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    LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — A Nebraska City woman and lifelong Republican who unsuccessfully ran for the Nebraska Legislature is suing her own party, claiming the Nebraska GOP defamed her in ads and robocalls it sponsored to help her rival. Janet Palmtag’s lawsuit accuses the Nebraska Republican Party of knowingly lying in campaign ads that said she had broken the law and lost her real estate license, the Omaha World-Herald reported. The party’s campaign efforts in the race were intended to help state Sen. Julie Slama of Peru, who in November won the seat in the officially nonpartisan Legislature. The bitter race exposed a divide in the state GOP, as Slama was backed by Gov. Pete Ricketts, who appointed her to the seat in 2019, while Palmtag was endorsed by former Republican Gov. Dave Heineman. In October, the Nebraska Public Service Commission found that the Nebraska Republican Party and a political...
    ROSWELL, N.M. (AP) — The Republican Party of New Mexico has called on a state representative who disaffiliated with the party to resign. State Rep. Phelps Anderson earlier this month left the Republican Party after voting in favor of a Democratic-backed abortion bill. Anderson, who represents portions of the Chaves, Lea and Roosevelt counties, sided with seven Democrats in repealing a 1969 abortion law that bans and criminalizes the procedure. He then changed his party voter registration to “decline to state.” The executive board of the state GOP voted unanimously on Tuesday to request Anderson's resignation. “Rep. Anderson should step down immediately," said Steve Pearce, the chairman of the Republican Party of New Mexico, in a statement. "He has betrayed the people of his district. He ran as a Republican and he’s chosen to leave those who had trusted him to represent them in Santa Fe." Anderson declined to comment...
    The House GOP’s campaign arm rolled out new members of its leadership team heading into the 2022 midterms as it looks to take back the lower chamber. The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) announced Tuesday that Reps. Ken CalvertKenneth (Ken) Stanton CalvertMORE (Calif.), Jodey ArringtonJodey Cook ArringtonK Street navigates virtual inauguration week READ: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results Hillicon Valley: House votes to condemn QAnon | Americans worried about foreign election interference | DHS confirms request to tap protester phones MORE (Texas) and Buddy CarterEarl (Buddy) Leroy CarterGeorgia elections chief refutes election claims in letter to Congress Trump Georgia call divides House GOP Bipartisan lawmakers call for overhauling medical supply chains MORE (Ga.) will serve as deputy chairs behind Rep. Tom EmmerThomas (Tom) Earl EmmerMinnesota Republican gets stuck upside down in the middle of virtual committee hearing House Republican campaign arm rolls out target list for midterms...
    Republican Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley claimed Thursday that former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment was an attempt to delegitimize half the country. Hawley told Fox News anchor Harris Faulkner that he viewed the proceedings as unconstitutional, referring to the process more than once as a “kangaroo court.” (RELATED: Joe Scarborough Flames Josh Hawley: Other Than Trump, He’s ‘Most Responsible For The Cop Killing’) WATCH: Faulkner began the segment with a clip of ABC’s Terry Moran, who argued that Trump had personalized the Republican Party like “a caesar … a fuhrer.” “Is the Republican Party belonging solely to Donald Trump, Senator Hawley?” Faulkner asked. “No, that’s absurd,” Hawley replied, saying that the party belonged to the voters and all elected Republicans remained accountable to them alone. “That’s who I’m accountable to. I’ve taken an oath to uphold the Constitution and serve the people of my state.” Hawley went on...
    The New York Times ‘Your Own Private Army’: How the Republican Party Allied With Militias LANSING, Michigan – Last April, dozens of heavily armed militia members crowded the Michigan Capitol to protest a stay-at-home order declared by the Democratic governor to contain the pandemic. Chanting and stomping, they stopped legislative work, tried to force their way into the room, and brandished their rifles from the gallery at the legislators below. At first, Republican leaders had some doubts about their new allies. “The perception was not good. Next time tell them not to bring guns, ”complained Mike Shirkey, the majority leader in the state Senate, according to one of the protest organizers. However, Michigan’s highest-ranking Republican came to his senses after organizers threatened to return with guns and “militiamen to sign autographs and hand AR-15 rifles to the boys on the Capitol lawn.” “In his favor,” wrote Jason Howland, the organizer...
    As the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump rages on with compelling presentations from Democrats asserting he incited rioters to storm the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, the case for conviction has rapidly become less about the former president than the Republican Party right now.  According to a new Reuters report, dozens of Republicans met recently to discuss breaking away from the GOP to form a “center-right breakaway party” in direct opposition to Trump. According to report from Reuters, dozens of Republicans met on Zoom recently to discuss breaking away from the GOP to form a “center-right breakaway party” in direct opposition to former President Donald Trump. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) The report notes that more than 120 people participated in a Zoom call that included former elected Republicans, former officials from past administrations and even an assortment of ex-ambassadors and Republican strategists.  The group is said to be planning to run...
    Dozens of former Republican officials, who view the party as unwilling to stand up to former President Donald Trump and his attempts to undermine U.S. democracy, are in talks to form a center-right breakaway party, four people involved in the discussions told Reuters. The early-stage discussions include former elected Republicans, former officials in the Republican administrations of Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush and Trump, ex-Republican ambassadors and Republican strategists, the people involved say. More than 120 of them held a Zoom call Friday to discuss the breakaway group, which would run on a platform of "principled conservatism," including adherence to the Constitution and the rule of law -- ideas those involved say have been trashed by Trump. The plan would be to run candidates in some races but also to endorse center-right candidates in others, be they Republicans, independents or Democrats, the people say. Evan McMullin, who...
    The Republican Party of East Baton Rouge, Louisiana, condemned GOP Sen. Bill Cassidy for his vote affirming that the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump is constitutional. The party, in a move it said is historic, unanimously voted to censure Cassidy on Wednesday, arguing that his vote was “a betrayal of the people of Louisiana and a rebuke to those who supported President Trump and him.” The “extraordinary” vote “is a tribute to the wisdom and many great accomplishments” of the former commander in chief, the resolution stated. The censure resolution rebuked the impeachment efforts at-large, arguing that the charges against the former president are “completely false, malicious, and without merit,” before calling it a “sham and a cruel hoax on the American people and attempt to perpetuate and legitimate a lie.” The text of the censure accused Democrats of pushing impeachment to bar Trump from running for...
    (CNN)A group of more than 100 former Republican officials have discussed the possibility of forming a conservative party due to their unhappiness with the direction of the GOP under former President Donald Trump and the likelihood he'll be acquitted at the end of his second impeachment trial, according to Republicans who participated in the conversation.Former Republican House Rep. Charlie Dent confirmed to CNN that he and about 120 Republicans held a conversation last Friday about whether to form a new party or a new faction within the Republican Party that would operate independently from the GOP."Clearly, there are a number of Republicans like myself and other Republican leaders, who want a clean break from President Trump, and we are kind of rallying around some core founding principles like truth and honesty, and democracy, and rule of law," the former Pennsylvania congressman, who is a CNN contributor, told CNN's Chris Cuomo...
    A group described by Reuters as “former Republican officials,” numbering as many as “dozens,” is reportedly seeking to form a new, “center-right” alternative to the current Republican Party — one without the influence of Donald Trump. Reuters reported Wednesday: Dozens of former Republican officials, who view the party as unwilling to stand up to former President Donald Trump and his attempts to undermine U.S. democracy, are in talks to form a center-right breakaway party, four people involved in the discussions told Reuters. The early stage discussions include former elected Republicans, former officials in the Republican administrations of Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush and Trump, ex-Republican ambassadors and Republican strategists, the people involved say. More than 120 of them held a Zoom call last Friday to discuss the breakaway group, which would run on a platform of “principled conservatism,” including adherence to the Constitution and the rule of...
    Dozens of former Republican officials, who view the party as unwilling to stand up to former President Donald Trump and his attempts to undermine U.S. democracy, are in talks to form a center-right breakaway party, four people involved in the discussions told Reuters. The early-stage discussions include former elected Republicans, former officials in the Republican administrations of Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush and Trump, ex-Republican ambassadors and Republican strategists, the people involved say. More than 120 of them held a Zoom call Friday to discuss the breakaway group, which would run on a platform of "principled conservatism," including adherence to the Constitution and the rule of law -- ideas those involved say have been trashed by Trump. The plan would be to run candidates in some races but also to endorse center-right candidates in others, be they Republicans, independents or Democrats, the people say. Evan McMullin, who...
    The New York Times ‘Your Own Private Army’: How the Republican Party Allied With Militias LANSING, Michigan – Last April, dozens of heavily armed militia members crowded the Michigan Capitol to protest a stay-at-home order declared by the Democratic governor to contain the pandemic. Chanting and stomping, they stopped legislative work, tried to force their way into the room, and brandished their rifles from the gallery at the legislators below. At first, Republican leaders had some doubts about their new allies. “The perception was not good. Next time tell them not to bring guns, ”complained Mike Shirkey, the majority leader in the state Senate, according to one of the protest organizers. However, Michigan’s highest-ranking Republican came to his senses after organizers threatened to return with guns and “militiamen to sign autographs and hand AR-15 rifles to the boys on the Capitol lawn.” “In his favor,” wrote Jason Howland, the organizer...
    The New York Times ‘Your Own Private Army’: How the Republican Party Allied With Militias LANSING, Michigan – Last April, dozens of heavily armed militia members crowded the Michigan Capitol to protest a stay-at-home order declared by the Democratic governor to contain the pandemic. Chanting and stomping, they stopped legislative work, tried to force their way into the room, and brandished their rifles from the gallery at the legislators below. At first, Republican leaders had some doubts about their new allies. “The perception was not good. Next time tell them not to bring guns, ”complained Mike Shirkey, the majority leader in the state Senate, according to one of the protest organizers. However, Michigan’s highest-ranking Republican came to his senses after organizers threatened to return with guns and “militiamen to sign autographs and hand AR-15 rifles to the boys on the Capitol lawn.” “In his favor,” wrote Jason Howland, the organizer...
    The New York Times ‘Your Own Private Army’: How the Republican Party Allied With Militias LANSING, Michigan – Last April, dozens of heavily armed militia members crowded the Michigan Capitol to protest a stay-at-home order declared by the Democratic governor to contain the pandemic. Chanting and stomping, they stopped legislative work, tried to force their way into the room, and brandished their rifles from the gallery at the legislators below. At first, Republican leaders had some doubts about their new allies. “The perception was not good. Next time tell them not to bring guns, ”complained Mike Shirkey, the majority leader in the state Senate, according to one of the protest organizers. However, Michigan’s highest-ranking Republican came to his senses after organizers threatened to return with guns and “militiamen to sign autographs and hand AR-15 rifles to the boys on the Capitol lawn.” “In his favor,” wrote Jason Howland, the organizer...
    The New York Times ‘Your Own Private Army’: How the Republican Party Allied With Militias LANSING, Michigan – Last April, dozens of heavily armed militia members crowded the Michigan Capitol to protest a stay-at-home order declared by the Democratic governor to contain the pandemic. Chanting and stomping, they stopped legislative work, tried to force their way into the room, and brandished their rifles from the gallery at the legislators below. At first, Republican leaders had some doubts about their new allies. “The perception was not good. Next time tell them not to bring guns, ”complained Mike Shirkey, the majority leader in the state Senate, according to one of the protest organizers. However, Michigan’s highest-ranking Republican came to his senses after organizers threatened to return with guns and “militiamen to sign autographs and hand AR-15 rifles to the boys on the Capitol lawn.” “In his favor,” wrote Jason Howland, the organizer...
    "I don't even wait. And when you're a star, they let you do it. You can do anything,” Donald Trump said in the infamous Access Hollywood tape that caught him bragging about grabbing women by the private parts. He was right. Republicans made him the figurehead of their party and, one month after that tape emerged, he was elected president. In 2021, he’s finally out of the White House but it turns out that “anything” also includes inciting a violent insurrection that left five people dead in a failed attempt to cancel a democratic election and keep himself in power. In spite of the harrowing, explicit, and convincing evidence presented by their Democratic colleagues, a majority of Republican lawmakers still seem certain to acquit Trump for inspiring an insurrection. Which is no surprise, given how the actions of the alleged party of law and order over the past five years...
    The historic trial will resume at noon in the same hemicycle where pro-Trump protesters were violently engulfed on January 6. Police officers screaming in pain, terrified elected officials, threatening assailants: mixing snippets from a surveillance camera, sometimes unpublished, with videos posted by the rioters, the prosecution reminded the hundred senators on Wednesday, both judges and jurors and witnesses, that they themselves had narrowly escaped “the worst”. The elected Democrats of the House of Representatives, responsible for bringing the charge against the former president, also placed the assault in the context of the post-election crusade of the Republican billionaire, who has always refused to concede his defeat to Joe Biden. “President Trump was not an innocent witness to an accident,” as his lawyers suggest, but he “gave up his role as commander-in-chief to become the chief instigator of a dangerous insurgency, “said Jamie Raskin, who oversees the team of prosecutors....
    Dozens of former Republican officials, who view the party as unwilling to stand up to former President Donald Trump and his attempts to undermine U.S. democracy, are in talks to form a center-right breakaway party, four people involved in the discussions told Reuters. The early-stage discussions include former elected Republicans, former officials in the Republican administrations of Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush and Trump, ex-Republican ambassadors and Republican strategists, the people involved say. More than 120 of them held a Zoom call Friday to discuss the breakaway group, which would run on a platform of "principled conservatism," including adherence to the Constitution and the rule of law -- ideas those involved say have been trashed by Trump. The plan would be to run candidates in some races but also to endorse center-right candidates in others, be they Republicans, independents or Democrats, the people say. Evan McMullin, who...
              Senator Amanda Chase (R-Chesterfield), who is running for the GOP gubernatorial nomination, announced Tuesday that she is suing the Republican Party of Virginia (RPV). Chase has been critical of the RPV decision to hold a nominating convention since the decision was first announced in December. Now, after months of fractious debate in the RPV over that decision, Chase is suing, arguing that she is harmed by the RPV choosing a nominating method currently illegal under Executive Order 72, which bans large gatherings like an in-person convention. In her announcement, Chase said, “How will Republicans win in November if candidates don’t even know the details of the nomination process? Clearly, many welcome the standoff. It means they, members of the SCC will choose the Republican nominees; and apparently, they’re okay with that. I am not; and neither should you [be].” Chase is being represented...
    MORE than 120 anti-Donald Trump Republicans are considering forming a breakaway party, as the former president has branded them "losers." The group consists of former Republican officials who are discouraged by the party's loyalty to Trump and have started talks about a possible center-right breakaway party. 4A group of Republicans are reportedly concerned about the party's loyalty to TrumpCredit: Reuters 4Evan McMullin said that he hosted the Zoom call where the group discussed a potential third partyCredit: Getty Images - Getty The group held a Zoom call last Friday to hold some early-stage discussions, according to Reuters. Among potential members are former elected Republicans as well as officials who served in the administrations of GOP leaders Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush and Trump, the report said. Evan McMullin, who was a chief policy director of the House Republican Conference, said that he hosted the Zoom call, and...
    Famed Watergate journalist Carl Bernstein lashed out at the Republican Party as complicit in aiding and abetting former President Donald Trump in sedition and undermining “the very basis of our democracy.” Appearing on Cuomo Prime Time after second day of Trump’s Senate trial for inciting insurrection, which featured chilling new video evidence, the former Washington Post journalist and author made clear he thought the 45th president’s misconduct far exceeded  that of Richard Nixon’s. “People always draw the comparison, Carl. Nixon, this is like Nixon,” host Chris Cuomo noted. “You were there. You are here. What’s the feel in contrast?” “This is unprecedented. This is a seditious president of the United States who has undermined the very basis of our democracy, who does not care about loss of life,” Bernstein said, before invoking the word “evil” three times in describing Trump. “It’s the same president who is negligent in homicidal terms because of his handling of the Covid situation and not handling...
    A contingent of former Republican officials are in talks to form a political party that would break away from supporters of former President TrumpDonald TrumpSchoen says Trump team will be 'very well prepared' after criticism Iowa Republicans seek to cut funding for schools with 1619 Project in curriculum Capitol rioter seen smoking in Rotunda arrested MORE, Reuters reported on Wednesday. More than 120 people were on a call on the matter on Friday, including former government employees who worked under the Trump administration, the Reagan administration and both Bush White House's as well as former GOP members of Congress. Evan McMullin, former chief policy director for the House Republican Conference, told Reuters that he co-hosted the call with former officials who fear a large faction of the party is unwilling to stand up to Trump. “Large portions of the Republican Party are radicalizing and threatening American democracy,” McMullin told Reuters. “The party...
    By Tim Reid (Reuters) - Dozens of former Republican officials, who view the party as unwilling to stand up to former President Donald Trump and his attempts to undermine U.S. democracy, are in talks to form a center-right breakaway party, four people involved in the discussions told Reuters. The early stage discussions include former elected Republicans, former officials in the Republican administrations of Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush and Trump, ex-Republican ambassadors and Republican strategists, the people involved say.     More than 120 of them held a Zoom call last Friday to discuss the breakaway group, which would run on a platform of "principled conservatism," including adherence to the Constitution and the rule of law - ideas those involved say have been trashed by Trump. The plan would be to run candidates in some races but also to endorse center-right candidates in others, be they Republicans, independents...
    ABC reporter Terry Moran said Wednesday that former President Donald Trump “has the Republican Party as a personalized power” and that it’s as if he is a “caesar” or “fuhrer” to the party. Moran joined ABC’s special coverage of Trump’s impeachment trial and was introduced by host George Stephanopoulos to give his analysis on the House impeachment managers’ Wednesday arguments. (RELATED: ‘Trump Will Be Acquitted’: Former Impeachment Attorney Says ‘There Is A Substantial Defense’ To Be Presented) “Whatever you think of this case, they’ve risen to the moment. This is an atrocity in our history, an atrocity against our democracy, and the care with which the Democratic House managers of this impeachment trial have come prepared, their argument is organized,” Moran said. “They’re ringing the notes of patriotism and the emotion of the attack itself, and surrounding that with what they hope is an evidentiary trail from Donald...
    The New York Times ‘Your Own Private Army’: How the Republican Party Allied With Militias LANSING, Michigan – Last April, dozens of heavily armed militia members crowded the Michigan Capitol to protest a stay-at-home order declared by the Democratic governor to contain the pandemic. Chanting and stomping, they stopped legislative work, tried to force their way into the room, and brandished their rifles from the gallery at the legislators below. At first, Republican leaders had some doubts about their new allies. “The perception was not good. Next time tell them not to bring guns, ”complained Mike Shirkey, the majority leader in the state Senate, according to one of the protest organizers. However, Michigan’s highest-ranking Republican came to his senses after organizers threatened to return with guns and “militiamen to sign autographs and hand AR-15 rifles to the boys on the Capitol lawn.” “In his favor,” wrote Jason Howland, the organizer...
    House Republicans launched a plan to retake the House majority in 2022 by targeting 47 districts with vulnerable Democrats. The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) noted in a memo that the Republican Party is only five seats away from having a majority in the House of Representatives, and said the Republican Party can be competitive in four dozen districts. « We are just a few weeks away from the Biden administration and Americans are already seeing the job-destroying initiatives supported by House Democrats, » NRCC Chairman Tom Emmer said in a statement. “We will hold the House Democrats ruthlessly accountable for their socialist agenda and make sure voters understand policies with damaging impact like cutting off police funds, government-run healthcare, and ending the Keystone XL pipeline. they will have in the daily lives of Americans. «  Emmer noted that in the House, the Republican Party is « only five seats away from the...
    House Republicans have laid out their path to winning back the chamber they came close to flipping in 2020. They plan to rely on a similar playbook: slamming the Democrats as socialists who will implement "job killing policies," while at the same time downplaying any divisions within the GOP. Since President Biden has taken office, the National Republican Congressional Committee has honed in on the impacts of closing the Keystone XL pipeline and delays in reopening schools. "It's going to come down to two different agendas: one is about freedom— one is about having the right to self-determine your economic freedom, your individual liberties. The other one is about big government," National Republican Congressional Committee chair Tom Emmer said in a call with reporters on Wednesday.  "Every voter is going to have a clear understanding of the Democrats' socialist agenda and the damaging impact it's going to have on their...
    The New York Times ‘Your Own Private Army’: How the Republican Party Allied With Militias LANSING, Michigan – Last April, dozens of heavily armed militia members crowded the Michigan Capitol to protest a stay-at-home order declared by the Democratic governor to contain the pandemic. Chanting and stomping, they stopped legislative work, tried to force their way into the room, and brandished their rifles from the gallery at the legislators below. At first, Republican leaders had some doubts about their new allies. “The perception was not good. Next time tell them not to bring guns, ”complained Mike Shirkey, the majority leader in the state Senate, according to one of the protest organizers. However, Michigan’s highest-ranking Republican came to his senses after organizers threatened to return with guns and “militiamen to sign autographs and hand AR-15 rifles to the boys on the Capitol lawn.” “In his favor,” wrote Jason Howland, the organizer...
    The New York Times ‘Your Own Private Army’: How the Republican Party Allied With Militias LANSING, Michigan – Last April, dozens of heavily armed militia members crowded the Michigan Capitol to protest a stay-at-home order declared by the Democratic governor to contain the pandemic. Chanting and stomping, they stopped legislative work, tried to force their way into the room, and brandished their rifles from the gallery at the legislators below. At first, Republican leaders had some doubts about their new allies. “The perception was not good. Next time tell them not to bring guns, ”complained Mike Shirkey, the majority leader in the state Senate, according to one of the protest organizers. However, Michigan’s highest-ranking Republican came to his senses after organizers threatened to return with guns and “militiamen to sign autographs and hand AR-15 rifles to the boys on the Capitol lawn.” “In his favor,” wrote Jason Howland, the organizer...
    Over 33,000 registered voters left the California Republican Party in January, a stunning number underscoring the diminishing sway of the GOP in the Golden State. Statistics from the California secretary of state’s office reported first by The New York Times show the exodus from the California GOP, which appears to have accelerated after the Jan. 6 riot on Capitol Hill. Just over a thousand voters left the GOP on Jan. 5, while 3,243 left on Jan. 7. The shift underscores the California Republican Party’s dwindling strength in California, which has emerged as among the bluest states in the country. Republicans still had a foothold in the state in the 2000s, with several members of the GOP in the congressional delegation and Arnold Schwarzenegger serving two terms as governor from 2003-2011. However, the GOP’s power in the state has since diminished, with Democrats now holding the governor’s mansions and supermajorities in both...
    Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate and state senator Amanda Chase announced on Feb. 10 that she would be suing the state Republican Party over its refusal to hold a primary election. The Virginia Republican Party announced on Dec. 5, 2020 that it would hold a convention to choose the Party’s nominee for governor, according to the Virginia Dogwood. The Party prefers to hold nominating conventions to prevent Democrats from voting for the Republican candidate, due to the fact that Virginia holds open primaries. Chase claimed in a tweet that the Republican Party chose “an illegal nomination method and have yet to remedy the situation.” It’s official; I just filed a lawsuit against the Republican Party of Virginia. They’ve chosen an illegal nomination method and have yet to remedy the situation. Unless something changes;the SCC not the people will chose our statewide candidates. We the People know best. — Senator Amanda Chase...
    Americans' views of the Republican Party have taken a serious hit ever since the November election and the party's repeated efforts to overturn the election results, according to new polling from Gallup.  Just 37% of adults say they have a favorable view of the party, a precipitous 7-point slide in just a few months from the 43% who viewed it positively in November. In the same period, the Democratic Party gained a few points in favorability, with 48% of respondents now viewing it favorably. That gives Democrats what Gallup calls a "rare double-digit advantage in favorability." But what is perhaps most striking is where the GOP is bleeding support from—their own ranks. "Since November, the GOP's image has suffered the most among Republican Party identifiers, from 90% favorable to 78%. Independents' and Democrats' opinions are essentially unchanged," writes Gallup. That image problem isn't merely theoretical; it has already resulted in tens...
    /AP Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.Bruce Castor ambled and rambled through an opening argument that at times was close to incomprehensible. Only the writers for Saturday Night Live could have found it useful. David Schoen angrily yelled about partisanship to make a highly partisan argument against impeachment. Then he read a 1849 allegorical Longfellow poem about a brave nation surviving stormy seas—though that work’s calls for the country to “prevail o’er angry wave and gust” could well justify the proceedings at hand. Donald Trump’s lawyers offered a weak and ineffective case on the opening day of his second impeachment trial, as the two sides jousted over the constitutionality of holding an impeachment trial for a president who was no longer in office. The feebleness of the bumbling Trump team’s argument was...
    The House GOP’s campaign arm on Wednesday rolled out its target list for the 2022 midterms as the party works to retake the lower chamber in two years. The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) in a new memo outlined 47 Democrat-held seats it views as pickup opportunities in the next election. The party only needs five flips to retake the chamber after a successful 2020 cycle, during which it captured 15 seats despite expectations they could lose as many as 15 members. “House Republicans start the cycle just five seats short of a majority and are prepared to build on our 2020 successes to deliver a lasting Republican majority in the House. We will stay laser-focused on recruiting talented and diverse candidates, aggressively highlighting Democrats’ socialist agenda and raising enough resources to win,” NRCC Chair Rep. Tom EmmerThomas (Tom) Earl EmmerCongress has only begun its study of financial technologies Claudia Tenney...
    The New York Times ‘Your Own Private Army’: How the Republican Party Allied With Militias LANSING, Michigan – Last April, dozens of heavily armed militia members crowded the Michigan Capitol to protest a stay-at-home order declared by the Democratic governor to contain the pandemic. Chanting and stomping, they stopped legislative work, tried to force their way into the room, and brandished their rifles from the gallery at the legislators below. At first, Republican leaders had some doubts about their new allies. “The perception was not good. Next time tell them not to bring guns, ”complained Mike Shirkey, the majority leader in the state Senate, according to one of the protest organizers. However, Michigan’s highest-ranking Republican came to his senses after organizers threatened to return with guns and “militiamen to sign autographs and hand AR-15 rifles to the boys on the Capitol lawn.” “In his favor,” wrote Jason Howland, the organizer...
    Council on Foreign Relations President Richard Haass on Wednesday announced that he has officially left the Republican Party, invoking a version of former President Reagan’s famous quote: “I didn’t leave the Republican Party; the Party left me.” Haass, a veteran diplomat who worked under multiple presidential administrations, tweeted Wednesday that he had changed his voter registration to "no party affiliation" after 40 years as a member of the Republican Party.  “I worked for Reagan & Bush 41 & 43. But today’s Rep Party no longer embraces the policies & principles that led me to join it,” Haass wrote.  “To paraphrase Ronald Reagan, I didn’t leave the Republican Party; the Party left me,” he added, referencing the reasoning Reagan gave after switching from the Democratic to Republican Party in 1962.  I changed my registration to "no party affiliation" after 40 years. I worked for Reagan & Bush 41 & 43. But today’s...
    Republican Party slams GOP senator for doing his job on impeachment
    Nearly 140,000 voters left the Republican Party in 25 states in January, according to an analysis of public records obtained by The Hill.  Some of the steepest drops in Republican Party affiliation were seen in California, where over 33,000 registered voters left the GOP; Pennsylvania, where over 12,000 voters defected; and Arizona, where more than 10,000 Republicans changed their voter registration. And while California has morphed into a reliably blue state, Pennsylvania and Arizona are key battlegrounds where Republicans need support.  About 79,000 Democrats also left their party in January, according to public records. The New York Times was the first to report on the figures. The numbers do not give a full picture of changes across the country given that not every state has voter registration by party or releases their statistics. Shifts in voter registration are common after presidential elections, but the swing away from the Republican Party is particularly...
    The New York Times ‘Your Own Private Army’: How the Republican Party Allied With Militias LANSING, Michigan – Last April, dozens of heavily armed militia members crowded the Michigan Capitol to protest a stay-at-home order declared by the Democratic governor to contain the pandemic. Chanting and stomping, they stopped legislative work, tried to force their way into the room, and brandished their rifles from the gallery at the legislators below. At first, Republican leaders had some doubts about their new allies. “The perception was not good. Next time tell them not to bring guns, ”complained Mike Shirkey, the majority leader in the state Senate, according to one of the protest organizers. However, Michigan’s highest-ranking Republican came to his senses after organizers threatened to return with guns and “militiamen to sign autographs and hand AR-15 rifles to the boys on the Capitol lawn.” “In his favor,” wrote Jason Howland, the organizer...
    The Georgia Republican Party’s Election Confidence Task Force, appointed by State Chairman David Shafer and led by Atlanta attorney Brad Carver, has released its reported recommendations with the unanimous approval of the State Executive Committee. Among the proposals in the report: Requiring photo ID verification for all absentee ballot applications and ballots, ending the legally compromised system of signature verification, to combat ballot harvesting and absentee ballot fraud. Allowing observers at each step of the process, including ballot verification and duplication, with meaningful access, not the sham access allowed under the Secretary of State’s official election bulletins. Allowing videotaping of all election activity except voters casting their ballots. Eliminating unmanned ballot drop boxes (or, alternatively, mandating a strict chain of custody procedure) to combat supposedly ballot harvesting and absentee ballot fraud. Removing no-excuse absentee by-mail voting, allowing absentee ballots only for voters who...
    Joe Raedle/Newsmakers) Support for the Republican party is tumbling — leading to a sizable favorability gap between the GOP and the Democrats for the first time in nearly a decade. According to a new poll by Gallup, support for the Republican party has dipped sharply since November — down 6 points overall. And the drop is coming almost exclusively from within. Republicans gave their own party a 90 percent favorability rating in November. But that number is now down to 78 percent. The result is that, for the first time since the 2013 government shutdown, there is a double digit split in favorability between the two major parties, according to Gallup. Democrats checked in with a 48 percent approval rating in the survey, giving them an 11 point advantage over the GOP. That number represents a high water mark for the Democrats over the past eight years. ...
    Michigan state Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey (R) on Tuesday issued an apology after he was captured on video suggesting the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol was a hoax. In a statement issued Tuesday, the Michigan senate GOP leader apologized for comments made last week in a meeting with the Hillsdale County Republican Party. “I said some things in a videoed conversation that are not fitting for the role I am privileged to serve. I own that," Shirkey said in the statement. "I have many flaws. Being passionate coupled with an occasional lapse in restraint of tongue are at least two of them. I regret the words I chose, and I apologize for my insensitive comments.” During the informal meeting last week, Shirkey said he didn't believe that the rioters at the Capitol were supporters of then-President TrumpDonald TrumpSchoen says Trump team will be 'very well prepared' after criticism Iowa...
    This week, hosts Markos Moulitsas and Kerry Eleveld talked all things “(im)peach-y,” why Republican senators seem poised to once again protect Trump, and the tasks facing Joe Biden. For this episode, they were joined by political historian Kathleen Frydl, who talked about the potential for a transformative Biden presidency; and Joan McCarter, Daily Kos staff writer, who shared her thoughts on the difficulties the Senate faces with competing priorities thanks to the impeachment and senators’ regular work, as well as on Biden’s first few weeks in office. The big event looming over this whole week is Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial. With Republican senators once again lining up to stymie impeachment and protect Trump from facing real accountability, Markos wondered if they would “go down with this ship,” anticipating a kind of collapse of the Republican Party. Kerry replied: It’s a level of stupidity that, frankly, is jaw-dropping. But on top of that, the betrayal of the...
    The Republican Party's image among American voters has ticked downward since the November election, according to a new poll.  Thirty-seven percent of respondents in the Gallup survey said they now have a favorable view of the party, down from 43 percent in November. Positive views for the Democrats Party, meanwhile, rose to 48 percent during the same time period.  The GOP's decline has mainly been caused by its own members, the poll found. Just 78 percent of voters who identified as Republicans now say they view the party in a positive light, compared to 90 percent in November.  The last time the Republican Party's favorability rating dipped below 40 percent was in January 2019 during a government shutdown amid gridlock in Congress over a government spending bill and funding for former President TrumpDonald TrumpSchoen says Trump team will be 'very well prepared' after criticism Iowa Republicans seek to cut funding for schools with 1619 Project...
    The New York Times ‘Your Own Private Army’: How the Republican Party Allied With Militias LANSING, Michigan – Last April, dozens of heavily armed militia members crowded the Michigan Capitol to protest a stay-at-home order declared by the Democratic governor to contain the pandemic. Chanting and stomping, they stopped legislative work, tried to force their way into the room, and brandished their rifles from the gallery at the legislators below. At first, Republican leaders had some doubts about their new allies. “The perception was not good. Next time tell them not to bring guns, ”complained Mike Shirkey, the majority leader in the state Senate, according to one of the protest organizers. However, Michigan’s highest-ranking Republican came to his senses after organizers threatened to return with guns and “militiamen to sign autographs and hand AR-15 rifles to the boys on the Capitol lawn.” “In his favor,” wrote Jason Howland, the organizer...
    The outcome of former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial is all but certain. He will be, barring a startling development, acquitted on a charge of inciting insurrection. But the proceeding itself will raise a slew of questions about the Republican Party he has led for the last four years. But the evidence laid out by prosecution and defense, details of the actions of Trump supporters during the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, questions raised by senators, and the final vote tally will each offer insight into the direction of a party grappling with its post-Trump direction. For some conservatives, it represents the last chance at redemption. “The prosecution has the law, the evidence, and emotion on their side,” said Matt K. Lewis, author of Too Dumb to Fail: How the GOP Betrayed the Reagan Revolution to Win Elections (and How It Can Reclaim Its Conservative Roots). “What does it...
    The Louisiana Republican Party on Tuesday issued a rebuke of Sen. Bill CassidyBill CassidyGOP senator compares Trump impeachment proceedings to Soviet 'show trial' GOP senator: Administration officials showing 'they don't care if they have to work with us' Sunday shows preview: Budget resolution clears path for .9 trillion stimulus; Senate gears up for impeachment trial MORE (R-La.) over his vote declaring that former President TrumpDonald TrumpDOJ to seek resignations of most Trump-appointed US attorneys: report Trump attorney withdraws request to not hold impeachment trial on Saturday Kinzinger in op-ed calls on GOP senators to convict Trump in impeachment trial MORE’s impeachment trial is constitutional. Cassidy joined five other Republican senators and every Democrat in the upper chamber in rejecting an attempt to derail the proceedings. Cassidy had previously supported an effort by Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate looks to avoid dragged-out Trump impeachment battle The Memo: Democrats, GOP face dangers...
    Republican gubernatorial candidate and Virginia state Sen. Amanda Chase filed a lawsuit against the commonwealth's Republican Party on Tuesday over the party's move to hold a nomination convention instead of a primary.  "Currently, the Republican Party of Virginia has chosen a method that is illegal under the Governor's current executive orders and is secretly planning to chose the statewide nominees themselves, bypassing the people of Virginia," Chase said in a statement. "I will not stand for this. The people should be allowed to vote on Republican nominees."  Chase is part of a crowded GOP gubernatorial primary, but made national news when she was censured over comments appearing to show support for the rioters who attacked the Capitol last month.  The lawsuit comes ahead of a scheduled meeting of the Republican State Central Committee on Feb. 27, where they are expected to decide on the convention's format. Due to the state's coronavirus restrictions,...
    Nebraska’s Lincoln County Republican Party on Sunday voted to censure Sen. Ben Sasse (R-NE), one of the U.S. Senate’s most vocal critics of former President Donald Trump, the North Platte Telegraph first reported.  Lincoln County Republican Party’s 32 members voted unanimously for the measure, said chairwoman Carol Friesen. In the resolution, Sasse is accused of “dismissing the legitimate concerns” regarding allegations of voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election. The resolution also takes aim at Sasse for his conduct toward Trump, saying he failed to “respect the high office of the President of the United States.” Additionally, Sasse is criticized for “statements inciting radical proposals and retributions against law-abiding elected senators,” such as referring to Sens. Josh Hawley (R-MO) and Ted Cruz (R-TX) — both upper chamber Republicans who challenged Congress’s certification of the electoral college in favor of President Joe Biden. Nebraska’s Republican State Central Committee will meet Saturday to consider a similar resolution against...
    It is never preferable to be in the minority party in a legislative body. But as far as minorities go, House Republicans are in a pretty good spot. Between the trend of midterm elections usually favoring the party that is not in the White House, a closely divided House, and a party apparatus ready to continue their expectations-exceeding 2020 strategy while Democrats rework theirs, Republicans are on track to winning back the House in 2022. "It has the makings of what could be a good year for the Republicans when it comes to the House," said J. Miles Coleman, associate editor of Sabato's Crystal Ball at the University of Virginia Center for Politics. President Biden’s approval rating is around 53%, and while he is not underwater, history indicates he would need to bump that rating up by at least 10 points in order to have a shot...
    (CNN)A trio of Republican women in the US House of Representatives dominated the political headlines last week, and their stories will undoubtedly impact the GOP's chances of retaking the House in 2022. Indeed, Liz Cheney of Wyoming, Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia and Claudia Tenney of New York each illustrate the political topography of the midterm electoral battlefield. Richard N. BondLet's begin with Cheney, the daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, who now chairs the House Republican Conference and serves as the third highest-ranking member in House GOP leadership.Cheney's vote, along with that of nine other Republicans, to impeach former President Donald Trump for his role in the Capitol insurrection, riled her fellow House Republicans. A group of House Republicans even attempted to remove her from GOP leadership but were rebuffed in a 145-61 secret ballot last week.Cheney amplified her support for Trump's impeachment on Fox News this Sunday....
    (CNN)They've faced sharp backlash from former President Donald Trump and his supporters and been censured by their state parties, all the while facing new threats of primary challenges from the right. But the House Republicans who voted to impeach him are showing no signs of backing down and are signaling they'd do it again, the latest salvo in the battle over the party's direction in the aftermath of Trump's tumultuous tenure in the White House. "Hell no," Rep. John Katko of New York told CNN, when asked if he had any regrets for his vote to impeach Trump. "In eight years in Congress, I probably had a hundred votes that I could have gone either way, and I maybe second-guessed a little bit," Rep. Tom Rice, the South Carolina Republican who was censured by his state party for his vote, said in an interview. "This is not one of them."...
    Loading the player... Long time Republicans are ditching the political party after the January 6th Capitol riots left a bad taste in some GOP members’ mouths. However, a new study shows the trend has been actually growing for years. Read More: Rep. Omar calls out GOP colleagues for ‘whitewashing’ after comparison to Greene “The Republican Party as I knew it no longer exists. I’d call it the cult of Trump,” said, previous Undersecretary of the Treasury for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence in the Bush administration, Jimmy Gurulé, according to Reuters. In January, 12,000 Republicans in Pennsylvania removed the “R” from their voter registration. According to reports, Arizona followed suit with about 9,200, and in North Carolina, about 8,000 left the party. The change is notable because Republicans are losing supporters at a faster rate than Democrats. The publication also points out that just because a person is registered to...
    (CNN)Fresh off a surprisingly strong vote of support within the House Republican conference, Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney sat for an interview with "Fox News Sunday" anchor Chris Wallace in which she made clear that she has no plans of backing off her criticism of former President Donald Trump. It was an utterly remarkable interview, the clearest renunciation of the Trump years (and the legion of supporters he leaves behind) that we've seen come out of the GOP since the 45th president's election loss in November.I went through the transcript and picked out the lines you need to see. They're below. 1. "The oath that I took to the Constitution compelled me to vote for impeachment and it doesn't bend to partisanship, it doesn't bend to political pressure. It's the most important oath that we take."This is Cheney's response to the fact that she was censured by the Wyoming Republican Party...
    As the mainstream media struggles to find a new identity without President Trump to criticize at every turn, critics have noticed many liberal news organizations have attempted to make the QAnon conspiracy theory its latest foil in the post-Trump world. "The media have lined up with Democrats to share the talking point that the Republicans are the party of QAnon," NewsBusters executive editor Tim Graham told Fox News, noting that it’s absurd to paint QAnon as the new face of the GOP. "QAnon folks were Trump backers, but to equate that with the Republicans writ large is a bit like saying the Democrats are communists because factions of the old Communist Party USA endorsed a strategy of voting for Hillary Clinton in 2016," Graham added. "No one ever would ask the Democrats to explicitly denounce the Communist Party endorsement because it's ludicrous anyone would assume Democrats and Communists are the same...
    Until it has a new leader — a process that could take four years or more — the Republican Party is positioned to be a house divided, a leading Washington reporter argues. Appearing on Mediaite’s The Interview podcast, Axios national political correspondent Jonathan Swan broke down the state of the GOP in a post-Donald Trump America. The first issue, Swan asserts, is that the party isn’t truly post-Trump — as he remains the leading figure among Republicans. The quandary for the party at large is that the former president does not seem interested in building bridges, but rather seeking vengeance on Republicans who have crossed him. “He has substantial power, but he doesn’t use it in a strategic, or thoughtful, or methodical way,” Swan told Mediaite’s Aidan McLaughlin. “He’s entirely governed by himself, and his ego, and sees everything through his own aggrandizement. So it’s not as if he’s calling...
    Former Georgia Rep. Doug Collins (R) The Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest is compiled by David Nir, Jeff Singer, Stephen Wolf, Carolyn Fiddler, and Matt Booker, with additional contributions from David Jarman, Steve Singiser, Daniel Donner, James Lambert, David Beard, and Arjun Jaikumar. Leading Off ● GA-Sen, GA-Gov: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution's Greg Bluestein takes a look at the developing Republican primary contests for U.S. Senate and for governor, which already are shaping up to be ugly affairs. Before we get to the potential candidate fields, though, we'll set the scene with this quip from conservative commentator Martha Zoller: "The Republican Party in Georgia right now is like a Jenga game where someone has pulled out the wrong block," said the 2012 House candidate, explaining, "It's unstable and a mess." Team Red is hoping to defeat Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock, who will be up for a full six-year term next year,...
    Every president leaves a legacy. For Donald Trump it is, among many things, a Republican Party in worse shape than he found it. He won 74 million votes in November — more than any Republican presidential candidate in history. Joe Biden, however, received 81 million votes and a clear-cut victory in the electoral college, which is why the Democrat sits in the White House and Trump does not. That’s how our system of representative democracy works. But Trump didn’t just lose the White House. Under his divisive, ego-driven leadership, Republicans also surrendered control of the House and Senate, a losing trifecta unmatched since 1932 and President Herbert Hoover’s dismal showing amid the Great Depression. The Democratic hold over Congress is eyelash-thin and both chambers will be very much in play in 2022. For now, though, Democrats have control. But Trump leaves behind more than just a weakened GOP in...
            by Debra Heine  The Republican Party in one Nebraska county has chosen to censure GOP Senator Ben Sasse for supporting the impeachment trial of former President Trump in the Senate, and a number of other committee delegates throughout the state are reportedly thinking about doing the same. The Nebraska Republican Party will be holding a meeting later this month to discuss “possible action” related to Sasse’ votes in the Senate and his continual anti-Trump remarks. The Scotts Bluff County Republican Party chair told the local Star-Herald newspaper regretfully that state law prevents them from recalling the senator. Sasse is one of only five Republicans that voted with Democrats last week to table Senator Rand Paul’s (R-Ky.) point of order to dismiss the trial as unconstitutional. The Never-Trump senator has repeatedly blasted Trump in the wake of the January 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol, putting the blame squarely on...
    More from: Jonah Goldberg Progressives have made a mockery of the slogan listen to science Ted Cruz proved that GOP wont simply return to Reaganism after Trump Team Trump’s legal arguments veering into paranoid kook-land Cancel student-loan debt? Thats making the working class subsidize the elite! AOC gets the hype, but Joe Manchins approach is the winner for the Democratic Party As an American, I wish President Biden every success in defeating the pandemic and getting the economy moving again. But when it comes to the dysfunction of our political system and the polarized climate generally, it’s becoming clear he’s part of the problem, not the solution. I don’t think this is deliberate. No doubt Biden believes he’s doing right as he sees it. He’s also probably sincere about his desire to detoxify our politics by pushing for some gauzy notion of “unity.” The real problem isn’t the player,...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff ZIONSVILLE, Pa. (KDKA) — In an interview with Jake Tapper on CNN’s State of the Union, Pennsylvania Senator Pat Toomey commented on President Joe Biden’s presidency so far, the incoming impeachment trial for former President Donald Trump and the current factions within the Republican Party. Toomey said that he disagreed with the Biden administration’s current plan of passing COVID-19 relief without the support of Republicans. “It’s not an economy in collapse the way it was in March,” Toomey said. “Today, we have serious problems for workers in the restaurant, hospitality, travel and entertainment sectors. That’s really a handful of places and if those folks have fallen through the cracks of the trillions of dollars we’ve already spent that’s been meant to help them, then let’s have a conversation about how to help those folks.” Toomey also mentioned that President Joe Biden was “governing...
    Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyWyoming Republican Party censures Cheney over Trump impeachment vote Republicans worry Greene could be drag on party in suburbs Sunday shows preview: Budget resolution clears path for .9 trillion stimulus; Senate gears up for impeachment trial MORE (R-Wyo.), the highest ranking House Republican to back former President TrumpDonald TrumpTwitter permanently suspends Gateway Pundit founder's account Wyoming Republican Party censures Cheney over Trump impeachment vote Trump access to intelligence briefings will be determined by officials, White House says: report MORE’s second impeachment, said Sunday that he does “not have a role as the leader of our party going forward.” “We’re the party of Abraham Lincoln. We’re the party of Ronald Reagan. We have to really take a hard look at who we are and what we stand for and what we believe in,” Cheney said during an interview with host Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceWyoming Republican Party censures Cheney over Trump impeachment...
    Liz Cheney said Sunday that she will not step down as Wyoming's at-large representative after the state's GOP voted to formally censure her after she voted to impeach Donald Trump. The Wyoming congresswoman and Republican conference chair snubbed Trump in an interview with Fox News, claiming the party should not embrace the former president or anything spouted by Trump ultra-loyalist Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene. 'We have to make sure that we are able to convey to the American voters, we are the party of responsibility, we are the party of truth, that we actually can be trusted to handle the challenges this nation faces like COVID and that's going to require us to focus on substance and policy and issues going forward,' Cheney said. 'We should not be embracing the former president,' she added in her interview on 'Fox News Sunday' with Chris Wallace.  While stepping up her attacks on...
    Republican Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney said that former President Donald Trump “does not have a role” as a future leader of the Republican Party during a Sunday morning appearance on “Fox News Sunday.” “Is this still the party of Donald Trump?” anchor Chris Wallace asked Cheney after pointing out that House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy had met with the former president recently and secured a promise to help GOP candidates in 2022. WATCH: “Chris, we are the party of Abraham Lincoln, we are the party of Ronald Reagan,” Cheney responded. “We have to really take a hard look at who we are and what we stand for, what we believe in.” The Wyoming congresswoman pointed to Trump’s role in inciting the January 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol and recent GOP losses of the Senate and presidency as evidence that Trump “is a person who does not have...
    Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney said former President Donald Trump does not have a "role" in leading the Republican Party after the Jan. 6 Capitol riot and a looming impeachment trial. "Chris, we’re the party of Abraham Lincoln. We’re the party of Ronald Reagan," Cheney told Fox News Sunday anchor Chris Wallace. "We have to really take a hard look at who we are and what we stand for and what we believe in. I think when you look at both his actions leading up to what happened on January 6th, the fact that he was impeached in a bipartisan fashion, the fact that he lost the presidency, the fact that we lost the Senate, we have to be in a position where we can say we stand for principle, we stand for ideal." "Somebody who has provoked an attack on the United States capital to prevent the counting of...
    (CNN)Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney said Sunday she will not resign despite being censured by her state Republican Party over her vote to impeach former President Donald Trump. "I'm not (going to resign) Chris," Cheney, the No. 3 Republican in the US House of Representatives, told Chris Wallace on "Fox News Sunday." "And look, I think people all across Wyoming understand and recognize that our most important duty is to the Constitution, and as I've explained and will continue to explain to supporters all across this state, voters all across this state, the oath that I took to the Constitution compelled me to vote for impeachment, and it doesn't bend to partisanship. It doesn't bend to political pressure. It's the most important oath that we take. And so I will stand by that, and I will continue to fight for all the issues that matter to us all cross Wyoming."The Wyoming...
    Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyWyoming Republican Party censures Cheney over Trump impeachment vote Republicans worry Greene could be drag on party in suburbs Sunday shows preview: Budget resolution clears path for .9 trillion stimulus; Senate gears up for impeachment trial MORE (R-Wyo.) is standing by her vote to impeach former President TrumpDonald TrumpTwitter permanently suspends Gateway Pundit founder's account Wyoming Republican Party censures Cheney over Trump impeachment vote Trump access to intelligence briefings will be determined by officials, White House says: report MORE, saying on Sunday that despite Republican backlash, she felt “compelled” to support impeachment. “I think people all across Wyoming understand and recognize that our duty is to the Constitution,” Cheney said on “Fox News Sunday” in response to the Wyoming Republican Party voting to censure her on Saturday. “The oath that I took to the Constitution compelled me to vote for impeachment and it doesn’t bend to partisanship,...
    (CNN)The collision of the new President's agenda with the old one's impeachment trial this week sharpens the question: Just what kind of Republican opposition does the Democrat in the White House face? If the GOP remains an honest voice for a wide swath of Americans in the democratic competition of ideas, President Joe Biden has reason to follow his instincts toward common ground on Covid-19 relief and the rest of his agenda. But if the GOP has devolved into something else -- dishonest, detached from reality, bent on gaining power by undemocratic means if necessary -- he can justify skipping the time and effort. Biden has straddled the question so far. But Republican leaders plainly fear the party risks forfeiting its historic claim as the mainstream conservative alternative to Democratic liberalism.Distinguishing his party from Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia, Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky warned last week...
    Saturday Night Live’s Weekend Update had a series of jokes making fun of QAnon Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) saying that she “looks like the mug shot of a former child star,” and taking on several of the outlandish conspiracy theories she has supported. “Mitch McConnell, seen here ignoring a toddler who fell through the ice, criticized GOP conspirator Marjorie Taylor Greene saying her loony lies and conspiracy theories are ‘a cancer for the Republican party,'” said Weekend Update anchor Colin Jost. “Keep in mind, Greene believes cancer is a bioweapon created in a secret Jewish lab.” Jost’s co-anchor Michael Che took the next swing at Greene, saying that she “looks like the mug shot of a former child star, has supported conspiracy theories about 9/11, school shootings, the ‘Deep State,’ and Jewish people — Ah. I get it, lady. You’re my type.” “Greene apologized for her previous remarks, saying 9/11 absolutely happened, and to honor that day Greene plans to hijack and crash the Republican party,” Che...
    The Wyoming Republican Party on Saturday voted to censure Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyIn Marjorie Taylor Greene, a glimpse of the future AOC is an asset for Democrats, Greene is an albatross for the GOP The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - House boots Greene from committees; Senate plows ahead on budget MORE (R-Wyo.), the latest in a series of rebukes against the congresswoman and other Republicans who joined House Democrats last month in voting to impeach former President TrumpDonald TrumpChamber of Commerce CEO to leave: reports Fox News Media cancels Lou Dobbs's show GOP lawmakers call for Pelosi to be fined over new screenings MORE.  The Associated Press reported that the majority of the 74-member state GOP’s central committee voted in favor of the censure resolution, with only eight opposing the move.  The vote, which is largely symbolic, criticizes Cheney for voting to impeach Trump for...
    GOP Rep. Liz Cheney was censured in her home state of Wyoming because she voted to impeach then-President Trump in January. The motion, which passed on Saturday, called on Cheney to “immediately resign from her position” and for her to “immediately repay donations” made to her campaign by the Wyoming Republican Party. The state party will withhold future political donations from her. The vote was about 56 votes in favor and eight against, though no official tally was taken, the motion said, according to Forbes. The GOP lawmaker responded to the censure in a statement to the Washington Examiner, saying that her “vote to impeach” the president was “compelled by the oath I swore to the Constitution. Wyoming citizens know that this oath does not bend or yield to politics or partisanship.” "I will always fight for Wyoming values and stand up for our Western way of life. We...
    The Wyoming Republican Party voted overwhelmingly Saturday to censure U.S. Rep. Liz Cheney for voting to impeach President Donald Trump for his role in the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. Only eight of the 74-member state GOP's central committee stood to oppose censure in a vote that didn't proceed to a formal count. The censure document accused Cheney of voting to impeach even though the U.S. House didn't offer Trump 'formal hearing or due process.' 'We need to honor President Trump. All President Trump did was call for a peaceful assembly and protest for a fair and audited election,' said Darin Smith, a Cheyenne attorney who lost to Cheney in the Republican U.S. House primary in 2016. 'The Republican Party needs to put her on notice.' The Wyoming Republican Party voted overwhelmingly Saturday to censure U.S. Rep. Liz Cheney for voting to impeach President Donald Trump f...
    The Wyoming state Republican Party formally censured Rep. Liz Cheney Saturday, for her January vote to impeach President Trump for the second time in the U.S. House of Representatives. With only handful votes countering the censure motion, which passed 59-7, Wyoming’s GOP party has called on Cheney to resign.  Cheney, who easily survived a vote by House Republicans earlier week to strip her of her leadership title, showed no inclination of abiding by the state party’s wishes. CHENEY EASILY SURVIVES PUSH TO STRIP HER OF HER HOUSE GOP LEADERSHIP POSITION "My vote to impeach was compelled by the oath I swore to the Constitution," she said in a statement to Fox News Saturday. "Wyoming citizens know that this oath does not bend or yield to politics or partisanship." Cheney has faced surmounting backlash from Trump loyalists, as she was the most senior House Republican to vote in favor of impeaching...
    (CNN)The Wyoming Republican Party voted Saturday to formally censure Rep. Liz Cheney, the No. 3 Republican in the House, for her vote to impeach former President Donald Trump in the latest example of a state GOP punishing lawmakers who have bucked the former President.In the motion to censure Cheney, who easily survived a House Republican Conference vote to remain in her leadership spot earlier this week, the state Republican Party also called for her to "immediately" resign. The party intends to "withhold any future political funding" from her, the motion said. It also called on her to repay donations to her 2020 campaign from the state GOP and any county Republican Parties.Cheney's office did not immediately respond to CNN's request for comment.Cheney has faced intense backlash from Trump loyalists in her party for her vote last month to impeach Trump for "incitement of insurrection," following the January 6 attack on...
    During an appearance on CNN on Saturday, Rep. Charlie Dent told anchor Fredricka Whitfield that a group of GOP lawmakers is discussing leaving the Republican Party to create a new coalition, Raw Story reported. “In fact, just yesterday I participated in a forum or a summit where we talked about the future of the party, should there be a new party or a new faction,” he said. According to Dent, the group is currently discussing whether to create a new faction within the GOP or one that works outside of the current conservative coalition. “That’s the conversation that many Republicans are having, and we’re united around core principles like democracy, rule of law, measured statements, and we’re against cronyism and this type of ugly populism that we’ve witnessed the last four years under President Trump and folks like [Rep.]Marjorie Taylor Greene.” Dent suggested that there is a “real fear” that...
    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A Republican lawmaker in New Mexico who voted in favor of a Democratic-backed abortion bill has left the Republican Party, officials said. House Minority Leader Jim Townsend said on Friday that state Rep. Phelps Anderson of Roswell changed his voter registration to a “declined to state” after voting to repeal a 1969 bill that criminalizes abortion. “I received a letter from him, and I have had a conversation with him, and he has left the Republican Party,” Townsend said. Anderson, who represents portions of the Chaves, Lea and Roosevelt counties, sided with seven Democrats in repealing the bill, drawing criticism from his constituents as well as calls for his resignation. Anderson declined a request for an interview. “Sorry,” he told the Santa Fe New Mexican in a text message on Friday. “Not today as I have done enough.” Anderson was elected to the House of...
    Despite days of headlines highlighting divisions among House Republicans over Rep. Liz Cheney keeping her leadership role and Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene losing her committee posts, a high-profile freshman lawmaker, Rep. Madison Cawthorn, isn't concerned about bad perceptions. "Our party has never been more united," Cawthorn, a North Carolina Republican, told the Washington Examiner in an interview capping his first month in Congress. It's a period that has included the impeachment of then-President Donald Trump by the Democratic-majority House, with his Senate trial beginning Tuesday, along with the Jan. 6 siege of the Capitol. House Republicans voted to keep Cheney, a representative from Wyoming, in place Wednesday as the House Republican Conference's chairwoman despite her vote to impeach Trump. The next day, the bulk of GOP members opposed a measure passed by House Democrats stripping Greene, a representative from Georgia, from her committee assignments over a swath of...
    Former Rep. Barbara Comstock (R-VA) said Friday on CNN’s “Anderson Cooper 360” that former President Donald Trump is not the future of the Republican Party because of his age. Comstock said, “What I focus on is, at the beginning of this week, the Freedom Caucus claimed they had 115 signatures to get rid of Liz Cheney. In fact, she won resoundingly in a landslide with 70% support. I think the brave Republicans like Liz Cheney, like Ben Sasse, like Adam Kinzinger standing up to the bullies, are the future of the party. I think of those 10 people who voted for impeachment you’re going to see future governors, future leaders of the party, people like Ben Sasse. I’m going to focus on the positive there. I think it was appropriate that Marjorie Greene was kicked off of her committees with bipartisan support.” She continued, “Donald Trump lost the popular vote twice.”...
    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The national Republican Party in Washington is at war with itself, struggling to reconcile a bitter divide between former President Donald Trump’s fierce loyalists and those who want Trumpism purged from the GOP. They need only look across the Potomac River into Virginia to see the dangers that lurk if they cannot correct course. In just nine months, Virginia voters will elect a new governor in what marks the first significant test of the Republican Party’s strength in the post-Trump era. Although the state had a Republican governor as recently as 2014, it has trended solidly Democratic in recent years as the suburban counties outside Washington, swelling in population with a diverse blend of highly educated, well-to-do voters, have rejected the harsher edges of the GOP agenda in general, and Trump, in particular. Republicans also will be closely watching whether the governor’s race serves as a...
    Republicans are beginning to coalesce around a message for confronting President Biden’s new administration, with one GOP missive stating: “There’s bipartisan agreement. … Joe Biden’s a partisan.” The GOP is hammering Biden’s executive orders, his use of a budgetary maneuver to pass a COVID-19 relief package without Senate Republicans (despite their offers to compromise), and even occasional clashes with the dwindling number of centrist and red-state Democrats on Capitol Hill to undercut the new president’s talk of “unity.” “Biden is starting his presidency as one of the most partisan in history, exposing his campaign pledge to reach across the aisle as another empty promise,” said Republican National Committee Rapid Response Director Tommy Pigott. “In the early hours of the morning, in a vote strictly on party lines, the Senate adopted Bernie Sanders’s budget resolution necessary to force through a partisan bill using the Biden-supported reconciliation process.” Biden, opting against directing...
    By STEVE PEOPLES and SARAH RANKIN, Associated Press RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The national Republican Party in Washington is at war with itself, struggling to reconcile a bitter divide between former President Donald Trump's fierce loyalists and those who want Trumpism purged from the GOP. They need only look across the Potomac River into Virginia to see the dangers that lurk if they cannot correct course. In just nine months, Virginia voters will elect a new governor in what marks the first significant test of the Republican Party's strength in the post-Trump era. Although the state had a Republican governor as recently as 2014, it has trended solidly Democratic in recent years as the suburban counties outside Washington, swelling in population with a diverse blend of highly educated, well-to-do voters, have rejected the harsher edges of the GOP agenda in general, and Trump, in particular. Republicans also will be closely...
              COLUMBUS, Ohio – Jane Timken announced Friday her immediate resignation as Chairwoman of the Ohio Republican Party (ORP).  The message came during a spur of the moment meeting of the Ohio Republican Central Committee during which Timken did not say whether she was leaving to pursue a seat in the U.S. Senate. The Ohio Star reported that Timken was a likely candidate for the seat U.S. Senator Rob Portman said he would not seek for a third time in 2022. Although she did not officially say she is running, Timken was re-elected chairwoman of the ORP January 15 – Portman announced his decision on January 25. Today, I am announcing my resignation as Chairman of the Ohio Republican Party. I am confident that the work we have done over the last four years will leave our party in the best possible position to...
    As domestic violent extremists invaded the Capitol on Jan. 6, they shouted “we were invited here” by President Donald Trump and his fellow Republicans, some of them members of Congress in the Capitol building the insurrectionists were attacking. The events of last month made clear that President Biden faces a daunting challenge: Uprooting an entrenched infrastructure of domestic violent extremism without leading the nation into an even greater civil conflagration in the process. The challenge is all the greater, given how deeply rooted insurrectionism has become in the Republican Party. The roots of the Republican Party’s descent into supporting violent opposition to democracy itself are long and deep, but the events of 1995 are particularly relevant. In January of that year, Newt Gingrich became Speaker of the House, inaugurating what was to become 25 years of ever more nihilistic attacks by GOP officeholders on the governmental institutions they are charged...
    The Lincoln Project announced that it is parting ways with Jennifer Horn, a co-founder of the anti-Trump GOP group.  The group said Horn requested “an immediate ‘signing bonus’ payment of $250,000 and a $40,000 per month consulting contract.” That came after she asked in December for “a board seat on the Lincoln Project, a television show, a podcast hosting assignment, and a staff to manage these endeavors [to] establish immediate and long-term financial security.”  “These demands were unanimously rejected by the management committee and board,” the Lincoln Project said in a statement. “We immediately accepted Jennifer Horn’s resignation from the Lincoln Project.” The departure comes at a rocky time for the group, which also recently split with co-founder John Weaver following allegations he sent unwanted messages to young men, some of which were sexual in nature.  “John Weaver led a secret life that was built on a foundation of deception...
    Senator Ben Sasse received a fair amount of praise for smacking down the Republican party in his home state of Nebraska for planning to censure him. Sasse said the censure has nothing to do with policy and everything to do with him “not bending the knee to one guy” — former President Donald Trump. Mehdi Hasan, guest hosting All In with Chris Hayes Friday night, wasn’t impressed by Sasse’s video and knocked him for positioning himself as a “bold truth teller” now that Trump is out of office. Hasan talked about the “so-called Republican civil war” over Marjorie Taylor Greene and said the party lacks a governing philosophy and is just “own the libs and fight cancel culture” now. He walked through what Republicans have done in a few states to go after prominent people in their party who have gone against Trump, before bringing up Sasse’s comments. Hasan called the...
    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The national Republican Party in Washington is at war with itself, struggling to reconcile a bitter divide between former President Donald Trump’s fierce loyalists and those who want Trumpism purged from the GOP. They need only look across the Potomac River into Virginia to see the dangers that lurk if they cannot correct course. In just nine months, Virginia voters will elect a new governor in what marks the first significant test of the Republican Party’s strength in the post-Trump era. Although the state had a Republican governor as recently as 2014, it has trended solidly Democratic in recent years as the suburban counties outside Washington, swelling in population with a diverse blend of highly educated, well-to-do voters, have rejected the harsher edges of the GOP agenda in general, and Trump, in particular. Republicans also will be closely watching whether the governor’s race serves as a...
    Marjorie Taylor Greene Share on Facebook Share on twitter Share in mail Share on whatsapp “Someone who suggested that maybe no planes hit the Pentagon on September 11, that the horrific school shootings were pre-planned, and that the Clintons crashed JFK Jr.’s plane is not living in reality,” McConnell said. pick up The Hill. The Republican leader of the United States Senate, Mitch McConnell, has tacitly rebuked controversial Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene on Monday, assuring that “the crazy lies and conspiracy theories” that he proclaims are like “cancer” for the Republican Party and for the country. “Someone who suggested that maybe no planes hit the Pentagon on September 11, that the horrific school shootings were pre-planned, and that the Clintons crashed JFK Jr.’s plane is not living in reality,” McConnell said. pick up The Hill. Although she has not mentioned Greene’s...
    Over 24 hours this week, Republican representatives voted in defense of a rookie lawmaker, a conspiracy theorist known for her violent rhetoric, and a party establishment leader who voted to impeach Donald Trump. These seemingly contradictory decisions indicate that Republican leaders, especially in the lower house, are betting on creating a broad coalition of Trump supporters and haters to regain power. They also suggest that Republicans are unable or unwilling to remove right-wing extremists from their ranks, whatever the wishes of some leaders. “I think that, as a party, we need to find out what we stand for,” Sen. John Thune said, urging Republicans to “stay away from members who promote conspiracy theories. On Thursday, Democratic lawmakers voted – something their Republican counterparts did not the day before – to strip Representative Marjorie Taylor-Greene of her commission positions, effectively disabling her from affecting the passage of laws. . ...
    For many Republican voters across the country, the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol inspired by Donald Trump and carried out by his rabid supporters was the last straw. Literally tens of thousands of Republican voters have changed their party registration since the November election, with defections noticeably spiking after Trump supporters stormed the Capitol complex.  Many of those conservative voters switched to "unaffiliated" while others either went third-party or chose to affiliate with the Democratic Party. Lyle Darrah, who lives north of Denver in Weld County, was one voter who made the leap from Republican to Democrat, according to NPR. Darrah, a 49-year-old Coloradan who voted Trump in 2016 and Biden in 2020, said he was "completely shocked and ashamed" as he watched the events unfold on Jan. 6. "It's something I felt I could no longer be in support of," he added, and he hopes the switch sends "a...
    Nebraska Republican Sen. Ben Sasse is calling out state party members who he says are 'hacked off' that he condemned President Dump following the Jan. 6 riot. He released a YouTube video message to the state party's central committee where he said he was 'not bending the knee to one guy' and that the Republican Party was bigger than any one person. 'Politics isn't about the weird worship of one dude,' Sasse said. 'The party can purge Trump skeptics. But I'd like to convince you that not only is that civic cancer for the nation, it's just terrible for our party.'  'Politics isn't about the weird worship of one dude,' said Nebraska Republican Sen. Ben Sasse His appeal came after party members moved to censure him after he expressed openness to convicting Trump in his Senate impeachment trial.  Sasse cited his conservative voting record even as he let loose...
    By BOB CHRISTIE, Associated Press PHOENIX (AP) — Pressure is rising on the head of the Arizona Republican Party to allow an audit of her recent reelection as she continues to question President Joe Biden's victory in the state. A large group of GOP state lawmakers sent party Chair Kelli Ward a letter this week demanding that she allow an audit of her January reelection, which she won by 42 votes but is increasingly being challenged. The letter demands that Ward either allow an audit or step aside from efforts to audit results in Maricopa County that saw Biden win. “We urge you to heed the calls of your voters and allow for an immediate audit of the election that was held on January 23rd, in a manner that is fair and transparent,” said the letter signed by 18 state House and Senate lawmakers. “Or we would ask that you...
    Ohio Republican Party Chairwoman Jane Timken announced her resignation on Friday. “It has been a tremendous honor to serve as Chairman of the Ohio Republican Party and work with so many dedicated, rock-ribbed conservatives to strengthen our state and stand with [former] President Trump to make our nation great,” Timken said. “Over the last four years, we have secured Ohio’s place as a leading conservative stronghold, expanded Republican leadership at every level and helped President Trump win a commanding second victory in the state.” Timken's statement also talked about her intent to remain active in state politics. "President Donald J. Trump is the leader of our Party, and I am incredibly excited to continue to fight for him and the America First agenda in a new capacity going forward," she continued. "I will be making an announcement about my future plans in the coming weeks, but trust me when I...
    Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Ga.) fiercely defended former President TrumpDonald TrumpGOP senator warns his party must decide between 'conservatism and madness' Pompeo rebukes Biden's new foreign policy Here are the 11 Republicans who voted to remove Greene from House committees MORE during a press conference on Friday, arguing that the Republican Party “belongs to him.”  The comments from Greene — whom Congress voted to remove from her committee assignments on Thursday for past inflammatory remarks — come as the party finds itself mired in conflict over the direction it should take in the post-Trump era. Greene on Friday argued Trump remains popular with Republican voters. “He was a president that wanted every single person to achieve and that's why we supported him, that's why I've always supported him,” she told reporters, adding that "the party is his and doesn't belong to anybody else.” A recent Morning Consult poll shows 50 percent of Republican...
    By DAN SEWELL, Associated Press CINCINNATI (AP) — An Ohio Republican linked closely to Donald Trump stepped down Friday as the party’s chair, a signal of her interest in running for the U.S. Senate for the seat being left by the GOP’s Rob Portman. With Trump’s backing, Jane Timken took over the party leadership from a state chair allied with former Gov. John Kasich, a Republican opponent of Trump. State Republicans have done well during her four years, and while untried as a statewide candidate herself, she is well-connected and wealthy. “President Donald J. Trump is the leader of our Party, and I am incredibly excited to continue to fight for him and the America First agenda in a new capacity going forward,” Timken said in a statement, saying she will announce her plans ”in the coming weeks." In her last Tweet before her announcement, Timken criticized Rep. Anthony Gonzalez,...
    CINCINNATI (AP) — An Ohio Republican linked closely to Donald Trump stepped down Friday as the party’s chair, a signal of her interest in running for the U.S. Senate for the seat being left by the GOP’s Rob Portman. With Trump’s backing, Jane Timken took over the party leadership from a state chair allied with former Gov. John Kasich, a Republican opponent of Trump. State Republicans have done well during her four years, and while untried as a statewide candidate herself, she is well-connected and wealthy. “President Donald J. Trump is the leader of our Party, and I am incredibly excited to continue to fight for him and the America First agenda in a new capacity going forward,” Timken said in a statement, saying she will announce her plans ”in the coming weeks.” In her last Tweet before her announcement, Timken criticized Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, an Ohio Republican, for voting...
    Top Republicans are looking for big gains in the House in 2022, and they’ve decided that their best path to those gains is to welcome extremists to their party. Make that: to keep welcoming extremists to their party. That’s the message they sent when House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy first refused to discipline Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene for her violent rhetoric, anti-Semitism, and embrace of conspiracy theories, and it’s the message they put an exclamation point on Thursday night when all but 11 Republicans voted to keep her in her committee assignments. Those assignments included the education committee, despite Greene’s harassment of survivors of the Parkland school shooting and her claims that the Parkland and Sandy Hook shootings had been hoaxes. To McCarthy, the fact that Republicans voted both to keep Rep. Liz Cheney in leadership despite her vote to impeach Donald Trump and to protect Greene’s committee assignments is big evidence...
    On Thursday, Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse released a five-minute video in response to efforts by the Nebraska Republican State Central Committee to censure him due to his criticism of former President Donald Trump, as reported by The Hill. Sasse told Republicans in the state that they must choose between “conservatism and madness” as he faces a censure at the committee’s meeting on February 13. Sasse was previously censured in May 2016 for not being supportive enough of the then-Republican presidential candidate. Sasse, who has served in the Senate since 2015, described the efforts to remove Republicans not fully behind Trump from the party as “not only civic cancer for the nation [but] just terrible for our party.” He described those in the Nebraska state party of being out of touch with local people and “angry about life.” “Nebraskans aren’t rage addicts and that’s good news. You are welcome to censure...
    Colorado state Sen. Kerry Donovan (D) The Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest is compiled by David Nir, Jeff Singer, Stephen Wolf, Carolyn Fiddler, and Matt Booker, with additional contributions from David Jarman, Steve Singiser, Daniel Donner, James Lambert, David Beard, and Arjun Jaikumar. Leading Off ● CO-03: On Thursday, state Sen. Kerry Donovan became the most notable Democrat to announce a bid against Republican Rep. Lauren Boebert, a QAnon defender who is one of the most notorious freshmen in the 117th Congress. Donovan, who promoted her background as a rancher in her launch video, alluded to Boebert's extremism by saying, "The last thing we need are people in Congress who talk tough and stoke division and fear." A few other Democrats have expressed interest in running, so Donovan may face a competitive nomination fight before she can take on Boebert. One of them, state Rep. Dylan Roberts, told the Colorado...
    House Republicans took what looked like their first baby steps away from former President Donald Trump in a conference vote this week, but party operatives say he remains a force to be reckoned with. Rep. Liz Cheney, a Wyoming lawmaker who is also the daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, beat back an attempt to depose her as chairwoman of the House Republican Conference over her vote to impeach Trump. The final vote wasn’t particularly close: 145 Republicans voted to retain Cheney, 61 backed her ouster, and one voted present. So-called "Never Trump" conservatives expressed cautious optimism afterward that this suggests the former president is on shakier ground in his upcoming Senate trial than many expect. Only 10 Republicans in the House voted to impeach, and just five GOP senators voted to proceed with the trial after a point of order was raised challenging the constitutionality of convicting a...