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Trump’s impeachment trial:

    Loading the player... Senators voted Saturday to consider hearing from witnesses in the impeachment trial of Donald Trump, potentially extending proceedings that just hours earlier had seemed to be speeding to a swift conclusion and up-or-down vote over whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol siege. The last-minute fight over witnesses followed Friday night revelations from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say establishes Trump’s indifference to the violence. Read More: Trump and McCarthy got into profanity-laced screaming match during Capitol riots: report (Credit: Getty Images and McCarthy) The proceedings came to abrupt halt Saturday morning, with even senators seemingly confused about next steps. Senators were huddling on floor of the chamber as leaders spoke to the clerks at the dais. Impeachment trials are rare, especially for a president,...
    The Senate on Saturday voted 55-45 to accept a surprise request by Democratic impeachment managers to extend former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial by calling at least one witness. Impeachment managers led by Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.) said they want to depose and subpoena notes written by Rep. Jamie Herrera Beutler (R-Wash.) regarding Trump’s remarks during the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, which he was impeached for allegedly inciting. Herrera Buetler said overnight that House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) pleaded with Trump during the riot to call his supporters off, but that Trump told him, “Well, Kevin, I guess these people are more upset about the election than you are.” Five Republicans backed the request for trial witnesses. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) warned Democrats before the surprise announcement by Raskin that “if you want a delay, it will be a long one with many, many witnesses.” He then...
    One of the lawyers on former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE’s impeachment defense team grew frustrated after senators began laughing at him during Saturday remarks when the attorney mispronounced “Philadelphia.”  Michael van der Veen addressed the Senate after Democrats revived debate on whether to call witnesses for Trump’s impeachment trial, including virtually over Zoom.  Trump’s attorney said that sworn testimony from leaders such as House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Senate passes bill to award Capitol Police officer Congressional Gold Medal We know how Republicans will vote — but what do they believe? MORE (D-Calif.) and Vice President Harris should only be done in person.  “A lot of depositions need to be...
    WASHINGTON -- Senators have voted to consider hearing from witnesses in the impeachment trial of Donald Trump.The vote could potentially extend proceedings that had been expected to end with a vote on Saturday. If you want a delay, it will be a long one with many, many witnesses.— Lindsey Graham (@LindseyGrahamSC) February 13, 2021This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.A last-minute fight over calling witnesses threatened to slow the speedy conclusion of Donald Trump's historic impeachment trial Saturday as the Senate moved closer to a vote whether the former president incited the horrific attack at the Capitol.Heading into Saturday, senators appeared close to resolving the impeachment trial that laid bare the violence and danger to their own lives and the fragility of the nation's tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power. But that process may be at least temporarily slowed by a...
    WASHINGTON -- Senators have voted to consider hearing from witnesses in the impeachment trial of Donald Trump.The vote could potentially extend proceedings that had been expected to end with a vote on Saturday. If you want a delay, it will be a long one with many, many witnesses.— Lindsey Graham (@LindseyGrahamSC) February 13, 2021This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.A last-minute fight over calling witnesses threatened to slow the speedy conclusion of Donald Trump's historic impeachment trial Saturday as the Senate moved closer to a vote whether the former president incited the horrific attack at the Capitol.Heading into Saturday, senators appeared close to resolving the impeachment trial that laid bare the violence and danger to their own lives and the fragility of the nation's tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power. But that process may be at least temporarily slowed by a...
    More On: capitol riot Senate Democrats call for 11th-hour witnesses in Trump impeachment trial Mitch McConnell tells fellow GOP senators he will vote to acquit Trump Democrats delay Trump impeachment trial with 11th-hour call for witnesses Trump impeachment trial: Day 5 schedule, time and how to watch The Senate on Saturday voted 55-45 to accept a surprise request by impeachment manages to extend former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial by calling at least one witness. Impeachment managers led by Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.) said they want to depose and subpoena notes written by Rep. Jamie Herrera Beutler (R-Wash.) regarding Trump’s remarks during the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, which he was impeached for allegedly inciting. Herrera Buetler said overnight that House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) pleaded with Trump during the riot to call his supporters off, but that Trump told him, “Well, Kevin, I guess these people are more...
    Madison Summers February 13, 2021 0 Comments The Senate is continuing with its impeachment trial on whether to convict or acquit former President Donald Trump on an impeachment article, “incitement of insurrection.” Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has kept silent publicly on whether he would vote to convict Trump, but now his decision is made known. McConnell said on Saturday that he will vote to acquit Trump, The Hill reports citing a Republican senator familiar with McConnell’s decision. His decision was apparently made known in an email to the caucus. Sen. Kevin Cramer (R-N.D.) said he is unsure McConnell’s decision will swing undecided Republican senators, according to The Hill. “Mitch has been so clear and so respectful of each individual’s senators’ conscience,” Cramer said. The Senate was expected to have a final vote on Saturday to either convict or acquit Trump, as the former president is being charged for allegedly inciting...
    Fox News Legal Analyst Jonathan Turley is not impressed with Trump’s impeachment trial defense attorney Mike van der Veen. The second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump has had a shocking twist just as it looked like it was coming to a close, as the Senate voted 55-45 to call witnesses to the trial. This came in light of reports that House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy revealed to GOP colleagues that Trump effectively defended the insurrectionists during a phone call. Trump is said to have told McCarthy on that call, “I guess these people are more upset about the election than you are.” Turley said, of the 11th-hour request, that it’s “all perfectly bizarre to have this sudden surprise witness come up literally before closing arguments,” adding, “You’re not supposed to have these types of Perry Mason moments.” He then turned to criticize van der Veen, who elicited mocking...
    By LISA MASCARO, ERIC TUCKER and MARY CLARE JALONICK WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators voted Saturday to consider hearing from witnesses in the impeachment trial of Donald Trump, potentially extending proceedings that just hours earlier had seemed to be speeding to a swift conclusion and up-or-down vote over whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol siege. The last-minute fight over witnesses followed Friday night revelations from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say establishes Trump’s indifference to the violence. The proceedings came to abrupt halt Saturday morning, with even senators seemingly confused about next steps. Senators were huddling on floor of the chamber as leaders spoke to the clerks at the dais. Impeachment trials are rare, especially for a president, and the rules are negotiated for each one at the outset....
    The Senate will begin the fifth day of the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump Saturday morning. The Senate will decide whether they need to call for additional witnesses and documents for Trump’s second impeachment trial. If the Senate decides that they do not need additional witnesses and documents, then they may move to vote to either acquit or convict the president. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) announced Saturday morning that he will vote to acquit Trump, which may serve as a good sign that many Senate Republicans will vote to also acquit Trump. Follow Breitbart News for more coverage of the Senate impeachment trial against former President Donald Trump.
    The Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, which seemed destined for a Saturday afternoon conclusion, veered dramatically off script at the last minute — as Democrats are seeking to call a witness, and their request has been granted. By a vote of 55-45, the Senate voted to allow witnesses in the trial. Five Republicans joined the 50 Democrats — Sens. Susan Collins (R-ME), Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Mitt Romney (R-UT), and Ben Sasse (R-NE). Graham was a last-minute change, after initially voting nay. House impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD) sought to call Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (R-WA) via Zoom for her testimony — following her statement that House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) told her that former President Trump had sided with the mob during a phone call while the Capitol was under attack. Trump’s attorney, Michael van deer Veen, threatened that the defense would...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said Saturday that he will vote to acquit former President Donald Trump in his impeachment trial. McConnell shared the news in a letter with Senate Republicans, telling them he does not believe there is enough evidence to impeach Trump. McConnell had not previously said how he would vote. “While a close call, I am persuaded that impeachments are a tool primarily of removal and we therefore lack jurisdiction,” McConnell wrote, Politico reported. “The Constitution makes it perfectly clear that Presidential criminal misconduct while in office can be prosecuted after the President has left office, which in my view alleviates the otherwise troubling ‘January exception’ argument raised by the House,” McConnell continued. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) walks through the Senate subway on his way to the fourth day of the Senates second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol on...
    In this screenshot taken from a congress.gov webcast, lead House impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD) speaks on the fifth day of former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial at the U.S. Capitol on February 13, 2021 in Washington, DC.Congress.gov | Getty Images The Senate on Saturday voted 55-45 to being the process of calling witnesses as part of the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump. The trial was originally expected to concluded Saturday, however, this vote has extended proceedings. The vote to call witnesses comes as more details were revealed Friday night about an expletive-laden argument between House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy and Trump in a phone call as the Capitol riot was unfolding, in which Trump appeared to side with rioters and said they were more "upset" over the election results than McCarthy. This is breaking news. Please check back for updates.Related TagsBreaking News: Politics
    The Senate voted 55-45 to summon witnesses in Donald Trump's impeachment trial, extending it indefinitely. House lead impeachment manager Jamie Raskin on Saturday called on senators to vote to subpoena a GOP witness and evidence in Donald Trump’s impeachment trial. Raskin, a Maryland Democrat, said he wants the authority to subpoena Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, a Washington Republican who disclosed a conversation between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that took place during the January 6 attack on the Capitol. “After the breach and invasion took place he was not working on the side of defending the Capitol,” Raskin said of Trump. “But rather, he was continuing to pursue his political goals, and the information that came out last night. This piece of evidence is relevant to that.” Beutler, in a statement Friday, said she has disclosed many times over the past month her knowledge of the...
    WASHINGTON -- A last-minute fight over calling witnesses threatened to slow the speedy conclusion of Donald Trump's historic impeachment trial Saturday as the Senate moved closer to a vote whether the former president incited the horrific attack at the Capitol.Heading into Saturday, senators appeared close to resolving the impeachment trial that laid bare the violence and danger to their own lives and the fragility of the nation's tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power. But that process may be at least temporarily slowed by a debate over whether to hear from a House Republican who on Friday night offered new details about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say establishes Trump's indifference to the violence.Meanwhile, Republican leader Mitch McConnell made clear that he will vote to acquit Trump, according to a person familiar with his...
    WASHINGTON -- A last-minute fight over calling witnesses threatened to slow the speedy conclusion of Donald Trump's historic impeachment trial Saturday as the Senate moved closer to a vote whether the former president incited the horrific attack at the Capitol.Heading into Saturday, senators appeared close to resolving the impeachment trial that laid bare the violence and danger to their own lives and the fragility of the nation's tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power. But that process may be at least temporarily slowed by a debate over whether to hear from a House Republican who on Friday night offered new details about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say establishes Trump's indifference to the violence.Meanwhile, Republican leader Mitch McConnell made clear that he will vote to acquit Trump, according to a person familiar with his...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell confirmed his continued fealty to Donald Trump on Saturday morning, as he revealed plans to let the disgraced dictator off the hook for the Jan. 6 insurrection. McConnell, like 45 other Senate Republicans, continues to hide behind the fake “constitutionality” defense, which hinges on whether or not an impeachment trial can be held after the subject has left public office. McConnell, of course, also famously refused to hold the impeachment trial while Trump was still in office, and thus made this ridiculous non-defense copout possible.  The announcement comes even as Colorado Rep. Jaime Herrera Butler and other Republicans came out to confirm that Trump knew Pence was in danger and did not care, most vividly illustrated by a nasty call with a frantic Kevin McCarthy, where the one-term tyrant mocked the House Minority Leader’s distress. This revelation also comes even as multiple senators—Sheldon Whitehouse, Jeff Merkley, and...
    More On: impeachment Trump’s impeachment trial gets underway with Raskin call for witness depositions Trump impeachment trial: Day 5 schedule, time and how to watch Mittens come off: Bernie clashes with Trump lawyer after asking if Biden won election Trump team trolls Democrats with clips of repeated vows to ‘fight’ At least two Senate Democrats have called for the chamber to suspend closing arguments in former President Trump’s impeachment trial so that witnesses could be called. “Suspend trial to depose [Rep. Kevin] McCarthy and [Sen. Tommy] Tuberville under oath and get facts,” said Rhode Island Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse in a tweet late Friday evening. “Ask Secret Service to produce for review comms back to White House re VP Pence safety during siege. What did Trump know, and when did he know it?” Whitehouse and other Dems were responding to news reports which alleged that during the height of the...
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell told Republican colleagues that he will vote to acquit former President Donald Trump in his impeachment trial, according to a source familiar with the matter. (Reporting by Richard Cowan; Writing by Michael Martina; editing by Diane Craft) Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters. Tags: United States
    The Senate on Saturday is expected to conclude former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial with a vote to acquit him on the charge that he incited an insurrection that led to the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. Senators will convene in the chamber for a fifth and likely final day of the trial with up to four hours of deliberation on the case that was presented this week by nine House impeachment managers and rebutted by a team of Trump’s defense lawyers. Unless lawmakers decide to call witnesses, which appears unlikely, they will vote on whether to convict the former president on the one impeachment charge. Conviction would require 67 votes, including at least 17 Republicans, and party lawmakers say it’s unlikely more than a handful will join the Democrats. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Kentucky Republican, told fellow members of his party in a letter that...
    Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call/AP Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.Mitch McConnell refused to hold an impeachment trial while Donald Trump was in office. And on Saturday morning, he told his colleagues he would acquit Trump because the trial is unconstitutional since Trump is no longer in office. “While a close call, I am persuaded that impeachments are a tool primarily of removal and we therefore lack jurisdiction,” McConnell wrote to Senate Republicans. (He joined 44 Senate Republicans earlier in the week in voting that the trial was unconstitutional.)   McConnell helped created the very timeline he’s now claims is forcing his hand. Of course, McConnell helped created the very timeline he’s now claims is forcing his hand. A week after Trump incited a violent insurrection at the US Capitol, Democratic leader Chuck...
    The second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump was expected to conclude on Saturday, as the Senate prepared to make their final vote on whether or not to convict. The closing arguments were expected on day five, and it was not expected the Senate will have the votes to convict. The AP reported on Saturday morning that Senator Mitch McConnell will be voting to acquit, per their sources. The first thing that happened as proceedings opened on Saturday was lead House Rep. Jamie Raskin requesting time to subpoena and Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler over her reported phone call with President Trump on January 6. Michael van der Veen responded by demanding the opportunity to call witnesses of his own. We will have more breaking coverage as this develops. In the meantime, watch the live stream above. Have a tip we should know? [email protected]
    More On: Trump impeachment trial Trump’s impeachment trial draws to close as final arguments get underway Trump impeachment trial: Day 5 schedule, time and how to watch Trump impeachment defense says ‘reportedly’ is not evidence of anything Trump lawyers point to Democratic violence at ‘sham’ impeachment trial Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell on Saturday told fellow Republican senators that he intends to vote to acquit former President Donald Trump of inciting the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, according to multiple reports. Politico first reported that McConnell (R-Ky.) announced the decision in a letter to colleagues, though not all had read it before arriving to the Senate on Saturday for the expected final day of the trial, beginning at 10 am. The news all but assures that Trump will be acquitted in a mostly party-line vote. McConnell was among Trump’s sharpest critics on the right following the riot that left five...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has told fellow Republicans that he plans to vote to acquit Donald Trump on charges incitement of insurrection – a signal that the House-led effort to convict the former president will fail. McConnell made his position known on what could be the last day of the trial, as closing arguments were set to begin.  Although he had denounced Trump's actions in an emotional Senate floor speech immediately after the Jan. 6 MAGA riot in the Capitol, McConnell also did not act to hasten the impeachment trial while Trump was still in office. He voted along with 44 other Republicans that the post-presidency impeachment was unconstitutional – a position that did not prevail. Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell arrives at the US Capitol for the fifth day of the second impeachment trial of former US President Donald Trump, on February 13, 2021, in Washington,...
    Former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial continues on Saturday. Stay tuned to Breitbart News for live updates. All times Eastern. – 10:01 AM: Trial resumes. GOP Senator Mitt Romney says: “I will support additional witnesses" at Trump impeachment trial "if the counsel on either side wishes to call witnesses,” when asked if he would want to hear from House GOP leader Kevin McCarthy as a witness. — Clare Foran (@ckmarie) February 13, 2021 Senator Whitehouse nailed it. https://t.co/BfCsfTEh9B — Senator Jeff Merkley (@SenJeffMerkley) February 13, 2021 9:59 AM: Sen. Brown tells reporters that he’s “incredulous” that the testimony this week hasn’t changed more minds, but “I’ve watched my spineless colleagues walk around with fear in their eyes for four years so maybe I shouldn’t be surprised” — Lauren Fox (@FoxReports) February 13, 2021 9:50 AM: Senators are expected to make closing arguments unless Democrats decide at the last minute...
    Team Trump is defending this Following the latest bombshell news about Kevin McCarthy’s screaming match with Donald Trump on January 6, will House Managers request witnesses, or will today be the final day of the second impeachment trial for Trump? We’ll find out soon.  The impeachment trial is being aired on major television news networks and streamed on their websites. Daily Kos will have continuing coverage.
    The Senate is convening at 10 a.m. on Saturday for Day Five of former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial. It is expected to hold four hours of deliberation before voting whether to convict Trump on one article of inciting an insurrection. News Impeachment Donald Trump Senate U.S. Capitol Building Congress 2020 Elections Riots
    More On: Trump impeachment trial Trump impeachment vote, acquittal, expected today Trump impeachment defense says ‘reportedly’ is not evidence of anything Trump lawyers point to Democratic violence at ‘sham’ impeachment trial Trump’s legal team presents opening arguments at impeachment trial Closing arguments at former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial got underway Saturday morning — with each side granted two hours to make their final case to the US Senate before an expected vote on the verdict later in the day. But Day 5 of the shorter-than-anticipated proceeding is likely to race toward its conclusion, with Trump lawyer Bruce Castor saying on Friday that the defense summation was already “roughed out” and would only take “about an hour.” The unprecedented trial is widely anticipated to result in an acquittal after several Republican senators said the two-day presentation by Democratic impeachment managers from the House of Representatives had failed to...
    WASHINGTON -- Senators are poised to vote on whether Donald Trump will be held accountable for inciting the horrific attack at the Capitol after a speedy impeachment trial that laid bare the violence and danger to their own lives and the fragility of the nation's tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power.Barely a month since the deadly riot on Jan. 6, closing arguments are set for the historic trial in a rare Saturday session, held under the watch of armed National Guard troops still guarding the iconic building.The outcome of the quick, raw and emotional proceedings is expected to reflect a country divided over the former president and the future of his brand of politics.MORE: Trump lawyers argue impeachment based on 'hatred,' not facts EMBED More News Videos The defense team vigorously denied on Friday that Trump had incited the deadly riot and said his encouragement of followers to...
    Senate GOP Leader Mitch McConnell will vote to acquit former President Donald Trump in this second impeachment trial, Fox News has confirmed.  McConnell's vote had been closely watched since he's been very critical of Trump's role in inciting the Jan. 6 riot and his wife, former Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao, resigned from the Administration in the aftermath of the attack that killed at least five people, including a Capitol Police officer. McConnell alerted colleagues of his decision Saturday morning, before the Senate will convene for what is expected to be the final day of Trump's trial for "incitement of insurrection." This is a breaking news story. Please check back for updates.
    A Republican congresswoman intervened in the last hours of Donald Trump's impeachment trial to plead with 'patriots' who were around him on January 6 to go public on his actions. Jaime Herrera Beutler, who voted for Trump's impeachment, made the plea with hours before a likely vote on Trump's fate after revealing how he had rejected GOP minority leader Kevin McCarthy's plea to call off the mob. 'To the patriots who were standing next to the former president as these conversations were happening, or even to the former vice president: if you have something to add here, now would be the time,' she said. Her dramatic revelation of the call was seized on by one Democratic senator as a reason to demand witnesses. 'When McCarthy finally reached the president on January 6 and asked him to publicly and forcefully call off the riot, the president initially repeated the falsehood that...
    Democrats are reviving a debate over whether to call witnesses for the impeachment trial against former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE, an issue that as of Friday many senators viewed as settled. Neither House impeachment managers nor Trump's legal team had formally closed the door to calling witnesses, but senators on both sides of the aisle expected they wouldn't and that the trial would wrap up on Saturday. But some Democrats are now endorsing the idea in the wake of new details about conversations then-President Trump had with Sen. Tommy Tuberville (R-Ala.) and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyTrump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report Even with acquittal, GOP sees trial ending Trump's...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — AP source: Senate Republican leader McConnell tells colleagues he’ll vote to acquit Trump in impeachment trial. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump's second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 8:45 a.m. A little over a month ago, rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol as Congress was voting to affirm Joe Biden's election as the 46th president. On Saturday, the Senate is set to meet in a rare weekend session for closing arguments in Donald Trump's second impeachment trial. And the evenly-divided Senate is poised to vote on whether the former president will be held accountable for inciting the Jan. 6 siege. It seems unlikely that the 100-member Senate will be able to mount the two-thirds vote needed to convict Trump. Acquittal could heavily influence not only Trump’s political future but that of the senators sworn to deliver impartial justice as jurors. Trump is the only president to be twice impeached and the first to face trial after leaving office. House prosecutors have argued...
    Members of Congress stand to applaud Capitol Police officer Eugene Goodman You know what the Senate is doing next week? Nothing. They’re not in session next week. You know what they could be doing? Listening to witnesses. House impeachment managers could call witnesses in Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, and it wouldn’t take away one minute of productive time. They could call former chief of staff Mark Meadows and ask him to detail Trump’s actions on the afternoon of Jan. 6. They could call Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger and have him discuss calls from both Trump and Lindsey Graham. There’s absolutely no reason they could not call Mike Pence and have him confirm that he, not Trump, finally authorized the use of the National Guard. They could call every member of the Trump White House who resigned following Jan. 6 and ask them a simple question: “Why?” And, based on a...
    Reuters February 13, 2021 0 Comments Senate Republicans, while likely to acquit former President Donald Trump at his impeachment trial, showed little enthusiasm this week for a possible second White House bid in 2024 after reliving his supporters’ deadly storming of the U.S. Capitol. Following days of graphic videos of the melee presented by House managers, Republicans expressed concern about his post-election behavior, including his repeated false claim that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from him – even as they insisted that his trial on a charge of inciting insurrection is unconstitutional. Trump, the first president in U.S. history to be impeached twice, could run for another term in 2024 unless the Senate votes to bar him from future office, an unlikely feat. But the prosecution case by nine Democrats from the House of Representatives stirred painful memories of Jan. 6, when violent Trump supporters stormed the Capitol,...
    WASHINGTON -- Most every senator has pledged to listen to the evidence in Donald Trump's historic second impeachment trial, but most minds were likely made up before the trial began. Democrats would need a minimum of 17 Republicans to vote with them to convict Trump of incitement of insurrection, and that appears unlikely.Still, Democrats say they are holding out hope they will win over enough Republicans to convict the former president for his role in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, in which five people died. If Trump were convicted, the Senate could take a second vote to ban him from running for office again. A final vote is likely on Saturday.A look at the Republicans whom Democrats are eyeing as they make final arguments in the case:The frequent Trump criticsRepublican Sens. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Ben Sasse of Nebraska, Mitt Romney of Utah and Susan Collins of Maine have been...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 8:45 a.m. A little over a month ago, rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol as Congress was voting to affirm Joe Biden’s election as the 46th president. On Saturday, the Senate is set to meet in a rare weekend session for closing arguments in Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial. And the evenly-divided Senate is poised to vote on whether the former president will be held accountable for inciting the Jan. 6 siege. It seems unlikely that the 100-member Senate will be able to mount the two-thirds vote needed to convict Trump. Acquittal could heavily influence not only Trump’s political future but that of the senators sworn to deliver impartial justice as jurors. Trump is the only president to be twice impeached and the first to face trial after leaving office. House prosecutors have...
    DONALD Trump's impeachment trial could be over as early as today as legal teams prepare for the final argument ahead of the Senate vote. The former president is the first to be impeached twice and the first to face trial after leaving office. 5The final vote could come in this afternoon as the Senate is due to convene at 10am todayCredit: Reuters 5Michael van der Veen suggested that Trump using the phrase "peaceful and patriotic" to describe the riots during his speechCredit: Handout - Getty 5Trump's defense claim the Capitol riot on January 6 was an isolated incidentCredit: Handout - Getty If he's convicted, which seems unlikely at the moment, the Senate could bar him from running for office again. At least 17 Republicans in the 100-seat chamber would have to join all 50 Democrats to find the former president guilty. Only six Republicans voted with Democrats to move...
    The Senate will vote Saturday on the impeachment of former President Trump, with enough Republicans likely to stick by their former leader to ensure a not-guilty vote, sources told The Post. Though the Senate is effectively controlled by Democrats, a conviction would require a two-thirds majority — or 67 senators. Procedural votes this week suggest…
    House impeachment managers, lead by Congressman Jamie Raskin, Lead Manager, proceed through the Capitol Rotunda from the House side of the U.S. Capitol to the U.S. Senate chamber as the second impeachment trial of former U.S. President Donald Trump begins February 9, 2021 in Washington, DC.Sarah Silbiger | Getty Images Former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial is rapidly approaching its end, less than a week after it began. The final vote in the historic trial could come as soon as Saturday afternoon, one month after the House impeached Trump on one article of inciting the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Despite the new evidence presented, the passionate arguments delivered and hours of questions answered, the Senate appears just as likely to acquit Trump as it did before the trial began. The Senate is set to reconvene at 10 a.m. ET. The trial was unprecedented in a variety...
    (CNN)The Senate is poised to vote Saturday on whether to convict former President Donald Trump for inciting the insurrection at the Capitol last month in the culmination of the first impeachment trial of an ex-president in US history.The final vote is not set, but the Senate is racing toward concluding the trial in five days -- unless the Democratic impeachment managers seek witnesses. That could extend the trial beyond Saturday, although senators in both parties are not expecting any witnesses to be called.If there are no witnesses, the impeachment managers and Trump's lawyers will make closing arguments of up to two hours each before the Senate will move to a final vote, which could be held at 3 p.m. ET, though that's not finalized. It's still not clear whether senators will seek to make speeches to explain their votes once the legal teams conclude.The outcome of the final vote was...
    Donald Trump is the only US president to have twice suffered the infamy of “impeachment”. Donald Trump could be acquitted on Saturday after a vigorous trial in Congress, where his supporters sowed violence and chaos on January 6. The senators, at the same time witnesses, judges and jurors, must resume at 10:00 am (4:00 pm HB) the trial of the former president, one month to the day after his indictment for “incitement to insurrection”. Donald Trump, the only US president to have twice suffered the infamy of “impeachment”, has every chance of being acquitted, as in his first impeachment trial a year ago. Given his strong popularity on the right, it seems unlikely that 17 Republican senators will vote with the 50 elected Democrats and form the qualified majority necessary to convict him, a verdict that would pave the way for a term of ineligibility. Biden “impatient”...
    The House impeachment managers have left a strong impression on their fellow Democrats in what is as much an audition for bigger leadership roles down the line as a trial of former President Donald Trump. "The star of the trial has been Rep. Jaime Raskin of Maryland,” said Democratic strategist Brad Bannon. “He has made a powerful constitutional case against Trump and infused his legal brief with a heavy dose of humanity.” Raskin and his team prosecuting the case against Trump, who is charged with inciting an insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6, have elevated themselves in a way the last group of impeachment managers, led by Reps. Adam Schiff and Jerry Nadler, did not — even as their influence on Republican senators remains to be seen. The trial comes at a time when the House Democratic leadership team is aging, and some positions are sure to...
    By Andy Sullivan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Donald Trump's second impeachment trial could conclude on Saturday, leaving a divided U.S. Senate to decide whether the former president incited his supporters to attack the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 in a last-ditch effort to stay in power after his November election defeat. Trump is the first U.S. president to be impeached twice and the first to face trial after leaving office. If convicted, the Senate could then vote to bar him from running for office again. Conviction is seen as unlikely, however, as at least 17 Republicans in the 100-seat chamber would have to join all 50 Democrats to find the former president guilty. Only six Republicans voted with Democrats to move forward with the trial, rejecting an argument made by other Republican Senators that the Constitution does not allow Congress to impeach a president who has already left office. The Senate...
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Donald Trump's impeachment trial is slated to finish on Saturday with a vote on whether the former president should be convicted on a charge of inciting insurrection in a speech to supporters just before hundreds of them stormed the Capitol. Securing a conviction would require the vote of at least 17 members of Trump's Republican Party. Earlier in the week, six of them broke with the party to vote that the trial should proceed, and on Friday a Republican Senate aide said ultimately as many as 10 might vote to convict. Here's a look at the six Republican senators to watch during the final impeachment vote: BEN SASSE The Nebraska senator handily won re-election in 2020 and is considered a potential contender for the 2024 Republican presidential nomination. He publicly denounced https://www.facebook.com/SenatorSasse/posts/what-happens-on-january-6th-in-november-160-million-americans-voted-on-december-/3517705981660655 Trump's false claims of widespread electoral fraud and said there was no basis to object...
    (CNN)Saturday marks the fifth day of the Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, after a dramatic week that saw House impeachment managers and Trump's legal team offer dueling arguments over whether the former President was at fault for the January 6 riot at the US Capitol. The Senate is expecting to reconvene the trial at 10 a.m. ET on Saturday, though what happens the rest of the day is unclear. Most notably, Saturday's session could feature the vote on whether to convict or acquit Trump on the article of impeachment the House passed last month, which would bring the trial to an end. Here's how to watch and what to know about the Senate impeachment trial so far:How can people watch the trial?CNN's special coverage of the trial will begin Saturday at 10 a.m. ET and run until 4 p.m. ET. Coverage will stream live and can be...
    The former Republican president is accused of “incitement to insurrection” for the seizure of the Capitol by his supporters on January 6. US Senators vote Trump impeachment is constitutional But, according to the lawyer, the summons had to be a peaceful act. “Make no mistake about it, the vast majority of those who participated were peaceful,” Van Der Veen said. The lawyer noted that “like other politically motivated witch hunts that the left has undertaken in recent years, this impeachment is absolutely divorced from the facts.” “The Senate should vote quickly and decisively to reject it,” urged the defense. Other of Trump’s lawyers David Schoen had advanced that the defense team would take “three or four hours” on Friday to present their arguments against the conviction for inciting the January 6 riots, which caused the death of five people, including a policeman. In total,...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Most every Senate juror has said they will listen to the evidence in Donald Trump’s historic second impeachment trial, but most minds were likely made up before the trial began. Democrats would need a minimum of 17 Republicans to vote with them to convict Trump of incitement of insurrection, and that appears unlikely. Still, Democrats say they are holding out hope that they will win over enough Republicans to convict the former president for his role in the Jan. 6 Capitol riots, in which five people died. If Trump were convicted, the Senate could take a second vote to ban him from running for office again. A final vote is likely on Saturday. Here’s a look at the Republicans whom Democrats are eyeing as they make final arguments in the case: THE FREQUENT TRUMP CRITICS Republican Sens. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Ben Sasse of Nebraska, Mitt Romney...
    Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders clashed with one of former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial defense attorneys on Friday after asking him if President Biden won the 2020 election. Sanders asked in a written note submitted during the question period of Trump’s trial, “Are the prosecutors right when they claim that Trump was telling a ‘big lie’ or in your judgment did Trump actually win the election?” Trump lawyer Michael van der Veen asked incredulously, “My judgement? Who asked that?” “I did!” shouted Sanders, who lost the 2020 Democratic primary to Biden. “My judgment is irrelevant in this proceeding. It absolutely is,” van der Veen said, as Sanders bellowed a reply across the Senate floor. According to press pool reporters in the chamber, Sanders shouted back at van der Veen, “No, it isn’t!” and, “You represent the president of the United States!” Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), who is presiding over...
    By ALAN FRAM, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Seldom has Mitch McConnell signaled so little about such a consequential vote. While many expect the Senate's top Republican to back acquitting former President Donald Trump of inciting rioters who assaulted the Capitol last month, no one is really sure. The Washington political universe and the world beyond will collectively hold its breath when the Senate impeachment trial roll call reaches the Kentuckian's name. Over 36 years in the Senate, the measured McConnell has earned a reputation for inexpressiveness in the service of caution. This time, the suspense over how he'll vote underscores how much is at stake for McConnell and his party, though it seems extremely unlikely that 17 GOP senators will join all 50 Democrats to convict Trump. “The overwhelming number of Republican voters don’t want Trump convicted, so that means any political leader has to tread carefully,” said John...
    By LISA MASCARO, ERIC TUCKER and MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators are poised to vote on whether Donald Trump will be held accountable for inciting the horrific attack at the Capitol after a speedy trial that laid bare the violence and danger to their own lives and the fragility of the nation's tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power. Barely a month since the deadly riot, closing arguments are set for the historic impeachment trial as senators arrive for a rare Saturday session, all under the watch of armed National Guard troops still guarding the iconic building. The outcome of the quick, raw and emotional proceedings are expected to reflect a nation divided over the former president and the future of his brand of politics in America. “What’s important about this trial is that it’s really aimed to some extent at Donald Trump, but it’s...
    By MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Most every Senate juror has said they will listen to the evidence in Donald Trump’s historic second impeachment trial, but most minds were likely made up before the trial began. Democrats would need a minimum of 17 Republicans to vote with them to convict Trump of incitement of insurrection, and that appears unlikely. Still, Democrats say they are holding out hope that they will win over enough Republicans to convict the former president for his role in the Jan. 6 Capitol riots, in which five people died. If Trump were convicted, the Senate could take a second vote to ban him from running for office again. A final vote is likely on Saturday. Here's a look at the Republicans whom Democrats are eyeing as they make final arguments in the case: THE FREQUENT TRUMP CRITICS Republican Sens. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska,...
    (CNN)Donald Trump's impeachment lawyers failed to offer any real defense of why the former President did not do more to protect his vice president and members of Congress during the January 6 insurrection Friday, while new revelations about a conversation between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that day only added more damning details about what the former President knew and when.As the impeachment trial draws to a close, fresh attention on an account from House Republicans suggested that Trump had no intention of calling off the rioters who were ransacking the Capitol and threatening members in his name.And on the eve of Saturday's vote on the single impeachment article that accuses Trump of inciting the insurrection, one of those House Republicans called on others to speak out. 5 takeaways from Day 4 of Donald Trumps impeachment trial"To the patriots who were standing next to the former president as...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Seldom has Mitch McConnell signaled so little about such a consequential vote. While many expect the Senate’s top Republican to back acquitting former President Donald Trump of inciting rioters who assaulted the Capitol last month, no one is really sure. The Washington political universe and the world beyond will collectively hold its breath when the Senate impeachment trial roll call reaches the Kentuckian’s name. Over 36 years in the Senate, the measured McConnell has earned a reputation for inexpressiveness in the service of caution. This time, the suspense over how he’ll vote underscores how much is at stake for McConnell and his party, though it seems extremely unlikely that 17 GOP senators will join all 50 Democrats to convict Trump. “The overwhelming number of Republican voters don’t want Trump convicted, so that means any political leader has to tread carefully,” said John Feehery, a former...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators are poised to vote on whether Donald Trump will be held accountable for inciting the horrific attack at the Capitol after a speedy trial that laid bare the violence and danger to their own lives and the fragility of the nation’s tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power. Barely a month since the deadly riot, closing arguments are set for the historic impeachment trial as senators arrive for a rare Saturday session, all under the watch of armed National Guard troops still guarding the iconic building. The outcome of the quick, raw and emotional proceedings are expected to reflect a nation divided over the former president and the future of his brand of politics in America. “What’s important about this trial is that it’s really aimed to some extent at Donald Trump, but it’s more aimed at some president we don’t even know 20...
    Former President Trump's legal team took just about three hours of their 16-hour allotted time to lay out their defense Friday in the Senate's impeachment trial, claiming there was no insurrection during the riotous breach of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.Fast Facts Attorney Bruce Castor, who closed out the arguments on the fourth day of the trial, argued there was no insurrection Castor said Trump and his entire legal team denounce the violence that day and believe the actions of individual criminals were "horrific." Still, they argued Trump had nothing to do with inciting violence and his true supporters understand he wouldn't want that Castor said Trump and his entire legal team denounce the violence that day and believe the actions of individual criminals were "horrific." Still, they argued Trump had nothing to do with inciting violence and his true supporters understand he wouldn't want that Attorney Bruce Castor,...
    CDC guidelines to reopen schools: Teacher vaccinations not a must, 6 feet separation advised Trump’s team takes aim at rivals in brief and combative defense Best & Worst Refinance Mortgage Companies of 2021 Ad Microsoft These Unsold Jeep Grand Cherokees Are Now Dirt Cheap Ad Microsoft Refinance rates at 1.98% APR (15yr). Calculate your rate now Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/34 SLIDES © Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP/Shutterstock Read what the stars had to say on social...
    Trump lawyers: Impeachment based on hatred, not facts The Latest: Tuberville stands by account of Trump phone call As impeachment trial ends, GOP senators face big decision A multimedia impeachment trial: Video takes center stage Veteran GOP strategist resigns from board of Lincoln Project Trial highlights: Trump grievances, angry outbursts and more AP FACT CHECK: Trump’s team glosses over his Jan. 6 tirade Religion and the death penalty collide at the Supreme Court Pentagon approves 20 more COVID-19 vaccination teams Nebraska Sen. Sasse bets political future on opposing Trump Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Loading the player... Melania Trump is reportedly spending her post-White House life at the spa while her husband Donald Trump focuses on his second impeachment trial.  A source with knowledge of her schedule spilled to CNN that the former first lady has completely checked out of the political circus surrounding the ex president. These days, Melania prefers to fill her time with daily visits to the spa at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Florida.  Read More: Melania Trump made staffer write her ‘thank you’ notes to WH household staff “She goes to the spa, has lunch, goes to the spa (again) and has dinner with Donald on the patio,” one insider told CNN White House correspondent Kate Bennett. “Rinse and repeat. Every day.” GETTY Melania Trump left Washington with the worst public approval ratings of any first lady in modern history. Insiders claim she has had moments of...
    MSNBC’s Chris Hayes dissected the “blustering” and “lying” from Donald Trump’s defense after the fourth day of his Senate impeachment trial for inciting the Capitol insurrection. During his opening segment on Friday night, Hayes broke down the Trump lawyers’ strategy and tactics, likening the team’s “performative umbrage” to a rant from the network with Trump’s favorite cable TV prime time lineup. “Despite being allotted 16 hours over two days to lay out their case, Trump’s defense team used a little over three hours, the entirety of which was performative umbrage right out of a Fox News monologue,” Hayes said. “Blustering about Trump’s commitment to law and order and in some cases outright lying about the House Impeachment Managers’ case.” Hayes then played a clip of Trump attorney David Schoen claiming that House Democrats ambushed them by playing never-before-seen video during their prosecution against Trump. “Well, that would be quite a claim if it were true,...
    House aides claim Democrats' impeachment managers accidentally included a fake blue check verification mark on tweets that were presented at the Senate trial, according to a report. The tweets showed comments from Jennifer Lynn Lawrence who was retweeted by former President Trump. The two tweets that were exhibited included blue check marks next to Lawrence's name. Blue checks show the user's identity has been verified and also connotes a certain status. The Washington Examiner, which reported on Friday of Democrats admitting the accident, noted that a senior Democratic aide said: "If anything, it is further evidence of President Trump’s attention to and knowledge of what was being openly planned on January 6 by his followers, even those without Twitter verifications." TRUMP IMPEACHMENT DEFENSE TEAM PUTS DEMOCRATS ON TRIAL FOR PAST RHETORIC: 'STOP THE HYPOCRISY' "I’ve never been verified on Twitter so why did my Tweet used in the fact-free impeachment include a...
    The second impeachment trial for former President Trump wrapped up a key phase Friday night and could head for a vote on conviction as soon as Saturday. Trump's defense team presented its case Friday, taking just about three hours of their 16-hour allotted time. Then senators spent the next two-and-a-half hours peppering the legal teams for both sides with questions that got contentious at times.  The Senate will return at 10 am. EST on Saturday. House impeachment managers could make a request to extend the trial by calling witnesses. If they don't, the trial will head to closing arguments and a vote on whether Trump is guilty of "incitement of insurrection."  Friday evening gave the 100 senators who serve as Trump's jury their first chance to participate in the trial after sitting through lengthy legal arguments that kicked off in earnest on Tuesday. Senators posed 28 questions in total to the...
    House Impeachment manager Del. Stacey PlaskettStacey PlaskettStacey Plaskett becomes first non-voting delegate in history to serve as impeachment manager The Memo: New riot footage stuns Trump trial New security video shows lawmakers fleeing during Capitol riot MORE (D-Virgin Islands) on Friday drew a parallel between the process of wooing someone and former President TrumpDonald TrumpNRCC finance chair: Republicans who voted for Trump impeachment will not be penalized Blinken, UN head share first call after US rejoins Climate Accords, WHO GOP senators met with Trump's impeachment team to talk strategy MORE's repeated claims of election fraud that Democrats claim led to deadly Dec. 6 Capitol riot. "This attack is not about one speech. Most of you men would not have your wives with one attempt at talking to her," Plaskett said while arguing that the Jan. 6 riot would have never occurred without Trump. “It took numerous tries. You had to build it up,”...
    Impeachment proceedings against former President Donald Trump neared their conclusion Friday as his lawyers delivered their closing arguments in his defense. The fourth day of the trial also featured a question-and-answer segment, where Senate lawmakers were permitted to ask both legal teams for clarification on facts relevant to the case. A Senate vote on whether to convict Trump on a single count of incitement of insurrection could happen as early as Saturday. Here are seven key moments that occurred during the final day of arguments. Trump defense team accuses Democrats of showing ‘selectively edited’ video, other evidence Trump attorney David Schoen openly accused House impeachment managers of doctoring evidence displayed during the trial. The Trump team argued that clips from the former president’s Jan. 6, including his call for supporters to "fight like hell," were edited to remove context. "You get more due process than this when you fight a parking...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 8 p.m. Republican Sen. Tommy Tuberville of Alabama is standing by his account that he told then-President Donald Trump that Vice President Mike Pence was being evacuated from the Senate during the Capitol riot. The conversation is of interest to Democrats because Trump sent a tweet at 2:24 p.m. on Jan. 6 saying that Pence didn’t have “the courage” to challenge the election results. If Tuberville’s account is correct, then Trump would likely have known before sending the tweet that Pence had been evacuated and was in danger. At the time, the insurrectionists had already broken into the Capitol, some of them calling for Pence’s death. Tuberville recounted the phone conversation to reporters on Friday, saying, “I said, ‘Mr. President, they’ve taken the vice president out. They want me to get off the...
    By DAVID BAUDER, AP Media Writer NEW YORK (AP) — After unexpected video appearances by Madonna and Johnny Depp, all that seems missing from former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial is someone trying out a new dance routine. Trump's lawyers fully embraced a TikTok defense on Friday, using manipulated video and relying on rapid-fire, repetitive imagery to complain about manipulated video. The approach seemed the ultimate end of a proceeding where the use of media by both sides to make their arguments — sometimes chaotically, sometimes effectively — took center stage. It was very 2021. Or, perhaps, 2011. The Trump team's presentations owed an obvious debt to the creative use of video from the heyday of “The Daily Show” and other late-night comedies. They were seemingly created by someone who searched for phrases such as “fight like hell” and “throw a punch” and spliced together all the examples they could...
    Some 10.5 million total viewers watched the third day of the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump Thursday, down from 12.3 million who watched the second day of the trial. From 12 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., MSNBC was the most-watched among all three cable news networks, ABC, and CBS, and CNN were most-watched among the key demographic of viewers age 25-54 (NBC viewership was not available). MSNBC averaged 3.02 million total viewers, and 488,000 in the key demographic of viewers age 25-54. CNN had the second-most total viewers, 2.87 million, and the most in the demo, 639,000. Fox had the fewest total viewers during impeachment coverage, 815,000, and 144,000 in the demo. For each day of the trial, MSNBC has averaged the most total viewers, while CNN has had the most in the demo, and Fox has been the least-watched among the cable...
    NEW YORK (AP) — After unexpected video appearances by Madonna and Johnny Depp, all that seems missing from former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial is someone trying out a new dance routine. Trump’s lawyers fully embraced a TikTok defense on Friday, using manipulated video and relying on rapid-fire, repetitive imagery to complain about manipulated video. The approach seemed the ultimate end of a proceeding where the use of media by both sides to make their arguments — sometimes chaotically, sometimes effectively — took center stage. It was very 2021. Or, perhaps, 2011. The Trump team’s presentations owed an obvious debt to the creative use of video from the heyday of “The Daily Show” and other late-night comedies. They were seemingly created by someone who searched for phrases such as “fight like hell” and “throw a punch” and spliced together all the examples they could find, mostly from Democratic politicians. The...
    GOP Sen. Tommy Tuberville (Ala.) is doubling down on his claim that he spoke with then-President TrumpDonald TrumpNRCC finance chair: Republicans who voted for Trump impeachment will not be penalized Blinken, UN head share first call after US rejoins Climate Accords, WHO GOP senators met with Trump's impeachment team to talk strategy MORE on the afternoon of Jan. 6 — a narrative that was challenged hours earlier by Trump's defense team. Tuberville first revealed the call on Wednesday, saying Trump mistakenly called Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeGOP senators met with Trump's impeachment team to talk strategy Impeachment trial descends into chaos over Lee objection LIVE COVERAGE: Democrats focus on Trump remarks before attack on Capitol MORE (R-Utah) in an attempt to reach the freshman Alabamian. "[Lee] brought me the phone," Tuberville repeated Friday evening, after the Senate impeachment trial had wrapped up for the day. "It said 'White House'...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 7:05 p.m. The Senate has voted to give the Congressional Gold Medal to Eugene Goodman, a Capitol Police officer who led a violent mob away from the Senate doors on Jan. 6 as they hunted for lawmakers during the presidential electoral count. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called the vote at the end of the day’s impeachment proceedings, noting Goodman’s “foresight in the midst of chaos, and his willingness to make himself a target of the mob’s rage so that others might reach safety.” The Senate voted to award Goodman the medal — the highest honor Congress can bestow — by unanimous consent, meaning there were no objections. Goodman was in the Senate chamber as Schumer spoke, and the entire Senate stood and turned toward him, giving him a standing ovation. He put...
    Former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial was poised to conclude Saturday following his defense team’s presentation meant to highlight the hypocrisy and holes in the case against him. Trump’s lawyers arrived Friday for the fourth day of the trial with their own loop of footage to counter days of dramatic and carefully edited video from Democratic impeachment managers that attempted to show the former president incited the violent Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol that followed his speech to supporters at a nearby rally protesting the certification of the presidential election results. “This impeachment is completely divorced from the facts, the evidence, and the interests of the American people,” Trump lawyer Michael van der Veen told senators Friday. “The Senate should promptly and decisively vote to reject it. No thinking person could seriously believe that the president's Jan. 6 speech on the ellipse was in any way an incitement...
    Sen. Ted Cruz, the author of ‘One Vote Away,’ spoke with the Daily Caller News Foundation’s Samantha Renck about former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, if any Republicans are leaning to convict Trump and more. “If you look at what the House managers did, they spent virtually all of their time playing videos — really powerful, emotional videos — recounting what happened on January 6,” Cruz said. “[They were] making the case that January 6 was a horrific terrorist attack on the Capitol, that it was despicable.” “Everyone of us agrees that every one of the violent criminals who carried out that attack should be fully prosecuted and should go to jail for a very, very long time,” he said. Cruz discussed the legal question before the senate. (RELATED: EXCLUSIVE: Sen. Cotton Slams World Health Org ‘Chinese Communist Stooges’ In Renewed Call For Independent Investigation Of Wuhan Labs) “Did President...
    WASHINGTON -- Donald Trump's impeachment lawyers accused Democrats of waging a campaign of "hatred" against the former president as they sped through their defense of his actions and fiery words before the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, hurtling the Senate toward a final vote in his historic trial.The defense team vigorously denied on Friday that Trump had incited the deadly riot and said his encouragement of followers to "fight like hell" at a rally that preceded it was routine political speech. They played dozens of out-of-context clips showing Democrats, some of them senators now serving as jurors, also telling supporters to "fight," aiming to establish a parallel with Trump's overheated rhetoric."This is ordinarily political rhetoric that is virtually indistinguishable from the language that has been used by people across the political spectrum for hundreds of years," declared Trump lawyer Michael van der Veen. "Countless politicians have spoken of...
    WASHINGTON -- Donald Trump's impeachment lawyers accused Democrats of waging a campaign of "hatred" against the former president as they sped through their defense of his actions and fiery words before the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, hurtling the Senate toward a final vote in his historic trial.The defense team vigorously denied on Friday that Trump had incited the deadly riot and said his encouragement of followers to "fight like hell" at a rally that preceded it was routine political speech. They played dozens of out-of-context clips showing Democrats, some of them senators now serving as jurors, also telling supporters to "fight," aiming to establish a parallel with Trump's overheated rhetoric."This is ordinarily political rhetoric that is virtually indistinguishable from the language that has been used by people across the political spectrum for hundreds of years," declared Trump lawyer Michael van der Veen. "Countless politicians have spoken of...
    Republican senators are facing a historic choice after both sides in the impeachment trial of former President TrumpDonald TrumpNRCC finance chair: Republicans who voted for Trump impeachment will not be penalized Blinken, UN head share first call after US rejoins Climate Accords, WHO GOP senators met with Trump's impeachment team to talk strategy MORE rested their case Friday. No-one expects the number of Republicans who defy Trump to reach the total required for conviction — 17, assuming all Democrats vote the same way. But the final vote, expected Saturday or Sunday at the latest, will be a key test of the mood in a divided party. Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyThe Memo: Punish Trump or risk a repeat, warn Democrats FBI asks for help in identifying rioter amid impeachment trial The Hill's 12:30 Report: Republicans privately discuss trial votes MORE (R-Utah) became the only senator ever to vote to...