Thursday, Mar 04, 2021 - 07:15:54
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The proceedings:

    Judge Manuel García Castellón, who is investigating the Kitchen case on the para-police espionage of Luis Bárcenas, has refused to send Congress the summary of this case in view of his “reserved character” and in order to protect judicial independence and the rights of the parties. In a letter sent to Congress by the Supreme Court, the head of Investigative Court 6 of the National High Court justifies in this way the refusal to send Kitchen’s documentation to the Lower House to be used in the investigation commission opened there around this cause. “The reserved nature of the judicial proceedings in the seat of investigation is a fundamental principle”, indicates the magistrate, who cites article 301 of the Criminal Procedure Law, which establishes that “the proceedings of the summary will be reserved and They will not be public until the oral proceedings are opened.“. García Castellón’s second argument for rejecting...
    The Barcelona Urban Guard has found dog puppy carcasses in the freezer and other sick animals in a store in the Nou Barris district of Barcelona, ​​the City Council explained in a statement. Following a complaint from individuals who have bought sick puppies, The Guàrdia Urbana inspected the store to ensure that it complied with the regulations of the facilities and the health requirements of the puppies for sale. In the establishment register, there were a total of 30 dog puppies, 15 of them in the sales area, 12 in the quarantine area and two hospitalized (one of them diagnosed positive for a coronavirus and with a history of parvovirus, in a cachectic state and obvious symptoms of dehydration). The Urban Guard has opened proceedings before the fact that the veterinarian hired by the store does not have the professional title validated in Spain and is not registered, which means...
    The organization considers it unacceptable that cafes and restaurants remain closed while the government is considering relaxing some measures. The hospitality sector has been confined for several months in the Netherlands, due to the coronavirus crisis. Cafes are closed while restaurants are only open for take out service. According to KHN, government support measures are not sufficient to cover the fixed costs of businesses. The losses are increasing and the entrepreneurs are desperate, explains the federation. She had already initiated summary proceedings against the government’s measures last year, but the courts rejected the sector’s demands. This time, KHN wants to initiate substantive proceedings with a group of hospitality entrepreneurs. According to the organization, the Dutch state acts illegally by violating the fundamental rights of companies in the sector without sufficient justification and without compensation to the extent of the damage.
    (CNN)The whole world watched the second impeachment of former US President Donald Trump and his acquittal. In many cases, if media coverage is an indication, the global audience paid rapt attention. The BBC was one of many outlets that carried the Senate proceedings live. France24 television broadcast much of the proceedings on their English and French services, with simultaneous translation into French, including the final vote and subsequent responses by Democratic Senator Chuck Schumer and Republican Mitch McConnell -- both of whom condemned Trump's actions, but with McConnell nonetheless voting to acquit the former President. David A. Andelman At the onset of the proceedings, the leading Paris daily newspaper Le Monde carried an enormous photo at the top of its front page of the House impeachment managers marching across the Capitol Rotunda to the Senate floor. The French publication then followed the proceedings closely, concluding within minutes of the...
    The outcome of the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump is almost certainly predetermined -- that he will be acquitted.  It's already clear what the arguments from the House impeachment managers and Trump's defense team will be -- they made them in briefs submitted to the Senate before the in-person part of the trial started Tuesday.  But between the start of the arguments on merits Wednesday and the nearly inevitable acquittal of Trump stands one giant unknown that could significantly extend the trial -- whether there will be witnesses.  "On the question of witnesses, we have no news for you on that this morning," a senior aide on the impeachment managers' team said Tuesday. "I'll just say you're going to see a devastating case against Trump in the managers' presentation in the coming days."  Supporters of President Donald Trump climb the west wall of the the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday,...
    CNN’s John Avlon defended Donald Trump’s impeachment with a segment on the Constitutionality and the historical legitimacy of holding a Senate trial for the ex-president’s conduct. In a Tuesday Reality Check for New Day, Avlon bore down on Trump’s incitement of insurrection after supporters of the ex-president — fueled by his false claims about the 2020 election — laid siege to the U.S. Capitol in a violent attempt to overturn the certification of Trump’s defeat. “That’s the kind of high crimes the founders contemplated when they put impeachment in the Constitution,” Avlon said. Since conservatives have tried to delegitimize the impeachment before the trial, Avlon reminded viewers that the proceedings against Trump began while still in office. He also pointed to multiple historical precedents and legal arguments that strongly suggest the founders intended it would always be permissible to impeach former public officials for their conduct in office. “Not only can...
    Donald Trump's impeachment lawyer David Schoen has asked for the trial to be paused if it runs into the Sabbath because he is an observant Jew, in a move that could throw the timeline into uncertainty. Schoen, who previously acted as counsel to convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein, sent a letter to Senate leaders requesting the trial be put on hold past sundown on Friday through Saturday, according to the New York Times.  Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer's office, who is also Jewish, said the Senate will 'accommodate' Schoen's request.  However a pause could string the impeachment trial out longer than is in the interests of both parties. Both sides want a speedy trial with the Democrats almost certain not to get a conviction and keen to prevent further delays to the Biden administration's plans, while Republicans opposed the trial going ahead at all now Trump is no longer in office. ...
    Because attorney Lin Wood said publicly on Thursday that the State Bar of Georgia demanded he undergo a mental health evaluation in order to keep his law license, the Bar told Law&Crime on Friday that it could confirm an active inquiry into Wood. The Bar said that although the investigative process is normally confidential, Wood’s statement permitted the disciplinary body to confirm that he is under investigation “pursuant to Bar Rule 4-104.” That rule states that the State Disciplinary Board can, in its discretion, refer a lawyer to a mental health professional: Rule 4-104. Mental Incapacity and Substance Abuse (a) Mental illness, cognitive impairment, alcohol abuse, or substance abuse, to the extent of impairing competency as a lawyer, shall constitute grounds for removing a lawyer from the practice of law. (b) Upon a determination by the State Disciplinary Board that a lawyer may be impaired or incapacitated to practice law...
    Winning $730 million Powerball ticket sold in Maryland Law enforcements disastrous response during the deadly insurrection reveals a major gap in security: Whos viewed as a threat These $19k SUVs Will Make You Trade in Your Car Ad Microsoft The Highest Paying Cash Back Card Has Hit The Market Ad Microsoft 16 Highly Unnecessary Things People Waste Money On (You’re Guilty Of Many) Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/16 SLIDES © nurdanst/istockphoto Divorce Redefined Like practically every other part of life, divorce has been affected by the coronavirus pandemic. The process, numbers, and in some cases even reasons for seeking divorce have changed. "Often in a damaged marriage, there's a straw that breaks...
    On January 13th, Congress will begin proceedings for the impeachment of President Donald Trump, based on his incitement of the January 6th mob attack on the US Capitol. The official articles of impeachment, filed Tuesday night, charge the president with “incitement of insurrection,” based on his comments to the crowd, as well as previous calls made to election officials in Georgia that sought to alter the state’s election results. “He threatened the integrity of the democratic system, interfered with the peaceful transition of power, and imperiled a coequal branch of Government,” the articles allege. “He thereby betrayed his trust as President, to the manifest injury of the people of the United States.” National guard troops have been deployed within the Capitol building to guard against any attacks that might disrupt the proceedings. When does impeachment begin? The House of Representatives began proceedings at 9AM ET, which will include debate...
    President Donald Trump is less than two weeks away from his term ending. Yet some are pushing to impeach him for what would be the second time during his presidency. With just 9 days left until Trump leaves office, the bottom line is that will be nearly impossible to successfully impeach and convict the president in that time-frame. Calls for a second impeachment raise a unique scenario in which a president could theoretically be impeached twice within one term, especially in his waning days in office. Impeachment is a fairly simple process, with the Constitution allowing Congress to remove a president for “treason, bribery or other high crimes and misdemeanors.” This round of impeachment proceedings, led by Democratic Reps. David Cicilline of Rhode Island, Jamie Raskin of Maryland and Ted Lieu of California, charges that Trump incited an insurrection. (RELATED: Marco Rubio: The Left Is Using The Capitol Riot As...
    Loading the player... As deadly riots raged at the US Capitol on Wednesday, President Donald Trump and his attorney, Rudy Giuliani both inadvertently called Republican Sen. Mike Lee. But the calls, which were frantic attempts to delay the counting of Electoral College votes, were intended for another GOP senator, a spokesman for Sen. Lee confirmed to CNN. According to CNN, Lee’s spokesman said the calls from the president and his attorney were intended for Sen. Tommy Tuberville, a newly elected senator from Alabama. Charges need to filed against tRump ASAP. tRump waited 3hrs AFTER they stormed the State House to call the National Guard. Instead of calling in the National Guard tRump was calling Tuberville to make sure that the coup was still on. Only after staffers BEGGED tRump he called. — Carole Bennett (@CaroleBennett3) January 9, 2021 As an angry mob of Trump supporters stormed the Capitol, ransacking...
    Charlotte Pence Bond (pictured) extended her congratulations to Joe Biden and Kamala Harris just after her father certified the Democrats' Electoral College victory Mike Pence's daughter Charlotte Pence Bond extended her congratulations to Joe Biden and Kamala Harris just after her father certified the Democrats' Electoral College victory early Thursday morning.  Charlotte, 27, is the outgoing vice president's middle child, between his son Michael and second daughter Audrey.    'Congratulations to President-Elect Joe Biden and Vice President-Elect Kamala Harris,' she tweeted with an American flag after Congress officially confirmed that her dad's time as vice president was up. Pence oversaw the certification proceedings, provoking fury from Trump as he refused to align with the president's false claims that he had the power to single-handedly overturn the election results.  The proceedings were cast into chaos as a crowd of Trump supporters stormed the Capitol grounds on Wednesday afternoon, with dozens of...
    Mumbai, Nov 22: YouTuber Rashid Siddiquee has opposed the defamation notice issued against him by actor Akshay Kumar in connection with Sushant Singh Rajput death case and refused to pay Rs 500 crore damages sought by the star, saying there was nothing defamatory in his videos. Siddiquee has also urged Akshay Kumar to withdraw the notice, failing which he would initiate “appropriate legal proceedings” against the actor. Akshay Kumar Slaps Rs 500 Crore Defamation Suit Against YouTuber Rashid Siddiqui Who Falsely Embroiled him in Sushant Singh Rajput-Rhea Chakraborty Case. Kumar had on November 17 issued a defamation notice against Siddiquee seeking Rs 500 crore in damages for making “false and baseless allegations” against him in Rajput’s death case. Kumar, in the notice sent through law firm I C Legal, said Siddiquee in his YouTube channel FF News has published several “defamatory, libelous and derogatory” videos. Siddiquee, in his...
    A Kentucky judge has ordered the grand jury records from the Breonna Taylor case to be released, citing the need to show if 'publicly elected officials are being honest,' and clearing the way for grand jurors to speak about the proceedings.  'This is a rare and extraordinary example of a case where, at the time this motion is made, the historical reasons for preserving grand jury secrecy are null,' Jefferson Circuit Court Judge Annie O'Connell wrote in the ruling.  O'Connell said she made her decision after considering 'the interest of citizens of the Commonwealth of Kentucky to be assured that its publicly elected officials are being honest in their representations'.  During her ruling, O'Connell also ruled that grand jurors can speak publicly about the proceedings in the case against the police officers who shot Taylor, a 26-year-old EMT.  Scroll down for video   Jefferson Circuit Court Judge Annie O'Connell has ordered...
    GEO Group, the private prison company that contracts with Immigration and Customs Enforcement to run the Aurora Contract Detention Facility, has a history of coercing immigrant detainees into cleaning common areas under the threat of solitary confinement, newly unsealed documents reveal. The documents are photocopies of disciplinary reports from 2009, 2011 and 2014 that show Aurora ICE detainees being placed in solitary confinement for refusing to clean common areas. They're part of a class-action suit filed in the U.S District Court of Colorado in 2014 by a group of Aurora ICE detainees that alleged GEO significantly underpays detainees for work, and even coerces them into working for free at the Aurora facility. In court proceedings, GEO Group has insisted that its policies and practices are on the up-and-up, and that it hasn't violated any laws or ICE detention protocol through its voluntary work programs and cleaning requirements for detainees.Related Stories...
    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — In a rare release of grand jury proceedings, hours of material are now public in the Breonna Taylor case in Kentucky. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Three things to keep an eye on from the New York Jets’ scrimmage at MetLife By: Geoff Magliocchetti August 31, 2020 ShareTweet0 SharesThe New York Jets descended upon East Rutherford for the first time in 2020. There are several storylines that warrant attention. It had been just over eight months since the New York Jets made the Sunday drive down Route 3 to MetLife Stadium. It’ll be even longer before fans accompany them with the stadium’s seats left empty due to COVID-19 regulations. The Jets certainly looked different when they took to the turf at East Rutherford on Sunday, with several starters missing from their last descent against Pittsburgh on December 22. A training camp scrimmage was the Jets’ first on-field action in what will certainly be the most unusual season in recent memory. The official home slate gets underway on September 20,...
    Starting at 12PM ET on Wednesday, July 29th, the leaders of the tech industry are appearing before a congressional subcommittee to defend their business practices. Much of the run-up to the hearing has been centered on the unprecedented guest list, which includes CEOs from Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google. It will be the first time some of the men have appeared in front of Congress and by far the most significant hearing since the antitrust against Microsoft in the late ‘90s. The House Judiciary live-streams proceedings from the committee’s official YouTube page, so we expect a link to be posted there shortly before the hearing begins. Once the stream is available, we will update this post to include a direct link and an embed so that the hearing can be viewed from this page. The hearing will center on testimony from four CEOs: Apple’s Tim Cook, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, Facebook’s...
    The Covid-19 crisis closed local, state, and federal courtrooms, put trials on hold, and delayed justice. Now courts are evaluating how to resume operations in a world where social distancing and limited contact are the new norm. The reopening process is not just vital for our constitutional rights, but necessary to begin to address stark racial disparities that have become all the more apparent through the pandemic and recent reckoning on police violence and systemic inequities. Before courts return to “business as usual,” it’s important to remember that the system in place before the pandemic was in many ways inequitable, inefficient, and in serious need of a 21st century upgrade. Failure of technological imagination is no longer an excuse. WIRED OPINIONABOUTLucy Lang (@LucyLangNYC) is the Director of the Institute for Innovation in Prosecution and a former Assistant District Attorney in Manhattan, where she investigated and prosecuted domestic violence and homicides....
    By DAVID A. LIEB, Associated Press After her son was arrested for allegedly throwing rocks at police during a protest over racial injustice, Tanisha Brown headed to the courthouse in her California hometown to watch her son's arraignment. She was turned away, told the courthouse was closed to the public because of coronavirus precautions. A day later, the Kern County Superior Court in Bakersfield posted a notice on its website explaining how the public could request special permission from judicial officers to attend court proceedings. But problems with public access have persisted, according to a federal lawsuit filed Friday on behalf of Brown and several others who have been unable to watch court sessions. The situation in Kern County highlights the challenges courts across the U.S. are facing as they try to balance public health protections with public access to their proceedings amid the COVID-19 outbreak. The U.S. Constitution guarantees...
    After her son was arrested for allegedly throwing rocks at police during a protest over racial injustice, Tanisha Brown headed to the courthouse in her California hometown to watch her son’s arraignment. She was turned away, told the courthouse was closed to the public because of coronavirus precautions. A day later, the Kern County Superior Court in Bakersfield posted a notice on its website explaining how the public could request special permission from judicial officers to attend court proceedings. But problems with public access have persisted, according to a federal lawsuit filed Friday on behalf of Brown and several others who have been unable to watch court sessions. The situation in Kern County highlights the challenges courts across the U.S. are facing as they try to balance public health protections with public access to their proceedings amid the COVID-19 outbreak. The U.S. Constitution guarantees the right to...
    ALAMEDA, Calif. (KGO) -- Courtroom dramas change, but the courts themselves rarely do. The courts worked pretty much the same during the Patty Hearst trial in 1975 as they did during the OJ Simpson Trial in 1995, and how they were still operating this year... right up until the pandemic struck.Jack Newton is CEO of Clio, a legal software company. "We're seeing, what I describe as, 5 or 10 years of change in the legal profession happen in 5 or 10 months," Newton says.Sweeping changes in the Alameda County Courts have been shepherded by Presiding Judge Tara Desautels."So right now, we are in fact operating across all case types," she tells me. "What's different is we are doing it remotely."Many work meetings are going online during the pandemic -- maybe you have participated on Zoom calls yourself -- and now courts are too."It is a huge change. It is a...
    The Associated Press writes: “A Minnesota judge on Friday rejected allowing cameras in the court for pretrial proceedings of four former Minneapolis police officers charged in the death of George Floyd. News media organizations as well as defense attorneys had requested the audio and visual recordings. But Hennepin County District Judge Peter Cahill rejected the request, noting the prosecution had objected.” KSTP-TV’s Tom Hauser reports: “President Donald Trump continues to struggle convincing Minnesotans he’s handling the coronavirus pandemic effectively, while Minnesota Governor Tim Walz saw his coronavirus approval rating drop but still maintains majority support. … According to the poll of 1,500 Minnesotans conducted from June 12 to June 15, 34% of Minnesotans approve of President Trump’s handling of the coronavirus. … The survey shows the governor with a 64% approval rating among Minnesotans, down from 82% in May.” For the Star Tribune, Tim Harlow writes: “The Minneapolis City Council...
    Associated Press FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — A lawsuit says Kern County Superior Court is unlawfully denying the public's access to court proceedings despite resuming jury trials as the county began reopening for business. The American Civil Liberties Union and the First Amendment Coalition filed the federal lawsuit Friday on behalf of four women who said they were turned away when they tried to attend their son's court hearings and weren't given options to see or hear the proceedings by video or phone. A fifth plaintiff, who heads the ACLU of Southern California’s watchdog program for the Kern County court system, said they were also denied access to multiple court hearings. Kristin Davis, a spokeswoman for the court system, said she couldn't comment on pending litigation and referred to the court's website, which said the public can ask a judicial officer for permission to attend proceedings as long as they wear...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A Minnesota judge on Friday rejected allowing cameras in the court for pretrial proceedings of four former Minneapolis police officers charged in the death of George Floyd. News media organizations as well as defense attorneys had requested the audio and visual recordings. But Hennepin County District Judge Peter Cahill rejected the request, noting the prosecution had objected. Minnesota rules allow the judge, prosecutors or defense attorneys to veto camera coverage during criminal court proceedings before a conviction. The judge will rule later on whether cameras will be allowed at trial. A defense attorney filed a motion Thursday on behalf of the ex-officers to allow recording of all pretrial and trial proceedings. The motion argues that the recordings are necessary to guarantee the officers get a fair trial in light of what the defense calls “multiple and inappropriate public comments” by prosecutors and other officials. ...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The four former Minneapolis police officers charged in the killing of George Floyd have requested news cameras and microphones be allowed to cover their pre-trial and trial proceedings. In a motion filed Thursday, the attorneys for Derek Chauvin, J. Alexander Kueng, Tou Thao and Thomas Lane say the accused officers have requested and consented to video and audio coverage of the trial proceedings, regardless of objections from the prosecution. The motion argues that coverage of the proceedings is necessary to provided the former officers with a fair trial due to “inappropriate” comments from public officials and in light of the health demands of the on-going COVID-19 pandemic.
    The Supreme Court ruled in a 7-to-2 decision on Thursday that the Trump administration could expedite deportation proceedings for certain asylum-seekers without introducing asylum cases to the federal courts. The ruling applies to asylum-seekers who are picked up near the border and fail their initial screenings, making them eligible for expedited deportation, the Associated Press reported. The decision affirmed that the government can deport people who lack a credible asylum case without an immigration court ruling. A typical asylum case does not mandate judicial review of the “credible fear” determination under the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act. Asylum applicants must first demonstrate a credible fear of persecution in order to pass screenings. Central Americans migrants travel to the U.S. border to claim asylum (David McNew/Getty Images) In the 2017 case of Department of Homeland Security v. Thuraissigiam, authorities determined that Sri Lankan national Vijayakumar Thuraissigiam did not demonstrate...
    Court transcripts show that McClatchy, the now-bankrupt newspaper chain, mischaracterized proceedings in a lawsuit that Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA) has brought against social media giant Twitter. The headline and framing of an article from the correspondent for the newspaper who covers Nunes and Congress implies that his lawsuit is running into significant hurdles, but transcripts of the proceedings demonstrate that in reality Nunes’ lawyer is simply seeking court action to compel the social media company to cooperate with discovery efforts. A June 12 piece from McClatchy’s Kate Irby was headlined: “Devin Nunes’ attorney says he’s at ‘dead end’ in quest to reveal identity of Twitter cow.” The opening paragraphs of the article make it appear as though Steven Biss—the lawyer for Nunes, who is suing Twitter over various fake accounts created to attack him—is in trouble in the lawsuit in court and not getting anywhere. Irby wrote: The attorney for...
    House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff suggested on Sunday that former national security adviser John Bolton may soon testify before his panel – and that a fresh new round of impeachment proceedings may result from the memoir. Schiff, D-Calif., made the remarks as Bolton, appearing on a separate talk show, charged that the Schiff-lead impeachment proceedings earlier this year were "too politicized" to bother with. The back-and-forth came days after a federal judge determined that Bolton's decision to publish his upcoming tell-all memoir on the Trump administration had "exposed his country to harm and himself to civil (and potentially criminal) liability," and that Bolton had "likely jeopardized national security by disclosing classified information in violation of his nondisclosure agreement obligations.” FOX NEWS OBTAINS BOLTON'S BOOK -- HERE'S THE HIGHLIGHTS Schiff said on NBC News' "Meet the Press" that although he hasn't read Bolton's book, "The Room Where It Happened," his committee would...
    The Michael Flynn case is playing out like a film noir: We know the crime and that the criminal will get away from the start, and we’re watching to find out how things ended up there.  If Bill Barr’s Justice Department can’t convince a panel of judges to force Flynn’s trial judge, Emmet Sullivan, to let Flynn withdraw the guilty plea he’d already submitted, and that Sullivan has accepted, Trump will just pardon his former National Security Adviser. One way or the other, Flynn is getting off the hook.  The question is whether or not Barr’s crew will have to explain why they’re letting an admittedly guilty man walk. 
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