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Senate impeachment trial:

    (CNN)A wide array of Senate Republicans harshly criticized former President Donald Trump's defense team on the opening day of his second impeachment trial, arguing that Trump attorney Bruce Castor had delivered a rambling and unfocused argument in making the case that the proceedings are unconstitutional."I thought the President's lawyer, the first lawyer, just rambled on and on and on," John Cornyn of Texas, a member of Senate GOP leadership, said of Castor, adding that the lawyer "didn't really address the constitutional argument. Finally the second lawyer got around to it, and, I thought, did an effective job."Trump unhappy with his impeachment attorneys performance, sources sayCastor opened Trump's defense with a meandering presentation and warned that a second impeachment trial in 13 months would "open the floodgates" to future impeachments, even making the rhetorically unfounded suggestion that former Obama administration Attorney General Eric Holder could be impeached.Prominent Republicans argued on Tuesday...
    More from: Michael Goodwin New York Times ties itself in woke knots: Goodwin Take the GOP deal, Mr. Prez: Goodwin Biden brood already cashing in on Joes presidency: Goodwin Impeaching Trump gets more divisive by the minute: Goodwin Joe Biden’s far-left ‘unity’ will divide us: Goodwin Given that there have been only four presidential impeachments in American history, and given that only one man has twice suffered the indignity, viewers who tuned into the start of Donald Trump’s second Senate trial had a right to expect a buzz of excitement and a sense of drama. What they got instead was buzz-kill and all the drama of watching paint dry. Who knew impeachment could be so lifeless and history so meaningless? Certainly Chief Justice John Roberts knew. His refusal to preside reveals the exercise to be a cheap knockoff rather than the real thing. And it’s impossible to believe the...
    Donald Trump's impeachment trial could be finished as early as Saturday if there are no witnesses called by the prosecution as senators prepare to barrel toward a finale vote on the former president. Additionally, Trump's legal team is not expected to use the full 16 hours allotted to them to make their case - which would also cut down on trial time. And the Senate now will be in session late Friday and on Saturday after Trump attorney David Schoen dropped his request to have them recess for the Sabbath. Schoen, an observant Jew, said he would let the other defense attorneys take the lead during that time.  Donald Trump's defense lawyer David Schoen argued Tuesday that Democrats are using the impeachment proceedings as bloodsport to drag the former president through the wringer  House lead impeachment manager Representative Jamie Raskin points up at a video that he had just shown...
    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Senate voted Tuesday to proceed with the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump on a charge that he incited insurrection at the U.S. Capitol last month by urging hundreds of his supporters to confront lawmakers as they met to certify that Democrat Joe Biden had defeated him in last November's election.  The 56-44 vote to start hearing evidence in the case at mid-day Wednesday came after four hours of impassioned arguments about the constitutionality of holding the trial while Trump is no longer in office.   Democratic lawmakers from the House of Representatives prosecuting the case against Trump said the former U.S. leader must be held to account for his actions in his final weeks in office.  Trump's two lawyers contended that the country's Founding Fathers, in writing the Constitution, only intended for impeachment to be used as a tool to remove a president...
    (CNN)Former President Donald Trump was unhappy with his impeachment lawyer Bruce Castor's opening argument on the Senate floor Tuesday, two people familiar with his reaction told CNN. Castor, who is representing Trump alongside attorney David Schoen, delivered a meandering argument during the first day of the Senate impeachment trial, including praise for the House impeachment managers for a presentation that he said was "well done."Trump was almost screaming as Castor struggled to get at the heart of his defense team's argument, which is supposed to be over the constitutionality of holding a trial for a president no longer in office. Given that the legal team was assembled a little over a week ago, it went as expected, one of the sources told CNN. Still, Trump's allies were flabbergasted when the attorneys switched speaking slots at the last minute.Castor's discursive presentation featured lengthy praise of the Senate, including his home state...
    House Democrats on Tuesday launched their impeachment case against former President  Trump with a stirring video montage of violence and mayhem at the Capitol on Jan. 6 — a highly charged opening salvo, stripped of all subtlety, that at once implicated the former president in the deadly attack and heightened the pressure on Republicans to convict him. The 13-minute video, introduced by Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinDemocrats say Trump impeachment defense 'wholly without merit' Sunday shows preview: Budget resolution clears path for .9 trillion stimulus; Senate gears up for impeachment trial READ: Trump attorneys deny request for impeachment testimony MORE (D-Md.), the lead impeachment manager, featured a sampling of Trump’s fiery rhetoric leading up to the deadly siege, mashed up with scenes of mob violence in and around the Capitol building in the subsequent hours. The extraordinary demonstration — violent, profane and highly visceral — set an early tone for...
    The first day of Donald Trump's impeachment trial was dedicated to the legal debate and nuances over the constitutionality of trying a former president. But the opening minutes of the trial instead focused on the still-raw emotions from Jan. 6 as House managers played dramatic footage from the Capitol riots to help build their case for convicting Trump. It's a strategy the nine House impeachment managers plan to incorporate over the course of the week: making a personal and emotional appeal to the 100 senators – who are sitting as both jurists and witnesses – that Trump should be held accountable for "incitement of insurrection" even as he no longer occupies the White House. Trump's team, meanwhile, maintains that the Senate doesn't have the authority to convene a trial against a private citizen.[ WATCH: Democrats' Graphic Trump Impeachment Video ]After a weeks-long delay, the Senate resumed its historic and speedy trial on...
    By HOPE YEN and CALVIN WOODWARD, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawyers for Donald Trump stretched beyond the facts Tuesday when they argued there's an open-and-shut case that the Constitution bars impeaching former presidents. That question is not settled, though the weight of legal views contradicts the Trump team's assertions. Bruce Castor and David Schoen addressed the Senate on the first day of Trump's trial after Democratic impeachment managers from the House presented the opening of their case for conviction. Trump is accused of inciting the deadly siege on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Democrats overcame a procedural hurdle as the Senate voted 56-44 to proceed with trial but face tough odds trying to win the two-thirds majority needed to convict Trump. A look at the arguments: CASTOR, quoting the Constitution: "'Judgment in cases of impeachment’ — i.e., what we are doing — ‘shall not extend further than to...
    The first day of Donald Trump’s latest impeachment trial ended with something close to hard proof that a conviction is not at hand: on Tuesday afternoon, only six Republican senators joined with all Democrats to affirm that the trial of a former president is constitutional. The vote on this parliamentary point ensures the trial can move forward in earnest over the coming days. But it makes abundantly clear what was already known: that there are nowhere close to 17 GOP senators who are open to handing Trump a lifetime ban on holding federal office after his role in inciting the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. The six who merely went on record that the proceeding was constitutional include all of Trump’s most reliable critics in the Senate GOP: Sens. Susan Collins (R-ME), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Ben Sasse (R-NE), Pat Toomey (R-PA), and Mitt Romney (R-UT), who was the...
    A handful of GOP senators crossed party lines on Tuesday by voting to affirm the constitutionality of the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump. The Senate agreed to consider the case against Trump by a 56-44 vote following hours of arguments by the former president’s legal team and House impeachment managers. A total of six Republicans – Sens. Susan Collins of Maine, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska, and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania – sided with Democrats in calling for the trial to proceed. Cassidy voted to proceed with the trial just two weeks after he joined other Republicans in a vote to dismiss the impeachment charge on grounds that proceedings against a former president would be unconstitutional. The Louisiana senator explained his reversal shortly after the first day of arguments concluded. TRUMP'S IMPEACHMENT TRIAL: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 6:35 p.m. Senate Republicans had sharp criticism for former President Donald Trump’s lawyers after the opening of his second impeachment trial. Many said they didn’t understand Trump’s lawyers’ arguments as they sought to persuade the Senate to dismiss the trial on constitutional grounds. Trump was impeached by the House for inciting the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol. Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy, who voted with Democrats to move forward with the trial after voting against them in a similar vote two weeks ago, said Trump’s team did a “terrible job” and was “disorganized,” “random” and “did everything they could but to talk about the question at hand.” Maine Sen. Susan Collins, who also voted with Democrats, said she was “perplexed” by lead Trump lawyer Bruce Castor, “who did not seem to make any...
    A group of six Republicans voted that the impeachment trial against former President Donald Trump is constitutional Tuesday, moving the trial forward. The Senate held a vote Tuesday night after several hours of arguments from both sides which would rule if the trial was constitutional. The vote to proceed with the trial and that it is constitutional was 56-44. Republican Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy was the only Republican to change his stance after Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and a majority of Republicans voted in favor of Republican Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul’s motion to dismiss the impeachment trial against Trump, saying it was unconstitutional. Cassidy changed his tune after Tuesday’s arguments, slamming Trump’s impeachment lawyers and voting with a majority of Democrats, saying the trial to impeach Trump is constitutional. Cassidy told CNN after the vote that the House impeachment managers had a “very good opening” and made “very good arguments.” He also said:...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawyers for Donald Trump stretched beyond the facts Tuesday when they argued there’s an open-and-shut case that the Constitution bars impeaching former presidents. That question is not settled, though the weight of legal views contradicts the Trump team’s assertions. Bruce Castor and David Schoen addressed the Senate on the first day of Trump’s trial after Democratic impeachment managers from the House presented the opening of their case for conviction. Trump is accused of inciting the deadly siege on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Democrats overcame a procedural hurdle as the Senate voted 56-44 to proceed with trial but face tough odds trying to win the two-thirds majority needed to convict Trump. A look at the arguments: CASTOR, quoting the Constitution: “‘Judgment in cases of impeachment’ — i.e., what we are doing — ‘shall not extend further than to removal from office.’ What is so hard about...
    Michigan state Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey (R) said last week that he doesn't believe the rioters who stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 were supporters of then-President TrumpDonald TrumpDOJ to seek resignations of most Trump-appointed US attorneys: report Trump attorney withdraws request to not hold impeachment trial on Saturday Kinzinger in op-ed calls on GOP senators to convict Trump in impeachment trial MORE, despite many of them having left directly from a Trump rally near the White House. In a more than hour-long video of a meeting at a restaurant last Wednesday, Shirkey is seen erroneously telling supporters that it "wasn't Trump people" who stormed the Capitol, resulting in the deaths of several people including a Capitol Police officer, adding that the whole scene was "prearranged." "What about the D.C. thing? I was there," a man off-camera is heard asking Shirkey. "That wasn't Trump people. That wasn't Trump...
    U.S. President Joe Biden says while the impeachment trial of his predecessor is under way in the Senate, he will be focused on alleviating the suffering from the coronavirus pandemic. “I am not,” Biden replied when asked by reporters Tuesday in the Oval Office whether he is watching the trial. “We have already lost over 450,000 people, and we could lose a whole lot more if we don’t act and act decisively and quickly. … A lot of children are going to bed hungry. A lot of families are food insecure. They’re in trouble. That’s my job. The Senate has their job, and they’re about to begin it, and I am sure they are going to conduct themselves well.” The president added he will not be saying anything further about impeachment of former President Donald Trump, whom Biden defeated in last November’s election. White House press secretary Jen Psaki...
    More On: impeachment Senate votes 56-44 to proceed with Trump impeachment trial Trump impeachment lawyer says ‘floodgates will open’ if Senate convicts him ‘I have a job’: Biden says he will not watch Trump impeachment trial Trump’s second impeachment trial begins in Senate David Schoen unwittingly gave Twitter a lesson in orthodox Jewish customs during former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial on Tuesday. Schoen, Trump’s attorney, rested his hand on top of his head each time he took a sip of water while making his opening argument that the case is unconstitutional. Several viewers noted Schoen’s seemingly unusual drinking habit, with some even suggesting he was trying to keep a toupee from falling. “Is anybody going to acknowledge the way David Schoen is drinking water?” one user wrote. But the lawyer was likely making the ritual move because he is religiously observant. Rabbi Menchem Genack, CEO of the kosher...
    Paul Begala, a former adviser to President Clinton, tweeted during the opening arguments of former President TrumpDonald TrumpDOJ to seek resignations of most Trump-appointed US attorneys: report Trump attorney withdraws request to not hold impeachment trial on Saturday Kinzinger in op-ed calls on GOP senators to convict Trump in impeachment trial MORE’s second Senate impeachment trial that Trump is represented by “the law firm Meandering & Furious.” “Trump is apparently being represented by the law firm of Meandering & Furious,” he posted on Monday as Trump’s defense spoke in the upper chamber. The leaders of Trump’s legal team Bruce Castor and David Schoen both spoke during opening arguments in his Senate trial on Monday afternoon.  Trump is apparently being represented by the law firm of Meandering & Furious.— Paul Begala (@PaulBegala) February 9, 2021 Castor took to the podium first, starting by saying that the riots at the Capitol...
    Bradley Cortright February 9, 2021 0 Comments Former President Donald Trump’s legal team is warning “partisan” impeachment efforts will become the norm going forward in American political life if the Senate proceeds with its current impeachment trial. During his remarks on Tuesday, Trump attorney Bruce Castor warned senators that “the political pendulum will shift one day” and that “partisan impeachments will become commonplace.” Castor continued to note that when former President Bill Clinton was impeached, no American alive had witnessed an impeachment proceeding against a president. By contrast, he said many Americans have witnessed three presidential impeachments since. “This is supposed to be the ultimate safety valve, the last thing that happens, the most rare treatment,” he added. “The slippery slope principle will have taken hold if we continue to go forward with what is happening today and scheduled to happen later this week.” Trump’s other attorney, David Schoen,...
    A number of Republican senators criticized Trump’s legal team Tuesday for lacking focus and making “weaker” arguments than the House impeachment managers on the first day of former President TrumpDonald TrumpDOJ to seek resignations of most Trump-appointed US attorneys: report Trump attorney withdraws request to not hold impeachment trial on Saturday Kinzinger in op-ed calls on GOP senators to convict Trump in impeachment trial MORE’s impeachment trial. “Anyone who listened to those arguments would recognize that the House managers were focused, relied upon and trusted upon the opinion of legal scholars,” said Sen. Bill CassidyBill CassidyGOP senator compares Trump impeachment proceedings to Soviet 'show trial' GOP senator: Administration officials showing 'they don't care if they have to work with us' Sunday shows preview: Budget resolution clears path for .9 trillion stimulus; Senate gears up for impeachment trial MORE (R-La.) after joining with five other Republican senators in voting that the trial was...
            
    Six Republican elected officials joined the Democratic ranks to confirm that the trial was constitutional and could continue.
    Republican Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy slammed former President Donald Trump’s impeachment lawyers and voted with a majority of Democrats Tuesday, saying the trial to impeach Trump is constitutional. The Senate held a vote Tuesday night after several hours of arguments from both sides which would rule if the trial was constitutional. The vote to proceed with the trial and that it is constitutional was 56-44. Cassidy told CNN after the vote that the House impeachment managers had a “very good opening” and made “very good arguments.” Cassidy was also asked if it was constitutional, to which he said: “I’ve always said I would approach this with an open mind and would listen as an impartial juror to both sides.” He also said: “The House managers were focused, they were organized … they made a compelling argument. President Trump’s team, they were disorganized, they did everything they could but to talk...
    The US Senate voted 56 in favor and 44 against continuing the impeachment trial of former Republican President Donald Trump on Tuesday. This is the second impeachment proceeding that swiftly from New York real estate mogul. Six Republican elected officials joined the Democratic ranks to confirm that the trial was constitutional and could continue. However, Democrats will need the backing of at least 17 Republicans later to achieve the two-thirds majority necessary to complete the procedure for the former president who is now a private citizen.
    EX-PRESIDENT Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial is moving forward after a 56-44 Senate vote on Tuesday afternoon - but acquittal appears certain.  Only six Republicans joined every Democrat in voting in favor of proceeding with the trial, a sign that the trial is doomed. 1Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial is moving forward after a 56-44 Senate voteCredit: EPA Trump’s lawyers, David Schoen and Bruce Castor, argued that the whole proceeding was unconstitutional and did not follow due process.  The 45th president’s lawyers said there is no legal justification to hold an impeachment trial for a president who has left office.  However, senators agreed with House leaders that the Senate must hold the trial because Trump was impeached before his time in the White House was up.  The Senate completed initial arguments on Tuesday and will start hearing evidence on Wednesday.  Most read in NewsBreaking‘BASE HATRED’Vid of Dems calling for Trump...
    Alan DershowitzAlan Morton DershowitzDershowitz made use of Trump access to help secure pardons and clemency for clients Dershowitz nominates Kushner, aide for Nobel Peace Prize Paul says Roberts's absence 'crystalized' argument against Trump impeachment MORE, an attorney who defended former President TrumpDonald TrumpDOJ to seek resignations of most Trump-appointed US attorneys: report Trump attorney withdraws request to not hold impeachment trial on Saturday Kinzinger in op-ed calls on GOP senators to convict Trump in impeachment trial MORE in his first impeachment trial, was sharply critical on Tuesday of current defense attorney Bruce Castor and his opening argument in Trump's second Senate trial. “There is no argument. I have no idea what he's doing. I have no idea why he's saying what he's saying,” Dershowitz, an opinion contributor for The Hill, said on Newsmax. Tuesday marked the impeachment trial's first day as Trump stands accused of inciting the deadly riot at the Capitol on...
    More On: impeachment Trump impeachment lawyer says ‘floodgates will open’ if Senate convicts him ‘I have a job’: Biden says he will not watch Trump impeachment trial Trump’s second impeachment trial begins in Senate Trump impeachment trial: Schedule, time, and how to watch Senate Republicans held strong in their belief that a non-sitting president cannot be tried for impeachment, with an overwhelming 44 of them voting Tuesday that such a trial is unconstitutional. The 56-44 vote to proceed with the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump for allegedly inciting the deadly Jan. 6 attack on the US Capitol by his supporters is a second clear indicator that the proceeding will not result in a conviction. Six Republicans voted with all Democrats, one more than during a vote last month that gauged support for one of the former president’s key defenses — that the Senate has no jurisdiction over him...
    WASHINGTON (CBS/AP) — Republican Pennsylvania Sen. Pat Toomey was one of six Senate Republicans to join Democrats to proceed with former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial. The Senate voted mostly along party lines 56-44. Toomey was joined by Sens. Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Mitt Romney of Utah. RELATED: Philadelphia Opening 6 Mass Vaccination Sites To Significantly Increase Distribution To Include Teachers, School Staff Trump was impeached by the House of Representatives for “incitement of insurrection” for his actions leading up to last month’s deadly U.S. Capitol riot. On Sunday, Toomey told CNN it’s “very unlikely” the Senate votes to convict Trump. “You did have 45 Republican senators vote to suggest that they didn’t think it was appropriate to conduct a trial, so you can infer how likely it is that those folks will vote to convict,”...
    WASHINGTON (CBS News) — The Senate voted to move forward with former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial on Tuesday, with a majority of senators determining they have jurisdiction to place former presidents on trial in cases of impeachment. By a vote of 56 to 44, the Senate rejected arguments by Mr. Trump’s attorneys, who asserted that holding an impeachment trial of a former president is unconstitutional. Six Republicans joined all 50 Democratic senators in voting to move forward with the trial. But the vote also served as an indication of Mr. Trump’s eventual acquittal, since 17 GOP senators would need to vote with Democrats in order to convict him. Senator Bill Cassidy joined five other GOP senators who had previously voted that the trial is constitutional. Read more at CBSNews.com>>
    WASHINGTON - Arguments are under way in Washington in the historic second impeachment trial of former U.S. President Donald Trump, with lawmakers set to decide whether it is legal under the Constitution to try him after he has already left office. Nine Democratic lawmakers from the House of Representatives, acting as prosecutors against the former U.S. leader, are arguing at Trump’s trial before the 100-member Senate that he should be held accountable for inciting the storming of the Capitol on January 6. They say he urged hundreds of supporters to confront lawmakers as they were certifying that Democrat Joe Biden had defeated him in last November’s election. Congressman Jamie Raskin of Maryland told the Senate that if Trump is not held accountable, it “would create a brand-new January exception” where future presidents would not face consequences for any wrongdoing during their final month in office through impeachment and trial...
    Trump impeachment trial lawyer David Schoen argued that Chief Justice John Roberts’s absence from presiding over the Senate trial created a conflict of interest for Democrats that has effectively eroded Trump’s rights as a defendant. Roberts’s decision not to serve as the trial’s presiding officer led to the selection of Sen. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyTrump attorney withdraws request to not hold impeachment trial on Saturday Schumer, McConnell finalizing deal on Trump impeachment trial This week: Senate starts Trump trial as Democrats draft coronavirus bill MORE (D-Vt.) for the role. In addition to presiding over the proceeding, Leahy, the most senior member of the Senate Democratic Conference, is also expected to cast a vote on Trump’s conviction. Schoen argued that Leahy’s dual role amounted to a conflict of interest, and one that had produced a “tangible detriment” to Trump’s right “to a conflict free, impartial presiding officer.” Leahy, for his part,...
    Due to ongoing coverage of the beginning of the Senate impeachment trial of Former President Donald Trump, Tuesday's "Jeopardy!" episode will air overnight.Tuesday's episode of "Jeopardy!" will air at 3:07 a.mThere was no new episode of "General Hospital" Tuesday.
    Under high security, the US Senate launched the second impeachment trial for Donald Trump on Tuesday. The ex-president is accused of “incitement to insurrection” in the assault on the Capitol. correspondent in New York VSt is a national tragedy. A disaster for America’s image in the world. And Donald Trump is entirely responsible for it ”. Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, the second in a year, opened in the Senate for about 80 minutes. The second Democratic prosecutor out of the nine sworn in, David Cicilline, opens his remarks with an unequivocal accusation of the former president guilty of a “violent crime”, the one which aroused the anger of his supporters on January 6 during a rally long planned in front of the White House.
    The Senate rejected an attempt on Tuesday to derail former President TrumpDonald TrumpDOJ to seek resignations of most Trump-appointed US attorneys: report Trump attorney withdraws request to not hold impeachment trial on Saturday Kinzinger in op-ed calls on GOP senators to convict Trump in impeachment trial MORE’s impeachment trial by getting it declared unconstitutional.  Senators voted 56-44 on if the trial was constitutional falling short of the simple majority needed to grind the proceedings to a halt. Six GOP senators jointed with Democrats to say they believe the trial is constitutional, largely mirroring a similar vote from late last month.  Only Sen. Bill CassidyBill CassidyGOP senator compares Trump impeachment proceedings to Soviet 'show trial' GOP senator: Administration officials showing 'they don't care if they have to work with us' Sunday shows preview: Budget resolution clears path for .9 trillion stimulus; Senate gears up for impeachment trial MORE (R-Pa.), who had...
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A majority of the U.S. Senate on Tuesday voted to hold a full impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump when they backed Democrats' argument that the proceeding is allowed under the U.S. Constitution. Trump's lawyers argued that as a former president, the Senate has no legal standing for holding a trial on the House of Representatives' impeachment charge that he incited an insurrection while in office. (Reporting by Richard Cowan) Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters. Tags: United States, crime
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 5:20 p.m. Senators in Donald Trump’s historic second impeachment trial have agreed to consider the case, rejecting an attempt by the former president’s defense team and some Republican allies to halt the trial because he is no longer in office. The vote was 56-44 on Tuesday on the question of whether the Senate has jurisdiction and could proceed. Trump is facing a charge of incitement of insurrection for his role in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot. ___ HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT FORMER PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP’S SECOND SENATE IMPEACHMENT TRIAL: Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial has opened, an undertaking like no other in U.S. history. The defeated former president stands charged by the House with inciting the deadly mob attack on the Capitol to overturn the election in what prosecutors argue...
    The Senate voted Tuesday to move ahead with the unprecedented impeachment trial of former President Trump after listening to hours of arguments on whether it is constitutional to try a president who is already out of office.  The vote was 56-44. Trump's legal team said the trial is unconstitutional because he's no longer in office and can't face removal, which is the standard judgment of an impeachment conviction.  "President Trump is no longer in office. The object of the Constitution has been achieved. He has been removed by the voters," Bruce Castor, a Trump attorney, said.  Another Trump lawyer David Schoen said impeachment is moot. "Presidents are impeachable because they are removable," Schoen said. "Former presidents are not because they cannot be removed." House Democrats made the case that not only is there precedent for proceeding with impeachment for a federal official who is out of office, but it's the right thing to do to hold presidents...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate votes that Trump impeachment trial is constitutional, even as most Republicans vote against proceeding. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Senate Democrats and a handful of Republicans voted to carry out  Donald Trump’s impeachment trial after the first day of proceedings, defeating the argument it is unconstitutional because Trump is no longer in office. The vote means the trial will continue for at least a week, with Democratic impeachment managers presenting evidence Trump provoked the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. Trump is charged with one article of inciting an insurrection. The former president’s defense lawyers argued Tuesday Trump’s trial is unconstitutional, not only because he is now a private citizen, but because he was not afforded due process. House Democrats and ten Republicans voted to impeach Trump on Jan. 13 after just a few hours of debate. The process was carried out in sharp contrast to Trump’s Feb. 2020 impeachment trial that followed weeks of hearings and dozens of witnesses along with steps taken to ensure due process for...
    More On: capitol riot Trump impeachment lawyer says ‘floodgates will open’ if Senate convicts him ‘I have a job’: Biden says he will not watch Trump impeachment trial Accused ‘Oath Keepers’ Capitol rioter worked for FBI: attorney As impeachment trial starts, Marjorie Taylor Greene rips Capitol rioters who ‘ruined’ objection plans Donald Trump’s attorney David Schoen on Tuesday argued that Democrats will “tear this country apart” and “open up new and bigger wounds” with the impeachment trial of the former president for allegedly inciting the Jan. 6 Capitol riot. Schoen urged the Senate to vote later Tuesday to determine as unconstitutional an article of impeachment against Trump for allegedly provoking the rampage that left five dead. “This trial will tear this country apart, perhaps like we have only seen once before in our history,” Schoen said on the Senate floor. Schoen argued that a thorough investigation — such as...
    The second impeachment trial of Donald J. Trump—this time for inciting an insurrection—is underway, with Tuesday bringing four hours of debate on whether it’s constitutional to hold an impeachment trial for someone who is no longer in office. If that sounds familiar, it’s because the Senate already voted once on this question, with five Republicans joining Democrats to say yes, it is. The quality of the Trump team’s argument was previewed when one of the lawyers they cited in a pre-trial document said they misrepresented his work. Assuming Republicans once again join Democrats in moving the trial forward, the coming days will bring up to 16 hours of arguments over two days from both the House impeachment managers and Trump’s defense team, followed by up to four hours of questions from senators, possibly followed by debate over whether to allow witnesses and subpoenas. At no point should we lose sight of...
    (CNN)The second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump opened promptly at 1 p.m. Tuesday, a historic moment that ensures the 45th President's place in history -- although not the way he would have hoped.While the outcome -- Trump being acquitted on the single charge of incitement of a riot -- seems likely, there are still considerable stakes here. Among them: How potential offenses by future federal elected officials will be treated by Congress and Trump's role within the GOP moving forward.I watched the first day of proceedings, which was pretty exclusively focused on whether or not it is constitutional to impeach a former president, and jotted down some takeaways. They're below. * That video: If you watch only one thing that comes out of the first day of the trial, you need to make it the 13-minute video presented by the Democratic House managers at the start of their...
    More On: impeachment ‘I have a job’: Biden says he will not watch Trump impeachment trial Trump’s second impeachment trial begins in Senate Trump impeachment trial: Schedule, time, and how to watch Trump attorney withdraws request to pause impeachment trial Former President Donald Trump’s lead impeachment lawyer warned Tuesday that “the floodgates will open” if the Senate convicts Trump of inciting the deadly storming of the Capitol by his supporters. During arguments on Day One of Trump’s second impeachment trial, defense lawyer Bruce Castor said countless former government officials could be subjected to impeachment proceedings should House Democrats, led by US Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.), prevail against the ex-president. “If you go down the road Mr. Raskin asks you to go down, the floodgates will open,” Castor told the Senate. “The political pendulum will shift one day. This chamber and the chamber across the way will change one day...
    Reuters February 9, 2021 0 Comments Donald Trump’s historic post-presidency impeachment trial began in the Senate on Tuesday, with Democrats who are hoping to disqualify him from again holding public office again showing graphic video of last month’s deadly storming of the U.S. Capitol that he is charged with inciting. The dramatic proceedings in the 100-seat Senate focused upon the question of whether holding a trial after Trump has left office, as he did on Jan. 20, violates the U.S. Constitution, which allows for impeachment for “high crimes and misdemeanors.” House of Representatives Democrats serving as prosecutors opened their case by showing video of Trump supporters violently overwhelming police at the Capitol in the Jan. 6 attack after he had encouraged people in a speech to “fight like hell” to overturn his Nov. 3 election defeat. “If that’s not an impeachment offense, then there is no such thing,” Democratic...
    Former President TrumpDonald TrumpDOJ to seek resignations of most Trump-appointed US attorneys: report Trump attorney withdraws request to not hold impeachment trial on Saturday Kinzinger in op-ed calls on GOP senators to convict Trump in impeachment trial MORE’s attorney Bruce Castor opened his defense on Tuesday by arguing the impeachment trial is explicitly political and an effort by Democrats to ensure they never have to face Trump in an election again. “Let’s understand why we’re really here,” Castor said. “We’re really here because the majority of the House of Representatives does not want to face Donald Trump as a political candidate in the future.” If Trump is convicted in the Senate by a two-thirds majority, it would then only require a bare majority vote to bar him from ever running for office again. Castor accused Democrats of taking the easy way out and of infantilizing ordinary Americans, who he said...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – The second U.S. Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump got underway Tuesday. Senate Pro Tempore Patrick Leahy is presiding over the proceedings. RELATED: Calle Ocho Music Festival, Carnaval On The Mile Canceled Again Due To Pandemic It began with the chaplain leading the Senate in prayer and then the pledge of allegiance. The acting Senate sergeant-at-arms Jennifer Hemingway also read a proclamation. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer introduced a resolution on the rules of the impeachment trial. It was passed by a vote of 89 to 11. The big focus of day one will be whether the constitution allows Congress to impeach a president after he’s left office. RELATED: Live Updates: Second Trump Impeachment Trial Underway In Senate Before the proceeding got underway, Senator Marco Rubio expressed his displeasure in a video that it was moving forward. “There isn’t a single...
    The charge against Trump is derived from his actions on January 6, when he urged his followers to march towards the headquarters of Congress | 02/09/2021 | ionicons-v5-c13: 52 | . | Washington.- The second impeachment the former US president Donald trump started this Tuesday in a Senate totally divided, so he will hardly be condemned for his responsibility in the assault on Capitol. The 100 senators will serve as jury of the one known in the United States as « impeachment« , and they will be in charge of assessing the accusation of » incitement to insurrection« against Trump for the irruption of a peat his followers in the Capitol, which left 5 dead. « The Senate meets as court of impeachment« said the Democratic senator Patrick Leahy, who chairs the process, at the beginning of the session at 1:00 p.m. local time (6:00 p.m. GMT). The session began with a vote on...
    Miami : This Tuesday started, in the United States Senate, the second impeachment against Donald Trump. It is an unparalleled process because, thanks to him, the billionaire will go down in history as the only president of the American Union to have faced two consecutive no-confidence motions. On the other hand, the “impeachment” occurs even when the magnate left office, on January 20. That reality makes you the first U.S. ruler to face impeachment, despite leaving the Oval Office. The accusation that is on the table is “incitement to insurrection”, an accusation that was made by the House of Representatives, following the events that occurred in Washington DC on Wednesday, January 6. That day, a mob of pro-Trump protesters besieged the Capitol, the seat of the United States Congress. Many of them abruptly and violently broke into the building, with the sole intention of prevent senators from certifying Joe...
    February 9, 2021 4:25 PM | With information from EFE 15 minutes. The historic impeachmet to former US President Donald Trump began on Tuesday in a totally divided Senate, so he will hardly be condemned for his responsibility in the assault on the Capitol. The 100 senators will serve as impeachment jury, and will be in charge of assessing the accusation of “incitement to insurrection” against Trump for the irruption of a mob of his followers on the Capitol, which left 5 dead. “The Senate it meets as a court of impeachment, “said Democratic Senator Patrick Leahy, who is chairing the process, at the beginning of the session at 1:00 p.m. local time (18:00 GMT). The session began with a vote on the rules that will govern impeachment. These were approved by 89 votes in favor and 11 against. “It is our constitutional duty to carry out a fair and...
    More On: impeachment Trump’s second impeachment trial begins in Senate Trump impeachment trial: Schedule, time, and how to watch Trump attorney withdraws request to pause impeachment trial Trump trial will run into weekend, wrap next week, with 16 hours for each side WASHINGTON — President Biden will not tune into former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial because he is too busy, he told reporters on Tuesday as proceedings got underway. “I am not,” Biden said in the Oval Office when asked if he would watch the trial. “I told you before, I have a job.” The Biden administration has tried to distance itself from the partisan proceedings, instead focusing on its legislative agenda which includes a $1.9 trillion coronavirus rescue package. “We’ve already lost over 450,000 people and we’re going to lose a whole lot more if we don’t act and act decisively and quickly,” Biden said during...
    Outspoken celebrities took to Twitter to comment on the historic second impeachment of former President Donald Trump on Tuesday.  The former president has been out of office for nearly three weeks, but he is still facing consequences for his alleged part in the Jan. 6 riot that took place at the U.S. Capitol building that left several people dead and briefly interrupted the Senate from certifying the Electoral College votes, which were in favor of Joe Biden. Democrats in Congress, and even some Republicans, were outraged that the former president had gathered a rally in Washington, D.C., that day and repeated his false claims that he won the presidential election, and said he did not do enough to stop the attack once his supporters began to breach the Capitol about one hour after his rally's conclusion.  COUNTRY SINGER TENILLE ARTS RECALLS PERFORMING ON 'THE BACHELOR': 'JUST A PERFECT FIT' Bette Midler, Padma...
    A solid majority of U.S. voters believe it is unlikely the Senate will convict former President Donald Trump, a Rasmussen Reports survey released on the first day of the impeachment trial revealed. “How likely is it that the Senate will vote to convict former President Trump of ‘high crimes and misdemeanors’?” the survey, taken February 4 and 7 among 1,000 likely U.S. voters, asked. Overall, 64 percent cast doubt on a conviction. Of those, 28 percent deemed it “not very likely” and 36 percent chose “not at all likely.” Eleven percent remained confident, calling a conviction “very likely,” followed by 20 percent who said “somewhat likely.” Five percent remain unsure. Nearly three-quarters of Republicans, 72 percent, said it is either not very likely or not at all likely that the Senate will convict Trump, whom Democrats accuse of incitement of insurrection. Fifty-three percent of Democrats expressed the same view. The...
    Lead House impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD), who objected to the certification of 2017 election results, and promised to impeach President Donald Trump as soon as he took office, argued Tuesday that is is constitutional to impeach a former president. Raskin told the Senators assembled for the trial that if they did not hold a trial, they would be creating a “January exception,” allowing presidents to commit misconduct before leaving office. (He did not note that presidents are still subject to ordinary criminal law, including for crimes committed during their presidencies, after leaving office.) In addition, Raskin argued, the House had impeached Trump before he left office, suggesting that meant the process was legitimate for that reason. He also cited examples of states that intended impeachment to apply to former officials. And he argued that the Founders believed that challenges to elections were particularly grave abuses of power by...
    WASHINGTON - Arguments are under way in Washington in the historic second impeachment trial of former U.S. President Donald Trump, with lawmakers set to decide whether it is legal under the Constitution to try him after he has already left office. Nine Democratic lawmakers from the House of Representatives, acting as prosecutors against the former U.S. leader, are arguing at Trump’s trial before the 100-member Senate that he should be held accountable for inciting the storming of the Capitol on January 6. They say he urged hundreds of supporters to confront lawmakers as they were certifying that Democrat Joe Biden had defeated him in last November’s election. Congressman Jamie Raskin of Maryland told the Senate that if Trump is not held accountable, it “would create a brand-new January exception” where future presidents would not face consequences for any wrongdoing during their final month in office through impeachment and trial...
    WASHINGTON -- Donald Trump's historic second impeachment trial opened Tuesday in the Senate with graphic video of the deadly Jan. 6 attack on Congress and the defeated former president whipping up a rally crowd - "We're going to walk down to the Capitol!" - as he encouraged a futile fight over his presidency.The lead House prosecutor told senators the case would present "cold, hard facts" against Trump, who is charged with inciting the siege of the Capitol to overturn the election he lost to Democrat Joe Biden. Senators sitting as jurors, many who themselves fled for safety that day, watched the jarring video of the chaotic scene, rioters pushing past police to storm the halls, Trump flags waving."That's a high crime and misdemeanor," said Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., in opening remarks. "If that's not an impeachable offense, then there's no such thing."Trump is the first president to face impeachment charges...
    Former President Donald Trump spent Tuesday afternoon quietly watching television coverage of his second impeachment trial, according to multiple sources familiar with the schedule at his Mar-a-Lago home. Meanwhile, President Biden said he would not be watching proceedings, and would instead be focused on tackling the coronavirus pandemic. Trump's low-key afternoon stands in sharp contrast to his first trial when he kept a running commentary with 142 tweets and retweets – a then presidential record – during just a single day of opening arguments. Of course, in the final days of his time as chief executive, Twitter banned him, citing a threat of a repeat of the Jan. 6 Capitol violence that led to his impeachment by the House and triggered the Senate trial, the first time any U.S. president has been the subject of two. It means, this time, he left it to advisers and the Republican National Committee...
    The impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump got underway in the Senate on Tuesday, with the body set to decide on Trump's culpability in the Jan. 6 riots on the U.S. Capitol. Once the trial rules were approved, the House impeachment managers in charge of prosecuting Trump, led by Rep. Jamie Raskin of Maryland, kicked off the proceedings on the Senate floor. Watch the trial live below: Tags: impeachment, Congress, Senate
    White House press secretary Jen Psaki on Tuesday said President Biden is not weighing in on former President Donald Trump’s Senate impeachment trial because "he’s not a pundit," while maintaining that he will not watch the proceedings. During the White House press briefing Tuesday, Psaki was repeatedly pressed by reporters for commentary on behalf of the president regarding his predecessor’s second Senate impeachment trial — which began amid the briefing. WHO ARE THE DEMOCRATIC TRUMP IMPEACHMENT MANAGERS? "He’s not a pundit," Psaki said. "He’s not going to opine on the back-and-forth arguments, nor is he watching them." Psaki maintained that Biden has conveyed that Trump’s "words and his actions and of course the events of Jan. 6 were a threat to our democracy." "He ran against him because he was concerned that former President Trump was unfit for office, in part, because of his past history of invoking violence around the...
    More On: senate Trump’s second impeachment trial begins in Senate Rand Paul and Jim Jordan blast Dems for impeachment trial in op-eds Trump impeachment trial: Schedule, time, and how to watch Trump attorney withdraws request to pause impeachment trial Republicans on Tuesday announced selections for opposition leaders on the Senate’s evenly divided committees — leaning mostly on old hands who will face off against some new Democratic picks to lead the panels. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), who is known for readily bridging past political divides — as he did to work closely with former President Donald Trump — will be the top Republican on the Senate Budget Committee, which is being chaired by socialist Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, an independent who caucuses with Democrats. Graham, like Sanders, is a veteran member of the committee. Sen. John Barrasso (R-Wyo.) will be the GOP leader on the Senate Energy and...
    The Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump officially began Tuesday afternoon, and presiding officer Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., promised to conduct the proceedings fairly. Normally, as was done with Trump's first impeachment trial and that of former President Bill Clinton, the chief justice of the Supreme Court presides over a presidential impeachment trial. As Trump is no longer president, Leahy – the president pro tempore of the Senate – is filling that role. SENATE APPROVES IMPEACHMENT TIMELINE AS TRUMP'S SECOND TRIAL KICKS OFF "As many of you know, I did not ask or seek to preside over this trial," Leahy wrote in a letter to the Senate on Tuesday. "Yet while I occupy the constitutional office of the President pro tempore, it is incumbent upon me to do so." Leahy assured his colleagues that while he may be of the same party as the Democratic House impeachment managers prosecuting the case, he will look to...
    A visual aid for Republican Senators shown at Tuesday's impeachment trial The second impeachment trial of Donald J. Trump—this time for inciting an insurrection—is underway, with Tuesday bringing four hours of debate on whether it’s constitutional to hold an impeachment trial for someone who is no longer in office. If that sounds familiar, it’s because the Senate already voted once on this question, with five Republicans joining Democrats to say yes, it is. The quality of the Trump team’s argument was previewed when one of the lawyers they cited in a pre-trial document said they misrepresented his work. Assuming Republicans once again join Democrats in moving the trial forward, the coming days will bring up to 16 hours of arguments over two days from both the House impeachment managers and Trump’s defense team, followed by up to four hours of questions from senators, possibly followed by debate over whether to allow witnesses...
    WASHINGTON -- The Senate opened Donald Trump's historic second impeachment trial Tuesday, the defeated former president charged by the House with inciting the deadly mob attack on the Capitol to overturn the election in what prosecutors call the "most grievous constitutional crime."Trump's lawyers are insisting that he is not guilty of the sole charge of "incitement of insurrection," his fiery words just a figure of speech as he encouraged a rally crowd to "fight like hell" for his presidency. But prosecutors say he "has no good defense" and they promise new evidence.The Capitol siege on Jan. 6 stunned the world as rioters stormed the building to try to stop the certification of President-elect Joe Biden's victory. Five people died."Hear ye, hear ye, hear ye," the acting sergeant at arms intoned to start the trial.SEE ALSO: What to know about Trump's 2nd impeachment trialEMBED More News Videos Here's what you need...
    In a solemn atmosphere and under high security, the US Senate on Tuesday opened the second historic trial of Donald Trump, accused of having incited his supporters “to insurgency” before the bloody attack on the Capitol. Now living in Florida, the billionaire will not go to trial. And there is little doubt that he will eventually be acquitted. In great silence, the elected Democrats charged with the accusation crossed to the Senate the same corridors of the Capitol, the seat of Congress, where pro-Trump demonstrators had rushed on January 6, sowing chaos and forcing the evacuation of parliamentarians. An unprecedented situation, the 100 senators who serve as jurors were thus the witnesses, and victims, of the attack. After a prayer, they took their places for this doubly historic trial. It is indeed the first time that a former American president is targeted by an impeachment procedure...
    Trump finally coming out to tell insurgents "we love you" over two hours after the Capitol was invaded. Republicans are desperate to have no witness testimony at Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial. They’d much rather run on the pretense that the whole thing is unconstitutional for mumble mumble reasons, and power through the whole of the presentation from the House impeachment managers with hands clamped tightly over their ears. After all, as long as they can pretend to be voting on a technical issue about impeachment, it’s less obvious that they’re actually signing on as full participants in sedition. On the other hand, Democrats in both the House and Senate seem content to also run the impeachment trial without witnesses. Part of that comes from a concern that if there is a trial stretching out for weeks, Republicans will be on television every day pounding the “the Senate is getting nothing...
    WASHINGTON - The historic second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump started Tuesday in the U.S. Senate, with Trump accused of inciting insurrection a month ago by urging his supporters to confront lawmakers at the U.S. Capitol as they were certifying that Democrat Joe Biden had defeated Trump in the 2020 election. WATCH TRIAL LIVE The protest turned into mayhem, as about 800 supporters of Trump stormed past authorities into the Capitol, smashed doors and windows, ransacked some congressional offices and scuffled with police. Five people were left dead, including a Capitol Police officer whose death is under investigation as a homicide and a rioter shot by a police officer. The 100 senators – split evenly between Republican and Democratic caucuses -- hearing the impeachment case against the single-term president are in a unique position: many of them were witnesses themselves to the chaos of January 6 as they...
    The Senate will begin its second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump Tuesday afternoon. The Senate will begin at 1:00 P.M. Eastern, from which Republicans and Democrats will have four hours each to make their case as to whether Trump can be impeached now that he is out of office. The Senate can decide this matter with a majority vote. On Wednesday, Trump’s legal team and the House impeachment managers will have up to 16 hours each for presentations as to why or why not Trump should be impeached for allegedly inciting an insurrection. After the presentations, senators can decide if they need additional witnesses or documents for the trial, which can they can obtain via subpoena. Trump’s defense argued that that the Senate cannot try a president who left office. They also rejected the House’s argument that Trump should be barred from holding any future public office by...
    The Senate on Tuesday adopted the organizing resolution for former President TrumpDonald TrumpDOJ to seek resignations of most Trump-appointed US attorneys: report Trump attorney withdraws request to not hold impeachment trial on Saturday Kinzinger in op-ed calls on GOP senators to convict Trump in impeachment trial MORE's second impeachment trial. The resolution, which was approved in an 89-11 vote, lays out the timeline for the impeachment trial, which could wrap as soon as early next week. "It is agreed to by the House managers, the former president's counsel, and is cosponsored by the Republican leader. It is bipartisan. It is our solemn constitutional duty to conduct a fair ... impeachment trial," Senate Majority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerOcasio-Cortez, Schumer announce federal COVID-19 fund to help families pay for funerals Over 60 progressive groups urge Schumer to nix filibuster Booker reintroduces bill to give all newborns ,000 savings accounts MORE (D-N.Y.) said. GOP...
    White House press secretary Jen PsakiJen PsakiThe Memo: Democrats, GOP face dangers from Trump trial Biden administration sends conflicting signals on school reopenings White House says Biden 'head nod' didn't signify shift on Iran MORE on Tuesday said President BidenJoe BidenDemocrats say Trump impeachment defense 'wholly without merit' A US-Israel defense treaty has benefits — and perils White House: Biden won't spend much time watching Trump impeachment trial MORE would not be weighing in on the arguments from either side in Trump’s Senate impeachment trial, reiterating the administration’s stance that it will take a hands off approach to the proceedings. “Joe Biden is the president, he’s not a pundit. He’s not going to opine on the back-and-forth arguments, nor is he watching them, that are taking place in the Senate,” Psaki said during the daily White House press briefing when asked about Trump’s planned legal strategy that in part cites examples of Democrats calling...
    Former President Trump's impeachment is slated to continue throughout the weekend under a resolution authored by Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and GOP Leader Mitch McConnell.  Initially, the trial was to break for the Jewish Sabbath on Friday evening and Saturday due to a request from Trump's legal team. But Trump's lawyer David Schoen withdrew his request late Monday to "bring to a conclusion for all involved" and said other members of the defense team can handle the case as he observes the Sabbath.  The Senate approved the resolution by an 89-11 vote in one of its first actions during the impeachment trial.  TRUMP'S IMPEACHMENT TRIAL: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW The eight-page bipartisan resolution set out the rules and timeline for Trump's second impeachment trial in an effort to complete the unprecedented proceedings in a fair and speedy fashion. Trump's legal team and House Democratic impeachment managers have signed off on...
    The Senate Tuesday convened for the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump and will begin with a debate and vote on whether it is constitutional to try to convict an ex-president. The nine House impeachment managers entered the chamber after all 100 senators filed into the room and were seated for what is expected to be a trial lasting one week or more. The House voted to impeach Trump on Jan. 13 for inciting an insurrection that provoked the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. But Tuesday’s debate will center solely on whether the now-ex president can be convicted. The debate on the constitutionality of the trial is expected to last up to four hours, and the vote may mirror one taken last month in which 45 Republicans voted not to proceed to a trial on the grounds that Trump has now left office and as a...
    WASHINGTON, D.C. (CBSNEWS.COM) — The Senate is convening Tuesday to commence with the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, the first Senate trial of a former president in U.S. history. President Donald Trump at the White House on February 5, 2020 in Washington, DC. (credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images) Mr. Trump faces a single charge of “incitement of insurrection” for his role in the January 6 assault on the Capitol. The House of Representatives voted to impeach him on January 13, one week after the attack that left five people dead. Trump is the only president to be impeached twice. ♦♦♦ Click Here To Read The Complete Story On cbsnews.com ♦♦♦
    WASHINGTON -- The Senate opened Donald Trump's historic second impeachment trial Tuesday, the defeated former president charged by the House with inciting the deadly mob attack on the Capitol to overturn the election in what prosecutors call the "most grievous constitutional crime."Trump's lawyers are insisting that he is not guilty of the sole charge of "incitement of insurrection," his fiery words just a figure of speech as he encouraged a rally crowd to "fight like hell" for his presidency. But prosecutors say he "has no good defense" and they promise new evidence.The Capitol siege on Jan. 6 stunned the world as rioters stormed the building to try to stop the certification of President-elect Joe Biden's victory. Five people died.Trump is the first president to face impeachment charges after leaving office and the first to be twice impeached for high crimes and misdemeanors. He remains a challenge to the nation's civic...
    (CNN)Commentators weigh in on the first day of former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial. Without 67 votes to convict, the purpose of this impeachment trial--and metrics for success--are very different for Democrats and Republicans. But for the Biden Administration and Mitch McConnell, its the same: how quickly they can finish this and move on.— Sarah Isgur (@whignewtons) February 9, 2021 Most Senate GOP will gaslight. They don't wanna focus on merits of impeachment. They know on substance, it's a solid case.Trump helped incite an insurrection which lead to deaths and injuries. Period.History will judge harshly those who act out of cowardice and self-interest.— Ana Navarro-Cárdenas (@ananavarro) February 9, 2021 This might be the only trial in history (crim, civil, impeachment, whatever) where the entire body of evidence needed to convict is publicly available on video/social media.Witnesses would be great, but theres no critical fact one could provide thats not...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local): 1 p.m. Donald Trump’s historic second impeachment trial has opened in the Senate, with Democrats arguing that the former president should be convicted for inciting a violent mob of his supporters to attack the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Tuesday is the first day of arguments in the trial, which is expected to last around a week or more. Senators, sitting at their desks and in other locations around the chamber, will listen to arguments from Trump’s lawyers that the trial is unconstitutional because Trump is no longer president. Democrats will dispute that claim, pointing to legal experts and historical precedent. Each side has two hours to make its case on Tuesday, after which the Senate is expected to vote and reject the GOP efforts to dismiss the trial. Opening arguments from the...
    The Senate Tuesday convened for the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump and will begin with a debate and vote on whether it is constitutional to try to convict an ex-president. The nine House impeachment managers entered the chamber after all 100 senators filed into the room and were seated for what is expected to be a trial lasting one week or more. The House voted to impeach Trump on Jan. 13 for inciting an insurrection that provoked the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. But Tuesday’s debate will center solely on whether the now-ex president can be convicted. The debate on the constitutionality of the trial is expected to last up to four hours and the vote may mirror one taken last month in which 45 Republicans voted not to proceed to a trail on the grounds that Trump has now left office and as a private citizen,...
    WASHINGTON - The historic second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump starts Tuesday in the U.S. Senate, with Trump accused of inciting insurrection a month ago by urging his supporters to confront lawmakers at the U.S. Capitol as they were certifying that Democrat Joe Biden had defeated Trump in the 2020 election. WATCH TRIAL LIVE The protest turned into mayhem, as about 800 supporters of Trump stormed past authorities into the Capitol, smashed doors and windows, ransacked some congressional offices and scuffled with police. Five people were left dead, including a Capitol Police officer whose death is under investigation as a homicide and a rioter shot by a police officer. The 100 senators – split evenly between Republican and Democratic caucuses -- hearing the impeachment case against the single-term president are in a unique position: many of them were witnesses themselves to the chaos of January 6 as...
    Madison Summers February 9, 2021 0 Comments Congress is balancing former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial and seeking to pass COVID-19 relief at the same time, but Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) is saying “we can do both at once.” “It was said a few weeks ago in all the punditry and everywhere else that the impeachment trial would throw a wrench into President Biden’s early agenda. We are here today to say we are not letting that happen. We can do both at once,” Schumer said at Tuesday’s press conference. “To the pundits who said we can’t do both at once: We say you are wrong. We can and we are. The bottom line is simple the Senate is moving full steam ahead on a bold plan to great this country out of the crisis.” He also said, “Make no mistake: Senate Democrats will...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial opens in the Senate, first for an ex-president. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    More On: Trump impeachment trial Rand Paul and Jim Jordan blast Dems for impeachment trial in op-eds Trump impeachment trial: Schedule, time, and how to watch Biden refuses to comment on Trump impeachment trial Trump’s lawyers call Senate impeachment trial act of ‘political theater’ The second impeachment trial against former President Donald Trump is kicking off in the Senate — as Democratic House impeachment managers make the case against the former president for “incitement of insurrection,” for his role in the Capitol riot on Jan. 6. The opening of the trial will begin with four hours of arguments from Trump’s lawyers and the House managers over its constitutionality and then stretch over the rest of the week with a verdict expected possibly early next week. Trump’s legal team is set to argue that the proceeding is unconstitutional because he is no longer in office, while the Democratic House managers...
    Former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial begins on Tuesday with up to four hours of debate on whether a former president who was impeached while he was still in office can be prosecuted when he is no longer in the White House. The impeachment trial will continue on Wednesday, with each side getting up to 16 hours to present their case, if a majority of Senators agree later today that Trump can be convicted as a former president. Stay tuned to Breitbart News for live updates. All times Eastern. — 12:55 PM: National Guard patrol as impeachment trial is about to start. Members of the National Guard patrol at the U.S. Capitol as the second impeachment trial of former Pres. Trump is set to get underway. https://t.co/7b1YAZRViI #ImpeachmentTrial pic.twitter.com/LdDFE7TcZz — ABC News (@ABC) February 9, 2021 12:50 PM: Pelosi: Dems will be defending democracy: Speaker Pelosi to House Democrats...
    WASHINGTON -- Former President Donald Trump's historic Senate impeachment started Tuesday, this time over the deadly Jan. 6 insurrection at the United States Capitol.While Trump's acquittal is expected, all 100 senators will first have to sit at their desks and listen to hours of graphic testimony from House Democrats about the riots, which left five people dead. The House impeached Trump on Jan. 13, one week after the violence.Here's a look at things to know about what's next for the former president and Congress.How to watch the impeachment trialYou can watch live coverage here on our website or on our streaming apps for Apple TV, Android TV, Fire TV and Roku. Throughout the trial, stay up to date on all the impeachment trial developments with "Good Morning America," "World News Tonight" and other ABC News shows.Why was Trump impeached again?Then-President Donald Trump was impeached by the U.S. House for a...
    WASHINGTON -- The Senate is poised to launch Donald Trump's second impeachment trial Tuesday, the defeated former president charged by the House with inciting the deadly mob attack on the Capitol to overturn the election in what prosecutors argue is the "most grievous constitutional crime."Trump's lawyers are insisting that he is not guilty of the sole charge of "incitement of insurrection," his fiery words just a figure of speech as he encouraged a rally crowd to "fight like hell" for his presidency. But prosecutors say he "has no good defense" and they promise new evidence.The Capitol siege on Jan. 6 stunned the world as rioters stormed the building to try to stop the certification of President-elect Joe Biden's victory. Five people died.With senators gathered as the court of impeachment, the trial will start with debate over whether it's constitutionally permissible to prosecute Trump after leaving office. His defense team has...
    WASHINGTON -- Former President Donald Trump's historic Senate impeachment trial begins Tuesday, this time over the deadly Jan. 6 insurrection at the United States Capitol.While Trump's acquittal is expected, all 100 senators will first have to sit at their desks and listen to hours of graphic testimony from House Democrats about the riots, which left five people dead. The House impeached Trump on Jan. 13, one week after the violence.Here's a look at things to know about what's next for the former president and Congress.Why was Trump impeached again?Then-President Donald Trump was impeached by the U.S. House for a historic second time on Jan. 13, charged with "incitement of insurrection" over the deadly mob siege of the U.S. Capitol just days earlier. The four-page article of impeachment says that Trump "gravely endangered the security of the United States and its institutions of Government."EMBED More News Videos Elizabeth Schulze has more...
    WASHINGTON -- Donald Trump's historic second impeachment trial is an undertaking like no other in U.S. history, the defeated former president charged by the House with inciting the deadly mob attack on the U.S. Capitol to overturn the election in what prosecutors argue is the "most grievous constitutional crime."Trump's lawyers insist as the Senate trial opens Tuesday that he is not guilty on the sole charge of "incitement of insurrection," his fiery words just a figure of speech, even as he encouraged a rally crowd to "fight like hell" for his presidency. The Capitol siege on Jan. 6 stunned the world as rioters stormed the building to try to stop the certification of President-elect Joe Biden's victory. Five people died.No witnesses are expected to be called, in part because the senators sworn as jurors, forced to flee for safety, will be presented with graphic videos recorded that day. Holed up...
    The second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump begins today. Trump was charged with incitement of insurrection by the House after the attack on the Capitol last month. House impeachment managers and Trump’s legal team will debate the constitutionality of the case today. After a Senate vote, which will likely pass, both sides will begin opening arguments on Wednesday. What time does the impeachment start? The first day of the trial begins at 1PM ET. There will be four hours for both sides to present arguments. The House has already voted to bring an article of impeachment against Trump, so the Senate arguments will be over whether the misconduct is sufficient to justify penalties, including potentially barring Trump from holding federal office in the future. How long will the trial last? After the Senate vote passes, both sides will have 16 hours over two days to make their...