare workers saw a “30% relative decrease in the COVID-19 mortality rate compared to facilities without health care worker unions.” The team also found that there was “a 42% relative decrease in COVID-19 infection rates.”  While this...
    Ole Miss accidentally put porn star Johnny Sins on a cup honoring healthcare workers. The Rebels created a cup featuring the faces of medical workers in an attempt to honor them during the coronavirus pandemic. There was just one major problem. (RELATED: David Hookstead Is The True King In The North When It Comes To College Football) As noticed by many people, the adult film star appeared on the cup dressed as a doctor. You can see photos of the cup below. Oh No @OleMissSports… ???? pic.twitter.com/VXnm1R3pIp — W00PIGS000IE (@W00PIGS000IE) September 10, 2020 Oh my god… OLE MISS PUT JOHNNY SINS ON THE STADIUM CUPS ???????? pic.twitter.com/i4IwFzhSti — Justin King (@kingjustin1996) September 10, 2020 Known hero from Ole Miss…Johnny Sins @UnnecRoughness pic.twitter.com/g4fqhMGQkj — Barstool Sports (@barstoolsports) September 10, 2020 This is honestly one of the funniest things I’ve seen in a very long time. How does a mistake like this even get...
    Family members of George Floyd have been notified that multiple employees of a Minneapolis healthcare system have improperly accessed the man’s medical records sometime in the last 30 days, an attorney for the family said. Attorney Antonio Romanucci told KARE 11 that family members received a letter from Hennepin Healthcare, notifying them of the breach. Romanucci said the letter says those involved “no longer work at the organization.” He said the letter provided few other details, including how many people were involved and what information was accessed. Romanucci said the family is considering suing Hennepin Healthcare. “They feel it’s a continued assassination of George Floyd, his character,” Romanucci said. “It’s a non-stop issue. And they were very upset, very disturbed, disappointed that even in death, that George Floyd’s character is being maligned by people that didn’t have any business looking at his private medical record.” Romanucci did not  respond to...
    Multiple employees at the hospital where George Floyd was pronounced dead inappropriately accessed his medical records, according to the family’s lawyer. Attorney Antonio Romanucci told KARE 11 the Minneapolis hospital, Hennepin Healthcare, sent a letter to the family alerting them of the data breaches, which occurred over the last 30 days. Romanucci said the family is considering suing the hospital, fearing the breaches could have played into an attempt to assassinate Floyd’s character after he was killed by a Minneapolis police officer. “They feel it’s a continued assassination of George Floyd, his character,” Romanucci said. “It’s a non-stop issue. And they were very upset, very disturbed, disappointed that even in death, that George Floyd’s character is being maligned by people that didn’t have any business looking at his private medical record.” The letter stated that the employees who were caught “no longer work at the organization,” according to Romanucci. But...
    Multiple staff members of a Minneapolis healthcare system have been fired after improperly accessing the George Floyd’s medical records at some point in the past month, an attorney for Floyd’s family said Wednesday. Attorney Antonio Romanucci told Minneapolis’ KARE 11 that family members received a letter from Hennepin Healthcare, notifying them of the breach. People carry posters with George Floyd on them as they march from the Lincoln Memorial to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial during the March on Washington, Friday Aug. 28, 2020, in Washington.  (AP) Romanucci said the letter says those involved "no longer work at the organization." He said the letter did not elaborate on details like how many people were involved and what information was accessed. Romanucci said the family is considering suing Hennepin Healthcare. "They feel it's a continued assassination of George Floyd, his character," Romanucci said. "It's a nonstop issue....
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Family members of George Floyd have been notified that multiple employees of a Minneapolis healthcare system have improperly accessed the man’s medical records sometime in the last 30 days, an attorney for the family said. Attorney Antonio Romanucci told KARE 11 that family members received a letter from Hennepin Healthcare, notifying them of the breach. Romanucci said the letter says those involved “no longer work at the organization.” He said the letter provided few other details, including how many people were involved and what information was accessed. Romanucci said the family is considering suing Hennepin Healthcare. “They feel it’s a continued assassination of George Floyd, his character,” Romanucci said. “It’s a non-stop issue. And they were very upset, very disturbed, disappointed that even in death, that George Floyd’s character is being maligned by people that didn’t have any business looking at his private medical record.”...
    Lawmakers push to award posthumous Medal of Honor to Army medic Cpl. Waverly Woodson Jr. Cold weather brings new fears for struggling restaurant owners Ellen Pompeo Puts Her Scrubs Back on and Dedicates Greys Anatomy Season 17 to Healthcare Workers Grey's Anatomy is officially back in action.  The Season 3 Premiere of Station 19 Will Be a Giant Greys Anatomy Crossover E! See more videos SHARE SHARE TWEET SHARE EMAIL What to watch next Nikki Bella Strips Down & Gets Real About Her Post-Baby Body: "It Isnt Easy" E! Elsa Pataky Pays Tribute to "Amazing" Dad Chris Hemsworth With Adorable Photo E! Lupita Nyongo Honors Chadwick Boseman With Heart-Wrenching Tribute: "It Doesn’t Make Sense" E! The Secret Behind Pinks Thoroughly Modern Marriage to Carey Hart E! Justin Bieber Debuts Massive Neck Tattoo E! Armie Hammer Spotted Grabbing...
    By EDNA TARIGAN and VICTORIA MILKO, Associated Press JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — While Indonesia has recorded more deaths from the coronavirus than any other Southeast Asian country, it also has seen by far the most fatalities among medical workers in the region, leading to concerns about the long-term impact on the nation's fragile healthcare system. The tribulations endured by Indonesian healthcare workers are similar to others globally: long working hours, hospitals filled to capacity and a lack of resources like personal protective equipment. Indonesia's government has been able to provide PPE to healthcare workers after an initial shortage that saw doctors wearing plastic raincoats while working. But other issues remain in the country, where more than 200 medical workers, mostly doctors and nurses, have died from the virus. According to Dr. Halik Malik, spokesperson for the Indonesian Medical Association, coronavirus and non-coronavirus patients are often treated in the same healthcare...
    JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — While Indonesia has recorded more deaths from the coronavirus than any other Southeast Asian country, it also has seen by far the most fatalities among medical workers in the region, leading to concerns about the long-term impact on the nation’s fragile healthcare system. The tribulations endured by Indonesian healthcare workers are similar to others globally: long working hours, hospitals filled to capacity and a lack of resources like personal protective equipment. Indonesia’s government has been able to provide PPE to healthcare workers after an initial shortage that saw doctors wearing plastic raincoats while working. But other issues remain in the country, where more than 200 medical workers, mostly doctors and nurses, have died from the virus. According to Dr. Halik Malik, spokesperson for the Indonesian Medical Association, coronavirus and non-coronavirus patients are often treated in the same healthcare facilities, increasing workers’ potential exposure to the virus....
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — A Maryland congressman wants to award “hero pay” — or bonuses — to hospital workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic. The legislation is being proposed by Baltimore County Representative Dutch Ruppersberger. He named the bill after Doctor Joseph Costa, the Director of the Critical Care Unit at Mercy Medical Center who died of the coronavirus in July. CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE: TIMELINE: Coronavirus In Maryland, Tracking The Spread Latest coronavirus stories from WJZ Latest CDC Guidelines The proposal would provide hazard pay to doctors, nurses, specialists and non-medical staff, such as custodians who work in close proximity to infected patients. The specific bonus amount is not yet clear, nor where the funding would come from. Ruppersburger will formally unveil the proposal Thursday at Mercy Medical Center. For the latest information on coronavirus go to the Maryland Health Department’s website or call 211. You can find all...
    PRETORIA, South Africa (AP) — South African healthcare workers have protested against poor working conditions and urged the government to end corruption in the purchase of COVID-19 personal protective equipment. The protesters gathered Thursday in Pretoria and Cape Town, charging that the lives of healthcare workers are endangered as some health facilities have inadequate supplies of protective equipment like surgical masks. The union leading the demonstrations, the National Education, Health and Allied Workers’ Union, has threatened that its 200,000 public workers will go on strike on Sept. 10 if their issues are not addressed. A widespread strike by healthcare workers would cause serious problems for South Africa’s hospitals, which have been stretched to the limit by the coronavirus. Although the number of new confirmed cases of COVID-19 has decreased, South Africa is still reporting more than 2,000 new cases per day and the country has been warned of a...
    Of course she does. Ick. Maybe Joni Ernst got some backlash from Team Trump for "running on local issues" and trying to avoid the Trump racist conspiracy theory trap. To prove her bizarro bona fides, she decided to go QAnon and accuse Iowa's medical community of falsifying COVID-19 data for the money. Ernst told a gathering of about 100 supporters that she's “so skeptical” of the official death count from coronavirus. “They’re thinking there may be 10,000 or less deaths that were actually singularly COVID-19,” Ernst said. “I’m just really curious. It would be interesting to know that.” Uh-huh. "They're" thinking. They being the whack-job QAnon proponents who've found a side-line from Democratic pedophiliac pizza parlors in COVID-19 trutherism. She went even beyond that, though, to skate up to the line of accusing Iowa's medical community of fraud. “These health care providers and others are reimbursed at a higher rate...
    MONTEREY PARK (CBSLA) — Healthcare workers in Monterey Park held a moment of silence Tuesday night at a vigil for their fallen colleagues — five medical professionals who all worked at AHMC hospitals in the San Gabriel Valley and all lost their battles with COVID-19. “It scares me,” said critical care technician Tony Ramirez, who works at Garfield Medical Center. He lost three of his co-workers: radiology technician Da-wei Liang, cardiology technician Thong Nguyen, and unit secretary Alex Palomo. Their colleagues shared special memories about each of them. Liang was a husband and father. Nguyen immigrated from Vietnam with his three young daughters to offer them a better life. Palomo made every patient feel safe and cared for during their stay at Garfield Medical Center. Those at the vigil also honored the lives of two more AHMC medical professionals who died from coronavirus-related complications: Imelda Sudlra, a secretary at Greater...
    SACRAMENTO —  California lawmakers Monday wrapped up a legislative session largely defined by the pandemic, as they approved new COVID-19 sick leave for food workers, added sweeping labor protections for laid-off hotel employees and eased tax burdens on cash-strapped Californians wanting to borrow money from their retirement accounts. Several key proposals were still being debated Monday night ahead of the legislative deadline to send bills to Gov. Gavin Newsom. Among the pending bills was a measure to make it easier for employees who contract COVID-19 at work to qualify for workers’ compensation. Lawmakers were also considering whether to require healthcare providers to stockpile masks to avoid a future shortage. The bills made their way through the Capitol after the building itself had to be shuttered twice this year due to the coronavirus, shortening the time lawmakers had to craft and debate proposals. At least three lawmakers have been diagnosed...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – It was a day of piano music all across the city on Sunday. A piano performance took place outside of UPMC Shadyside to honor the efforts and sacrifices of healthcare workers during the coronavirus pandemic. That performance was part of “Piano Day Pittsburgh” and concerts just like it popped up all over the city. Jazz pianist Joe DeFazio and others traveled to Bloomfield and the Strip District to perform, as well.
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Some local organizations made sure that healthcare workers in the Pittsburgh area received PPE equipment. On Friday, several groups gave out N-95 masks and face shields in preparation for a potential fall wave of COVID-19. Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald says it’s another example of the community coming together during the pandemic. “You’ve got the Huntington Bank, you’ve got the Allegheny Medical Society, you’ve got Light of Life Mission, you’ve got the Foundation Community donating PPEs, putting out the N-95 masks, which are more protective than the traditional masks we have,” Fitzgerald said on Friday. The groups say some of the masks will also be given to people who are homeless.
    A preliminary study by Kaiser Health News and the Guardian found more nurses died from the pandemic than any other of the 177 confirmed deaths of healthcare workers. KHN and The Guardian reported 68 of those deaths were nurses, and 21 of them were doctors. Workers in the "support" category such as home health aides and occupational therapists, accounted for 30 deaths followed by administrators and other medically related professions, according to their website.  According to Business Insider, nurses on the frontline have expressed concern over their health and safety since they spend much more time with patients than all other healthcare workers. Earlier this month, The Guardian cited dire shortages of protective equipment, under staffing, and an overburdened healthcare system as reasons medical care workers were dying. Masks have been rationed and sometimes shared, nurses claim, adding N95 masks were often locked up and not distributed. At Mount Sinai Hospital...
    Nurses have died from COVID-19 at more than twice the rate of any other medical profession, a new study shows.  The preliminary study, led by The Guardian and Kaiser Health News, analyzes the 1,079 healthcare workers who have died in the US of COVID-19, finding that of the 177 workers currently profiled, 68 are nurses. The next highest death rate in healthcare workers are health care support at 30 and physicians at 21. The numbers continued to be updated on The Guardian’s website. (RELATED: Trump Strikes Deal To Secure 150 Million COVID-19 Rapid Tests For Schools And Nursing Homes) (Photo by MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP via Getty Images) Nurses are believed to spend the most time with COVID-19 patients at hospitals. At the height of the pandemic, nurses expressed concerns over shortages of masks and an inability to take sick leave when contracting the coronavirus, Business Insider reported.  The Guardian/KHN study also...
    A majority of Americans believe that there should be a priority system in place when it comes to determining who gets a coronavirus vaccine first, according to a new poll. According to a Harris poll shared with Axios on Monday, Americans say people who are high-risk and fighting the virus on the front lines should have first dibs on becoming vaccinated. Poll results show: 69% of Americans say they support a priority system for distributing a vaccine. 73% of Americans say healthcare workers should have priority access to a COVID-19 vaccine. 71% of Americans say seniors should have first grabs on a coronavirus vaccine. 68% of Americans say people who are immunocompromised should have access to a coronavirus vaccine first. 60% of Americans say that essential workers should have early access to a COVID-19 vaccine. According to the poll results, 66% of Americans say if the U.S. develops...
    CNN’s Anderson Cooper broke down crying after a report about one Florida healthcare worker’s harrowing fight with the coronavirus, who remained upbeat and offered well wishes to the CNN anchor’s adopted son, Wyatt, even as she faces the possible amputation of her hands from the disease. On Friday’s second-hour of AC360, the show broadcast a story from reporter Randi Kaye, who profiled a 41-year-old, wife and mother of two boys, Rosa Felipe, an EEG technician from Miami. Felipe likely contracted Covid-19 during her work at a hospital, where she has now been a patient in serious condition since early March. Felipe has two co-morbidities—asthma and diabetes—and spent two months on a ventilator. She has since recovered enough to breathe on her own, but the virus caused dangerous circulation issues in her hands, where blood costs caused her fingers to blacken and decompose. As a result, it’s now likely she will...
    CNN’s Anderson Cooper broke down crying after a report about one Florida healthcare worker’s harrowing fight with the coronavirus, who remained upbeat and offered well wishes to the CNN anchor’s adopted son, Wyatt, even as she faces the possible amputation of her hands from the disease. On Friday’s second-hour of AC360, the show broadcast a story from reporter Randi Kaye, who profiled a 41-year-old, wife and mother of two boys, Rosa Felipe, an EEG technician from Miami. Felipe likely contracted Covid-19 during her work at a hospital, where she has now been a patient in serious condition since early March. Felipe has two co-morbidities—asthma and diabetes—and spent two months on a ventilator. She has since recovered enough to breathe on her own, but the virus caused dangerous circulation issues in her hands, where blood costs caused her fingers to blacken and decompose. As a result, it’s now likely she will...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — As researchers across the world rush to develop a safe COVID-19 vaccine, questions are starting to emerge about who will get the vaccine first. A group from John’s Hopkins University released recommendations about who should be first in line. “There is certainly general consensus from my perspective that front line workers need to be part of the initial roll out, because it does the greatest good for everybody,” said Carleigh Krubiner an associate faculty member in the Berman Institute at Johns Hopkins University. The group released a report which includes two tiers. CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE: TIMELINE: Coronavirus In Maryland, Tracking The Spread Latest coronavirus stories from WJZ Latest CDC Guidelines Tier 1 includes essential workers who help in the ongoing COVID-19 response, people at risk of severe illness and death, along with their caregivers, and people who are essential to maintaining core societal functions. In tier...
    The expiration of weekly stipends for health care workers late last month has stoked fears of widespread staffing shortages in New Hampshire. The Concord Monitor reported that a lack of federal support for New Hampshire’s budget prompted Gov. Chris Sununu to not extend the Long Term Stabilization program, which previously provided stipends to 23,000 frontline workers. The state implemented the program during the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S. in early April. Under the program, full-time front-line health care workers received $300 weekly stipends, while $150 went to part-time workers. The program’s expiration and Sununu’s decision to not extend it comes just as New Hampshire grapples with staffing shortages in long-term care facilities dating back to before the coronavirus outbreak. Brendan Williams, the president of the New Hampshire Health Care Association, told the Monitor the move would exacerbate the shortages as many frontline...
    By Alaa Elassar, CNN (CNN) — A nurse at a Virginia hospital is being hailed a hero for starting a free pantry to help colleagues struggling to make ends meet during the coronavirus pandemic. Stacy Mason, who has worked at Mary Washington Hospital’s Intensive Care Unit (ICU) in Fredericksburg for more than seven years, established the “team cupboard” in May, after hearing health care workers talk about being unable to find essential items, like sanitary wipes and diapers. The initiative started as effort to help workers in the ICU, but quickly grew to include the entire hospital system. “Our ICU is truly like a family, especially now more than ever. We bond together, we celebrate the good times and mourn the bad times,” Mason told CNN. “So when this started happening, we began looking after one another. So I thought, if we can do this as an ICU, why can’t...
    LYNWOOD, Calif. (KABC) -- A group of workers at a Lynwood hospital who recently lost their jobs after it was sold and are now expressing concerns about the quality of care in midst of the coronavirus pandemic.Those laid-off workers gathered Friday to protest the change in ownership of St. Francis Medical Center, acquired by Prime Healthcare.Ana Navarro was laid off Thursday after working at the hospital for two years and says the situation is "very emotional" and confusion to all those affected.The hospital was in bankruptcy but one of the unions, SEIU United Service Workers West, fought against the deal and claims as many as 1/3 of hospital employees were losing their jobs, many of them in key departments, including emergency care and environmental services.Mayra Castañeda also lost her job after 23 years."We found out that only half of the housekeeping staff is there today, so you have half of...
    (CNN)A nurse at a Virginia hospital is being hailed a hero for starting a free pantry to help colleagues struggling to make ends meet during the coronavirus pandemic.Stacy Mason, who has worked at Mary Washington Hospital's Intensive Care Unit (ICU) in Fredericksburg for more than seven years, established the "team cupboard" in May, after hearing health care workers talk about being unable to find essential items, like sanitary wipes and diapers.The initiative started as effort to help workers in the ICU, but quickly grew to include the entire hospital system."Our ICU is truly like a family, especially now more than ever. We bond together, we celebrate the good times and mourn the bad times," Mason told CNN. "So when this started happening, we began looking after one another. So I thought, if we can do this as an ICU, why can't we do this for the hospital and the whole...
    As India celebrates 74th year of Independence on August 15, 2020, we can’t help but acknowledge that this year the situation is far different from the rest. This time the nation is fighting together against the deadly pandemic of coronavirus and amid this situation, the real heroes who have been keeping us safe are none other than the frontline workers at hospitals. Actor Amitabh Bachchan took to Twitter to convey his Independence Day wishes to his fellow countrymen and saluted the work of healthcare workers. Independence Day 2020: From Manoj Bajpayee’s 1971 To Deepika Padukone’s Khelein Hum Jee Jaan Sey, 5 Underrated Patriotic Films. The actor took to Twitter to share a beautiful post celebrating the 74th Independence day. The actor along with a poem that spoke about the country’s values and foundations and also shared a few pictures of sketches of healthcare professionals in masks. Sharing the same, he...
    Dr. Claire Rezba, an anesthesiologist at a hospital in Richmond, Virginia, began tracking healthcare worker deaths in late March. She has since counted at least 1,000 lives lost while working in healthcare during the pandemic, the CDC has counted 625.  In April, when the CDC issued their first report on COVID-19 infections among U.S. health care personnel, the tally of deaths was 27. By then, Rezba said she had already identified 150 to 200.   "At that point, I got really upset that our numbers were so different," she told CBS News. "(Then it) evolved into a sense of purpose that these sacrifices shouldn't go unnoticed." Elmer Wilester Ricks Jr., 63, nursing assistant, Greensboro, North Carolina, died of #covid19 6/25. No additional information located. #healthcareheroes #WearAMask https://t.co/gL3PDJieku pic.twitter.com/CqiKy9s08d— US HCWs Lost to Covid19 (@CTZebra) August 13, 2020 Armed only with Google, Rezba started her count by searching for reported deaths in New York...
    ALBANY — The head of the nation’s largest healthcare workers union slammed New York’s top health official Friday for claiming that hospital workers had enough PPE during the height of the coronavirus pandemic. “1199SEIU members and other first responders have been risking their lives . . . They selflessly went into rooms of infected patients without the PPE needed to keep themselves safe,” 1199SEIU president George Gresham seethed in a withering statement of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s health chief. “It is unconscionable that their accounts of what they experienced in institutions are being questioned . . . Our members didn’t and still don’t have time to play politics – they’re too busy fighting to save lives.” Health Commissioner Howard Zucker cast doubt at a legislative hearing Wednesday on widespread reports that nurses and other healthcare workers were dangerously short on personal protective gear to fight COVID-19 in the spring. “Just because...
    LOS ANGELES -- Seeing a need for protective eyewear for doctors and nurses on the frontlines, Fitz Frames, a 3D-printed eyewear company switched gears and stepped up to help. "At this time, protection is paramount," said Los Angeles-based ophthalmologist Vicki Chan, M.D. "They were able to take their technology and then custom fit goggles."Fitz Frames, which specializes in custom-fitted glasses for kids, created a line of frames they called Fitz Protect, designed for enhanced safety in the fight against COVID-19."We have an app that scans your face. You do a virtual try-on, and then we take your measurements," said Schlumberger. "Then we 3D print custom glasses that fit just your face."The company also donates frames to healthcare workers who sign up on their waitlist. For more information, visit www.fitzframes.com
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — As coronavirus cases continue to rise in Los Angeles and the surrounding areas, Fatburger is getting back on the road to dish out an additional 10,000 meals to local hospitals. Back in April and May, the Fatmobile made stops at dozens of area hospitals serving up a total of 25,000 meals for local healthcare workers. This week the Fatmobile made stops at Berkley East Convalescent Hospital and Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, Huntington Beach Hospital in Huntington Beach, and Methodist Hospital of Southern California in Arcadia. ❤️???????? https://t.co/Bjv7UArsU8 — FATBURGER (@Fatburger) July 31, 2020 On Friday, the chain distributed food to LAC+USC Medical Center in Los Angeles. The Fatmobile intends on hitting the road again, though date and locations were not immediately released.
    KAUFMAN, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – A brother and sister showed their appreciation for healthcare workers by donating earnings from their lemonade stand. After watching the news, Brock Henricks, 9, and Emma, 7, told their mom they wanted to help their friends and family who work in healthcare. “My kids have been begging to do a lemonade stand and we thought this was a great way to raise money for others during the pandemic,” said Jenny Henricks, mother. Brock Henricks, 9, and his sister Emma, 7 (credit: Texas Health Resources) Brock and Emma decided that they would use the money they earned to buy snacks for staff at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Kaufman. “It meant so much that they wanted to use their proceeds from the lemonade stand to brighten our day,” said Chelsey Maddox, R.N., an Emergency Department nurse at Texas Health Kaufman. Along with the help of a few friends in...
    By Diego Oré MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - When the coronavirus epidemic began to intensify in Mexico at the end of March, Doctor Jose Garcia said his bosses at a public trauma hospital in Mexico City denied his request for masks, gloves and disinfectant. They argued such protective equipment was only necessary for those working directly with coronavirus patients, Garcia said. Unconvinced, he bought it himself. The hospital's director disputes this, saying all staff received protective equipment. Either way, Garcia had already contracted the virus and infected his wife and one-year-old daughter. Garcia is one of over 70,000 medical workers to catch the coronavirus in Mexico, where the pandemic death toll is now the third-highest worldwide, behind the United States and Brazil. Government data indicates that healthcare workers' risk of dying is four times higher than in the United States, and eight times higher than in Brazil. "The coronavirus has hit...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City Healthcare workers at Brooklyn Hospital and from throughout the tri-state area are calling on hospitals and government to switch from disposable personal protective equipment to replace disposable N95 masks that they say run in short supply and are more expensive in the long run. Members of the New York State Nurses Association were joined by Public Advocate Jumaane Williams and a group called “COVID Courage,” to call on the city and state to fund purchases of reusable elastomeric respirators that cost $40, instead of $5 for the N-95 mask. The reusable mask, they say, “lasts for years without changing a filter,” while the N-95 mask are supposed to be used only once a day at the most, but hospital supervisors have asked some to reuse those masks up to a week,...
    LOS ANGELES -- A mother and daughter team is doing their part to help relieve healthcare workers' stress by making and donating scented candles to doctors and nurses in Orange County, California. "Anytime I watch the news and see these healthcare workers and the patients, it makes me very emotional," said Rammy Streit, co-founder of Calm Me Candles. "Our candles, the whole purpose of them is to bring positivity, calmness, and happiness to others.""I work in surgical ICU where we are taking care of the COVID positive patients," said Vickie Nimmo, an RN at UC Irvine Medical Center. "It's a very stressful time, long shifts. Hopefully, I can use these candles, cause it's a stress relief candle. So hopefully it'll reduce my stress tonight." "As a family we've always made candles together. We've made them for teachers gifts. We'd give them as gifts to friends and family," said Streit. "Then...
    MANILA (Reuters) - The Philippines' health department vowed on Sunday to update its game plan against COVID-19 within a week and sought to beef up the healthcare workforce in the capital Manila, where medical frontliners are calling for reviving strict lockdowns. The Southeast Asian country on Saturday reported 4,963 additional coronavirus infections, the largest single-day jump on record, bringing its total confirmed cases to 98,232, while its death toll had climbed to 2,039. It has the second-highest number of coronavirus infections and COVID-19 deaths in the region, behind Indonesia. In the largest call yet from medical experts to contain the virus, 80 groups representing 80,000 doctors and a million nurses, on Saturday said the Philippines was losing the fight against the disease and warned of a collapse of the healthcare system from soaring infections without tighter controls. In a statement issued following an unscheduled meeting late on Saturday of the...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- The healthcare market is strong in Illinois, and while that usually brings to mind doctors and nurses, you don't necessarily need a medical degree to get a job in the health industry."It really tugs at your heart strings when you see people who are good workers who are laid off due to no fault of their own," said Dr. Patrick McEneaney, owner of Northern Illinois Foot and Ankle. "And so when we're able to grab those people and bring them in use their expertise to help our patients, it really makes me happy."McEneaney said during the pandemic his practice has expanded by 50% and he's hiring, but not just doctors."What people don't realize is there is a whole backbone behind the scenes. We have people who make phone calls to patients. We have people who help patients fill out paper work," he said.There are lots of jobs...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City Thanks to the Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City, healthcare workers throughout the city have been able to get free rides and meals throughout the pandemic. NYC Health + Hospitals (H+H) and Uber for Business teamed up to start a program to provide free rides and meals to all of the nearly 6,000 residents and fellows across the City’s 11 public hospitals, giving them extra support during the pandemic. Under the program, NYC Health + Hospitals, working with the Mayor’s Fund, committed nearly $600,000 toward meal credits and Uber donated $175,000 in free rides, all of which went directly to fellows and residents working in H+H. “New York City’s healthcare heroes have guided this city through some of its most difficult moments in recent memory, and they are still doing...
    Irvine, Calif. (KABC) -- Healthcare workers everywhere are dealing with elevated levels of stress due to the COVID-19 pandemic. So a mother and daughter team is doing their part to help relieve some of this stress by making and donating scented candles to doctors and nurses in Orange County, California."Anytime I watch the news and see these healthcare workers and the patients, it makes me very emotional," said Rammy Streit, co-founder of Calm Me Candles. "Our candles, the whole purpose of them is to bring positivity, calmness and happiness to others,""I work in surgical ICU where we are taking care of the COVID positive patients," said Vickie Nimmo, an RN at UC Irvine Medical Center. "It's a very stressful time, long shifts. Hopefully, I can use these candles, cause it's a stress relief candle. So hopefully it'll reduce my stress tonight.""As a family we've always made candles together. We've made...
    (CNN)During a hospital shift, Hilal Ibrahim noticed that a patient's blood got on her uniform. The hospital stocked extra scrubs for her to change into, but because her hijab was also soiled, she had no choice but to go home.This is just one incident in Ibrahim's more than 10 years of volunteering and working at Park Nicollet Health Services, in her hometown of Minneapolis, that inspired her to design headscarves that meet the unique needs of the healthcare industry."I couldn't find an appropriate headscarf that was affordable, that was sustainable, that was beautiful," she told CNN. "No one was making it, so I had to make something."Ibrahim, 25, is also the founder and CEO of Henna and Hijabs. She started the fashion headwear company after graduating from high school.While working in the hospital, she saw that when a patient or employee needed to replace their hijab, the only option was...
    While a lot of companies are helping to support coronavirus relief efforts, many brands are also offering discounts and free products to the people putting themselves on the line to fight the pandemic. That means medical professionals and first responders working long, exhausting hours can find savings on a variety of products that might make life a little easier right now. Most discounts can be found on shoes and athletic apparel, which makes sense given that many of these workers are on their feet all day and require comfortable, supportive clothing. But there are also deals on everything from mattresses to hotel rooms to car rentals to doughnuts. Here are just few examples: Crocs is donating 10,000 free pairs of shoes a day with free shipping to healthcare workers. The North Face is giving a 50% discount to healthcare workers in the United States through Dec. 31, 2020....
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (Reuters) - Nearly 200 federal healthcare workers have been deployed to California's Central Valley agricultural breadbasket, where hospitals are overwhelmed with COVID-19 cases and new infection rates are soaring, Governor Gavin Newsom said on Monday. (Reporting by Sharon Bernstein; Editing by Sandra Maler) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.
    Healthcare workers treating coronavirus patients face a much higher risk than their colleagues, but a hospital's ventilation system may protect them, two new studies reveal. More than 5.4 percent of physicians, residents, nurses and other clinicians from coronavirus units had positive test results as did 0.6 percent from non-coronavirus wings, researchers found in one report. This means this groups of employees are at an 800 percent higher risk of contracting COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, than those in other units.     But another study found that, even when in a room with an infected person breathing or coughing, a hospital ventilation system circulates outside air so often that the risk plateaus after 30 minutes.  A study from Houston Methodist Academic Institute, found that 5.4% of healthcare workers in COVID-19 units had positive test results as did 0.6 percent from non-COVID wings. Pictured:  Hospital ventilation systems have about...
    When you buy through our links, we may earn money from our affiliate partners. Learn more. Mount Sinai Queens The work nurses do is essential to society, although it often goes without recognition or praise. As the fight against COVID-19 continues, there's no better time than now to show your appreciation for them. We rounded up more than 22 gifts to give to nurses, including useful items to bring to work as well as relaxing items to use at home.  Nurses are some of the hardest working professionals you'll ever meet. It's a job that requires a high level of empathy and compassion, and it often goes without recognition or praise. Being a nurse can be demanding both physically and mentally under normal circumstances, but as the fight against COVID-19 continues, the demand is even higher. Healthcare professionals are putting themselves at risk on a daily...
    RAWLINS, Wyo. (AP) — Testing of inmates, staff and healthcare workers at Wyoming's maximum-security prison has detected at least 10 cases of the coronavirus, corrections officials said Wednesday. Wyoming was among just a couple states with no known coronavirus among inmates. Testing to date has revealed three inmates, one staff member and six healthcare workers with the virus. As of Wednesday, 876 inmates and workers at the Wyoming State Penitentiary had been tested. Full results were pending. The tests were part of a plan to screen all Wyoming inmates over the weeks ahead. A case of coronavirus in a contract healthcare worker last week prompted the department to begin testing at the Wyoming State Penitentiary a couple weeks earlier than planned. The prison was locked own because of the positive results and contact tracing was being done. Wyoming as of Wednesday had over 540 active, reported cases of the coronavirus,...
    NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- Like all the other theaters on and off Broadway, Manhattan's famed Public Theater had to shut down in March due to the coronavirus pandemic.Still, the non-profit organization has found a way to stage a play online and honor New York City's healthcare workers at the same time."The Line" takes us to the front line of the fight against COVID-19. The words you hear during this presentation are real, but spoken by actors."It was our love letter to health care workers in New York City for their bravery and their sacrifice," co-creator Erik Jensen said.He and his wife Jessica Blank interviewed some of those workers then transcribed and organized what they heard to create what they call a "documentary play.""In this moment when we are being tested as a country, we would do well to listen to these health care workers and to look at them...
    NEARLY half of NHS workers were infected with Covid during the peak of the epidemic, leading scientists claim. Sir Paul Nurse, Francis Crick Institute director, told MPs today that "up to 45 per cent" of healthcare workers were infected in April. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 3Nearly half of all NHS workers were infected with Covid at peak of epidemic, top experts claimCredit: AFP or licensors But a lack of testing meant most cases went undetected as the majority were asymptomatic. He was speaking at the Health and Social Care Committee which has met to hear evidence as part of the committee's inquiry into the management of the coronavirus outbreak. Sir Nurse said: "My colleagues in the Crick contacted Downing Street in March, wrote to minister (Matt) Hancock in April, emphasising two main things. "The importance of regular, systematic testing of all healthcare...
    In order to ensure that the people fighting on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic are taken care of, the Volunteers of Legal Service announced last week that the group has launched a COVID-19 Frontline & Healthcare Workers Initiative to ensure that workers’ legal needs are met regardless of their ability to pay for services. The group wants to ensure that as many frontline health care workers get free access to pro bono attorneys for services such as power of attorney, medical advance directives, control of remains and standby guardianship forms at a time when these workers are more vulnerable to incapacity and death. “We are both humbled and honored to be able to provide free legal services to these frontline healthcare workers who ​are putting their health ​and lives on the line,” said Marcia Levy, VOLS executive director. “We believe that by providing them with life planning services, we...
    Captain Tom Moore was knighted for raising millions of dollars for the NHS. Chris Jackson / Staff / Getty Images Captain Tom Moore, a 100-year-old British war veteran, raised nearly £33 million (or $40 million) for the UK National Health Service by walking laps around his garden. To celebrate his efforts, Queen Elizabeth II knighted Moore at Windsor Castle on Friday. The Queen knighted Moore in front of his family on the castle grounds. "I have been overwhelmed by the many honors I have received over the past weeks, but there is simply nothing that can compare to this, I am overwhelmed with pride and joy," Moore wrote on his Twitter account about the experience. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Captain Tom Moore, the 100-year-old World War II veteran who raised $40 million for the UK National Health Service, was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II on...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- New York received help from across the country at the height of the pandemic, and now, Governor Andrew Cuomo is paying it forward.Teams of healthcare workers from New York are now operating two testing sites in Houston.They've set up in churches in minority communities hit hard by the virus.The teams arrived over the weekend with 10,000 test kits."We got so much help, that once it calmed down we could go out and help others that helped us," said Eddie Fraser, Vice President at Northwell."They provided nurses and additional staff, testing supplies, PPEs," another official said.The teams are expected to test 500 people per day at each site.They've partnered with a lab in Houston, meaning people will get their results in just two days.WATCH THE SERIES: EYEWITNESS TO A PANDEMIC (Episode 6 below)EMBED More News Videos Suddenly, the brutal death of George Floyd while in the custody...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — A Navy veteran who has worked in the medical field for decades is now answering the call to help nurses on the front lines. As COVID-19 cases continue to climb in California, his Sacramento start-up is doing its part to serve those on the frontlines. Taggart Neal runs TAGCarts, designing and developing medical workstations for healthcare workers. “We need solutions, we need them on demand and we have surge capacity,” Neal said. When the pandemic hit earlier this year, his company pivoted, answering the call of the governor for healthcare companies to innovate. That’s when HEROcarts was born. Neal says the carts are a “virtual nurse care package for nurses.” Named after our heroes on the frontlines, this single-patient bedside HEROcart comes stocked with critical PPE, things like K and N 95 masks and disposable gloves. The carts are assembled in Roseville at Pride Solutions by US...
    What started as a class project, has now become a weekly act of kindness during the coronavirus pandemic. Three years ago, AltaEats owner and Executive Chef Paul Ragan was helping his daughter, Emma, on a project for school with the premise to help feed those in need. They were attempting to think of a system where they could store food curbside for anyone to pick up. Although it never came to fruition, when COVID-19 hit, that class project was the genesis for what is now Emma's Pantry.Emma's Pantry is the name of Thursdays at AltaEats restaurant in Pasadena, CA, where they offer free meals to first responders and healthcare workers, and deliver 90 free meals to the Pasadena Senior Center every week."With the COVID-19 and everything, we kind of came up with doing a weekly meal for people who are first responders, healthcare workers, and anyone else who is hungry,"...
    President Trump is covering up. The president, who has resisted calls to wear a face covering in public throughout the coronavirus epidemic, appeared for the first time with one before the White House press corps. It was navy blue bearing the presidential seal in gold. The occasion was a visit to Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., where he met with wounded troops and medical staff on Saturday. Donald Trump wears a face mask as he arrives to visit with wounded military members and front line coronavirus healthcare workers. EPA “I love masks in the appropriate locations,” Trump told reporters as he left the White House. Earlier in the week he had promised to take the precaution during his visit. Donald Trump wears a face mask as he arrives to visit with wounded military members and front line coronavirus healthcare workers.EPA “You’re in a hospital setting, I think it’s...
    The use of “convalescent plasma”—blood plasma from people who have recovered from an infectious disease—has been a common treatment going back for decades. From ZIKA and flu, to Ebola and SARS, direct administrations of the antibodies contained in the blood of disease survivors has been trialed as a potential means of conferring at least some immunity on others. For some diseases it works remarkably well, for others the effect of plasma therapy is less potent, but the trials are an obvious step toward finding a means of fighting a disease when neither conventional treatment nor vaccines are available. Widespread trials of convalescent plasma are currently underway with COVID-19 patients, and early results of those trials have been hopeful. The primary focus of these trials has been, understandably, on the hope that plasma therapy might provide a tool to help those seriously ill when other treatments had been unsuccessful. But there’s another potential use...
    Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar on Tuesday falsely claimed that healthcare workers “don’t get infected” with Covid-19 “because they take appropriate precautions” as he attempted to make the case for reopening schools in the fall—even with coronavirus cases surging across the United States. “There’s no reason we can’t do any of this,” Azar, a former pharmaceutical lobbyist and executive, said during an event at the White House. “We have healthcare settings. We have healthcare workers, they don’t get infected because they take appropriate precautions. They engage in social distancing, they wear facial covering, they use good personal hygiene. This can work, you can do all of this. There’s no reason schools have to be in any way any different.” In addition to noting that Azar’s claim about healthcare workers not getting infected is wildly false—according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 94,000 healthcare workers have...
    Like millions of teenagers across the US, one Sparta, Illinois high school senior's prom plans were ruined by COVID-19 — but while she didn't actually get to attend the big dance, the pandemic didn't stop her from making her own prom dress anyway. In fact, Peyton Manker, 18, decided to change up her design to incorporate COVID-19, crafting her own gown entirely out of duct tape with details that spotlighted the virus, paid tribute to healthcare workers, and urged others to flatten the curve. 'We can have some positive things come out of this whole experience and my dress is an example of that,' she told CNN.  Lookin' good! Peyton Manker, 18, made a coronavirus-themed prom dress out of duct tape Canceled: Like millions of teenagers across the US, the Sparta, Illinois high school senior's prom plans were ruined by COVID-19 Timely and stylish! She had already...
    (CNN)More than 1,400 Georgia healthcare workers have petitioned the state's governor asking that he impose further restrictions to slow the spread of Covid-19.Georgia has seen the virus surge in the past week, with the number of new cases increasing by over 50%.In a letter dated Thursday, the healthcare workers ask that Gov. Brian Kemp close bars and nightclubs and prohibit indoor gatherings of more than 25 people, including at places of worship. The letter also recommends a statewide face covering requirement and asks that the governor allow mayors and county officials to institute requirements appropriate for their jurisdictions.More of CNNs coronavirus coverage Map: Where your state stands on flattening the curve Guide: 10 key Covid-19 symptoms Video: As Trump downplays virus, facts show a surge Returning to work: What health experts want you to know Q&A: Why are cases soaring while deaths decrease? ...
    DENVER (CBS4) – In the battle against coronavirus, healthcare workers are on the front lines. Nurses, in particular, are dealing with long hours, high caseloads, and the anxiety of potentially infecting their families. Tara Rynders had seen compassion fatigue and burn out among nurses before coronavirus. In 2018, she developed a workshop called Do No Harm, in which nurses but their stories into words, and then developed movements for those words. COVID Stories (credit Tara Rynders) “It’s trauma that we have that needs to be moved through us and movement is a way to do that,” Rynders explained. She tapped into her experience as a life-long dancer, with the goal of making nurses feel seen, heard and cared for. “We are interpreting what these movements are, what these emotions are physically and offering them and releasing them and letting them go,” Rynders said. COVID Stories II (credit Tara Rynders) In...
    EAST LIBERTY (KDKA) — A group of healthcare workers is demanding transparency from government officials about funds being sent to nursing homes during the Coronavirus pandemic. On Wednesday morning, they stood in front of Excel Home Care in East Liberty, holding signs that read “Home Care is Essential.” The workers say they want to know where millions of dollars from the CARES Act is going. They believe that money from the CARES Act should go to the frontline workers, specifically mentioning the minority workers. They want hazard pay, PPE and paid sick time. The group wanted to drop off a letter but told KDKA Excel’s office locked their doors and would not let them inside. “They called the building manager, and he asked us to leave,” Francis Nolan Adams said. “When all we wanted to do was have them explain to us where the money has gone that...
    PASADENA, Calif. (KABC) -- Three years ago, ALTAeats owner and Executive Chef Paul Ragan was helping his daughter, Emma, on a class project with the premise to help feed those in need. They were attempting to think of a system where they could store curbside food for anyone to pick up.Although it never came to fruition, when the coronavirus pandemic hit, that class project was the genesis for what is now Emma's Pantry.Emma's Pantry is the name of Thursdays at ALTAeats restaurant in Atladena, where they offer free meals to first responders and healthcare workers, and deliver 90 free meals to the Pasadena Senior Center every week."With the COVID-19 and everything, we kind of came up with doing a weekly meal for people who are first responders, healthcare workers, and anyone else who is hungry," said Ragan."When people pull up and genuinely thank us... to still have people acknowledging that...
    HYDE PARK — Chicago Cubs right fielder Jason Heyward donated $100,000 to UChicago Medicine to help healthcare workers and assist in contact tracing during the coronavirus pandemic. Half of Heyward’s donation will go to the hospital’s Healthcare Heroes Fund, which covers expenses for frontline workers, including temporary housing. The donation will also go contact tracing efforts across the South Side. The donation helps the hospital set up a team of contact tracers for the South Side after partnering with the South Side Healthcare Collaborative. South Side neighborhoods have seen large clusters of coronavirus cases over the past few months. Officials have cited several reasons for the high number of cases in predominantly Black communities, from large populations of essential workers to wide-ranging health care disparities from historic disinvestment. “Through this donation, I want to help ease the personal burdens on our healthcare heroes and support efforts aimed at reducing the...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City Two frontline nurses from Astoria shared their love with the world as they tied the knot during a live wedding ceremony on NBC’s TODAY show on June 25.  Vanessa Baral, 27, a float nurse from Long Island Jewish Forest Hills Hospital, and Herwyn Silva, 28, a nurse at Lenox Hill Hospital, were married by TODAY co-anchor and ordained minister Hoda Kotb as the couple’s coworkers held watch parties for the ceremony at both hospitals.  Baral’s LIJ Forest Hills coworkers celebrate the couple’s nuptial. (Photo courtesy of Northwell Health) Silva’s coworkers at Lenox Hill Hospital cheer on the newlyweds. (Photo courtesy of Northwell Health) NBC is sending the newlywed couple to Fiji for their honeymoon.  “It definitely caught us by surprise. We still can’t believe it and we’re still processing it,” the couple told...