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Donald Trump’s impeachment trial:

    CNN anchor Jake Tapper criticized Republicans who voted in the Senate to dismiss the upcoming impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump. Discussing the proceedings on Tuesday afternoon’s “CNN Newsroom,” Tapper argued that Republicans have never wanted to hold Trump “to any sort of standard.” Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and 44 other Republicans voted Tuesday for Republican Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul’s motion to dismiss the trial, with every Democrat and five GOP senators voting to table the motion. WATCH: “You know, it’s just so strange because — look, I’m not a constitutional scholar. I don’t have an opinion on this, but a lot of people who are voting to not have any consequences for Donald Trump are doing so not because of constitutionality but because they don’t want to hold Donald Trump to any sort of standard and they never have,” Tapper said. “Some of these are the...
    Fox News’ Neil Cavuto questioned Marco Rubio Tuesday over his opposition to an impeachment trial for Donald Trump because he’s out of office. Rubio said again he finds the idea of the trial “stupid,” claiming it’s not even constitutional after voting with 44 other Republicans earlier to dismiss the trial at the outset. The Florida Republican said the trial just pours gasoline on the fire in an already-divided America, adding, “There’s a lot of reasons why this is a terrible idea for the country. It’s not just a waste of time but will hurt America.” “Isn’t that of Donald Trump’s doing?” Cavuto asked. He questioned Rubio on whether Trump provoked the mob with his incendiary comments. Rubio dodged and said, “Donald Trump is a private citizen.” “Do you think he should be punished for those remarks?” Cavuto asked. “He’s a private citizen,” Rubio reiterated. “If the president did something that...
    Forty-five senators voted on Tuesday with Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY), raising constitutional concerns over the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump. Forty-five senators voted with Paul’s motion to raise the question of whether it is constitutional to impeach Trump after he left office. This means that likely five Republicans voted with Democrats on the question of whether it is constitutional to impeach a former president. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) voted with Paul on the motion that the impeachment trial is unconstitutional. Sens. Susan Collins (R-ME), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Mitt Romney (R-UT), Ben Sasse (R-UT), and Pat Toomey (R-PA) voted with Democrats, believing that the impeachment is constitutional. This vote likely serves as a proxy vote on the final vote of whether to convict Trump on the question if he incited an insurrection during the January 6 riots. Paul wrote on Tuesday that 45 senators agreed that...
    A majority of Republicans voted Tuesday that Donald Trump's second impeachment is unconstitutional, a sign the former president will likely be acquitted in his upcoming trial. Republican Senator Rand Paul forced the Senate to vote on the issue, arguing the trial was illegal given that Trump no longer occupies the Oval Office. Most Republicans, including GOP Leader Mitch McConnell agreed with him: 45 of them voted it was illegal but five GOP senators joined Democrats to give them 55 votes to proceed.  Those 45 Republicans are also likely to vote for Trump's acquittal when the time comes. The Republicans who voted with Democrats were Senators Mitt Romney, Ben Sasse, Susan Collins, Lisa Murkowski and Pat Toomey. Paul argued that trying a former president would violate the U.S. Constitution. 'He is a private citizen,' the senator said of president.  A majority of Republicans voted that Donald Trump's second impeachment is unconstitutional...
    A US senator third in line for presidential succession is a huge comic book fan - and has also appeared in five Batman films. Vermont Democrat Patrick Leahy, who will preside over Donald Trump's impeachment trial, is lifelong Batman fan who appeared in numerous caped crusader movies - including The Dark Knight with Heath Ledger. 4Vermont Democrat Patrick Leahy, who will preside over Donald Trump's impeachment trial, is a lifelong Batman fanCredit: AP:Associated Press 4He appeared alongside Heath Ledger in The Dark KnightCredit: Warner Bros 4The Vermont Democrat is a huge comic book fanCredit: AP:Associated Press Leahy a veteran democratic senator from Vermont, is the current president pro tempore of the US Senate. This means that in succession terms, he could become president after the vice president, Kamala Harris, and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. In 1995, Leahy appeared in Batman Forever via an uncredited cameo and in the same year,...
    Former National Security Advisor John Bolton says the second impeachment of President Trump won't manage to hold the former president accountable and will instead fire up his fundraising machine while energizing his supporters in conservative media. Bolton, Trump's former national security advisor who penned a blistering tell-all but did not participate in the first impeachment, argues that impeachment will not bring 'closure' to the Trump era, and may embolden him. 'His great fundraising Wurlitzer will work overtime, as will his followers’ echo chamber, while the litigation plods on long after the Senate’s work is over,' wrote Bolton, a Republican and former UN ambassador who was a frequent Fox News contributor before joining the White House.  Former National Security Advisor John Bolton is arguing that a Senate impeachment trial won't succeed in holding Donald Trump accountable. 'His great fundraising Wurlitzer will work overtime, as will his followers’ echo chamber,' Bolton...
    George Washington University Professor Jonathan Turley will meet with Senate Republicans on Tuesday at their in-person lunch to discuss the constitutionality of the impending impeachment trial for former President Donald Trump.  Turley has argued that the impeachment trial is unconstitutional because Trump is no longer the president. He was invited by Senate GOP leadership, and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., plans to discuss the constitutionality question at the lunch.  That the constitutionality of a trial will be discussed among Republicans -- and that an advocate against its constitutionality will be their lunch guest -- signals that Senate Republicans may be distancing themselves from the prospect of convicting Trump and barring him from office, something many flirted with in the wake of the attack on the Capitol.  "On its face, the planned impeachment trial is at odds with the language of the Constitution, which expressly states that removal of a president is the...
    Donald Trump directed one of his former political aides on a mission to reassure GOP senators that he doesn't have any plans to form a third party that could siphon off Republican voters. Brian Jack, who served as Trump's political director during his time in the White House, portrayed his message to Republican lawmakers as they prepare for an impeachment trial against the former president next month. 'The president wanted me to know, as well as a handful of others, that the president is a Republican, he is not starting a third party and that anything he would do politically in the future would be as a Republican,' North Dakota Senator Kevin Cramer told Politico of Trump. 'The Republican Party is still overwhelmingly supportive of this president.' The report indicated that Jack did not specifically mention impeachment during his calls, but wanted to make sure it was known that Trump...
    DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – On Monday, Jan. 25, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi formally sent the Senate the article of impeachment against former President Donald Trump for incitement of insurrection. When the former President faces his second impeachment trial next month, Chief Justice John Roberts won’t be presiding. Instead, Democratic Vermont Senator Patrick Leahy will preside. The Constitution says when a President is tried on impeachment, the Chief Justice shall preside, but there’s no mention of who should oversee it when it involves a former President. SMU law professor Eric Cedillo said the former President will likely raise the issue. “It’ll probably be an appeal to the people listening to it more than anything else. The actual senators listening to what’s going on, procedurally, if they have any issue with the way in which the President Pro Tem presides, then I’m sure that’ll come up during the actual trial itself.” Senator John...
    Nine House Democrats, including lead impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD), walked across the Capitol on Monday evening to officially deliver to the Senate floor the article of impeachment accusing Donald Trump of inciting an insurrection, marking the second, unprecedented time a president has been sanctioned by the lower house. Raskin then read out the impeachment article in the well of the Senate. Trump was impeached by a historic, bipartisan majority in the House on January 13th, just one week after a pro-Trump mob laid siege to the Capitol and disrupted the Electoral College certification of Joe Biden’s victory, resulting in five deaths, including one police officer. Trump infamously refused to condemn the rioters in real time and sent several Tweets that appeared to revel in the chaos, among them was a video that expressed sympathy with the violent insurrectionists, saying: “We love you, you’re very special.” Last Friday, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced the schedule for...
    Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) exits the Senate chamber after the third day of the Senate impeachment trial of U.S. President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, January 23, 2020.Erin Scott | Reuters Sen. Patrick Leahy, not Chief Justice John Roberts, will preside over the imminent impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump. Leahy is the president pro tempore of the Senate, and is the longest-serving active Democrat in the chamber. "When I preside over the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, I will not waver from my constitutional and sworn obligations to administer the trial with fairness, in accordance with the Constitution and the laws," Leahy said in a statement. The president pro tempore of the Senate historically presides over impeachment trials of non-presidents. Typically, the chief justice of the United States presides over presidential impeachment trials. The trial is set to advance the week of...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal law enforcement officials are examining a number of threats aimed at members of Congress as the second trial of former President Donald Trump nears, including ominous chatter about killing legislators or attacking them outside of the U.S. Capitol, a U.S. official told The Associated Press. The threats, and concerns that armed protesters could return to sack the Capitol anew, have prompted the U.S. Capitol Police and other federal law enforcement to insist thousands of National Guard troops remain in Washington as the Senate moves forward with plans for Trump’s trial, the official said Sunday. WASHINGTON, DC – JANUARY 13: An article of impeachment for incitement of insurrection against President Donald Trump sits on a table at the U.S. Capitol on January 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. The House of Representatives voted to impeach Trump a second time, after Vice President Mike Pence declined to use the...
    In an interview with Fox News on Sunday, Republican Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida described the upcoming Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump as “stupid” and slammed Democratic Party politicians. The House of Representatives impeached Trump last week, claiming that he incited an insurrection against the U.S. government when he told his supporters to storm the Capitol building and overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election. Trump’s trial in the U.S. Senate will start next month, but it remains unclear how many Republicans are open to defecting and convicting the former commander-in-chief. Speaking with anchor Chris Wallace, Rubio argued that the push to convict Trump could further divide the American people and inflame partisan passions. “Well, first of all, I think the trial is stupid. It’s counterproductive. We already have a flaming fire in this country, and it’s like taking a bunch of gasoline and pouring it...
    CNN White House correspondent Jeff Zeleny told host Abby Philip on Sunday that Donald Trump might testify at his forthcoming impeachment trial due to his desire for attention, Raw Story. “He is now taking it [impeachment] much more seriously, we’re told,” he said. “He has followed the advice of Senator Lindsay Graham and he’s going to retain a South Carolina lawyer, Butch Bowers, who is really — has never operated on this type of impeachment level. He’s done some state impeachment cases, but President Trump is very engaged.” Zeleny claimed that there are currently not enough Republican senators in support of impeachment to convict Trump. The reporter continued to suggest that the trial could give Trump a chance to emerge more powerful, which he said would run contrary to the desires of some Republicans in the GOP. “He’s watching all of this very carefully. And Abby what if he decides...
    WASHINGTON -- The words of Donald Trump supporters who are accused of participating in the deadly U.S. Capitol riot may end up being used against him in his Senate impeachment trial as he faces the charge of inciting a violent insurrection.At least five supporters facing federal charges have suggested they were taking orders from the then-president when they marched on Capitol Hill on Jan. 6 to challenge the certification of Joe Biden's election win. But now those comments, captured in interviews with reporters and federal agents, are likely to take center stage as Democrats lay out their case. It's the first time a former president will face such charges after leaving office."I feel like I was basically following my president. I was following what we were called to do. He asked us to fly there. He asked us to be there," Jenna Ryan, a Texas real estate agent who posted...
    Donald Trump became the first president in history to be impeached twice when the House of Representatives voted last week to charge him with inciting the January 6 riots at the U.S. Capitol. His Senate trial is scheduled to begin next month. But there are still concerns about lawmakers’ safety and some believe that it would be best to allow senators to vote secretly as to avoid violence and ensure that Republicans go with their conscience, according to a Saturday report from Raw Story. Former Labor Secretary Robert Reich was first to float the idea, urging Democrats — who have a one-vote majority in the upper chamber — to allow a confidential vote. “If Republican senators had integrity and if Trump supporters were peaceful, this wouldn’t be necessary. But they’re not and they’re not. So a secret ballot offers a better chance of convicting Trump and ensuring he’ll never again...
    Friday on FNC’s “Hannity,” Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) challenged the premise of an impeachment effort led by congressional Democrats against former President Donald Trump. Cotton said because Democrats were pursuing the effort, it was as if Trump were “living rent-free” inside their heads. “Shortly after the House passed its article of impeachment against the president last week, I said it’s beyond the Senate’s constitutional authority to have a trial for a former president,” he said. “It just doesn’t make any sense. And I think most Americans are going to look at the Senate wasting our time on a trial to convict and remove from office a man who left office last week.” “I mean, Donald Trump moved out of the White House on Wednesday, but he is still living rent-free in the Democrats’ heads because they’re pursuing this impeachment after he’s already left office when the Constitution plainly says impeachment...
    He second impeachment or impeachment against the former president of the United States, Donald trump, start the next week of February 8. He is accused of “inciting insurrection” with the assault on the Capitol. This has been reported by the leader of the Democratic majority in the Senate, Chuck Schumer. He indicated that accusations for impeachment will be sent to the Upper House this week and that procedural matters and preparations will begin. The head of the Republican minority in the Senate, Mitch McConnell, asked for a delay in the beginning of the impeachment trial in order to prepare the defense of Donald Trump. “The trial will take place in the United States Senate, and there will be a vote on whether or not to ‘convict’ the president,” Schumer said. In addition, it indicated that it will be a “full and fair trial.” ...
    The former president of the United States is accused of having encouraged his supporters to launch an assault on the Capitol which led to the death of 5 people. Lhe impeachment trial of Donald Trump will begin the second week of February in the Senate, after the transmission of the indictment of the former president at the beginning of next week, announced Friday the Democratic leader of the Senate Chuck Schumer. “Once the files are drafted, the presentation by the parties will begin the week of February 8,” Chuck Schumer told his colleagues in the Senate. This program amounts to postponing the trial for two weeks, which will allow the upper house to confirm Joe Biden’s appointments to his government beforehand, and potentially deal with a massive economic aid plan to address the crisis. caused by the coronavirus. “Our prosecutors are ready to defend their case before the...
    Accused of encouraging his supporters to launch the invasion of Capitol Hill on January 6, former US President Donald Trump would become ineligible if found guilty. Trial begins February 8 Democratic leaders in Congress announced Friday, January 22, the date for the impeachment trial of Donald trump. It will begin the second week of February in the Senate that the upper house received the former president’s indictment early next week, reports Le Figaro. This two-week delay between the delivery of the indictment and the start of the debates will allow the Senate to confirm the members of its government. “Once the files are drafted, the presentation by the parties will begin the week of February 8”, said Friday night Chuck Schumer, the Democratic leader of the Senate. “Incitement to insurgency” Judged for “incitement to insurgency”, Donald trump is accused of having encouraged his supporters to break...
    This two-week delay between the delivery of the indictment and the start of the proceedings will ensure that the trial does not monopolize the sessions in the upper house for the start of Joe Biden’s term. The Senate will thus be able in particular to confirm the members of its government. “Once the files are drafted, the presentation by the parties will begin the week of February 8,” Chuck Schumer, the Democratic leader of the Senate, where Donald Trump is to be tried for “incitement to insurgency” said Friday evening. Mr. Schumer had previously clarified to his colleagues that the indictment “would be sent to the Senate on Monday”. “Our prosecutors are ready to defend their case before the 100 senators who will serve as judges during the trial,” Ms. Pelosi then confirmed in a statement. Concretely, these “prosecutors” – elected Democrats of the House led by Jamie Raskin...
    The opening arguments in the impeachment trial of Donald Trump in the Senate over the mutiny in the federal Capitol will begin the week of February 8, the first time that a former president will face such a process after leaving office. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced the schedule after reaching an agreement with Republicans, who had pushed to delay the trial to give Trump a chance to organize his team of lawyers and prepare his defense. before the only charge against him: inciting an insurrection. The February start date also gives the Senate more time to confirm President Joe Biden’s nominees to his cabinet and to examine the high-priority $ 1.9 trillion COVID-19 aid bill. on the agenda of the new White House that could stall during the impeachment process. “We all want to leave behind this terrible chapter in our nation’s history,” Schumer said of the deadly...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced on Friday that opening arguments in the upcoming impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump will begin on Monday, February 8. As reported by the Associated Press, the delayed start date came as the result of an agreement with Senate Republicans, who had endeavored to give the one-term executive an opportunity to assemble his legal team. Trump was impeached last week by the House of Representatives for the second time in his presidency when 222 Democrats and 10 Republicans voted to try him for inciting insurrection. On the morning of January 6, the former commander-in-chief urged thousands of his supporters to march on the U.S. Capitol Building as Congress worked to certify the results of the electoral college, a development that ultimately proved deadly and delayed certification by several hours. This came after months of unfounded claims of election fraud from Trump, as well...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced on Friday that former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial will begin on Feb. 9. "For the information of all senators, the house managers will come to read the article of impeachment at 7 p.m. on Monday, January 25th," Schumer said. "Members will then be sworn in the next day, Tuesday, January 26th. After that, both the house managers and the defense will have a period of time to draft their legal briefs, just as they did in previous trials. "During that period, the Senate will continue to do other business for the American people, such as Cabinet nominations and the COVID-relief bill, which would provide relief for millions of Americans who are suffering during this pandemic. Then, once the briefs are drafted, presentations by the parties will commence the week of February 8th. "The January 6th insurrection at the Capitol, incited...
    There were still a few minutes left of Donald Trump’s troubled tenure as U.S. president, but his First Lady had had enough. When the pair disembarked from Air Force One at Palm Beach International Airport on Wednesday, Trump paused for one last photocall. His wife, however — who’d changed en route from a fitted suit and heels into a flowing Gucci kaftan and flats — barely broke her stride. She headed straight for the waiting limousine, leaving him to wave for the cameras and small crowd on his own. Melania, at least, knew that it was all over. For her, the departure from the White House may have come not a moment too soon. There were still a few minutes left of Donald Trump’s troubled tenure as U.S. president, but his First Lady had had enough But one can hardly say the same for her husband who, even now,...
    Democratic Senate leader Chuck Schumer on Friday made an unfortunate slip of the tongue as he slammed former President Donald Trump’s conduct related to the Jan 6 Capitol riot. Schumer was informing senators about the plans for an impeachment trial of the ex-president. The House last week impeached the president for "incitement of insurrection" for his alleged role in encouraging protesters who went on to storm the Capitol. It was at that point when Schumer made a somewhat phallic flub. SCHUMER SAYS PELOSI TO DELIVER TRUMP IMPEACHMENT ARTICLE MONDAY, TRIGGERING TRIAL STANDOFF WITH MCCONNELL "Make no mistake, there will be a trial and when that trial ends, senators will have to decide if they believe Donald John Trump incited the erection... insurrection against the United States," he said. Schumer seemed to catch his gaffe and visibly winced. And, perhaps needless to say, Twitter users rose to the occasion. "Well, it WAS...
    New York : Former President Donald Trump is seen on his arrival in West Palm Beach, this Friday, the same day as the inauguration of his successor Joe Biden. Photo: Giorgio Viera / EFE WASHINGTON – Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, announced this Friday that the president of the House of Representatives, also a Democrat Nancy pelosi, will send the article of impeachment to the former president to the Upper House on Monday Donald trump, with which the process will formally begin. Trump, the first president in US history to be subjected to two political trials, will be on this occasion under the charge of “inciting insurrection” for the violent assault on the Capitol on January 6 of a mob of his followers, and that left five dead. This means that Trump’s second impeachment trial could begin next Tuesday, the day after the delivery of...
    Savannah Rychcik January 22, 2021 0 Comments Pete Buttigieg, President Joe Biden’s nominee for transportation secretary, is stressing the importance of maintaining bipartisanship during former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial in the Senate. Co-host of “The View” Ana Navarro noted the article of impeachment against Trump will be delivered to the Senate on Monday and asked Buttigieg if he believes Trump will be convicted. “I don’t know, but certainly what’s different this time is you have Republicans and Democrats agreeing on, some Republicans, agreeing with Democrats on this,” Buttigieg said. He added, “I think it’s very important that it be bipartisan. Look, accountability is part of unity and that’s something the Senate will have to take seriously in addition to all of the other business of the country. It’s not a small task, but it’s really important for us to be able to move on.” Watch his comments...
    Democrats are really eager to get former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial started. A little slip of the tongue punctuated Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer's announcement Friday that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi will send the article of impeachment to the Senate on Monday. “The Senate will conduct a trial of the impeachment of Donald Trump,” Schumer, a New York Democrat, said on the Senate floor, in his third day as majority leader. “It will be a full trial. It will be a fair trial. But make no mistake: There will be a trial, and when that trial ends, senators will have to decide if they believe Donald Trump incited the erection — insurrection against the United States," he added, quickly correcting himself. SCHUMER: "Senators will have to decide if they believe Donald Trump incited the ERECTION against the United States." pic.twitter.com/GllUiqAEUy— Breaking911 (@Breaking911) January 22, 2021 Trump was impeached...
    Donald Trump is looking at a potentially disastrous impeachment trial as he has no clear strategy — and no legal team that could carry it out if he did — a new report claims. Bill Palmer, founder of the political news outlet Palmer Report, noted that the former president appears to be in serious trouble as he faces the prospect of being convicted. A prominent critic of the now-former president, Palmer wrote that Trump had no lawyers or strategy yet, and does not appear to have much help coming soon. “To that end, Trump’s Senate impeachment trial could begin as soon as next week – and CNBC is reporting that he still has no lawyers and no legal strategy for the trial,” he wrote. “This is notable because Trump relied on laughably inept lawyers while trying to overthrow the election result, but now he can’t get anyone at all. Even...
    More On: chuck schumer Schumer: Trump impeachment article going to Senate on Monday Biden attends church service with Pelosi, McConnell before inauguration Mitch McConnell’s betrayal hurts the nation: Goodwin McConnell, Pelosi, Schumer will join Biden at church before his inauguration This going to be hard to live down. Majority Leader Chuck Schumer got a rise out of lawmakers on the Senate floor Friday when he fumbled his words and said that they will have to decide if former President Trump incited the “erection” against the US. “Make no mistake, there will be a trial and when that trial ends senators will have to decide if they believe Donald John Trump incited the erection against the United States,” Schumer said. Noticing his boneheaded slip-up, he corrected himself and said “insurrection,” but that didn’t stop online wags from roasting him. “Well, sometimes insurrection is a HARD word to pronounce,” one Twitter...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi will deliver a House-passed impeachment article to the Senate Monday – kicking off a Senate trial for former President Donald Trump as President Joe Biden begins the first week of his presidency and seeks to get a cabinet confirmed and move his agenda. Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer announced Pelosi's move on the Senate floor Friday at the start of the day's session, after new Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell put out a proposal that would have delayed a trial until mid February in part to give Trump's legal team time to prepare. 'I have spoken to Speaker Pelosi who informed me that the articles will be delivered to the Senate on Monday.' Schumer listed impeachment along with other pressing business.  Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer announced Pelosi's decision to transmit an impeachment article to the Senate 'The Senate must and will do all three:...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said House Democrats will send over the impeachment article against former President Donald Trump charging him with inciting an insurrection against the Capitol. Schumer, a New York Democrat, said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told him she would send the article over on Monday. “The Senate will conduct a trial of the impeachment of Donald Trump,” Schumer, a New York Democrat, said on the Senate floor. “It will be a full trial. It will be a fair trial. But make no mistake: There will be a trial, and when that trial ends, senators will have to decide if they believe Donald Trump incited the insurrection against the United States.” Schumer's announcement rejects a request by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell to delay the arrival of the article until next Thursday and to begin the trial in mid-February, which he said would provide adequate time for...
    WASHINGTON -- Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell is proposing to push back the start of Donald Trump's impeachment trial to February to give the former president time to prepare and review his case.House Democrats who voted to impeach Trump last week for inciting the deadly Jan. 6 Capitol riot have signaled they want to move quickly to trial as President Joe Biden begins his term, saying a full reckoning is necessary before the country - and the Congress - can move on.But McConnell in a statement Thursday evening suggested a more expansive timeline that would see the House transmit the article of impeachment next week, on Jan. 28, launching the trial's first phase. After that, the Senate would give the president's defense team and House prosecutors two weeks to file briefs. Arguments in the trial would likely begin in mid-February."Senate Republicans are strongly united behind the principle that the institution...
    Orly Taitz, the conspiracy theorist, dentist, and attorney who led the “birther” movement’s litigation to contest the reality that Barack Obama was born in the United States, is suing Vice President Kamala Harris and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) in an attempt to stop the U.S. Senate from presiding over a trial connected to former president Donald Trump’s historic second impeachment. In a Thursday press release, Taitz said the lawsuit, filed on behalf of the Defend Our Freedoms Foundation, or DOFF, would attempt to persuade a court that any upcoming Trump impeachment trial in the U.S. Senate would be unconstitutional. Her rationale is that the “plain language” of the Constitution allows only an impeachment “trial of a sitting president, not a private individual,” and gives the Senate “only one remedy, removal from office.” Taitz says any attempt to try Trump in the senate would merely be an attempt...
    Kevin McCarthy said Thursday that he would not support an effort from Republican lawmakers to push out Representative Liz Cheney from her leadership position in the House. 'Do you want Liz Cheney to remain as conference chair or no?' a reporter asked McCarthy during his weekly conference on Thursday. The Minority leader simply shot back: 'Yes.' Cheney, who represents Wyoming and serves as GOP conference chairwoman, is facing extraordinary clapback from her own party after she became the highest ranking Republican to vote for impeaching Donald Trump earlier this month. But McCarthy says she should remain in her post. Many of Trump's House allies are circulating a petition demanding a vote to call on Cheney to resign. Cheney is also facing fallout in her home state, where Cheney already has her first primary challenger for the 2022 race. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said Thursday that he does not...
    Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Thursday she will send the impeachment article against Donald Trump to the Senate in 'a few days' so his trial can begin. That would put the start date sometime next week in what could be a speedy trial as Republican senators say there are not enough members in their party willing to convict the former president. Pelosi said she'll be talking with the House impeachment managers 'in the next few days' about when 'the Senate will be ready' to receive the article.  'We will be in another few days, when I'll be talking with managers, as to when the Senate will be ready for the trial of the then President of the United States for his role in instigating an insurrection on the House, on the Capital of the United States, on our democracy to undermine the will of the people,' she said.  The speaker said...
    Donald Trump's impeachment trial could last a mere three days once the Senate begins the proceedings as the former president struggles to find lawyers to represent him. Trump spent his first afternoon out of office at his Mar-a-Lago residence on the phone with allies. He had two queries: asking if GOP senators will vote to bar him from ever running for office again, two people with knowledge of the calls told The Daily Beast.  He also asked what lawyers should represent him in trial. The former president is having trouble finding a legal team to represent him. Members of his first impeachment legal team, including Jay Sekulow and former White House Counsel Pat Cipollone, aren't interested.  Republican Senator Lindsey Graham, a close Trump ally, is one of the people who spoke to the former president on Wednesday and confirmed the former president's troubles.  '[Trump] said, 'I really don't know the lay...
    Several Republican lawmakers involved in some way with the rally ahead of the storming of the Capitol earlier this month sought with Donald Trump for a pardon – but the president's legal advisors warned against granting the pleas. Two people familiar with the plans told CNN that Trump decided not to grant the pardons to lawmakers before he leaves office Wednesday. He also decided Saturday night, according to sources, that he would not pardon himself or his family members. Although it is not clear from the Tuesday report which Republican lawmakers directly asked the president for clemency, there are a number who were involved in the rally Democrats are claiming incited the ensued deadly riot. Among those who spoke to the rally at the Ellipse before the mob rioted were Representatives Paul Gosar and Andy Biggs of Arizona and Mo Brooks of Alabama.  Top 'Stop the Steal' organizer Ali Alexander...
    Chief Justice John Roberts is eager to avoid presiding over Donald Trump's second impeachment trial – after he became a lightning rod during the first one. Just as the Senate is seeking to ascertain how it might proceed with an impeachment trial without blowing up the start of Joe Biden's term, the Supreme Court could face its own business being rearranged. The Constitution states that 'When the President of the United States is tried the Chief Justice shall preside.' But with the Senate having been in recess since the House voted to impeach, the trial will occur when Trump is no longer in office – potentially giving Roberts an out.   Supreme Court Justice John Roberts is not keen to preside over the historic second impeachment of Donald Trump 'He wants no further part of this,' a Capitol Hill source told Politico.  Roberts has spent his tenure seeking to avoid...
    Donald Trump could face a difficult impeachment trial if he picks Rudy Giuliani to represent him, strategist Karl Rove says. The former adviser to George W. Bush turned television pundit suggested that Trump’s risk of conviction could go up if he selects his personal lawyer and former New York City mayor as his legal counsel, The Hill reported. Appearing on Fox News Sunday, Rove hinted that Trump’s chances of being convicted are much higher in the second impeachment compared to the first, when Republicans were largely united behind him. This time, outgoing Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has reportedly signaled that GOP members can vote their conscience, and he will not instruct them to acquit him. Rove noted that Giuliani has been pushing a defense that Trump could not be held responsible for the attack on the U.S. Capitol earlier this month, saying that the unfounded claims of election fraud...
    High-profile lawyer Alan Dershowitz, who acted as part of Donald Trump’s legal defense amid the first impeachment trial, believes that the current push to impeach the president after his time in office is “plainly unconstitutional,” Breitbart reported. “If you can impeach anyone who is not a sitting president, there are no limits to the power of the Congress to try ordinary citizens,” he said during an interview on Fox News’ Sunday Morning Futures. “It’s plainly unconstitutional and the Senate should not proceed with this unconstitutional act.” Dershowitz warned that impeaching Trump post-presidency would have “horrendous” legal implications. Per Breitbart, the lawyer argued that the GOP lawmakers in the Senate do not have the jurisdiction to put Trump – who soon be an American citizen – on trial. Dershowitz warned that it would allow Congress to have unlimited power over ordinary citizens and suggested this purported expansion of power would have...
    Bradley Cortright January 17, 2021 0 Comments Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) is cautioning his colleagues that voting to convict President Donald Trump on the charge of “incitement of insurrection” would be “disastrous” for the country and the Republican Party. During an appearance on Fox News on Sunday, Graham said, “This is insane at every level. It will create further division in the country.” He asked, “What good comes from impeaching Donald Trump after he leaves office?” Graham noted that some lawmakers are hoping to impeach Trump, even after he leaves office, so that they can vote to ban him from holding office in the future. He added, “This has never been done in the history of our country. I think it’s blatantly unconstitutional.” The South Carolina senator then turned his attention to his Republican colleagues, “If we embrace an unconstitutional impeachment of Donald Trump after he’s out of office, it will...
    Vice President-elect Kamala Harris said she and President-elect Joe Biden are ready to 'multitask' as they'll come into office needing Congress to quickly pass more COVID-19 financial relief - and with the Senate picking up the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump.  'We know we have to multitask there,' she told National Public Radio in an interview Thursday. 'We have to multitask, which means as with anyone, we have a lot of priorities and we need to see them through.' Harris might have an additional job on her plate on day No. 1, as some experts believe as president of the Senate she could chair Trump's impeachment trial, as opposed to Chief Justice John Roberts.   Vice President-elect Kamala Harris told NPR she knows she and President-elect Joe Biden will have to 'multitask' as they'll come into office pushing for a $1.9 trillion COVID-19 rescue package - and she might...
    With his defenses, the future president approves the impeachment procedure brought against Donald Trump, while fearing that it will spoil the “hundred days” of his legislative program. correspondent in New York Lhe last poisoned gift from Donald Trump to his successor Joe Biden was not premeditated: the parliamentary impeachment procedure against the outgoing president, initiated Monday in the House of Representatives, will bounce back in the Senate after “Inauguration Day”, the ceremony of investiture of January 20. Equipped with the narrowest room for maneuver in the upper house of Congress, on a perfect equality of votes with the Republicans (50) and that, decisive, of the future vice-president Kamala Harris, the Democrats now fear that the trial of Donald Trump for inciting an insurgency does not strike the legislative priorities of the new Administration.
    Fox News hosts Sean Hannity and Tucker Carlson came out swinging for Donald Trump on Wednesday night and urged Mitch McConnell to end what they called 'impeachment madness'.  The pair of hosts spoke separately on their own shows but both took a hard line against Senate Majority Leader McConnell who rejected a speedy Senate impeachment trial for Donald Trump then said he was willing to convict. Neither expressly supported nor condemned the President or his actions over the last week, resisting the urge to share their opinion on whether or not Trump actually deserves to be impeached over the MAGA mob riot he's accused of inciting. They did, however, slam Republicans for their cooperation in the impeachment process which they say won't do anything to solve the party's problems and may cost them tens of millions of votes. If Trump is convicted by Senate trial the Senate can then vote...
    Trump has called on Americans to be united and does not discuss his impeachment while Joe Biden has asked Congress to work on priorities despite the trial. LUS President Donald Trump on Wednesday evening called for unity, saying violence “has no place” in America. “None of my real supporters could be in favor of political violence,” he said in a video message in which he never mentions his indictment by Congress for encouraging the assault on his sympathizers against the Capitol. “If you do this, you are not supporting our movement, you are attacking it, you are attacking our country. We cannot tolerate it, ”he added. Biden: working on priorities For his part, President-elect Joe Biden on Wednesday asked Congress to work on the priorities of his program, despite the impeachment trial of Donald Trump, which will open after the Democrat comes...
    Donald Trump’s trial will take place after he leaves the White House, that is to say after Joe Biden takes office on January 20. A historical situation It is the first time in the history of the United States that an impeachment has been voted twice against the same president. Donald trump would soon be tried by the Senate following the indictment by the House on Wednesday for “incitement to insurgency”. The decision was passed by 232 votes to 197. In total, ten Republicans, including Liz Cheney, the daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, participated in the vote with them. “No one is above the law, not even the President of the United States”, said Nancy Pelosi, the leader of the House Democrats on the remarks echoed by 20 minutes. In his opinion, Donald Trump represents “a danger to democracy”. He is, in fact, accused by the...
    Trump has called on Americans to be united and does not discuss his impeachment while Joe Biden has asked Congress to work on priorities despite the trial. LUS President Donald Trump on Wednesday evening called for unity, saying violence “has no place” in America. “None of my real supporters could be in favor of political violence,” he said in a video message in which he never mentions his indictment by Congress for encouraging the assault on his sympathizers against the Capitol. “If you do this, you are not supporting our movement, you are attacking it, you are attacking our country. We cannot tolerate it, ”he added. Biden: working on priorities For his part, President-elect Joe Biden on Wednesday asked Congress to work on the priorities of his program, despite the impeachment trial of Donald Trump, which will open after the Democrat comes...
    Wednesday's House vote to impeach President Trump has teed up a Senate trial where President Donald Trump will once again decide on a team to represent him – this time on a charge of 'incitement of insurrection.' Sources have already said Trump may turn to lawyer Rudy Giuliani as he battles impeachment a second time, this time before a Senate 'jury' that may be considerably more skeptical than last time. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Wednesday he does not know how he will vote. Giuliani has been a key legal advisor to Trump while also leading a personal crusade to unearth potential dirt on Joe Biden in Ukraine as well as on his son's business dealings. Donald Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani, who has led Trump's legal effort to overturn the election results in court, is expected to head his legal effort as the impeachment trial approaches in the...
    PRESIDENT Donald Trump has been impeached for a second time, leaving questions as to whether or not he could be removed from office before Biden is inaugurated. Trump became the first US president in history to be impeached twice on January 13 when 232 House members voted for his impeachment. 8US President Donald Trump waves to the media as he makes his way to board Air Force OneCredit: AFP - Getty Was Donald Trump impeached? Trump was formally impeached for a second time after congressmen debated his impeachment on January 13. Ten out of 211 House Republicans and 222 House Democrats voted for Trump's impeachment just before 4pm, giving the House enough ballots to impeach the president. 8Credit: AP:Associated Press Democrats have accused President Trump of encouraging his supporters to attack the Capitol building, resulting in the death of five people. Democrats formally introduced the articles on January 11. Trump has become the first president in...
    WASHINGTON (CBS/CNN) — For the first time in U.S. history, a president of the United States has been impeached for the second time. The House of Representatives voted Wednesday to impeach President Donald Trump in a bipartisan vote to condemn his role inciting the riot at the U.S. Capitol last week. Pennsylvania Congresswoman Madeleine Dean is one of the nine impeachment managers. “I am honored to serve as an impeachment manager among my esteemed colleagues,” Dean said in a statement. “It is for the sake of our country, not the hate of one man or anyone, but for the love of our country and Constitution. The case is clear: it is our solemn duty to impeach Donald J. Trump. This tragedy must have consequences.” House Democrats and ten Republicans — including the House’s No. 3 Republican — voted in favor of the impeachment of Trump exactly one week after a...
    The House voted Wednesday to mpeach President Donald Trump for a second time for 'incitement of insurrection,' exactly a week after the MAGA mob stormed Capitol Hill.  The Democratic majority was joined by some Republicans, making the House's move bipartisan unlike Trump's first impeachment less than 13 months ago.   Earlier, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's spokesman confirmed that McConnell informed Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer that he wouldn't bring the Senate back before January 19, the day before President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration.  The revelation came after the House cleared procedural hurdles and debate had started on the article. IMPEACHMENT TIMETABLE Wednesday afternoon: House vote on single Article What happens next? Nancy Pelosi decides when to transmit Article to Senate. When she does, it must begin trial on the next sitting day and sit six days a week until it concludes  Tuesday January 19:  Earliest date Mitch McConnell has said trial can...
    President-elect Joe Biden will begin his term seeking to confirm his cabinet and seize hold of the coronavirus response while the Senate most likely moves ahead with an impeachment trial of his predecessor.   Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has decided not to use his position to bring the Senate back into session for an immediate impeachment trial – putting the start date of a trail off by days, and throwing the start of Biden's tenure into doubt.  McConnell's office confirmed Wednesday that the leader, who is reportedly infuriated with Trump following the MAGA mob that ransacked the Capitol, would not use special emergency authority to bring colleagues back to consider an impeachment article against Trump.  Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has 'not made a final decision on how I will vote' on impeachment, he told colleagues. He has decided not to use emergency powers to call the Senate back...
    Lindsey Graham slammed Mitch McConnell and other Republican leaders in the Senate on Wednesday as the House began debate to impeach President Donald Trump a second time. In a lengthy statement, delivered the day after Graham traveled to Texas with President Trump to visit a new section of the border wall, the senator argued: 'The last thing the country needs is an impeachment trial of a president who is leaving office in one week.' Graham, a staunch Trump ally, warned another impeachment trial 'could invite further violence' and decried Democrats for wanting to do a 'do-over impeachment.' 'The House impeachment process seeks to legitimize a snap impeachment totally void of due process. No hearings. No witnesses. It is a rushed process that, over time, will become a threat to future presidents. As to Senate leadership, I fear they are making the problem worse, not better,' he said.  Senator Lindsey Graham...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the fallout from the attack of the U.S. Capitol by pro-Trump loyalists (all times local): 1:20 p.m. If the House impeaches President Donald Trump, a Senate trial on whether to convict him of inciting insurrection seems all but certain to have to wait until President-elect Joe Biden is inaugurated. That’s the word from a spokesman for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. The spokesman says aides to the Kentucky Republican have told Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer’s staff that McConnell won’t agree to invoke powers calling senators into emergency session. That means the Senate almost certainly won’t meet again until Jan. 19. That’s the day before Biden’s inauguration. The House is set to vote later Wednesday on impeaching Trump, accusing him of rallying a violent mob of supporters to attack the Capitol last week. ___ HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE FALLOUT FROM...
    East Bay Rep. Eric Swalwell will serve as an impeachment manager as the House of Representatives moves Wednesday to impeach President Donald Trump for inciting last week’s deadly storming of the Capitol complex. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi named the Dublin Democrat as one of nine impeachment managers. Congressman Ted Lieu of Southern California was also selected. With Vice President Mike Pence declining to use the 25th Amendment to try to remove Trump from office, the House is expected to vote as early as Wednesday to impeach the president. It would then fall to the Senate to convict Trump. While a number of Republicans in recent days have openly called for Trump’s impeachment and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is reportedly quietly supportive of the idea, it was unclear Wednesday whether enough members of the GOP planned to join Democrats to secure a conviction. If the Senate found Trump guilty, lawmakers...
    Pennsylvania Congresswoman Madeleine Dean was named one of the managers of President Donald Trump's impeachment trial. The nine managers would be responsible for prosecuting Trump, and proving he should be removed from office after he incited the violent attack of the U.S. Capitol last Wednesday, House Speak Nancy Pelosi said. “Tonight, I have the solemn privilege of naming the Managers of the impeachment trial of Donald Trump,” Pelosi Tuesday night.  “It is their constitutional and patriotic duty to present the case for the President’s impeachment and removal. They will do so guided by their great love of country, determination to protect our democracy and loyalty to our oath to the Constitution.  "Our Managers will honor their duty to defend democracy For The People with great solemnity, prayerfulness and urgency.” The other eight managers are Rep. Jamie Raskin, Rep. Diana DeGette, Rep. David Cicilline, Rep. Joaquin Castro, Rep. Eric Swalwell, Rep. Ted Lieu,...
    President Donald Trump will be exposed to a new impeachment trial, but this would begin months after his departure from the White House. Miami World / eldiariony Congressman James E. Clyburn, one of the highest-ranking Democrats, the House of Representatives would vote in favor of a new trial against Trump on Tuesday, but it would take time to send the resolution to the Senate. The impeachment is to convict Trump of inciting the attack on the Capitol on January 6, when hundreds of his supporters forcibly entered the building in an incident that left four dead, including a police officer. Legislative action is different from invoking Amendment 25 to the Constitution, which allows for the removal of a president. Lawmakers and other political figures have called for Trump’s resignation over the Capitol events. The Democrats’ CalculationAccording to Clyburn, the time to get Trump removed by impeachment is short since the...
    Attorney Alan Dershowitz said Sunday that any second impeachment attempt against President Donald Trump “will not go to trial” because Trump will no longer be president by the time the process reaches the Senate. “It will not go to trial. All the Democrats can do is impeach the president in the House of Representatives — for that all you need is a majority vote,” Dershowitz told Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures.” “You don’t have to take evidence and there are no lawyers involved.” “But the case cannot come to trial in the Senate because the Senate has rules and the rules would not allow the case to come to trial, according to the majority leader [Sen. Mitch McConnell], until 1 p.m. on Jan. 20th, an hour after President Trump leaves office,” Dershowitz continued. He added that “the Constitution specifically says the president shall be removed from office upon impeachment,...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Two Republican senators now say President Donald Trump should resign as support for the drive to impeach him a second time is gaining momentum in his final days in office after the deadly riot at the Capitol by a violent mob of Trump supporters. Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania on Sunday joined Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski in calling for Trump to “resign and go away as soon as possible.” Murkowski, who has long voiced her exasperation with Trump’s conduct in office, told the Anchorage Daily News on Friday that Trump simply “needs to get out.” Toomey said that even though he believes Trump committed impeachable offenses in encouraging loyalists in the Capitol siege on Wednesday, he did not think there was enough time for the impeachment process to play out. Toomey said that resignation was the “best path forward, the best way to get this person in...
    Donald Trump has started putting together a defense team for a second impeachment trial with Rudy Giuliani and Alan Dershowitz said to both be in the running. Two sources told CNN Giuliani, Trump's personal attorney and the man who spearheaded the president's failed legal efforts to overturn the presidential election, is expected to represent Trump if the unprecedented event of a second impeachment trial materializes. The sources said Trump is also considering hiring Dershowitz, the controversial celebrity attorney who represented him at his first impeachment trial in December 2019 for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Dershowitz, who has infamously worked on the defense teams for OJ Simpson, Jeffrey Epstein and Harvey Weinstein, said it would be an 'honor and privilege' to defend the president for a second time.  House Democrats will introduce their impeachment resolution on Monday charging Trump with 'incitement of insurrection' for his part in stoking up the...
    Donald Trump's first impeachment trial didn't convict him. A second one might.Consolidated News Photos/CNP via ZUMA Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.Should we impeach Donald Trump? Yes. It’s true that an impeachment trial can’t be finished before January 20, which makes it seem sort of pointless. But for two reasons, it’s not. First, trying to overturn an election violently and illegally in order to stay in power is, by definition, something that a president can only do during his last month or so in power. Doing nothing about it sends a message that lame duck presidents can basically do anything with impunity. I hardly need to explain why this is a very bad precedent to set. Second, an impeachment trial might be curiously attractive to Republicans, whose support will be needed....
    On Friday, outgoing Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell circulated a memo to Republican senators that outlined the procedure for holding another impeachment trial for President Donald Trump. According to The Washington Post, which obtained a copy of the document, McConnell told his colleagues that proceedings would most likely occur after President-elect Joe Biden is inaugurated. If the Democratic-controlled House of Representatives impeaches Trump, McConnell told his colleagues, the articles would reach the upper chamber one day before Biden’s inauguration. The upper chamber will not reconvene for substantive business until then, although it is scheduled to hold two pro forma sessions next week. Absent agreement from all lawmakers, McConnell would not be able to begin the trial before Jan. 19, the memo stressed. “Again, it would require the consent of all 100 senators to conduct any business of any kind during the scheduled pro forma sessions prior to January 19, and...
    Impeachment witness Alexander Vindman is speaking out against what he called “a campaign of bullying, intimidation and retaliation by President Donald Trump and his allies” after he decided to testify before Congress, cutting short a promising career and leading to his retirement from the military last month. Writing in an op-ed published in Saturday’s Washington Post, the lieutenant colonel opened up about what he described as a painful experience after he chose to come forward about his knowledge of Trump’s phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky in which he pushed for an investigation of Joe Biden. That call ultimately led to a congressional inquiry that ended with Trump being impeached by the House and ultimately acquitted in a Senate trial. Vindman had announced last month that he was leaving the military, with his attorney releasing a statement saying that it was clear that his future within the institution would...