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    BELLMORE, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) — Fighting food insecurity and bringing hospitality workers back on the job, that’s the goal behind Carroll’s Kitchen Long Island. On Wednesday, CBS2’s Jenna DeAngelis learned more about the nonprofit, and how you can help. Chefs were chopping, cutting and cooking up a storm in a Bellmore kitchen, making meals to deliver to domestic violence shelters. “It’s really rewarding, at the end of the day, helping people and bringing meals to people in need,” founder Ryan Carroll said. MORE: Concerned Volunteers Build Pantry From Scratch To Address Hoboken’s Food Insecurity The Sayville resident started the nonprofit after losing his job as a chef in New York City when the COVID-19 pandemic hit. “Everybody was kind of broken in March. It was a very sad time. It was like fight or flight and we just started fighting and we never stopped,” Carroll said. The kitchen built a team of...
    PRINCE Harry and Meghan Markle have reunited with two aides who lost their jobs during 'Megxit' as the Sussexes go on a hiring spree. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have re-hired former palace staffers Clara Loughran and Beth Herlihy to work for their non-profit organisation Archewell. ⚠️ Read our Meghan and Harry blog for the latest news on the Royal couple 5Harry and Meghan have reunited with two aides who lost their jobs during 'Megxit'Credit: Getty Images 5Beth Herlihy began working for the Sussexes in September 2018 5Clara Loughran had worked for Prince Harry since 2015Credit: PA:Press Association Both women, aged in their 30s, lost their jobs when Harry and Meghan stepped back as senior members of the Royal Family. The Sussexes have also hired employees in the United States - including a head of communications, a press secretary and a chief of staff, the Daily Mail reports....
    Jill Biden would be first FLOTUS to have a full-time job Lille suffer first defeat of season at Brest Saturday Night Live portrayed Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben as people who lost their jobs in 2020 © Saturday Night Live/NBC/YouTube Maya Rudolph and Kenan Thompson during "Saturday Night Live" on November 7. Saturday Night Live/NBC/YouTube Dave Chappelle hosted the latest "Saturday Night Live" episode. After giving a monologue, Chappelle introduced a skit, saying: "A lot of people have lost their jobs in this climate, and unfortunately, a lot of Black people lost their jobs." The camera then panned to Maya Rudolph as the former food brand mascot Aunt Jemima and Kenan Thompson as the former logo of rice brand Uncle Ben's. The characters were shown being fired in the skit, which parodied both brands' reckonings with their problematic roots earlier this year. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories....
    Maya Rudolph and Kenan Thompson during "Saturday Night Live" on November 7. Saturday Night Live/NBC/YouTube Dave Chappelle hosted the latest "Saturday Night Live" episode. After giving a monologue, Chappelle introduced a skit, saying: "A lot of people have lost their jobs in this climate, and unfortunately, a lot of Black people lost their jobs." The camera then panned to Maya Rudolph as the former food brand mascot Aunt Jemima and Kenan Thompson as the former logo of rice brand Uncle Ben's. The characters were shown being fired in the skit, which parodied both brands' reckonings with their problematic roots earlier this year. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Dave Chappelle hosted this week's "Saturday Night Live" episode, which came hours after President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris gave election victory speeches to the nation.  After Chappelle gave an opening monologue that included commentary on the...
    Dodgers manager thinks Manny Machado-Brusdar Graterol beef is over The Trendiest Hairstyle the Year You Were Born 1 million married women lost their jobs last month due to back-to-school season — and economists fear it could lead to a lost generation of mothers © Simon Ritzmann/Getty Images Simon Ritzmann/Getty Images Married women lost 1 million jobs in September alone, while single men and women gained jobs. The dip in married women in the workforce, economists say, could be due to the difficulty of childcare amid the back-to-school season. Women shoulder most of the burden at home, according to studies from Boston Consulting Group and Northwestern University. At some point, women then have to choose between performing well at work and at home, explaining the dip in employment for those who are married. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Back-to-school season is tough enough on working parents....
    Trump, others to pay respects to Ginsburg at court America’s most historic fast food joints Half of adults who lost their jobs during the pandemic are still unemployed © Associated Press Half of workers who lost their job during the pandemic haven't returned to work yet. Associated Press Pew Research Center, a nonpartisan think tank, conducted a random online survey of 13,200 Americans in August 2020. Pew found that half of adults that lost a job due to the COVID-19 crisis haven't returned to work, and 60% of those who took a pay cut in the beginning of the pandemic are still making less than they were before March. As of September 12, 12.6 million Americans are receiving unemployment benefits, and the unemployment rate is at 8.4%. Lower-income adults are less likely to have gone back to work, suggesting the economic recovery has primarily helped wealthy people —...
    One of the industries hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic is also one of the industries on which others rest, often invisibly. Without child care, parents struggle to do their own jobs. And child care is in a major crisis. One in five child care jobs has disappeared since February. Those losses are a jobs crisis for women, and women of color in particular: This is a workforce that’s 95% women, 20% Latina, and 19% Black. By contrast, the workforce as a whole is 47% women, 8% Latina, and 7% Black women. So when tens of thousands of child care workers lose their jobs, it’s hitting people who are already discriminated against and disadvantaged in the labor market. Child care workers don't have financial leeway to take a hit like this—the average full-time, year-round worker in the industry is paid just under $30,000, with Latina and Black women making even less. They’re also unlikely to have...
    Donald Trump has signed an executive order to provide $300 a week in federal unemployment aid, with money drawn from a disaster relief fund. Twenty-five states have said they will apply for the federal money, though they would need to revamp their computer systems to do so. Other states are still considering whether to take that step; two have said they won't. Some states may be hesitating to overhaul their unemployment systems because they expect Congress to eventually pass a new rescue package with an enhanced jobless benefit that might not require any changes. In states that decide to pay out the $300, the government estimates it would take three weeks, on average, for the states to send the money to the unemployed. And initially only enough money is being allotted to cover three weeks of payments. Even with subsequent grants, analysts estimate that there would be enough money to...
    Men wait at dawn in order to be the first in line to enter a bookkeeping shop to fill out unemployment forms near the U.S.-Mexico border in Imperial County, which has been hard-hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, on July 24 in Calexico, California.Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images Thousands of workers in California are turning to the state's unemployment system for a second time. Indeed, more than half of people who recently applied for unemployment benefits in the Golden State had lost their jobs (or had their hours cut) again after having returned to work, according to an analysis published Thursday by the California Policy Lab. It's a drastic rise from earlier in the coronavirus pandemic and hints at the fickle nature of the economic recovery across the country. "It's become apparent that for the individuals who have been lucky enough to return to work, they're seeing that this new employment...
    Clemson, Ohio State and Alabama lead preseason coaches poll 25 Ways to Transform Your Style Under $25 Nearly one third of people that have gone back to work after being laid off during the coronavirus pandemic have lost their jobs again, study finds © Reuters Reuters As many as 31% of workers who were initially added back to payrolls after COVID-19 layoffs have been laid off again, a study from Cornell University showed. In addition, another 26% that have returned to work have been told by employers that they're at risk of another layoff or furlough, according to the study.  "Thus, nearly 3 out of 5 re-payrolled workers are either again out of work or fear being so," said Daniel Alpert, Cornell Law School senior fellow and adjunct professor.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. A second wave of coronavirus layoffs is happening, even for workers...
    Rangers aim to fluster Hurricanes in series opener These 13 States Need to Lock Down Immediately, Harvard Researchers Say While Congress haggles over the next round of coronavirus aid, Americans who have buried loved ones and lost their jobs face a future shrouded in fear and uncertainty © Scott Heins/Getty Images New Yorkers in need wait in a long line to receive free produce, dry goods, and meat at Lincoln Center on July 29, 2020. Scott Heins/Getty Images The coronavirus has not only infected almost 4.5 million Americans, but also triggered a historic economic recession and unprecedented job losses. Congress signed the $2 trillion CARES Act in March to soften the blow for businesses and individuals and is now haggling over the next relief package. People told Business Insider that their stimulus checks are long gone and those who received weekly federal unemployment benefits aren't sure how they...
    SAN ANTONIO – Although the unemployment rate in Bexar County has decreased since the start of the pandemic, many people are still in need of a job and possibly considering changing careers. Romanita Matta-Barrera, the executive director of San Antonio Works, the workforce team within the San Antonio Economic Development Foundation, wants you to know you’re not alone. “And now more than ever, all of us have our respective core competencies and we are coming together sharing information that are really intended to help job seekers get back to work or find their what’s next,” she said. VIA, Mayor agree on plan to use 1/8 cent sales tax for economic recovery, then transportation SA Works recently released a special edition quarterly jobs report, which focuses on helping people who may have become unemployed during the pandemic. For the first time, the report includes a “skills transfer” section. “So, we wanted...
    In an appearance on CNN’s Newsroom with Ana Cabrera, Congressman Joaquin Castro (D-TX) expressed his frustration Sunday with the surge in coronavirus cases in Texas, saying that he felt that people had made major sacrifices to fight the pandemic, but that leaders like President Donald Trump and Gov. Greg Abbott (R-TX) had “squandered people’s sacrifices.” Cabrera played a video clip of Vice President Mike Pence visiting a church in Dallas, Texas earlier Sunday, in which Pence wore a mask but the church choir was shown singing very close together, not wearing masks. “How concerned are you,” Cabrera asked Castro, to see images like this when coronavirus cases are surging in Texas? Castro said it was “alarming,” and added that from the beginning of the pandemic, Abbott had “basically followed the see no evil, hear no evil, do as little testing as possible philosophy of Donald Trump.” Castro added that text...
    With numbers like these, no wonder the food bank lines are so long. Domestic workers are overwhelmingly marginalized workers, and as we know, the coronavirus pandemic has been the hardest on already marginalized people. A new survey of 800 Black immigrant domestic workers in three areas shows just how bad it is for these workers who take care of children, elderly people, and people with disabilities, or who clean homes. The workers’ stress and pain were evident when they spoke to reporters, as Gabe Ortiz wrote. The numbers are staggering, too. Overall, 45% of the Black immigrant domestic workers surveyed had lost their jobs. Another 25% had their hours or pay reduced. Nearly two out of three were experiencing housing instability, and half don’t have health insurance. But the overall numbers cover big variations between the locations surveyed by the Institute for Policy Studies’ Black Worker Initiative, in partnership with the National Domestic Workers’...
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