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    MASHPEE, Mass. (AP) — The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe scored a legal victory Friday when the U.S. Interior Department withdrew a Trump administration appeal that aimed to revoke federal reservation designation for the tribe’s land in Massachusetts. A federal judge in 2020 blocked the U.S. Interior Department from revoking the tribe’s reservation designation, saying the agency’s decision to do so was “arbitrary, capricious, an abuse of discretion, and contrary to law.” The Trump administration appealed the decision, but the Interior Department on Friday moved to dismiss the motion. In a filing in a federal appeals court in Washington, D.C., the Interior Department said it had “conferred with the parties and none opposes this motion.” A judge granted the motion and dismissed the case. The tribe’s vice chair, Jessie Little Doe Baird, called it a triumph for the tribe and for ancestors “who have fought and died to ensure our Land and...
    MASHPEE, Mass. (AP) — The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe scored a legal victory Friday when the U.S. Interior Department withdrew a Trump administration appeal that aimed to revoke federal reservation designation for the tribe's land in Massachusetts. A federal judge in 2020 blocked the U.S. Interior Department from revoking the tribe's reservation designation, saying the agency's decision to do so was "arbitrary, capricious, an abuse of discretion, and contrary to law." The Trump administration appealed the decision, but the Interior Department on Friday moved to dismiss the motion. In a filing in a federal appeals court in Washington, D.C., the Interior Department said it had "conferred with the parties and none opposes this motion." A judge granted the motion and dismissed the case. The tribe’s vice chair, Jessie Little Doe Baird, called it a triumph for the tribe and for ancestors "who have fought and died to ensure our Land and...
    MASHPEE, Mass. (AP) — The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe scored a legal victory Friday when the U.S. Interior Department withdrew a Trump administration appeal that aimed to revoke federal reservation designation for the tribe’s land in Massachusetts. A federal judge in 2020 blocked the U.S. Interior Department from revoking the tribe’s reservation designation, saying the agency’s decision to do so was “arbitrary, capricious, an abuse of discretion, and contrary to law.” The Trump administration appealed the decision, but the Interior Department on Friday moved to dismiss the motion. READ MORE: Spencer Man Killed In Snowmobile Crash In Maine In a filing in a federal appeals court in Washington, D.C., the Interior Department said it had “conferred with the parties and none opposes this motion.” A judge granted the motion and dismissed the case. The tribe’s vice chair, Jessie Little Doe Baird, called it a triumph for the tribe and for ancestors...
    Miami Herald | Tribune News Service | Getty Images Ji Hyun came to the United States from South Korea to pursue her dream of becoming an intensive care unit nurse.  Now, she is one of many international students whose job prospects and legal immigration status are threatened by monthslong processing delays in U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services facilities. Ji Hyun graduated from nursing school in December and secured a job offer to work in the intensive care unit of a Georgia hospital. On Nov. 4, she mailed out an application for Optional Practical Training, a 12-month program that allows F-1 student visa holders to temporarily work in the U.S. in the field in which they studied. By the time she got a receipt on Feb. 10 confirming USCIS received her application, it was too late. She lost her job offer. Her employer needed to have her approved work authorization by...
    Uber has lost the final appeal in a long running UK legal battle over whether its drivers are self-employed or legally-recognized workers with all the attendant rights, Bloomberg reports. The ruling is the conclusion of the company’s five-year legal fight in the country and a major setback for Uber that will affect all gig workers in the UK, regardless of employer. The ruling will have a significant impact on the UK’s estimated 4.7 million gig economy workers, affecting not just tech giants like Uber and food delivery firm Deliveroo, but also less well known companies like couriers CitySprint and plumbing outfit Pimlico Plumbers. The original case against Uber was bought in 2016 by two drivers for the company, James Farrar and Yaseen Aslam. They argued that Uber controlled nearly all the aspects of their working conditions, including who they could accept for rides and how much they would be...
    WASHINGTON (WJZ) — A group of more than 20 Senate Democrats, including Maryland Sens. Ben Cardin and Chris Van Hollen, have reintroduced legislation designed to allow some immigrants with temporary protected status to apply for legal permanent residency. The SECURE Act would, according to the lawmakers, allow those who have fled armed conflict or other events to apply to become legal permanent residents. They said around 411,000 people from 10 countries from Central America, Asia, the Caribbean, northern Africa and the Middle East would qualify. RELATED: Woman Injured In Cutting At Food Lion Store In Baltimore County, Police Say “We believe in keeping families together,” Cardin said. “The SECURE Act will make sure we keep families together. It will make sure that we have predictability.” RELATED: US Army Field Band From Marylands Fort Meade Performs On Super Bowl Sunday According to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, a person has to...
    Colombia will register hundreds of thousands of Venezuelan migrants and refugees currently living in the country, without proper documentation, in order to provide them with legal residence permits and facilitate access to health care and job opportunities, the Colombian government reported on Monday. President Ivan duque noted that through a new temporary protection statute, Venezuelan migrants currently living in the country without authorization will be eligible to obtain residence permits for 10 years, while migrants who have temporary residence may extend their stay. The new measure could benefit to about a million Venezuelan citizens who currently live in Colombia without the required documentation, as well as hundreds of thousands who need to extend their temporary visas. We launched the # Temporary Protection Statute for Venezuelan migrants, with the aim of providing care to those fleeing the dictatorship. This mechanism allows us to have information to grant them immigration status and,...
    BOGOTA (Reuters) - Colombia will give temporary protective legal status to Venezuelan migrants, President Ivan Duque said on Monday in a joint announcement with Filippo Grandi, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Colombia has for years been the top destination for people fleeing economic and social collapse in neighboring Venezuela. Some 966,000 of the more than 1.7 million Venezuelan migrants living in Colombia do not currently have legal status. The protective status will be valid for 10 years. (Reporting by Julia Symmes Cobb; Writing by Oliver Griffin) Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters. Tags: United Nations, Venezuela, Colombia, South America
    SAN DIEGO (AP) — For the opening salvo of his presidency, few expected Joe Biden to be so far-reaching on immigration. A raft of executive orders signed Wednesday undoes many of his predecessor’s hallmark initiatives, such as halting work on a border wall with Mexico, lifting a travel ban on people from several predominantly Muslim countries and reversing plans to exclude people in the country illegally from the 2020 census. Six of Biden’s 17 orders, memorandums and proclamations deal with immigration. He ordered efforts to preserve Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, a program known as DACA that has shielded hundreds of thousands of people who came to the U.S. as children from deportation since it was introduced in 2012. He also extended temporary legal status to Liberians who fled civil war and the Ebola outbreak to June 2022. But that’s just the beginning. Biden’s most ambitious proposal, unveiled Wednesday, is...
    Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador urged incoming President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump grants clemency to more than 100 people, including Bannon Scalise bringing Donna Brazile as guest to Biden inauguration Sidney Powell withdraws 'kraken' lawsuit in Georgia MORE to provide legal immigration status to Mexican nationals working in the U.S.  “We have been proposing that our countrymen who have been working for years should be regularized, contributing to the development of that great nation,” Lopez Obrador said during a press briefing just ahead of Biden's swearing in on Wednesday. Mexicans accounted for just over half of the 11 million undocumented immigrants in the U.S. in 2018, according to the Migration Policy Institute, though the number of unauthorized Mexican immigrants in the U.S. is on the decline. The request marks the latest lobbying effort toward the incoming administration from America's southern neighbor as Biden plans to roll out an expansive immigration plan through legislation...
    Hours ahead of Joe Biden’s inauguration, incoming White House officials released more details of the president-elect’s ambitious legislative proposals on immigration reform, including a pathway to U.S. citizenship for an estimated 11 million people and a series of executive actions, among them an immediate stop to construction of fencing along the southern border. The incoming administration described its package as a common-sense approach to modernizing and restoring humanity to the immigration system following four years of President Trump’s systematic crackdown on both legal and illegal immigration. The U.S. Citizenship Act, which officials said will be sent to Capitol Hill on Inauguration Day, offers an eight-year road map to citizenship for the estimated 11 million immigrants in the United States without legal status. If approved, it would prioritize three categories of people to immediately receive green cards: farm workers, those with temporary protected status and beneficiaries of Deferred Action for...
    After taking the oath of office on Wednesday, President-elect Joe Biden will send Congress a proposal that would allow millions of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. to apply for legal status, increase aid to Central America, refocus border control measures and expand legal immigration, according to incoming White House officials. The centerpiece of the sweeping plan, dubbed the U.S. Citizenship Act of 2021, is a legalization provision with two different pathways. Temporary Protected Status (TPS) holders, farm workers and undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children would be eligible to apply for green cards immediately and for U.S. citizenship after three years. Other eligible undocumented immigrants, including workers deemed essential during the coronavirus, would be able to apply for work permits and temporary deportation relief. After five years, they could request permanent residence and become naturalized U.S. citizens after another three years. All applicants would need to pay...
    PRESIDENT-Elect Joe Biden has already announced a series of new bills and actions to undo some of President Donald Trump's moves. Biden's inauguration will take place on January 20, and introducing a new immigration bill is one of the things at the top of his to-do list during his first 100 days. 5President-elect Joe Biden delivers remarks in Wilmington, DelawareCredit: Represented by ZUMA Press, Inc. What is Joe Biden's Immigration bill? President-elect Joe Biden is expected to introduce a massive new immigration bill to Congress on his first day in office. The bill is set to provide an eight-year path to citizenship for an estimated 11 million people living in the US without legal status. It provides "one of the fastest pathways to citizenship for those living without legal status of any measure in recent years," but it fails to include the "traditional trade-off of enhanced border security favored by many...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden plans to unveil a sweeping immigration bill on Day One of his administration, hoping to provide an eight-year path to citizenship for an estimated 11 million people living in the U.S. without legal status, a massive reversal from the Trump administration’s harsh immigration policies. The legislation puts Biden on track to deliver on a major campaign promise important to Latino voters and other immigrant communities after four years of President Donald Trump’s restrictive policies and mass deportations. It provides one of the fastest pathways to citizenship for those living without legal status of any measure in recent years, but it fails to include the traditional trade-off of enhanced border security favored by many Republicans, making passage in a narrowly divided Congress in doubt. Expected to run hundreds of pages, the bill is set to be introduced after Biden takes the oath of office...
    WASHINGTON - President-elect Joe Biden plans to unveil a sweeping immigration bill on the first day of his administration, hoping to provide an eight-year path to citizenship for an estimated 11 million people living in the U.S. without legal status, a massive reversal from the Trump administration's harsh immigration policies.  The legislation puts Biden on track to deliver on a major campaign promise important to Latino voters and other immigrant communities after four years of President Donald Trump's restrictive policies and mass deportations. It provides one of the fastest pathways to citizenship for those living without legal status of any measure in recent years, but it fails to include the traditional trade-off of enhanced border security favored by many Republicans, making passage in a narrowly divided Congress in doubt.   Expected to run hundreds of pages, the bill is set to be introduced after Biden takes the oath of office Wednesday, according...
    President-elect Joe Biden plans to immediately put forward legislation offering a pathway to citizenship for 11 million illegal immigrants. Four people who have been briefed on the plan say Biden plans to announce the legislation on his first day in office, according to the Associated Press. “This really does represent a historic shift from Trump’s anti-immigrant agenda that recognizes that all of the undocumented immigrants that are currently in the United States should be placed on a path to citizenship,” Marielena Hincapie, executive director of the National Immigration Law Center, said about the plan, which she was briefed on. Biden’s incoming chief of staff, Ron Klain, confirmed Saturday that Biden would send an immigration bill to Congress “on his first day in office” but did not elaborate on what was in the plan. Biden is also expected to sign a variety of executive orders on his first day in office,...
    SAN DIEGO (AP/CBS13) — President-elect Joe Biden’s decision to immediately ask Congress to offer legal status to an estimated 11 million people in the country has surprised advocates given how the issue has long divided Democrats and Republicans, even within their own parties. According to four people briefed on his plans, Biden will announce legislation on his first day in office to provide a path to citizenship for millions of immigrants in the United States illegally. The president-elect campaigned on a path to citizenship for the roughly 11 million people in the U.S. illegally, but it was unclear how quickly he would move while wrestling with the coronavirus pandemic, the economy and other priorities. For advocates, memories were fresh of presidential candidate Barack Obama pledging an immigration bill his first year in office, in 2009, but not tackling the issue until his second term. Biden’s plan is the polar opposite...
    SAN DIEGO (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden’s decision to immediately ask Congress to offer legal status to an estimated 11 million people in the country has surprised advocates given how the issue has long divided Democrats and Republicans, even within their own parties. Biden will announce legislation his first day in office to provide a path to citizenship for millions of immigrants in the United States illegally, according to four people briefed on his plans. The president-elect campaigned on a path to citizenship for the roughly 11 million people in the U.S. illegally, but it was unclear how quickly he would move while wrestling with the coronavirus pandemic, the economy and other priorities. For advocates, memories were fresh of presidential candidate Barack Obama pledging an immigration bill his first year in office, in 2009, but not tackling the issue until his second term. Biden’s plan is the polar opposite of...
    New York : Vice President-elect Kamala Harris. Photo: Ethan Miller / . The vice president-elect of United States, Kamala Harrissaid this Tuesday in an interview with the Hispanic channel Univision that the new Democratic government headed by President-elect Joe Biden “has planned” to present an immigration reform bill to Congress. In the interview with the journalist Ilia Calderón, from the Univision Newscast, Harris did not specify the date on which his government will present the immigration reform bill, although Biden promised to promote a comprehensive immigration reform in his first hundred days in power. The plan would pave the way for millions of undocumented people residing in the United States to become citizens, after a process of years in which they first have to achieve the permanent legal resident status. The vice president-elect, a daughter of Indian and Jamaican origin, also referred to the situation...
    "Immigrants say the Pledge of Allegiance to the United States during a naturalization ceremony on July 9, 2014 in New York City." Thousands of Liberian immigrants who are otherwise eligible to apply for permanent status in the U.S. through a law passed last year but faced immense difficulties largely due to intentional sabotaging by the Trump administration will now have one more year to complete the application process. “Tucked inside the $900 billion spending deal passed by Congress on Dec. 21, 2020 and signed by the president on Dec. 28 is a brief, but critical provision extending the Liberian Refugee Immigration Fairness program, or LRIF, for one additional year,” LRIF Strategy Group said in a statement received by Daily Kos. It’s a victory for families who’ve faced “obstacles and roadblocks” by the administration “every single step of the way,” UndocuBlack Network National Policy and Advocacy Director Patrice Lawrence recently told ProPublica. LRIF Strategy Group estimates that as many as...
    "A person holds an American flag as they participate in a ceremony to become an American citizen during a U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services naturalization ceremony at the Miami Field Office on August 17, 2018 in Miami, Florida." A new law last year allowing thousands of Liberian immigrants who faced separation following loss of their temporary protections to apply for green cards should have brought some much-needed relief. Should have. Instead, ProPublica reports that the Trump administration has largely undermined the application process, leaving advocates “surprised by how many hoops immigrants were being asked to jump through” as the deadline to apply quickly approaches. Some difficulties can be pinned to novel coronavirus pandemic. That’s been unavoidable in all aspects of daily life. But Dara Lind reports there’s been a “broad failure” by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), the federal immigration agency tasked with processing this paperwork. It’s also been one of many agencies politicized by the...
    COVID vaccine live updates: Fauci says Trump, Biden should get vaccinated; nursing homes wont get shots until next week Biden campaigns for Georgia Senate Democrats following electoral college victory Judge approves settlement in womens sports case at Brown PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — A federal judge on Tuesday approved a settlement between Brown University and student-athletes who had challenged the Ivy League school's decision to drop several women's varsity sports. © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this Sept. 25, 2019, file photo, people rest on grass while reading at Brown University in Providence, R.I. The university and attorneys for student-athletes, who challenged the Ivy League school's decision to reduce several women's varsity sports teams to club status, announced a proposed settlement Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File) U.S. District Judge John McConnell Jr. signed off on the agreement, ending more than two decades of legal battles...
    Stars turning 60 in 2020 Asia Markets: Hong Kong and Seoul stocks rise early Friday as Tokyo and Shanghai lose ground UFC facing class action lawsuit worth up to $5 billion after fighters score legal victory The UFC’s roughest fight might be in court over the next few years. A group of former UFC fighters suing the promotion scored a key legal victory on Thursday when federal judge Richard Boulware said he would grant their lawsuit class-action status, according Kevin Draper of The New York Times. The antitrust lawsuit dates all the way back to 2014, initially filed by Cung Le Jon Fitch and Nate Quarry against the UFC’s parent company. The lawsuit claims the UFC has abused its monopoly power in the MMA labor market, suppressing fighter wages. While competitors remain like Bellator and the PFL, other larger competitors like Strikeforce, Pride and WEC have been bought out...
    "Honduran father Juan and his six-year-old son Anthony walk home after attending Sunday Mass on September 9, 2018 in Oakland, California. They fled their country, leaving many family members behind, and crossed the U.S. border in April at a lawful port of entry in Brownsville, Texas seeking asylum. They were soon separated and spent the next 85 days apart in detention." The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is urging President-elect Joe Biden to allow families separated by the Trump administration to be able to return to the U.S., the AP reports. While Biden has pledged to create a federal task force to help reunite families, he’s reportedly been undecided if they’ll be allowed to return to the U.S. But the answer should be clear, advocates say.  “We think that’s only fair given what they’ve been put through,” ACLU attorney Lee Gelernt told the AP, saying that these families must be protected once here. “We will...
    U.S. President Donald Trump addresses a crowd during a campaign rally on October 24, 2020 in Lumberton, North Carolina. President Donald Trump cast his ballot early in Florida at his Mar-a-Lago resort on Saturday. Soon thereafter, questions were raised by social media users who wondered whether Trump violated voting laws. “Trump just voted in Florida,” noted popular YouTube personality Brian Tyler Cohen via Twitter. “Just a reminder that his address is listed as Mar-a-Lago. But per a use agreement [with] Palm Beach, it can’t be both a private club AND a personal residence. Meaning he voted from an invalid address.” “Isn’t there a term for that?” Cohen added. Many users chimed in with the response suggested by the implication raised through Cohen’s rhetorical question–with thousands of tweets quickly piling up and accusing the 45th president of committing voter fraud. Others remarked on the circumstances as well: Donald Trump voted in Florida...
    By ELLIOT SPAGAT, Associated Press SAN DIEGO (AP) — The Trump administration can end humanitarian protections that have allowed hundreds of thousands of people from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Haiti and Sudan to remain in the United States, a divided appeals court ruled Monday. While an appeal is imminent and orders to leave wouldn't take effect for months, the decision moved many people closer to losing legal status, including families who have been in the U.S. for decades and have young children who are American citizens. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals lifted a preliminary injunction that blocked the government from ending Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for people from those four countries that are affected by natural disasters and civil conflict. The order also applies to beneficiaries from Honduras and Nepal, who sued separately but are subject to Monday's ruling under an agreement between attorneys for both sides, said...
    PASADENA, Calif. – The Trump administration can end humanitarian protections that have allowed hundreds of thousands of people from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Haiti and Sudan to remain in the United States, a divided appeals court ruled Monday. While an appeal is imminent and orders to leave wouldn't take effect for months, the decision moved many people closer to losing legal status, including families who have been in the U.S. for decades and have young children who are American citizens. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals lifted a preliminary injunction that blocked the government from ending Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for people from those four countries that are affected by natural disasters and civil conflict. The order also applies to beneficiaries from Honduras and Nepal, who sued separately but are subject to Monday's ruling under an agreement between attorneys for both sides, said Ahilan Arulanantham, a lawyer for...
    (CNN)The love child of the former king of Belgium, Albert II, is asking a court to grant her royal status, months after she was recognized as his fourth child. Back in January, Albert's lawyers acknowledged that Delphine Boël, a 52-year-old Belgian artist, was his daughter, seven years into a legal battle over her paternity. The former king had contested Boël's claim that she was conceived during an affair between him and her mother, Sybille de Selys Longchamps, but reversed his position following the results of a court-ordered paternity test. DNA test forces former Belgian king to admit fathering a child in extramarital affairAlbert's lawyers said in a statement at the time that "legal paternity is not necessarily a reflection of biological paternity," pointing out that the former king had not been involved in Boël's upbringing and that he'd respected her relationship with her "legal father."Speaking in January, Alain Berenboom,...
    Attorney General William Barr has vigorously defended the use of aerial surveillance against nonviolent George Floyd protestors in Washington, D.C. as well as in  Minnesota, California and Arizona. But Sami D. Said, inspector general for the United States Air Force, disagreed with Barr’s claims and and described him as “mistaken” in a report released on Monday, August 24. Reporter Colin Kalmbacher, in Law & Crime, notes that Barr has defended that aerial surveillance based on the statute 32 U.S.C. § 502(f) — which, Barr said, “authorizes states to send forces” in support of “operations or missions undertaken by the member’s unit at the request of the president or secretary of defense.” But Said, in his report, found Barr’s claims to be misleading, saying, “Policy interpretations by (the National Guard Bureau, NGB) led to a mistaken belief that (secretary of defense) approval for use of the RC-25B was not required by...
    FALLS CHURCH, Va. (AP) — A Libyan military commander who previously lived for decades in Virginia says he deserves immunity from a pair of civil lawsuits accusing him of atrocities and indiscriminate killings because he is Libya’s head of state. Family members who say their loved ones were killed or tortured by Khalifa Hifter’s forces have filed two separate lawsuits against him in federal court in Alexandria. The lawsuits seek millions of dollars in damages that could be recovered from property Hifter, a dual U.S. and Libyan citizen, and his family still own throughout northern Virginia. Hifter leads the self-styled Libyan National Army, a faction in a civil war that has raged in the country for years. Once a lieutenant to Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi, Hifter defected to the U.S. during the 1980s and spent many years living in northern Virginia. He is widely believed to have worked with the...
    FALLS CHURCH, Va. (AP) — A Libyan military commander who previously lived for decades in Virginia says he deserves immunity from a pair of civil lawsuits accusing him of atrocities and indiscriminate killings because he is Libya’s head of state. Family members who say their loved ones were killed or tortured by Khalifa Hifter’s forces have filed two separate lawsuits against him in federal court in Alexandria. The lawsuits seek millions of dollars in damages that could be recovered from property Hifter, a dual U.S. and Libyan citizen, and his family still own throughout northern Virginia. Hifter leads the self-styled Libyan National Army, a faction in a civil war that has raged in the country for years. Once a lieutenant to Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi, Hifter defected to the U.S. during the 1980s and spent many years living in northern Virginia. He is widely believed to have worked with the...
    By MATTHEW BARAKAT, Associated Press FALLS CHURCH, Va. (AP) — A Libyan military commander who previously lived for decades in Virginia says he deserves immunity from a pair of civil lawsuits accusing him of atrocities and indiscriminate killings because he is Libya's head of state. Family members who say their loved ones were killed or tortured by Khalifa Hifter's forces have filed two separate lawsuits against him in federal court in Alexandria. The lawsuits seek millions of dollars in damages that could be recovered from property Hifter, a dual U.S. and Libyan citizen, and his family still own throughout northern Virginia. Hifter leads the self-styled Libyan National Army, a faction in a civil war that has raged in the country for years. Once a lieutenant to Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi, Hifter defected to the U.S. during the 1980s and spent many years living in northern Virginia. He is widely believed...
    SAN DIEGO, Aug. 04, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — via NEWMEDIAWIRE — Medical Marijuana, Inc. (OTC: MJNA) (the “Company”), the first-ever publicly traded cannabis company in the United States that launched the world’s first-ever cannabis-derived nutraceutical products, brands and supply chain, announced today that its subsidiary Kannaway® is proud to support the European Industrial Hemp Association (EIHA) in its recent opinion letter to the European Commission on the legal status of cannabidiol (CBD) and hemp.  EIHA’s letter was written in response to the European Commission’s decision to suspend all applications for hemp extracts and natural cannabinoids under the European Union’s Novel Food rules and also deem under a “preliminary conclusion” that extracts from the flowering and fruiting tops of the hemp plant should be considered a drug under the United Nations Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs of 1961. EIHA explains that the decision is “not based on the latest scientific literature nor inspired by the current debate at...
    BOYLE HEIGHTS, LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- The lives of an undocumented 8-year-old boy and his father are starting to turn around.Edgar Machic Jr. was caught on camera during an Instagram Livestream, helping his dad sell flowers in Boyle Heights in July.After the video was shared, father and son were shown an outpouring of support by the community, and a GoFundMe account raised more than $45,000.Then, about a week later, an attorney walked up to their stand."God touched the heart of the attorney, Alex," said Edgar Machic, junior's dad. "He's getting Edgar Jr. permanent residency in the U.S. Doing that first, then getting me political asylum."Junior started helping sell flowers when his dad lost his job due to COVID-19.The two immigrated to the United States after the son's mom passed away and had to leave his two sisters behind."We're here as an extension of Edgar's mom, and in honor of my...
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