Tuesday, Mar 02, 2021 - 14:57:25
79 results - (0.000 seconds)

extremist groups:

    New York : Members of the National Guard outside the Capitol in Washington DC. Photo: Chip Somodevilla / . The Capitol Acting Chief of Police has warned that the extremists who attacked Congress in January are not defused, on the contrary: they would be planning “Blow up” the building when the president, Joe Biden, give your first speech at a joint session of both houses on the premises. “We know that members of the militias who were present in January have expressed their desire to blow up the Capitol and kill as many members as possible. [legislativos], and that there is a direct link with the State of the Union Address, the date of which has not yet been determined, “Acting Chief Yogananda Pittman said this Thursday in Congress. Based on this information, the Capitol Police has decided to maintain its reinforced security measures around...
    (CNN)A Pentagon report on extremism obtained by CNN gives disturbing insight into how White supremacists are active in the military and offers recommendations to better identify domestic extremists and prevent them from serving. It details an instance of a former National Guardsman who is a member of a dangerous neo-Nazi group bragging about openly discussing extremist views while serving and separately describes service members describing how they recognize fellow White supremacists by their fascist tattoos and T-shirt logos. While the report, commissioned by Congress and dated October 2020, concluded that extremist views were not widespread and identified "a low number of cases in absolute terms," it underlines the urgency of the problem because "individuals with extremist affiliations and military experience are a concern to U.S. national security because of their proven ability to execute high-impact events." Roll Call was first to report on the Pentagon's findings. Secretary of Defense orders...
    The FBI has connected at least 40 people who allegedly participated in the riot at the U.S. Capitol building last month to extremist groups including the Proud Boys and the Oath Keepers, the Associated Press reported Tuesday. At least 16 defendants were found to be members of or associated with the Proud Boys, a Western-chauvinist group, and at least five people were linked to the Oath Keepers, an anti-government group, the AP reported. A supporter of former President Donald Trump proposed transporting “heavy weapons” to members of the Oath Keepers via boat for Jan. 6, court documents said. The Oath Keepers were preparing for the events at the Capitol for weeks ahead of the event, according to the AP. Reported extremists talked about participating in “2 days of wargames” as “combat” training for “urban warfare, riot control, and rescue operations,” court documents said. Supporters of former President Donald Trump gathered...
    Rioters clash with police using big ladder trying to enter Capitol building through the front doors. Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images The FBI has linked at least 40 defendants in the Capitol riot to extremist groups and movements. Court documents so rioters were linked to the Oath Keepers, the Proud Boys, and other groups. A review from from the Associated Press found another 59 were linked to extremist rhetoric. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Dozens of rioters charged in the January 6 Capitol insurrection have been linked to extremist groups and rhetoric in the weeks since the attack. According to a report from the Associated Press, extremist ideologies and conspiracy theories have been cited as evidence in nearly have half of the more than 200 federal cases tied to the insurrection. The FBI has linked at least 40 defendants to extremist groups and movements, while...
    WASHINGTON DC -- A Democratic congressman accused Donald Trump in a federal lawsuit on Tuesday of inciting the deadly insurrection at the U.S. Capitol and of conspiring with his lawyer and extremist groups to try to prevent the Senate from certifying the results of the presidential election he lost to Joe Biden.The lawsuit from Mississippi's Rep. Bennie Thompson, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, is part of an expected wave of litigation over the Jan. 6 riot and is believed to be the first filed by a member of Congress. It seeks unspecified punitive and compensatory damages.The case also names as defendants the Republican former president's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani and groups including the Proud Boys and the Oath Keepers, extremist organizations that had members charged by the Justice Department with taking part in the siege.Lawyers for Trump have denied that he incited the riot. A Trump adviser didn't...
    The Pentagon is probing how extremist groups are recruiting new members among the military, with a seemingly "aggressive" effort to attract members who are about the leave the service.  SECRETARY OF DEFENSE ISSUES 'STAND-DOWN' ORDER TO ADDRESS EXTREMISM IN THE MILITARY "Some of these groups are very organized. They very aggressively recruit soon-to-be-veterans," Defense Department spokesperson John Kirby said at a press conference on Monday. Rooting out radicalization in the military has been a top priority for defense officials, particularly after the Jan. 6 siege on the U.S. Capitol. The FBI has since arrested dozens of suspects, some of whom worked for law enforcement agencies at the time or are former military personnel.  Officials believe that extreme ideology coupled with advanced military training has emboldened former members of the military to pledge their support to right-wing groups.  MINNESOTA PREPARES FOR POTENTIAL GEORGE FLOYD-RELATED UNREST AS TRIAL OF DERECK CHAUVIN NEARS Kirby reminded military officials...
    Officials are growing concerned over increased collaboration between extremist groups in Georgia, according to a report from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Justin Thayer, the leader of a group known as the Georgia III% Martyrs, is advocating for unity among paramilitary extremist groups following the arrests of those who participated in the Jan. 6 storming of the U.S. Capitol, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Thayer told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution via a text exchange that the arrests of those who participated in the storming demonstrates the “way patriots are now being hunted down and arrested by fellow men and women who have taken the same oath.” Thayer says the arrests have “disheartened any faith I had in the redemption or reformation of the USA as one entity.” A militia that served as Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene’s personal security is forming alliances and advocating secession. #gapol https://t.co/2VL769EmNe — Chris Joyner (@cjoyner) February 4, 2021...
    Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin reads the same intelligence briefing every morning as President Biden, including threat assessments related to extremists and the U.S. Capitol — and he believes the National Guard should stay on duty there. “He is constantly monitoring the situation,” Pentagon spokesman John Kirby told the Washington Examiner Thursday. “He wants to get them home as soon as possible.” The FBI handles threat assessments in the Washington, D.C., region that are being used to justify what officials, though without describing that intelligence, say is a need for some 7,500 Guardsmen to remain in the capital city. The FBI declined to tell the Washington Examiner how often it provides security briefings and to whom, but it said that intelligence is collected and shared promptly. "The FBI is constantly gathering information to identify any potential threats, and we share that information with our partners in a timely manner," a bureau...
    Extremist paramilitary groups are joining forces in the wake of the attack on the United States Capitol, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. According to the publication, Justin Thayer, head of the Georgia III percent Martyrs — the group that provided security for Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene — said the groups are advocating for Georgia’s secession from the union. “The way patriots are now being hunted down and arrested by fellow men and women who have taken the same oath has disheartened any faith I had in the redemption or reformation of the USA as one entity.” Thayer said his group has aligned with the American Patriots USA and the American Brotherhood of Patriots. The former is headed by Chester Doles, who the AJC claimed is known for his associations with various neo-Nazi hate groups over the years. Doles has also confirmed to the outlet that the militia groups are working together...
    Loading the player... More Republican Congress members are facing scrutiny after the Capitol insurrection on Jan. 6. When asked whether the country heading to Civil War, Representative Paul Gosar of Arizona said “We’re in it. We just haven’t started shooting at each other yet,” Gosar said. Rep. Andy Biggs (R-AZ) talks to the media at a press conference outside the US Capital on December 03, 2020 in Washington, DC. The House Freedom Caucus repeated unproven or discredited allegations about election fraud in the 2020 US presidential election. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images) According to The New York Times, nearly 150 House Republicans were in support of former President Donald Trump’s baseless claims of voter fraud during the 2020 presidential election. Gosar and many other Republican members of the House are said to have deep ties to extremist groups who caused a riot and stormed the halls...
    With domestic extremist networks scrambling to regroup online, experts fear the next attack could come from a radicalized individual — much harder than coordinated mass events for law enforcement and platforms to detect or deter. The big picture: Companies like Facebook and Twitter stepped up enforcement and their conversations with law enforcement ahead of Inauguration Day. But they’ll be tested as the threat rises that impatient lone-wolf attackers will lash out. Get smarter, faster with the news CEOs, entrepreneurs and top politicians read. Sign up for Axios Newsletters here. Where it stands: “Without any apparent large scale event in the immediate future, there is always a risk that radicalized individuals may feel themselves compelled to act out,” said Jared Holt, a visiting research fellow with the Atlantic Council. What they’re saying: Twitter says it’s working closely with the FBI and Department of Homeland Security to minimize potential risks, including those...
    The takeover in 2016 by right-wing extremists of a federal bird sanctuary in Oregon. A standoff in 1992 between white separatists and federal agents in Ruby Ridge, Idaho. The 1995 bombing of a federal building in Oklahoma City that killed 168 people. Right-wing extremism has previously played out for the most part in isolated pockets of America and in its smaller cities. The deadly assault by rioters on the U.S. Capitol, in contrast, targeted the very heart of government. And it brought together, in large numbers, members of disparate groups, creating an opportunity for extremists to establish links with each other. That, an experts says, potentially sets the stage for more violent actions. “The events themselves, and participation in them, has a radicalizing effect. And they also have an inspirational effect. The battle of Capitol Hill is now part of the mythology,” said Brian Michael Jenkins, a terrorism...
    Fears that an untold number of Americans are being radicalized is prompting the administration of U.S. President Joe Biden to take a closer look at efforts to counter domestic extremism and at whether enough is being done. White House press secretary Jen Psaki announced the overhaul of the country’s approach to domestic terrorism Friday, citing the January 6 siege of the U.S. Capitol. “The tragic deaths and destruction that occurred underscored what we have long known — the rise of domestic violent extremism is a serious and growing national security threat,” Psaki told reporters, calling the new effort “really the first step.” “The Biden administration will confront this threat with the necessary resources and resolve,” she added. As part of the overhaul, Biden on Friday tasked the director of national intelligence to work with the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Department of Homeland Security to produce a comprehensive threat...
    It’s not a good time to be a member of an extremist hate group who wants to go on vacation. In the wake of the riot at the U.S. Capitol, Airbnb says it has been taking more aggressive actions to prevent members of violent hate groups from using its service. The company reiterated, however, that its concern is focused on people who may commit violent acts, regardless of where they fall on the political spectrum. Airbnb used dummy accounts on Facebook, Twitter and other online forums to identify users with ties to various hate groups. (iStock) In a report from Engadget, which cited a tech website called The Information, Airbnb has been using dummy accounts on Facebook, Twitter and other online forums to identify users with ties to various hate groups. Members of Airbnb’s team would reportedly avoid interacting with individuals and would only search out public posts to make...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Troops in riot gear lined the streets of the nation’s capitol, but there were no crowds. Armored vehicles and concrete barriers blocked the empty streets around the U.S. Capitol. From behind miles of fencing, Joe Biden was safely sworn in as president in a Washington on edge, two weeks after pro-Trump rioters besieged the U.S. Capitol. Law enforcement officials contended not only with the potential for outside threats but also with rising concerns about an insider attack. Officials were monitoring members of far-right extremist and militia groups, increasingly concerned about the possibility such groups could stream into Washington and spark violent confrontations, a law enforcement official said. There were a few scattered arrests, but no serious disruptions in the city during Biden’s inauguration ceremony. As Biden put it in his address: “Just days after a riotous mob thought they could use violence to silence the will of...
    WASHINGTON -- Troops in riot gear lined the streets of the nation's capitol, but there were no crowds. Armored vehicles and concrete barriers blocked the empty streets around the U.S. Capitol. From behind miles of fencing, Joe Biden was safely sworn in as president in a Washington on edge, two weeks after pro-Trump rioters besieged the U.S. Capitol.Law enforcement officials contended not only with the potential for outside threats but also with rising concerns about an insider attack. Officials were monitoring members of far-right extremist and militia groups, increasingly concerned about the possibility such groups could stream into Washington and spark violent confrontations, a law enforcement official said.There were a few scattered arrests, but no serious disruptions in the city during Biden's inauguration ceremony.As Biden put it in his address: "Just days after a riotous mob thought they could use violence to silence the will of the people, to stop...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Investigative reporter Chuck Goudie has an in-depth discussion with Professor Cynthia Miller-Idriss about why federal law enforcement believes white supremacist extremists and other anti-government fringe groups are the greatest domestic terror threat facing the United States right now.SEE ALSO | Security on high alert in Washington DC in days before presidential inaugurationEMBED More News Videos 250 Illinois National Guard troopers will be deployed to the Capitol complex and downtown Springfield. Miller-Idriss directs the Polarization and Extremism Research and Innovation Lab at the American University in Washington, D.C.Professor Miller-Idriss explains how several extremist groups mobilized on January 6th with some pro-Trump supporters to incite violence at the Capitol.She tells the I-Team she believes the Biden administration will need to approach our country's extremism issues on multiple levels because counterterrorism policing is not enough. Miller-Idriss says so many are vulnerable to persuasive online propaganda and more people need to...
    Supporters of President Donald Trump take over balconies and inauguration scaffolding at the United States Capitol on Wednesday, January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Law enforcement are taking a closer look at how extremist groups may have organized violence ahead of the Capitol insurrection.  Members of the Proud Boys, Three Percenters, and The Oath Keepers are among those who have been arrested on charges that they participated in the riots. The US Attorney for DC said that that determining the level of planning done by groups like these is a top priority for investigators. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. As the FBI continues to investigate the mob of crazed pro-Trump fanatics who took over the Capitol on January 6, investigators are focusing on the role that extremist groups played in organizing the terror. Members of the extremist groups Proud Boys,...
    Two members of the National Guard have been removed from Wednesday's presidential inauguration over possible ties to extremist groups, officials said. The FBI has been working to vet the 25,000 troops standing guard in the Washington, D.C., area. General Dan Hokanson, the National Guard chief, said the two members made "inappropriate comments or texts" and were sent home "out of an abundance of caution." Hokanson said one member was flagged through a tip line and one was reported by other soldiers.  Ten others were also removed from duty for a "number of different reasons" unrelated to extremism, Hokanson said. He did not elaborate on the circumstances. "We are not taking any chances," said Jonathan Hoffman, a Pentagon spokesperson. "If there is any reason that somebody's name is brought to the attention of the command, they are being removed from the line." An investigation will determine whether further action —...
    (CNN)Prosecutors have levied the first significant conspiracy charge against an apparent leader in the extremist Oath Keepers movement, alleging the Virginia man was involved in "planning and coordinating" the breach of the Capitol earlier this month, according to court documents.The Justice Department charged Thomas Caldwell, a 65-year-old from Virginia with a leadership role in the paramilitary right-wing group, with four counts, including conspiracy to commit an offense, obstruction of an official proceeding and "Violent entry or disorderly conduct."Caldwell interacted in the riot alongside a group of eight to 10 people wearing Oath Keeper-emblazoned gear, who would "move in an organized and practiced fashion and force their way to the front of the crowd gathered around a door to the US Capitol," according to a law enforcement affidavit.Capitol riot investigators narrow in on extremist groups and military-style coordination Prosecutors also describe his interactions with two other charged right-wing militants, Jessica Watkins...
    (CNN)They moved in an "organized and practiced fashion" as they pushed through crowds toward entrances to the US Capitol. On the inside, several maintained formation, putting their hands on each other's shoulders to keep in lockstep. Some communicated over radios, while others gave directions with hand signals and voice calls. Members of militant groups that stormed the seat of legislative power earlier this month during the certification of the presidential vote have quickly become a top focus of federal law enforcement investigating the January 6 insurrection. At least five alleged rioters with ties to self-styled militias have been documented in criminal complaints released in recent days, representing a small but alarming segment of the dozens of defendants charged to date.RELATED: Decoding the extremist symbols and groups at the Capitol Hill insurrectionDecoding the extremist symbols and groups at the Capitol Hill insurrection Some of the groups present, like The Oath Keepers,...
    Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images. According to a breaking news report by the Associated Press, U.S. defense officials have tangible concerns about a possible “insider attack” directed at the inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden on January 20, and now the FBI is individually vetting the approximately 25,000 National Guard troops being sent to Washington, D.C. for Inauguration Day. The deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol on January 6 heightened concerns about domestic terrorism, and possible sympathizers within the ranks of the military and law enforcement. The 25,000 troops who will be in our nation’s capital this Wednesday are “at least two and a half times the number for previous inaugurals,” according to the AP. Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy acknowledged in an interview Sunday that officials were “conscious of the potential threat,” and he had instructed unit commanders to watch for specific warning signs within their ranks. However, he pointed out,...
    The Capitol insurrection both further normalized the idea of violent government overthrow and allowed extremist groups to network with a broader population. As rioters laid siege to the U.S. Capitol, the seat of American democracy became a melting pot of extremist groups: militia members, white supremacists, paramilitary organizations, anti-maskers, and fanatical supporters of Donald Trump, standing shoulder to shoulder in rage. Experts say it was the culmination of years of increasing radicalization and partisanship, combined with a growing fascination with paramilitary groups and a global pandemic. And they warn that the armed insurrection that left five people dead and shook the country could be just the beginning. "We look at it like a conveyor belt of radicalization," said Devin Burghart, executive director of the Institute for Research & Education on Human Rights. "Once they step on that conveyor belt, they're...
    WASHINGTON - In the 10 days since the violent Jan. 6 rampage at the U.S. Capitol by President Donald Trump’s supporters, a fuller picture has emerged about the rioters, with researchers identifying members of more than a dozen extremist groups that took part in the riots. The storming of the Capitol drew extremists that included adherents of the QAnon conspiracy theory, the far-right group the Proud Boys, militiamen, white supremacists, anti-maskers and diehard Trump supporters, all gathered to stop Congress from certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s victory. “There have been any number of groups that the Southern Poverty Law Center normally tracks and monitors as a part of our work addressing hate and extremism,” said Lecia Brooks, chief of staff for the SPLC. Brooks shared with VOA the names of more than a dozen extremist groups that she said took part in the riots. Other extremist researchers interviewed by VOA...
    AZUSA (CBSLA) — Federal authorities have made another arrest related to the riot at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Anthime Joseph Gionet, also known as “Baked Alaska” was arrested in Texas Saturday on charges of knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds. Gionet has well-known connections to extremist groups. Gionet, who streamed himself hyping up the crowd inside of Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi’s office, has ties to Southern California — including reportedly attending school at Azusa Pacific University and previously interning at Warner Records. His social media accounts show him posing for photos with guns by the iconic Hollywood sign. “He’s a noted Nazi miscreant,” Brian Levin, the director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at Cal State San Bernardino. “It is a disgrace that someone like him...
    CNN’s Jake Tapper said on the Tuesday broadcast of his show “The Lead With Jake Tapper” that President Donald Trump has “played footsie” with extremist groups that “sure do love him.” Tapper was joined by former Republican Michigan Rep. Mike Rogers and they discussed the role that Trump and Republicans played in the incitement of the riot that took place at the U.S. Capitol last Wednesday. “Don’t House Republicans and Senate Republicans and MAGA media, people who lied to Trump supporters, don’t they need to own up to what they did?” asked Tapper. “Because that’s part of the problem.” (RELATED: ‘Clear Acts Of Sedition And Violence And Terrorism’: Jake Tapper Blasts Trump Statement During Riots) Rogers said that he thought they should take responsibility, referring to the people who joined Trump in alleging that massive voter fraud swung the election towards President-elect Joe Biden. He then stated that they...
    Incoming Senate Majority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerMichigan GOP lawmaker says he's 'strongly considering' impeachment Senate Democrats demand Trump address COVID-19 vaccine distribution Pelosi acknowledges criticism from Ocasio-Cortez, younger members: 'I'm not dismissing her' MORE (D-N.Y.) said on Tuesday that Senate Democrats will launch probes stemming from the Jan. 6 Capitol attack after they take back control of the chamber on Jan. 20.  Schumer sent a letter to his caucus, a copy of which was obtained by The Hill, outlining plans for investigating both the mob violence and related issues and vowing "vigorous oversight."  "Our caucus will make sure that the events are fully investigated and every necessary security measure is in place for the upcoming Inauguration and the days leading up to it," Schumer wrote in the letter.  The Senate is getting briefed on the inauguration on Tuesday amid growing security concerns about President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenCapitol Police confirm investigation into some officers'...
    Amanda Andrade-Rhoades/Washington Post/Getty Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.Last week’s violent insurrection at the US Capitol Building confirmed what researchers, lawmakers, and even Defense Department officials have been warning about for years: The United States military has not properly dealt with the far-right extremists in its ranks.  Some pro-Donald Trump rioters were either active-duty service members or veterans, including Ashli Babbitt, an Air Force veteran with at least seven deployments, who was killed by police while trying to break into the Speaker’s Lobby in the building. “What Trump has done is he’s radicalized portions of the population. And the military reflects that.” In the days since her death, Babbitt has been celebrated by the far right and has become a symbol of the military’s growing extremism problem. Allegedly joining her at...
    (CNN)Flags, signs and symbols of racist, white supremacist and extremist groups were displayed along with Trump 2020 banners and American flags at Wednesday's riot at the US Capitol. The pictures tell part of the story of the beliefs of some of those who chose to show up on that day -- from passionate and peaceful Trump supporters to extremists who showed their hate with their symbols as well as their actions. The mixing of the groups is one issue that experts who track extremism and hate have long been concerned about. The certification of the election results proved to be exactly the type of event that brought together various groups and could have led to radical ideas being shared, they say. The initial event, which was heavily promoted and encouraged by President Trump, gave all of these groups something to rally around. "This was an event designed to oppose the...
    AZUSA (CBSLA) — Chaos at the nation’s Capitol Wednesday left the country and the world stunned. Rioters clash with police trying to enter Capitol building through the front doors. (Photo by Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images) One day later, it’s been found that among the group of rioters who breached the doors and sent lawmakers scrambling to the floor were several well-known members of extremist groups — including Jake Angeli of QAnon, self-proclaimed white nationalist Richard Barnett, Nick Ochs of the Proud Boys and Tom Gionet, also known as Baked Alaska. Gionet, who streamed himself hyping up the crowd inside of Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi’s office, has ties to Southern California — including reportedly attending school at Azusa Pacific University and previously interning at Warner Records. His social media accounts show him posing for photos with guns by the iconic Hollywood sign. “He’s a noted Nazi miscreant,”...
    The day after the first insurrection at the U.S. Capitol in more than 200 years, we're learning more about some of the right-wing extremist groups involved in the riot."The individuals who stormed the Capitol were a mixed collection of folks who include militant Trump supporters, election deniers and Alt-Right Folks," said Brian Levin, director of the Center for Study of Hate and Extremism at Cal State University San Bernardino."We had Nazis. We had a confederate flag inside the Capitol," said Levin. "And we didn't even see that during the Civil War," he said.Pictures released by Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police of some of the rioters include one of a tattooed man wearing a fur and horns, identified as Jake Angeli, who is a well-known Q-Anon supporter."Q-Anon is a bizarre conspiracy theory, which is anchored in this mystery of this fellow Q... who is supposed to be feeding information to folks about...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — A recent NYPD memo warns about the threats officers are facing from terrorists and other extremist groups. According to the bulletin within the department’s intelligence bureau, there is evidence that officers and former officers continue to be targets. Police say just this year, suspected violent extremists used explosive devices, knives and vehicles to attack law enforcement and government facilities. Recently, there has been al-Qaida and neo-Nazi propaganda aimed at them. Police are encouraging its officers to remain vigilant. MORE FROM CBS NEW YORK Caught On Camera: Suspected Burglars Cart Off More Than $10,000 Worth Of Stolen Items, NYPD Says Long Island Man Offers To Shovel Snow, Receives Overwhelming Response From Community Since Pandemic Layoff New Yorkers Can Now Apply For Pandemic-Related Rent Relief Under Revamped Program
    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey and Iraq have agreed to continue their cooperation in fighting extremist organizations, including the Islamic State group and Kurdish rebels, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Thursday. Speaking to reporters following meetings with visiting Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi, Erdogan also said he hoped that an Iraqi-Turkish oil pipeline that was damaged by the IS during the conflict against the militant group would soon be repaired and would resume oil transfers to world markets. Turkey has carried out numerous ground and aerial cross-border offensives into neighboring northern Iraq to attack militants of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK, who maintain bases in the region. The latest offensive in June, dubbed Operation Claw Tiger, saw Turkish commandos being airlifted into Iraqi territory. The PKK, which has been fighting the Turkish state since 1984, is considered to be a terror organization by Turkey, the United States and...
    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey and Iraq have agreed to continue their cooperation in fighting extremist organizations, including the Islamic State group and Kurdish rebels, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Thursday. Speaking to reporters following meetings with visiting Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi, Erdogan also said he hoped that an Iraqi-Turkish oil pipeline that was damaged by the IS during the conflict against the militant group would soon be repaired and would resume oil transfers to world markets. Turkey has carried out numerous ground and aerial cross-border offensives into neighboring northern Iraq to attack militants of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK, who maintain bases in the region. The latest offensive in June, dubbed Operation Claw Tiger, saw Turkish commandos being airlifted into Iraqi territory. The PKK, which has been fighting the Turkish state since 1984, is considered to be a terror organization by Turkey, the United States and...
    Anti-abortion advocates decried President-elect Biden's selection of California Attorney General Xavier Becerra to head the Department of Health and Human Services, citing his record of opposing abortion restrictions. “When you look at somebody like Xavier Becerra and his record in California, you see that this man is not a moderate on the issue of abortion, he is a pro-abortion extremist,” said Mallory Quigley, vice president of communications at anti-abortion advocacy group the Susan B. Anthony List. Becerra has served as California’s attorney general since 2017. From 2003 to 2017, he was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, where he represented a Los Angeles district. In 2018, the Supreme Court ruled against a California law defended by Becerra mandating that anti-abortion crisis pregnancy centers tell patients that abortions are covered by plans in the state. The court sided with the crisis pregnancy centers, which argued that...
    In an appearance on MSNBC on Sunday, former FBI assistant director for counterintelligence, Frank Figliuzzi, accused Republicans of using similar rhetoric as extremist groups in the wake of the 2020 election, Raw Story reported. Figliuzzi’s discussion with host Alex Witt noted the recent violent comments from various Republicans and their potential to radicalize. “This is the language that gets people recruited and radicalized whether you intend it to happen or not,” he said. According to Figliuzzi, political polarization has turned division between Americans into existential threats. “When people think there is an existential threat to their very being, to what they believe in, when they think that the other side isn’t just wrong, but rather its evil, it’s from the devil,” he said. “When we hear stuff like this, we’re headed towards violence, and that I think should wake all of us up.”   Defne Karadeniz / Getty Images...
    As ballot counting continues in battleground state Arizona, the mainstream media has branded Trump supporters gathered outside the Maricopa County Elections office as an “extremist group,” despite lack of visible evidence of violence, danger or so-called “extremism.” “Just walked out of the Maricopa County Elections Office to this where a large extremist group has re-gathered, extremely angry yelling ‘count those votes’ and screaming at the media and others in the area. They are angry claiming an unfair election and broken system,” CBS 5 and 3 reporter Briana Whitney tweeted, referring to the group of protesters who remained behind yellow caution tape. Just walked out of the Maricopa County Elections Office to this where a large extremist group has re-gathered, extremely angry yelling “count those votes” and screaming at the media and others in the area. They are angry claiming an unfair election and broken system. #azfamily pic.twitter.com/DvRXpTIVpv — Briana Whitney...
    Facebook has temporarily deactivated an algorithm that automatically recommends political or social issue discussion groups to its users as a precaution about misinformation ahead of the U.S. presidential election. "This is a measure we put in place in the lead-up to Election Day. We will assess when to lift them afterwards, but they are temporary," Facebook spokeswoman Liz Bourgeois said in a statement to cnet.com. More than 1.8 billion people engage in Facebook groups every month, according to the company. CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced the move Wednesday during a Senate hearing in response to a question by Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass., who asked why Facebook was not eliminating pages by groups that were “breeding grounds for hate, echo chambers of misinformation.” “We have taken the step of stopping recommendations in groups for all political content, or social issue groups, as a precaution for this," Zuckerberg said, according to the Washington Examiner. ...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- Right now safety protocols are going into place all across the Bay Area as we get closer to Election Day.Some building owners have boarded up to keep their properties safe.RELATED: Dozens of ballots deposited at Richmond City Hall drop-off site missing, county official saysThere is a fear of protests sparking violence among extremist groups.The FBI says the San Francisco field office has opened up a command post as a way to better work with local authorities on any problems or issues that may arise."I've never experienced something like this in my life," says barber shop owner Ahmet Giftgi.In the past 24 to 48 hours wood boards have gone up outside numerous buildings in the Financial District of San Francisco. One of many safety measures we're seeing all across the Bay Area as we approach Election Day.VIDEO: Trump, Biden respond to deadly police shooting and civil unrest...
    Boogaloo Bois waiting at the area of Friday night's rioting on May 30, 2020 in Louisville, Kentucky. The Photo Access / MediaPunch /IPX Men who identify as Boogaloo Bois, known for wearing Hawaiian shirts and wielding rifles at police brutality protests across the US, have been linked to several crimes.  With a name based on the title of a cult 1980s film, the group is a loosely organized and largely libertarian militia group that is centered on anti-government rhetoric.   Started on forums and organized in private groups online, often associated with far-right extremist politics, the group has created confusion by attending Black Lives Matter protests. "When we see these far-right groups manifesting in the streets and saying that they're with the protesters, we're just seeing another instance of the far right attempting to jump into and perhaps derail a left wing, or rather a broad mass protest movement,"...
    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The U.N. humanitarian chief warned Tuesday that daunting problems in Africa’s Sahel region are getting worse and the region “is very close to a tipping point — and so by extension are its African neighbors, Europe, and the world.” Mark Lowcock said in a virtual speech to students at the Paris Institute for Political Science that he deals with the world’s worst humanitarian tragedies, and “nowhere scares me more than the Sahel.” He said six central Sahel countries — Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Mali, Niger, and northeast Nigeria — are at “a true epicenter of conflict and insecurity, weak governance, chronic underdevelopment and poverty, demographic pressures, and climate change.” Lowcock said there are conflicts between farmers and herders mainly over scarce resources, conflicts instigated by terrorist and extremist groups seeking to undermine governments, and violence from organized crime groups running trafficking networks who “stage kidnappings, loot...
    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The U.N. humanitarian chief warned Tuesday that daunting problems in Africa’s Sahel region are getting worse and the region “is very close to a tipping point — and so by extension are its African neighbors, Europe, and the world.” Mark Lowcock said in a virtual speech to students at the Paris Institute for Political Science that he deals with the world’s worst humanitarian tragedies, and “nowhere scares me more than the Sahel.” He said six central Sahel countries — Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Mali, Niger, and northeast Nigeria — are at “a true epicenter of conflict and insecurity, weak governance, chronic underdevelopment and poverty, demographic pressures, and climate change.” Lowcock said there are conflicts between farmers and herders mainly over scarce resources, conflicts instigated by terrorist and extremist groups seeking to undermine governments, and violence from organized crime groups running trafficking networks who “stage kidnappings, loot...
    Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer doubled down on Sunday by calling out rhetoric from the White House and the Republican Party following the foiled kidnapping plot that was being concocted against her. Whitmer gave an interview to Face The Nation, where CBS’ Margaret Brennan immediately focused on the FBI’s arrest of anti-government militia members charged with planning to abduct the governor. When asked if she thinks the security threat is over, Whitmer praised the Michigan State Police but slammed the GOP as she expressed her remaining concerns. I do believe that there are still serious threats that groups like this group, these domestic terrorists, are finding comfort and support in the rhetoric coming out of Republican leadership from the White House to our state House. And so I remain concerned about safety and integrity going up to this election. Whitmer’s comments come days after she seemed to blame Donald Trump...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – This week, the FBI arrested more than a dozen people charged with plotting to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer. The men were associated with a militia group trying to instigate a civil war. It’s a situation law enforcement agencies here at home have been warning against. As CBS2’s Kevin Rincon reports, violent extremist groups like the one in Michigan have been popping up throughout the country, including here in the Tri-State Area, and police say the coronavirus pandemic in many ways has made things worse. The 13 people charged this week in the Michigan plot were part of a group that dislikes government, is anti-police, and showed a willingness to use violence. It’s similar to groups that showed up this summer to the Michigan capitol in Lansing, armed. It’s a growing problem in the age of COVID. “One of the great laws of unintended consequences from...
    (CNN) — Rep. Debbie Dingell of Michigan warned Friday of the increasing threat for political violence and that “words have consequences,” a day after an alleged domestic terror plot to kidnap the state’s Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer was revealed. “I hope that this got a lot of people’s attention and we can all take a deep breath and really think about how fear and division is dividing this country and stop being pitted against each other,” Dingell told CNN’s Alisyn Camerota on “New Day.” The plot against Whitmer, announced by federal and state authorities on Thursday and resulting in 13 arrests, highlighted the threat from far-right extremist groups across the country, particularly in the closing weeks of the 2020 election season. Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel, in a separate interview on “New Day” Friday morning, said it’s “not just a Michigan problem” and said there are similar groups operating in different...
    Washington (CNN)Rep. Debbie Dingell of Michigan warned Friday of the increasing threat for political violence and that "words have consequences," a day after an alleged domestic terror plot to kidnap the state's Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer was revealed."I hope that this got a lot of people's attention and we can all take a deep breath and really think about how fear and division is dividing this country and stop being pitted against each other," Dingell told CNN's Alisyn Camerota on "New Day."The plot against Whitmer, announced by federal and state authorities on Thursday and resulting in 13 arrests, highlighted the threat from far-right extremist groups across the country, particularly in the closing weeks of the 2020 election season. Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel, in a separate interview on "New Day" Friday morning, said it's "not just a Michigan problem" and said there are similar groups operating in different states.Dingell, a...
    White nationalist groups, who make up some of the most serious terror threats in the country, find new members and support in the U.S. military. These groups believe that white people are under attack in America. In their effort to create an all-white country where nonwhites do not have civil rights protections, these groups often instigate violent confrontations that target racial and religious minorities. Since 2018, white supremacists have conducted more lethal attacks in the United States than any other domestic extremist movement. The Proud Boys group, for example, whom President Donald Trump addressed in the first presidential debate of 2020, includes veterans and active duty service members. The group’s members, who are required to engage in physical violence before joining, celebrated Trump’s statement to “stand back and stand by,” considering his call an endorsement of their extremist ideology.
    Joe Biden spoke at Gettysburg Tuesday in a speech talking about political divides in America, and addressed issues of racial injustice in particular. “Too many Americans seek not to overcome our divisions but to deepen them. We must seek not to build walls but bridges. We must seek not to have our fists clinched but our arms open,” he said. He invoked Charlottesville as he said, “Hate never goes away. It only hides. When it’s given oxygen, when it’s given an opportunity to spread, when it’s treated as normal and acceptable behavior, we’ve opened a door in this country that we must move quickly to close.” Biden commended peaceful protesters “giving voice to the calls of justice” while stating again that violence and looting “cannot be tolerated.” “I believe in law and order. I have never supported defunding of police but I also believe in justice is real. It’s...
    Leaders of the Proud Boys, a right-wing pro-Trump group. Anadolu Agency / Getty Images The Proud Boys are an extremist right-wing organization with ties to white supremacist violence that has been classified as a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center.  Insider spoke to experts on psychology, sociology, and white supremacy on who exactly joins the Proud Boys.  Typically, people who join organizations like the Proud Boys are young men who have felt disenfranchised and unable to achieve success because of an external societal factor, like immigration or racial diversity.  Many of the Proud Boys' talking points are echoed on the political stage, making joining the "fraternity" of "Western chauvinists" appealing to a broad audience.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.   President Donald Trump generated headlines when he said the Proud Boys — a self-proclaimed "fraternity" of "Western chauvinists" categorized by the Southern Poverty Law...
    Amy Coney Barrett. It should not be a surprise that the person Donald J. Trump has nominated to fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court created by the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg believes abortion is “always immoral.” That stance, after all, is a key reason Amy Coney Barrett got the nod, although she has plenty of views on a range of other issues that would nudge the court further to right if she is confirmed. She was, after all, a member of the “Faculty for Life” at Notre Dame. It’s thus hardly unexpected that The Guardian would discover Barrett’s name among those who signed a 2006 ad from the extremist anti-abortion group St. Joseph County Right to Life attacking the “barbaric legacy of Roe v. Wade.”  The ad, published in the South Bend Tribune of Indiana, states: “We, the following citizens of Michiana, oppose abortion on demand and defend the right to life from fertilization to natural death. Please continue...
    I never thought I would have to say this but– political extremism is expected to have an impact on the upcoming election and – perhaps even scarier – the potential aftermath of the election, should some people decide to take things into their own hands if it doesn’t come out as they hope. The president’s response to moderator Chris Wallace’s Tuesday night debate question about white supremacy didn’t help, when he advised the extremist group Proud Boys to “Stand down and stand by.” Social media is likely part of the blame, but there are, of course, other reasons for any increase in white supremacy and extremism which, FBI Director Chris Wray called the biggest domestic terrorism threat in recent testimony before the House Homeland Security Committee. The Netflix movie, The Social Dilemma, helps explain why this is true. Algorithms designed to present us with content we find compelling, along with...
    President Donald Trump on Tuesday didn’t condemn white supremacist groups and their role in violence in some American cities this summer, branding it solely a “left-wing” problem and telling one far-right extremist group to “stand back and stand by.” “Almost everything I see is from the left wing, not from the right wing,” said Trump, whose exchange with Democrat Joe Biden left the extremist group Proud Boys celebrating what some of its members saw as tacit approval. He was responding to a question from debate moderator Chris Wallace, who asked the president if he would condemn white supremacist and militia groups that have showed up at some protests. Wallace specifically mentioned Kenosha, Wisconsin, where a white teenager was charged with killing two protesters during demonstrations over the police shooting of Jacob Blake, a Black man. Trump has repeatedly blamed “antifa,” which stands for the anti-fascist protest movement.
    By Mark Hosenball and Sarah N. Lynch (Reuters) - The director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation told Congress on Thursday that anarchist and extremist "Antifa" demonstrators who engaged in recent violent protests are targets of serious FBI investigations. At a hearing of the Republican-led Senate Homeland Security committee, Christopher Wray said that the Bureau had seen "organized tactical activity at both the local and regional level." "We have seen Antifa adherence coalescing and working together in what I would describe as small groups and nodes," he said. Wray added that the bureau is conducting multiple investigations "into some anarchist violent extremists, some of whom operate through these nodes." Antifa, short for anti-fascist, is an amorphous movement "who believe in active, aggressive opposition to far right-wing movements," according https://www.adl.org/resources/backgrounders/who-are-antifa to the Anti-Defamation League, which tracks extremists. Wray stressed that while there are active probes into Antifa and other extremist groups,...
    (CNN)Social media posts from far-left extremist groups conveying hateful, and at times violent, sentiments against police surged during the recent period of protests and civil unrest, according to a new report. The findings were published Monday by the Network Contagion Research Institute (NCRI), a non-partisan organization that tracks hate and misinformation on social media. The authors wrote that tactics employed by right-wing extremist groups, such as the use of memes and codewords to share ideas and organize offline activity, are also being used by extremist groups on the left. What we do and dont know about the extremists taking part in riots across the USWhite supremacist groups pose a much more significant threat in the US than far-left networks or other extremist groups, according to an analysis from the Center for Strategic and International Studies. But there is now evidence to support that anarchist and socialist militant groups have also...
    Twitter has banned the accounts of far-right extremist group the Oath Keepers and its founder, Stewart Rhodes. According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, the group is one of the US’s largest anti-government movements. It claims to have tens of thousands of members, many of whom identify as former law enforcement and military. The group recently tweeted there would be “open warfare against the Marxist insurrectionists (its shorthand for Black Lives Matter activists) by election night.” A spokesperson for Twitter told News Brig it banned accounts associated with the Oath Keepers for violating its policies on violent extremist groups. “There is no place on Twitter for terrorist organizations or violent extremist groups and individuals who affiliate with and promote their illicit activities,” the company says on the policy page. “We examine a group’s activities both on and off Twitter to determine whether they engage in and/or promote violence against civilians to advance...
    People in the United States are unwittingly being indoctrinated online by extremist groups just as the the coronavirus pandemic makes them more susceptible to right- and left-wing radicalization, potentially leading to a surge of domestic attacks in coming years. Domestic terrorism was named by the Department of Homeland Security’s acting Secretary Chad Wolf this week as a top national security concern. Private sector officials who study terrorism trends told the Washington Examiner that foreign extremists attempting to enter the U.S. are not as much the problem as homegrown terrorists. “There’s a lot of legitimate cause of concern,” said Michael Smith II, terrorism analyst and Johns Hopkins University lecturer on global security and intelligence. “You have seen growing instances of right-wing extremists modeling behaviors that can have an effect of inspiring competence in their sympathizers' interest in perpetrating violent crimes against minority groups, as well as against people who don’t...
    Cologne University students have donated at least €8,500 from their student fees towards a far-left extremist Antifa group which is under observation by the German security services. The Cologne General Students’ Committee (AStA) has donated thousands of euros since at least 2010 to the Antifa AK extremist group, according to budget documents. Following the revelation, the local Green University group expressed their full support for Antifa. “Antifa AK is the student body, and the student body is Antifa!” the Green group wrote on Facebook. It added that Antifa AK was “a working group of the student body of the University of Cologne and thus an integral part of it”, Die Welt reports. Antifa Preparing Violent Attacks on Police and Political Opponents, Say German Authorities https://t.co/Cczu6GpHOj — Breitbart London (@BreitbartLondon) August 9, 2020 According to the newspaper, the Antifa AK group is on a list of extremist groups observed by the Federal Office...
    The Islamic State (ISIS) and other violent extremist groups continue to attack in the Philippines despite American efforts during the coronavirus pandemic, according to an inspector general report. ISIS carried out attacks across the Philippines between April and June, despite Operation Pacific Eagle – Philippines (OPE-P), which the U.S. launched in 2017 to counter terrorism in the Southeast Asian country, according to the report, which was released to the public on Tuesday. ISIS reportedly killed 12 and wounded 13 Philippine soldiers in April and attempted an ambush in May, followed by a rocket attack on civilians, according to the report published by the Lead Inspector General, a team comprised of the inspectors general for the departments of Defense, State and the U.S. Agency for International Development. (RELATED: First American Convicted By Jury For Joining ISIS Top Recieve New Sentence Hearing: Report) “Social media posts by extremists included calls for attacks against...
    Facebook is still littered with groups and pages aligned with the antigovernment “boogaloo” movement months after the company announced that it would ban these communities, according to a new report from the Tech Transparency Project Wednesday. In June, Facebook announced that it would remove groups dedicated to the boogaloo movement, months after reports first surfaced that the right-wing extremist group leveraged the platform to organize for an armed revolt. At the time, Facebook said that it removed over 200 boogaloo Facebook groups and 95 Instagram accounts for violating its policies against organized violence, along with 400 other groups that were related to the extremist movement. But that policy change could be less effective than it originally suggested. In its report Wednesday, the Tech Transparency Project said that it had “found that Facebook has consistently failed to spot boogaloo activity and missed boogaloo groups’ simple name changes designed to...
    Rockies rely on strong bullpen again, sweep 2 from As Exclusive: Buddy, first dog to test positive for COVID-19 in the U.S., has died Jeff Bezos crumples under pressure on whether Amazon will continue to block customer donations to SPLC-designated extremist groups, saying its an imperfect system © Provided by Business Insider Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos testifies at the House antitrust hearing. Mandel Ngan-Pool/Getty Images Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos crumpled under questioning at the hands of Rep. Matt Gaetz during Wednesday's tech antitrust hearing.  Gaetz asked Bezos about the company's Amazon Smile program, which allows customers to designate charities they'd like to support. Amazon will donate a portion of some of their sales to that organization.  The company relies on the U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control and the Southern Poverty Law Center to determine any charities that are ineligible for Amazon Smile, which includes groups that promote...
    Arie Perliger July 5, 2020 6:58PM (UTC) "domestic terrorism" designation: no real effect As U.S. politics heat up in advance of the November election, it's not surprising that extremist groups across the political spectrum are becoming more active and engaged in acts of political violence. A growing number of scholars and policymakers suggest this problem should be dealt with by designating violent groups as "domestic terrorist" organizations. : Like most students of American extremism, I agree that some members of domestic extremist groups do engage in terrorist acts — using violence to spread fear among targeted groups of people, with the aim of promoting political objectives. Nonetheless, as someone who has studied democracies' response to domestic terrorism for almost 20 years, I believe that legally designating domestic extremist groups as terrorist organizations will have limited benefits, if any at all. What is domestic terrorism There is not a formal legal...
    Facebook has banned a violent subset of the anti-government “boogaloo” movement after authorities linked its members to real-world attacks. The social-media giant called the extremist network as a dangerous organization — the same category it applies to white supremacist groups and terrorists — after months of tracking its involvement in protests around the US. “This violent network is banned from having a presence on our platform and we will remove content praising, supporting or representing it,” Facebook said in a Tuesday blog post. “It is actively promoting violence against civilians, law enforcement and government officials and institutions.” Authorities have tied boogaloo activists to acts of violence stemming from recent protests over the police killing of George Floyd, which Facebook indicated was a factor in its decision. Followers of the movement have varying ideologies but are generally anticipating a second American civil war. Facebook said it removed more than 300...
    Facebook has labeled the extremist anti-government Boogaloo movement a 'dangerous organization' and banned 500 groups and pages, as the social media giant tries to rebuild its reputation amid the ongoing ad boycott.  The platform announced Tuesday it has banned hundreds of accounts, groups and pages linked to the Boogaloo movement, in what it describes as the 'latest step in our commitment to ban people who proclaim a violent mission from using our platform'. This includes the removal of 220 accounts, 28 pages, 106 groups, and 95 Instagram accounts which are part of the extremist network and pose a 'credible threat' to public safety, it said.  Facebook also removed another 400 groups and 100-plus pages that were hosting 'similar content' affiliated with the core network but not operated by the core members. This comes as more than 160 companies have now pulled advertising on Facebook in the last week as part...
    MENLO PARK (CBS SF / CNN) — Facebook on Tuesday banned hundreds of accounts, groups and pages that it said were linked to the Boogaloo movement, a loosely organized extremist collective whose members have occasionally shown up armed to racial justice and anti-quarantine protests around the country. The banned content includes a core set of 220 Facebook accounts, 95 accounts on Facebook-owned Instagram and dozens of pages and groups that Facebook, in a blog post, said posed a “credible threat” to public safety. Facebook said the accounts were “actively promoting violence against civilians, law enforcement, and government officials and institutions.” That network of Facebook users, the company said, was engaged in recruiting followers from the wider Boogaloo movement for clearly violent purposes. In a separate move, Facebook issued another batch of bans Tuesday targeting more than 400 groups and 100 pages that hosted “similar content” praising or supporting the movement but that Facebook...
    (CNN Business)Facebook (FB) on Tuesday banned hundreds of accounts, groups and pages that it said were linked to the Boogaloo movement, a loosely organized extremist collective whose members have occasionally shown up armed to racial justice and anti-quarantine protests around the country.The banned content includes a core set of 220 Facebook accounts, 95 accounts on Facebook-owned Instagram and dozens of pages and groups that Facebook, in a blog post, said posed a "credible threat" to public safety. Facebook said the accounts were "actively promoting violence against civilians, law enforcement, and government officials and institutions." That network of Facebook users, the company said, was engaged in recruiting followers from the wider Boogaloo movement for clearly violent purposes.In a separate move, Facebook issued another batch of bans Tuesday targeting more than 400 groups and 100 pages that hosted "similar content" praising or supporting the movement but that Facebook said were not primarily...
    Three Democratic Senators on Tuesday urged Facebook to more aggressively purge white supremacist groups from its platform. In a letter to Mark ZuckerbergMark Elliot ZuckerbergCoca-Cola announces pause on all social media advertising Hillicon Valley: Facebook to label 'newsworthy' posts that violate policies | Unilever to pull ads from Twitter, Facebook, Instagram | FEC commissioner steps down Facebook to label but leave up 'newsworthy' posts that violate policies MORE, Sens. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerRepublican Scott Taylor wins Virginia primary, to face Elaine Luria in rematch Republican Daniel Gade wins Virginia primary to challenge Mark Warner Warner: Trump and 'henchman' Barr 'willing to get rid of anyone' investigating Trump associates MORE (D-Va.), Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoNAACP Legal Defense Fund urges Senate to reject GOP police reform bill Overnight Defense: Navy won't reinstate fired captain | Dems probe use of federal officers in DC | Air Force appoints woman as top noncommissioned officer...
    Breaking News — Brasilia, Jun 21 . .- The Brazilian Police carried out an operation this Sunday against three extremist groups that support President Jair Bolsonaro and that are being investigated for leading undemocratic acts in recent weeks, official sources reported. The operation carried out search and search warrants on a farm in Brasilia, considered the headquarters of the groups “QG Rural”, “300 of Brazil” and “Patriots”, made up of militants in favor of the Bolsonaro government, explained the Special Coordination of Fight against Corruption and Organized Crime (Cecor) of the Civil Police of the Federal District. All three groups are under investigation for leading anti-democratic protests in recent days and simulating fireworks attacks on the Supreme Court building. Likewise, the Police investigates the practice of “supposed crimes of private militia, threats and possession of weapons.” In the action, some thirty agents seized fireworks, notes with plans of actions...
    (CNN)Attorney General William Barr defended the shocking use of force on peaceful protesters outside the White House Monday, saying at a news conference on Thursday that difficulties with relocating authorities earlier in the day had forced the clash. Flanked by federal law enforcement leaders at the Justice Department in his first public remarks since the extraordinary episode, Barr maintained that his decision to disperse the crowd followed signs that the crowd was "becoming increasingly unruly" and had nothing to do with a photo-op staged by President Donald Trump at a nearby church that took place minutes later."There was no correlation between our tactical plan of moving the perimeter out by one block and the President's going over to the church," Barr said.The explanation came after criticism had mounted over the situation, with lawmakers and public figures, including the President's first defense chief, Jim Mattis, decrying the violent spectacle. Barr said...
    WASHINGTON (AP) - U.S. officials are seeking to determine whether extremist groups had infiltrated police brutality protests across the country and deliberately tipped largely peaceful demonstrations toward violence - and if foreign adversaries were behind a burgeoning disinformation campaign on social media. As demonstrations spread from Minneapolis to the White House, New York City and overseas Sunday, federal law enforcement officials insisted far-left groups were stoking violence. Meanwhile, experts who track extremist groups also reported seeing evidence of the far-right at work. Investigators were also tracking online interference and looking into whether foreign agents were behind the effort. Officials have seen a surge of social media accounts with fewer than 200 followers created in the last month, a textbook sign of a disinformation effort. TOP STORIES Van Jones: Forget the KKK, its the white, liberal Hillary Clinton supporter we should worry about Celebrities blasted for donating to protester bail fund...
1