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    These days, Lipi Roy spends her free hours helping people with substance-abuse issues get vaccinated. “It’s the right thing to do,” the doctor and NYU assistant professor told The Post. In New York, only 6% of the population is fully inoculated, per worldwide COVID-19 vaccination database GlobalEpidemics.org. Complex online scheduling platforms, language barriers and inequitable health care have hindered access to the vaccine for many vulnerable citizens. But now, heroic New Yorkers are fighting to level the playing field. Like Roy, Tomas Ramos has made it his mission to help immunize people who might otherwise struggle to get a coveted appointment slot. His grassroots organization, the Bronx Rising Initiative, hosts pop-up vaccination centers for seniors living in The Bronx’s housing projects. “We’re trying to save lives,” Ramos told The Post.  Tomas Ramos’ Bronx Rising Initiative hosts pop-up vaccination sites for senior citizens living in Bronx...
    New York : Last september, Brazilian dentist Raquel Trevisi, 38, was hospitalized with COVID-19. As he practiced physical exercises and did not have any pre-existing conditions, He believed that his illness would not get worse. However, it got worse and worse. “No one would have ever imagined that they would have some kind of complication with COVID, because they led a healthy life, but each organism reacts differently to the virus. The disease is very complex, ”he tells BBC News Brasil, the BBC’s Portuguese service. The woman’s lungs were severely affected by the coronavirus. Admitted to a private Presidente Prudente hospital in São Paulo, where she lives, she needed to be referred to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and was intubated. On the second day in the ICU, she was placed in position prone position (face down), a technique used to improve lung oxygenation. She spent 18 hours like...
    Jab tidings TOO often over the past year we have been glued to the TV for the Prime Minister’s doom-laden special broadcasts, dreading the announcement of new restrictions. Not today. Today Boris Johnson is all smiles and we can celebrate smashing the target for vaccinating 15million of the most vulnerable, thanks to our wonderful scientists, health workers and military, not to mention The Sun’s Jabs Army of volunteers. 4Boris Johnson was all smiles announcing that Britain has hit the 15 million vaccinations targetCredit: Twitter Today we can see Covid cases down 80 per cent since the New Year. These are massive steps towards a brighter future, but we are hungry for more. What we crave now are details of how we will get our lives back; how our children will go back to school; how shops, pubs and restaurants will reopen; how we will be able to meet up...
    Hing Yiu Chung lives in a very mixed neighborhood in San Francisco that was hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic. Although it is difficult to obtain vaccines, this 69-year-old woman managed to inoculate herself by taking proof of where she lives. Miami world / apnews She had to stand in line for two hours with other seniors, some disabled or using canes, to receive one of the 200 or so vaccinations a Bayview clinic gives every day. “Luckily it was not a cold day nor did it rain. Otherwise it would have been harder ”, declared this Chinese woman. The experience was not ideal, but it offers many poor people, Hispanics and African Americans the opportunity to get vaccinated as part of a multi-community initiative targeting the ZIP codes most affected by COVID-19. Dallas tried something similar, prioritizing certain zip codes where there are generally large minority communities, but dropped...
    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Church leaders in Richmond are partnering with local health districts to get COVID-19 vaccines to the most vulnerable people in their communities. Second Baptist Church, in South Richmond, and First African Church, in North Richmond, were both vaccination sites Saturday. The Richmond Times-Dispatch reports that the churches' efforts are part of an attempt to find new strategies to reach segments of the community that may not have access to information or to transportation to get vaccinated. The events are not open to the public. Faith community leaders work with the health departments to identify, register and then vaccinate people most at risk. About 500 people are set to be vaccinated at these smaller event through this week at sites in the Richmond and Henrico health districts. They’ll all be invited back for a second shot in a few weeks. “We’re really trying different strategies to be...
    President Joe Biden signs an executive order after speaking during an event on his administration's Covid-19 response with U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris, left, in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, on Thursday, Jan. 21, 2021.Al Drago | Bloomberg | Getty Images The more than 40 million Americans who rely on nutritional programs will soon see another bump in benefits. President Joe Biden on Friday is expected to sign an executive order that will ask the U.S. Department of Agriculture to expand various food benefits programs. First, Biden will ask the USDA to consider allowing states to expand access to enhanced Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP. In addition, Biden's executive order also tasks the agency to examine increasing the Pandemic Electronic Benefits Transfer program, or P-EBT, by 15%. The program replaces school meals for low-income children and has been an important lifeline for many, as...
    EAST HOLLYWOOD -- Heleo Leyva is a street vendor that's been keeping busy since the start of the pandemic.Leyva has been hosting community cookouts in the East Hollywood, area of Los Angeles, along with other local volunteer chefs, to help provide food for the neighborhood's most needy, such as the elderly and homeless."It all starts with donations, then we buy the stuff and then we come out here and grill. And give it out to people living on the street," said Leyva. "I thought to myself well 'I have a big grill,' and this is a way I that I can chip in and help out," said Daniel Mattern, a volunteer chef.Weekly the group has been giving out about 130 free plates of food. Locals line up to wait for the grilled food and walk away with a good meal, which often includes chicken and meat, along with some delicious...
    These days, the world has seen and heard enough bad news. So Jill Wiedemann-West, CEO of People Incorporated, an Eagan-based nonprofit providing integrated behavioral and mental health services, felt happy to be able to finally be the bearer of some good news. Right before the winter holidays, Wiedemann-West received an email that was sent to members of the National Council for Behavioral Health, outlining details of the just-approved $2.3 trillion COVID-19 relief spending bill. Major recipients in this package are certified community behavioral health clinics (CCBHCs), nonprofits like People Incorporated that provide a comprehensive range of mental health and substance use disorder services to vulnerable individuals. The new package allotted $600 million in new funding for those programs through Sept. 30, 2021. In 2017, after an exhaustive application process, People Incorporated became one of six providers in Minnesota awarded CCBHC status by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The new spending package...
    Scientists have identified the brain cells that are most vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease for the first time, in what's being referred to as the 'holy grail' of dementia studies.  The brain cells lie in a region known as the entorhinal cortex, which controls memory, navigation and time perception, and are the first to be killed off by the disease. The researchers hope the findings could be used to develop a new and much more targeted approach to developing therapies to slow or prevent the spread of Alzheimer's disease.   The brain cells lie in a region known as the entorhinal cortex, which controls memory, navigation and time perception, and are the first to be killed off by the disease HOW MANY PEOPLE HAVE DEMENTIA? The charity Alzheimer's Research UK has described dementia as the greatest health challenge of our time. Somebody is diagnosed with it every three seconds. It is the...
    Savannah Rychcik December 25, 2020 0 Comments Pope Francis is advocating for the “most vulnerable and needy” so they can receive the COVID-19 vaccine ahead of others. “Vaccines for everybody, especially for the most vulnerable and needy,” who should be first in line, Francis said on Friday, according to The Associated Press. He said the development of the vaccines are a “light of hope” for the world. Francis continued, “We can’t let closed nationalisms impede us from living as the true human family that we are.” He called on leaders to “promote cooperation and not competition, and to search for a solution for all.” Francis delivered his address from the Apostolic Palace instead of outdoors in St. Peter’s Square in Vatican City. During his Christmas address, Francis acknowledged the impact the pandemic has had on the world and urged all to come together. ...
    There is a common misconception in higher education that when college acceptance letters arrive, the biggest hurdle to a bright future has been successfully overcome. However, the greater challenge, which will only be exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, is keeping college students enrolled after their freshman year. In fact, National Student Clearinghouse reported that of the 2.6 million first-time undergraduate students who enrolled in fall 2018, almost 25 percent did not persist into their second year. And among students of color, almost 30 percent of Hispanic students and 33 percent of Black students did not stay in school after their freshman year according to that same report. Given the disproportionate effect the pandemic has had on vulnerable communities, we risk these numbers growing at a rate that will have severe consequences for generations to come as well as a negative effect on our nation’s economy during the post-pandemic recovery. We know...
    (CNN)Optimism about 2021 is emerging in wealthier corners of the world, with both the United States and the United Kingdom beginning Covid-19 vaccinations and other nations close behind. But for many countries, the long tail of the pandemic could make next year even more devastating than 2020.The coronavirus, combined with climate change and conflict, is expected to exacerbate already long-running crises in many developing countries next year, according to a new report from the International Rescue Committee (IRC), a major US humanitarian group. Despite the gravity of the pandemic, the direct impact of Covid-19 in areas where the IRC operates was less damaging than feared, the organization's CEO David Milliband said on Tuesday. But it came with disastrous side effects, he added, including disrupting supply chains, causing food insecurity in some countries, and driving people away from hospitals, resulting in poor treatment for other diseases, including malaria.Many of these are...
    The year 2020, no doubt, will be forever defined by the unprecedented global chaos brought by COVID-19. But 2020 was also a historically grim year in the battle against climate change, particularly in the United States. In the West, tens of thousands of wildfires – an annual occurrence dramatically exacerbated by exceptionally hot, dry weather – burned upwards of 10 million acres. Dozens were killed directly from the blazes and thousands lost their homes; millions of other residents were forced to breathe what was temporarily some of the world's most polluted air, possibly leading to long-term health problems. Thousands of miles away, the Atlantic Ocean produced a record-breaking 30 named hurricanes and tropical storms, including 12 that made landfall on the continental United States. Category 4 Hurricane Laura, among the strongest storms ever to hit the country, caused dozens of deaths in Louisiana and billions of dollars in damage....
    Academics who study cults have revealed the traits that make people most susceptible to being drawn into a 'destructive' organisation - and the red flags to look out for if you're worried about one you have joined.  US-based Steven Hassan, a former Moonie and author of the Cult of Trump, and André Spicer, a professor of organisational behaviour at the Cass Business School in London, spoke to BBC podcast The Orgasm Cult, which is investigating the 'orgasmic meditation' wellness group, OneTaste. OneTaste was founded in 2004 and promoted the benefits of a practice known as 'orgasmic meditation', when a woman has her clitoris 'stroked' by a man - either her partner or another paying participant - in 15-minute sessions. Although members reported feeling sexually liberated and in control of their bodies, others have said the group operated more like a 'cult' led by a charismatic leader - it's founder Nicole Daedone.   ...
    Dr. Moncef Slaoui, head of the government’s coronavirus vaccine program, projected that as many as 100 million people could be vaccinated by the end of February, constituting a large portion of the vulnerable population. “Between mid-December and the end of February, we will have potentially 100 million [people immunized], which is really more or less the size of the significant at-risk population: the elderly, the healthcare workers,” Slaoui told reporters Wednesday. The leading vaccine candidates that have been put forward for emergency use authorization come from Pfizer and Moderna and must be administered in two shots about three weeks apart. The government vaccine development initiative Operation Warp Speed plans to distribute 40 million vaccine doses, enough for 20 million people, by the end of December. Slaoui said that in January, there will be enough vaccines to immunize 30 million more people, followed by another 50 million people immunized...
    One silver lining during the economic crash caused by the coronavirus pandemic has been the existence and expansion of Medicaid. The massive federal and state program has helped millions of Americans who have lost jobs get health care for themselves and their families. But Medicaid may soon become a victim of its own success. So many people have enrolled in the system this year that states, overwhelmed and facing tight budgets, may have to make cuts. Why should Medicaid take a hit? “Because,” as Joan Alker, executive director of the Center for Children and Families at Georgetown University points out, “two things—Medicaid and education spending—are the top two areas of spending in pretty much all state budgets.” Indeed, Medicaid eats up about 30% of all state spending, according to the National Association of State Budget Officers. That usually makes it a fat target when cuts have...
    One sector is flourishing during the pandemic: K-12 private schools Travel recommendations, restrictions likely to extend through Christmas: Fauci Mohamed El-Erian sounds the alarm on brewing bond-market risks that could plunge the most vulnerable companies into bankruptcy © Reuters/Lucy Nicholson Reuters/Lucy Nicholson Economist Mohamed El-Erian cautioned investors about the risk of rising corporate bankruptcy rates in an interview with Bloomberg TV on Friday. While many investors are ignoring short-term market risks in the hopes that 2021 will be met with a swift vaccine deployment and economic recovery, El-Erian said the time between now and a rollout of the vaccine matters. "People have got to be very careful, especially in high-yield credit, and in emerging markets," he said. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Many investors have chosen to look past short-term market risks in the hopes that 2021 will be markedly more...
    The Catholic Knights of Columbus in Washington, D.C., spent Black Friday distributing coats to children in need — the “most vulnerable members of our society,”  Supreme Knight Carl Anderson told the Daily Caller News Foundation. In partnership with the Metropolitan Police Department, members of the global Catholic men’s organization gathered Friday at Saint John Paul II National Shrine in Washington, D.C. to distribute coats to children aged 2 to 16-years-old. “As our nation faces tough economic times due to the pandemic, the Knights of Columbus remains steadfast in our commitment to helping the most vulnerable members of our society,” Anderson told the DCNF. (RELATED: Knights Of Columbus Announce $100 Million Fund To Aid Catholic Dioceses During Coronavirus) Photo courtesy of the Knights of Columbus. “Helping children in need was a fundamental reason for Blessed Michael McGivney’s founding of the Knights of Columbus in 1882 and continues to be a very...
    ABC Updated: 11/22/2020 7:35 PM Save Related News The Provincial Association of Hairdressing and Related of Albacete carried out this Sunday a solidarity action at the Virgen de Los Llanos Academy, where 25 hairdressing and barbershop professionals and six aesthetics They offered their services free of charge to people who lack financial resources. Throughout the morning about 75 people passed through the academy, arriving through the parishes and other associations of the city. Santi Moliné, president of the provincial association, explained that this first solidarity action will not be the only one, but that the intention is to give continuity to contribute to the emotional well-being of the most vulnerable people. The mayor of Albacete, Vicente Casañ, who visited the academy with several councilors, added: «We have to thank groups like this one from hairdressing and aesthetics, who offer their work and know how...
    An arthritis drug has been found to cut deaths in patients admitted to hospital with Covid-19 by a remarkable two-thirds – giving medics a powerful new weapon in their armoury against the disease. The daily pill, first earmarked as a potential Covid game-changer by a British firm, reduces deaths by 71 per cent in those with moderate or severe illness, researchers say. Importantly, it works in the elderly, raising hopes that it will save the most vulnerable. Called baricitinib, and marketed under the brand name Olumiant, it is a relatively new drug for rheumatoid arthritis that has been available for only three years. An arthritis drug has been found to cut deaths in patients admitted to hospital with Covid-19 by a remarkable two-thirds. Picture: Stock But in February it was identified as a strong candidate to help treat what was then the new threat of Covid-19. The drug was...
    What you need to know about coronavirus on Monday, October 19 Restaurants and bars owned by celebrities Do you know these lucrative Social Security secrets? Ad Microsoft Incredible Blanket Puts Humans In A Deep Sleep, Melting Stress Away Ad Microsoft The 23 Hottest Gadgets of 2020 Ad Microsoft ...
    These 2 Moves in Your 20s Could Make You a Millionaire in Your 60s Talus Expedition Gear: An RV in a Box Do you know these lucrative Social Security secrets? Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/5 SLIDES © Provided by Best Life This Scary Symptom Is Affecting the Most Vulnerable COVID Patients As if the novel coronavirus wasn't frightening enough, some seniors are facing a particularly troubling symptom of COVID-19: delirium. In addition to the virus's more apparent threats to a person's health (respiratory failure and lung damage chief among them), delirium complicates an already confounding and terrifying disease. A September study from King's College London found that delirium—an acute state of confusion brought on by illness or intoxication—is a key COVID symptom among the frail and elderly. Patients exhibited incoherent thought or speech, confusion or memory...
    Getty Images The Covid-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected low- and middle-income Americans as well as communities of color, exacerbating inequality and leading to increased financial stress. Those hit hardest by the pandemic are now feeling the most anxiety about their personal finances. Nearly 75% of Americans with annual household incomes of less than $50,000 said they were at least somewhat concerned about their financial situation right now, compared to 63% with annual household incomes of $100,000 or more, according to a September survey from the National Endowment for Financial Education. This marks a change over the last few months — in April, a similar survey from NEFE showed that financial stress was consistent for those on opposite ends of the spectrum. Now, the burden has shifted to lower income and minority families, whose wages and safety nets have been stretched further as the Covid-19 crisis continues. More from Invest in...
            by Richard McCarty  In the vice presidential debate, Kamala Harris was lucky that Mike Pence chose not to attack her prosecutorial record except to note that, when Harris was the San Francisco district attorney, blacks were 19 times more likely to be charged with minor drug offenses than whites or Hispanics. Harris’s years spent as a prosecutor and state attorney general demonstrate that she lacks integrity and good judgment; consequently, she is unfit to serve as vice president, just one heartbeat from the presidency. As a law enforcement official, Harris focused on winning at any cost, even if that meant that innocent people would be incarcerated or denied compensation for wrongful convictions. The following are some notable examples of how Harris victimized the vulnerable. Harris’ office prosecuted Jamal Trulove for the murder of his friend. Trulove was convicted without any physical evidence and only one witness whose testimony...
    Students who are academically struggling will be able to receive one-on-one in-person tutoring in the Los Angeles Unified School District under an agreement between the teachers union and district. Until the deal, which the union announced late Thursday, leaders of the teachers union had discouraged voluntary teacher participation in such tutoring until it signed off on safety protocols and other operating rules for the effort — reflecting the statewide concerns among teachers about returning to work amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Families interested in the tutoring should speak to their child’s teacher or the school administration. The district did not provide information on Friday about how many students may be able to benefit from the tutoring. Supt. Austin Beutner said last week that the effort was being organized locally in each of the district’s 42 administrative units. The school year started Aug. 18. Teachers who participate will be compensated at their...
    Willow Smith on "Red Table Talk." Red Table Talk/Facebook Watch On the season three premiere of "Red Table Talk" on Facebook Watch, Willow Smith spoke about the last time she felt most vulnerable. The star, who's the daughter of Will Smith and Jada Pinkett Smith said that she felt vulnerable when she opened up about her past self-harm during a 2018 episode of "RTT." At the time, Smith revealed that she cut her wrists after questioning her identity and purpose following the release of her hit 2010 single "Whip My Hair." "Looking back, it makes me feel even stronger because so many people DMed me or talked to me and were like, 'That really helped me,'" Smith said on the most recent episode of "RTT." Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.   Willow Smith said that the last time she felt most vulnerable was when she revealed...
    Access to public space has been restricted in the pandemic, from libraries to parks to transit to sidewalks. While it's still too early to predict exactly how public space will evolve, some concerning patterns have emerged. Who gets to exist in these spaces and how will likely be drawn along race- and class-based lines, experts told Insider. "Who knows if we'll ever be able to do the things we used to do?" one library director said. "I hope we can." Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. On a Friday in early March, Jennifer Pearson looked around her library in Lewisburg, Tennessee. "The library was full of older people," Pearson, the library's director, said. "I thought, if I don't close this space, they will never stop coming to it, so I have to close it, for their good and for my staff." The Marshall County Memorial Library closed in...
    Republicans in California’s 48th Congressional District see an opportunity to take back the seat they lost in 2018 by running a stronger candidate against freshman Democrat Rep. Harley Rouda. Rouda, a former real estate executive, was among seven House Democrats in 2018 to flip Republican seats. Rouda represents the state’s coastal region of Orange County, including Huntington Beach. He beat 30-year Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, a Republican, by 7 points, largely due to Rohrabacher's political baggage relating to his praise of Russian President Vladimir Putin. Rouda’s race against Rohrabacher was one of three in the state that billionaire Mike Bloomberg’s organization spent over $10 million combined to support. Rouda currently serves on the House Oversight Committee and the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. Rouda now faces Orange County Supervisor Michelle Park Steel, a Korean American married to Republican National Committee member Shawn Steel. She won a post on the...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City BY WES MOORE New York City’s nonprofits have always played a critical role in supporting vulnerable New Yorkers, but the effects of COVID-19 have significantly exacerbated the demand for human services, wreaking havoc on the frontline organizations that New Yorkers depend upon. Now a decision by the Mayor threatens their viability amidst an ongoing pandemic and unprecedented unemployment rates.  On the city’s chopping block are reimbursements to groups that help feed hungry seniors, provide mental health care, educate our children, and clothe and house the homeless. For years, these organizations have been a lifeline to New Yorkers living in poverty and, throughout the pandemic, they remain on the frontlines providing essential life-saving services. That’s why it is essential that the Mayor immediately reinstate his commitment to fully reimburse the city’s human...
    A doctor who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of conditions relating to the brain is suggesting to Donald Trump that he adopt the controversial theory of 'herd immunity', according to reports.  Scott Atlas was announced as the newest member of the White House coronavirus task force on August 12, and has been dubbed by White House officials the 'anti Fauci' because his opinions are frequently at odds with veteran infectious diseases expert Dr Anthony Fauci. Atlas, 65, is a radiologist, a senior fellow at the conservative Hoover Institution of Stanford University and a frequent Fox News commentator.  Dr Scott Atlas joined the White House coronavirus task force on August 12  He previously served as chief of neuroradiology - radiology of the brain and nervous system - at the Stanford University Medical Center. He has also advised Republican presidential candidates on health care, including Mitt Romney and Rudy Giuliani, the president's...
    Bogotá, Aug 23 . .- The massacres in recent days in Colombia, which claimed 34 lives, reflect a bloody dispute between different armed groups after the signing of the peace agreement with the former FARC guerrilla that puts the most vulnerable population in a permanent state of defenselessness. The victims of the recent killings in the departments of Nariño, Cauca, Arauca and Valle del Cauca are mostly young people, peasants, indigenous people or people of African descent, who historically are among the communities most affected by the internal armed conflict that did not end with the agreement. peace agreement with the FARC, signed in November 2016. “The humanitarian crisis in the department of Nariño is growing ruthlessly, anxiety does not allow us to live with dignity with the enjoyment of rights enshrined in the Constitution,” the Indigenous Unit of the Awá People (Unipa) said in a statement this Sunday. Three...
    A dedicated aunt from Tacoma, Washington is stressing the importance of wearing masks during the coronavirus pandemic by sporting a custom one that pays homage to her premature twin nephews. Lex and Lochlan O'Malley were born at just 24 weeks gestation in 2017, and spent 15 weeks in the NICU before coming home on oxygen — and they've continued to face health struggles, including chronic lung disease. To help more Americans understand the importance of wearing masks for people like her nephews — who are more vulnerable to the virus — Tennessy Fraumeni had her own powerful mask custom made to show an image of the two as very little babies in the hospital. Statement piece: Tennessy Fraumeni ordered a custom mask from Etsy that says 'this is why' and includes a photo of her nephews, who were born prematurely, in the hospital Little: Lex and Lochlan O'Malley were born...
    Summer is bringing a new wave of coronavirus hot spots. See how the map is changing. Trumps executive stimulus orders: When they start, are they legal, what you should know How To Sell Your Home For The Best Price Possible Ad Microsoft 17 Ways These $20 Lights Will Upgrade Your Home Ad Microsoft Beat The Heat With This $89 Mini AC Unit Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/16 SLIDES © mstahlphoto/istockphoto Vulnerable Vocations Recessions are stressful for everyone who earns a paycheck, but some jobs are far more vulnerable than others during times of economic crisis. The next recession will be unlike any in modern history, as it will coincide with...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Two brothers have gone above and beyond in their efforts to slow the spread of COVID-19 in South Florida. Luke Elegant, 20, and his 17-year-old brother Hudson decided to play their parts in bettering the Miami community by donating 10,000 surgical face masks to the Miami Rescue Mission to help those who are the most vulnerable. The Mission helps Miami’s homeless community on a daily basis and the Elegant brothers have been volunteering and fundraising for them for more than a decade. In those twelve years, they have raised over $51,000, trained and supervised hundreds of volunteers, and tutored homeless individuals studying to take high school equivalency exams. The Miami Rescue Mission received a donation of 10,000 facial masks by brothers Luke and Hudson Elegant. (CBS4) Amazingly, the Mission has remained open during the entire COVID-19 pandemic by following social distancing protocols in its cafeteria, education center...
    Reuters July 15, 2020 0 Comments The Paycheck Protection Program appears to have thrown a critical safety net under U.S. middle and upper-middle-wage jobs, but it faltered when it comes to lower-paying positions and the industries hit hardest by the coronavirus pandemic, according to a Reuters analysis of loan details. Analysis of data on nearly 4.9 million PPP loans released last week by the Trump administration showed the program, a subject of controversy because a number of larger well-connected borrowers tapped it even though it was designed to aid vulnerable small businesses, did partially hit its target. Separating U.S. industries into groups of around 60 each ranked by average annual pay, the Reuters analysis showed that employers in the middle of the wage scale received an outsized share of PPP loans both in dollar terms and the number of loans disbursed. The middle group includes a diverse set of...
    It happened on July 1, but the event captured on Page One of Sunday’s Post captures what’s going horribly wrong across the city right now: a lack of respect for the police, from people on the street, to politicians in their offices. Two police officers have handcuffed a man and are putting him in their car. He’s resisting, flailing about, while onlookers taunt the police and film them from multiple angles. This is how impossible it is to enforce the laws these days. As the scuffle continues, one man in the crowd steps right next to the action. The cop pushes him away, to keep him from interfering. Then, when the cop’s body camera falls to the ground, police say the man kicks it away. The officer rushes the man, who proceeds to put the cop in a headlock. The crowd jeers and cheers; when the man lets go they...
    Australia is under cyber attack from a malicious 'state-actor' with banks, transport networks, electricity grids and the military all under threat - but a security analyst says the most vulnerable target is the nation's open, democratic system of government. Other security experts have pointed the finger squarely at Beijing, with former officials claiming the cyber invasion is payback for Australia's decision to ban Huawei from the national 5G network. The Chinese telecommunications giant is the world's largest 5G infrastructure builder but Canberra hit the brakes on their involvement in Australia's critical infrastructure roll-out in August 2018, citing national security concerns. Although the perpetrator of the cyber invasion has not been named, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said a 'sophisticated state-based actor' was behind ongoing attacks which have hit Australian universities, hospitals, industry and governments. Chinese President Xi Jinping drives in a Hong Qi car after inspecting the troops during a...
    Hundreds of thousands of Americans have suffered “deaths of despair” from alcohol and drug abuse and suicides because they could no longer provide for their families. Even before the COVID-19 crisis, during a post-recession period when the economy and stock market were booming, the poorest 50% of Americans lost wealth. And now many of them have lost their jobs, their income, their livelihoods. 40%: The Percentage of Lost Jobs that May Be Lost for Good Anywhere from half to three-quarters of Americans are living paycheck-to-paycheck. Now the paychecks are disappearing. Tens of millions of Americans have lost their jobs, many of which will not come back. A recent paper out of the University of Chicago estimates that over 40 percent of jobs lost are gone for good. $40 Trillion: The Amount of Wealth that Went to America’s Richest 10% in Just Ten Years The poorest 50% got nothing. Their wealth actually declined. Over three-quarters of our wealth is owned by the richest 10% of Americans. Over...
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