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    February 23, 2021 12:41 PM | With information from EFE 15 minutes. The president of the Federal Reserve (FED) of the United States (USA), Jerome Powell, affirmed on Tuesday that the coronavirus pandemic left a “significant mark” on inflation, but is not a threat to the economy. In fact, he pointed to an “improvement” in the outlook for the second half of the year. “The pandemic has left a significant mark on inflation (…). For some of the sectors that have been most severely affected, prices remain particularly weak“This was stated by Powell in his appearance before the banking committee of the US Senate to offer his semi-annual report on monetary policy. However, the president of the FED said that “in general, and In the accumulated of the last 12 months, inflation continues to be below our objective of 2% long-term”. He also insisted that the US economy is still...
    Steve Jobs' youngest daughter has made her modeling debut in Glossier's playful holiday beauty campaign after striking a pose in her bathtub.   Eve Jobs, the daughter of the late Apple founder and billion investor Laurene Powell-Jobs, may have been inspired to launch her modeling career after her mother revealed earlier this year that her children won't be inheriting her wealth.  The 22-year-old star alongside Euphoria star Sydney Sweeney and RuPaul's Drag Race runner-up Naomi Smalls in the socially-distanced new campaign, which was self-shot, according to Glossier founder Emily Weiss. Strike a pose: Eve Jobs has made her modeling debut in Glossier's new holiday campaign  Natural beauty: In the self-shot photos, the 22-year-old can be seen posing in a bubble bath 'Eve Jobs — yes, [Apple] Jobs — all grown up and self-shot for Glossier holiday 2020,' Emily, 35, captioned the images of Eve that she shared on Instagram.    In one...
    Attorney Sidney Powell speaks at a press conference on election results in Alpharetta, Georgia, U.S., December 2, 2020.Elijah Nouvelage | Reuters Sidney Powell's Kraken needs an editor. Despite being cut loose from Trump's legal team, Powell is forging ahead with her election-conspiracy crusade to overturn Joe Biden's presidential win. But the conservative attorney's self-described Kraken keeps getting its tentacles tied in a knot of typos and errors — including the recent backwards claim, later amended, that a pernicious voting algorithm took votes from Biden and flipped them to President Donald Trump. Powell corrected the error later Friday, citing CNBC as she explained the mistake to a federal appeals court, which she is asking to decertify the results of Georgia's presidential race. The initial, mixed-up message claimed in a filing that "machine-controlled algorithms deliberately run by Dominion Voting Systems ... generally took more than 2.5% of the votes from Mr. Biden...
    President Donald Trump defended QAnon conspiracy theorists during a White House meeting on the Georgia Senate races, saying they believe in 'good government.'   In a meeting on keeping control of the Senate, attended by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and other Republican lawmakers and aides, the president brought up Congresswoman-elect Marjorie Taylor Greene's support of the group, The Washington Post reported. 'Q-an-uhn,' he said, mispronouncing the name of the group, is made up of people who 'basically believe in good government.'    Greene won a House seat in Georgia this November and was one of several congressional candidates who expressed support for parts of the baseless theories spouted by the fringe group. It's also not the first time the president has defended the conspiracy theorists, who believe Trump was elected to save the world from the 'deep state.' They also falsely believe the world is run by a group of Satan-worshiping pedophiles who...
    (CNN)Massachusetts police have arrested a man who told two hikers who weren't wearing masks he had Covid-19 and spat at them several times.Hale Powell, 71, was charged with assault and battery and false threat of a biological agent, Ashburnham Police said in a statement. Powell is accused of spitting on two hikers who were not wearing masks last week at the Hudson Overlook on the Midstate Trail in Ashburnham, calling them selfish and "completely irresponsible."Face masks or cloth coverings are required in all public places in Massachusetts, indoors and outdoors, even if people are able to maintain six feet of social distancing, according to a revised November 6 order from Gov. Charlie Baker.Powell pleaded not guilty to the charges in Winchendon District Court on Tuesday, according to a statement from the Worcester County District Attorney's office. CNN has reached out to Powell and his attorney, Robert Normandin, for comment. Read...
    The Trump administration sought to distance itself from attorney Sidney Powell on Thursday, insisting she is ‘not a member’ of their legal team – despite the president tweeting only last week that she was. In a written statement issued by Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani, and his senior campaign adviser, Jenna Ellis, they said: ‘Sidney Powell is practicing law on her own. ‘She is not a member of the Trump Legal Team,’ the message continued. ‘She is also not a lawyer for the President in his personal capacity.’ The statement was issued just days after Powell appeared on-stage alongside Giuliani for a bizarre press conference at the Republican National Committee headquarters in Washington, in which she stunningly claimed that Democrats had ‘paid’ to rig the election. Sidney Powell, right, speaks next to former Mayor of New York Rudy Giuliani, as members of President Donald Trump's legal team, during a...
    Former Secretary of State Colin PowellColin Luther PowellICE reversal: part push to reopen schools, part hardline immigration policy Powell takes on Trump over Confederate flag Supreme Court rules states can remove 'faithless electors' MORE, a four-star general who served under former President George W. Bush, said Sunday he supports the push to rename Army bases named after Confederate leaders.  “I would rename the bases. We really hadn’t that about it a few years ago, now with Black Lives Matter and all the issues that are before us I think it's a good idea to rename the 10 bases in the U.S. Army that are named after Confederates,” Powell said on CBS’s “Face the Nation.”  NEWS: Former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs Colin Powell tells @margbrennan that he would rename Army bases currently named after Confederate leaders. “I would rename the bases,” he tells @margbrennan. Adds that he agrees with...
    Jun 29 (.) – Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said Monday that the outlook is “extraordinarily uncertain” and will depend on both containing the virus and the government’s efforts to support the economic recovery. Economic activity has picked up in recent weeks after what has been months of confinement in some parts to slow the spread of the coronavirus, Powell said in remarks prepared for a hearing in Congress on Tuesday. “We have entered an important new phase and we have done it earlier than expected,” Powell said. “While this rebound in economic activity is welcome, it also presents new challenges, notably the need to keep the virus under control.” With output and employment still well below pre-crisis levels, the Fed chief said, “The future path for the economy is extremely uncertain and will largely depend on our success in containing the virus.” He added again that a full recovery...
    VIDEO1:1101:11Lululemon acquires in-home fitness company 'Mirror'Closing Bell U.S. stock futures were flat in overnight trading ahead of the last trading day of a volatile month for stocks on Tuesday.  Dow futures fell 16 points. The S&P 500 and Nasdaq-100 were set to open higher, with gains of 0.14% and 0.34%, respectively. Shares of Wells Fargo ticked nearly 2% lower in after hours trading after the bank said it would likely slash its dividend in the third quarter to comply with the Federal Reserve stress test. Bank of America, Citi, JPMorgan and Goldman Sachs said their dividends would stay the same.  Shares of chip stock Micron jumped 5% in after hours trading on Monday following its better-than-expected earnings report. Micron gave strong forward revenue guidance. Shares of Lululemon also gained nearly 4% in extended trading on news it will acquire at-home fitness company Mirror for $500 million.  Zoom In IconArrows pointing...
    Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell holds a news conference following the Federal Reserve's two-day Federal Open Market Committee Meeting in Washington, July 31, 2019.Sarah Silbiger | Reuters Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said big questions remain over the outlook for the economy, particularly in light of ongoing efforts to contain the coronavirus pandemic. In remarks he will deliver Tuesday to the House Financial Services Committee, the central bank leader turned up concerns he had expressed earlier this month about growth as the U.S. remains mired ina  recession that began in February. "Output and employment remain far below their pre-pandemic levels. The path forward for the economy is extraordinarily uncertain and will depend in large part on our success in containing the virus," Powell said.  "A full recovery is unlikely until people are confident that it is safe to reengage in a broad range of activities," he added. "The path forward...
    (CNN)Masks were the first to go. Then toilet paper flew off shelves. And while Americans are being nickel-and-dimed with coronavirus-related costs in a shaky economy, the latest national shortage includes, well, nickels and dimes. There's a coin shortage in the US."What's happened is that, with the partial closure of the economy, the flow of coins through the economy has gotten all — it's kind of stopped," Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell said during a virtual hearing with the House Financial Services Committee on Wednesday.That's because the supply chain that coins usually flow through has been interrupted during the pandemic, Powell said. Banks and businesses have shuttered or changed the way they operate. And so there are fewer coins reaching the public.Read More"The places where you go to give your coins, and get credit at the store and get cash — you know, folding money — those have not been working....
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell stressed Tuesday that the federal government’s role in strengthening the U.S. market in the face of a recession is vital in preventing a worsening of economic inequality. Powell said the the Fed would continue to deploy all its financial tools to help “get back as quickly as we can to a tight labor market.” And he reiterated his belief that Congress must avoid withdrawing its own rescue efforts too quickly or else the most disadvantaged households would disproportionately suffer. The chairman’s remarks to a House committee came on the second day of his semi-annual testimony to Congress on monetary policy. As he had on Tuesday to the Senate Banking Committee, Powell stressed that the Fed would keep its benchmark interest rate, which influences many business and household loans, at a record low near zero and make full use of the numerous lending...
    Jamie Grill | JGI | Getty Images This is breaking news. Please check back for updates. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell told Congress on Wednesday that the circulation of physical coinage ground to a halt amid the coronavirus outbreak but that the central bank is working to fix the flow. The topic came to light after Rep. John Rose, R-Tenn., said banks in Tennessee are reporting they're receiving smaller-than-usual sums of coinage. Rose asked the Fed chairman if the central bank was aware of any shortages in the production and distribution of currency. "What's happened is, with the partial closure of the economy, the flow of coins through the economy has ... kind of stopped. The places where you'd go to give your coins and get credit ... those have not been working," Powell said. "So, a whole system of flow has kind of come to a stop. We're well aware...
    VIDEO2:4602:46Fed chair Jerome Powell: We'll move away from ETFs to direct corporate bond purchasesHalftime Report The Federal Reserve's landmark corporate bond buying program eventually will entail mostly individual company debt rather than exchange-traded funds, Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said Wednesday. Powell made the comments before the House Financial Services Committee in the second day of his semiannual testimony on Capitol Hill. His remarks come the same week the Fed announced it would expand a facility to buy company debt from ETFs into individual securities. "Over time we'll gradually move away from ETFs and move to buying bonds," Powell said. "It's a better tool for supporting liquidity and market functioning." In a move that set off a sharp surge in the stock market, the Fed announced in late March it would embark on two facilities to jump into the $9.6 trillion corporate debt market. One would buy bonds directly from...
    Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said the U.S. economy faces a deep downturn with "significant uncertainty" about the timing and strength of a recovery. He warned that the longer the recession lasts, the worse the damage that will be inflicted on the job market and businesses. Powell stressed in prepared testimony to Congress that the Fed is committed to using all its financial tools to cushion the economic damage from the coronavirus. But he said that until the public is confident the disease has been contained, "a full recovery is unlikely." The chairman warned that a prolonged downturn could inflict severe harm, especially to low-income workers who have been hit hardest. Powell is delivering the first of two days of semi-annual congressional testimony, first on Tuesday to the Senate Banking Committee and then on Wednesday to the House Financial Services Committee. Fed Chair Jerome Powell says economy will recover, but...
    A statue of worldwide Boy Scouts founder Lord Robert Baden-Powell will be “temporarily” removed in southern England amid topplings of controversial monuments, officials said. Amid the surging worldwide anti-racism movement, Baden-Powell, who served in the British Army, founded the Scouting movement in 1908 and died in 1941 at age 83, has been accused of racism, homophobia and support for Adolf Hitler. Officials in the southern seaside town of Poole said the statue would be under 24-hour guard until it can be transported to a secure ­location. “We acknowledge the differing views of the life activities of Baden-Powell and want to create time for all views to be aired,” the local town council said. Officials hoped that the statue could eventually be reinstalled “as soon as the threat level subsides.”
    A statue of the founder of the Scout movement, Robert Baden-Powell, will be given 24-hour protection after its removal has been delayed, even as protesters continue to insist monuments with racist connotations be taken down across the United Kingdom. TOPPLED STATUE OF 17TH-CENTURY SLAVE TRADER FISHED OUT OF BRITISH HARBOR, TAKEN TO 'SECURE LOCATION' The statue of Baden-Powell -- a British Army officer who critics say was a racist and Nazi sympathizer -- has been labeled as a target for anti-racist protesters and police advised the Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole (BCP) Council to remove it. A statue of the founder of the Scout movement Robert Baden-Powell on Poole Quay in Dorset, England ahead of its expected removal to "safe storage" following pressure to remove it over concerns about his alleged actions while in the military and "Nazi sympathies" Thursday June 11, 2020. (Andrew Matthews/PA via AP) The statue was...
    The Federal Reserve expects that as many as 15 million Americans will remain unemployed by year-end even as the economy continues recovering from the impact of the coronavirus. That assessment is more pessimistic than the Trump administration's sunnier forecast. In releasing their latest policy statement and economic projections on Wednesday, Fed officials predicted that the nation's jobless rate will drop from 13.3% to 9% this year, which would be near the peak during the Great Recession.  Just under 6 million Americans were unemployed as of January, before the pandemic crippled the economy. In April, that number soared to 23 million before receding to 21 million last month. Trending News Walmart knocked for locking up beauty products for black people Bon Appetit editor resigns over offensive Halloween photo Home Depot distances itself from Trump-supporting co-founder Business bankruptcies surge in the coronavirus recession After 1 billion robocalls, a record FCC fine on...
    President Trump late Sunday responded to former Secretary of State Colin Powell’s earlier announcement that he will be supporting Joe Biden for president in 2020 after saying that Trump “drifted away” from the Constitution during his tenure. Powell made the announcement on CNN and said that while he will vote for Biden, he will not hit the campaign trail. His decision is not that stunning. He said he voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016. GEORGE BUSH SPEAKS OUT ON GEORGE FLOYD, RACISM "I'm very close to Joe Biden in a social matter and in a political matter," Powell said. "I've worked with him for 35, 40 years. And he is now the candidate and I will be voting for him." Video“Colin Powell was a pathetic interview today on Fake News CNN,” Trump tweeted. “In his time, he was weak & gave away everything to everybody- so bad for the USA. Also got...
    Former Secretary of State Colin Powell, who served in the administration of George W. Bush, said Sunday he won’t be voting for fellow Republican President Trump in November’s general election. “I certainly cannot, in any way, support President Trump this year,” Powell said Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union.” “We have a Constitution and we have to follow that Constitution and the president has drifted away from it.” Powell, who voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016, said protests in dozens of cities after the death of George Floyd at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer show Americans are getting frustrated. “I think what we’re seeing now, this massive protest movement I have ever seen in my life, I think it suggests the country is getting wise to this and we’re not going to put up with it anymore,” the retired general and former head of the Joint Chiefs of...
    Washington (CNN)Former Republican Secretary of State Colin Powell said Sunday that he'll vote for Democrat Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election, choosing again not to vote for Donald Trump for president."I certainly cannot in any way support President Trump this year," Powell, a Republican, told CNN's Jake Tapper on "State of the Union," adding that he couldn't bring himself to vote for Trump four years ago.The retired general voted for Trump's Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton, in 2016, and hacked emails released in September of that year showed Powell strongly condemning Trump, labeling him a "national disgrace and an international pariah."Powell said Sunday that he is "very close to Joe Biden on a social matter and on a political matter.""I worked with him for 35, 40 years, and he is now the candidate and I will be voting for him," he continued.Read MoreAsked by Tapper if he would be campaigning...
    Retired four-star general and Secretary of State Colin Powell will be voting for former Vice President Joe Biden, saying they are close on social and political issues. “I will be speaking for him but I don’t plan to make campaign trips,” he told CNN. Mr. Powell, who served under Republican Presidents George W. Bush, George H.W. Bush, and Ronald Reagan, said President Trump “lies” and the people have let him get away with it. TOP STORIES Coronavirus hype biggest political hoax in history Democrats know their time grows short Lincoln Memorial, WWII Memorial defaced by vandals in rioting He said there is currently disdain for American foreign policy everywhere in the world and the country needs to get on top of it. “It seems to all come out of the White House without consultation,” Mr. Powell said. “This is not the way the system is supposed to work.”
    The son of a retired St. Louis police captain who was killed during looting sparked by the death of George Floyd has a message for the person who pulled the trigger: “just step back from what you are doing.” Brian Powell made the remark to Fox2Now after David Dorn, 77, was gunned down early Tuesday while working as security for Lee’s Pawn Shop and Jewelry. Around 4 a.m. that morning, Powell said his brother – who was crying – called him to inform of him of his father’s death, leaving a "numbing feeling that came over my body.” “The person who pulled the trigger, my message to them would just simply be, just step back from what you’re doing. Know the real reason that you are protesting. Let’s do it in a positive manner,” Powell told the station. “We don’t have to go out and loot and do all the other things.” BULLET PENETRATES MISSOURI TROOPER’S FACE SHIELD DURING RIOTS IN ST. LOUIS, ‘NARROWLY’ AVOIDS SERIOUS...
    Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell acknowledged Friday that the Fed faces a major challenge with the launch in the coming days of a program that will lend to companies other than banks for the first time since the Great Depression. The Fed’s Main Street Lending is geared toward medium-sized companies that are too large for the government’s small business lending program and too small to sell bonds or stock to the public. The individual loans, which could reach $600 billion, will technically be made by banks. But the Fed will buy 85 percent to 95 percent of each loan, thereby reducing the risk to banks and freeing them to do more lending. Powell said that Main Street will make its first loans in a “few days.” He has previously set June 1 as the target, or soon after. He noted that the complexity of the program goes far beyond the...
    Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said Friday the coronavirus is having a disproportionate impact on low-income workers in the U.S., saying the pandemic is "falling on those least able to bear its burdens." Speaking in an online discussion with Princeton University economist Alan Blinder, a former vice chairman of the Fed, Powell said there is "tremendous inequality" in how the health crisis and the steep recession it has caused is affecting Americans.  "If you were someone who made $40,000 or less annually, the chances of your being laid off in the last month or so approached 40%," said Powell, who pointed to women in low-paid service-sector jobs as one particularly vulnerable group. "So almost 40% of those people have lost a job." Coronavirus: The Race To Respond Trump says U.S. "terminating" relationship with WHO Some plasma donors may be more beneficial to COVID-19 treatment Cuomo says New York City on track to...
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