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    (CNN)Ahead of Tuesday's opening arguments, House impeachment managers filed their final pretrial legal brief that rebutted the filing by President Donald Trump's team on Monday, in what amounts to a preview of the arguments that will play out in the Senate in the coming days.Read that legal brief below:
    Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images Former President Donald Trump’s impeachment defense team filed its final brief before the Senate trial begins on Tuesday. And the full, 78-page Trump legal brief contains a number of bizarre claims and partisan whataboutist attacks on Democrats and is replete with the same pugnacious, rhetoric befitting Trump’s now-departed Twitter feed. Many observers quickly pointed out that, in the footnotes, the brief tries to cite as evidence of its defense of Trump against incitement of insurrection a post from the far right conspiracy blog Gateway Pundit, whose proprietor, Jim Hoft, was just banned from Twitter this past Saturday for repeatedly pushing the “big lie” about widespread election fraud. But that is just the tip of the proverbial crazy iceberg. #1 – It cites “Trump Derangement Syndrome.” The legal brief trots out this popular MAGA phrase and gives what is ostensibly a legal response to the House Impeachment Managers the feel of an angry thread on...
    House Democrats on Monday categorically rejected the legal argument advanced by Donald Trump's defense team, dismissing claims that the former president bears no responsibility for last month's deadly attack on the Capitol.  In a legal brief filed by the nine Democratic impeachment managers, the lawmakers contend that Trump incited the mob of his supporters that carried out the Jan. 6 attack, and said Congress has every right to convict the former president to prevent him from holding high office again. "The House states that each and every allegation in the Article of Impeachment is true, and that any affirmative defenses and legal defenses set forth in the Answer are wholly without merit," the managers wrote.  The filing is just the latest in the back-and-forth exchange of legal documents between the two sides ahead of the Senate impeachment trial, which kicks off on Tuesday.  House Democrats, joined by 10 Republicans, impeached Trump...
    (CNN)In a pretrial brief ahead of former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial in the Senate, Trump's legal team accused House Democrats of engaging in "political theater" and argued that the upcoming trial is unconstitutional because Trump is no longer president.Read the brief:
    CNN legal analyst Jennifer Rodgers claimed in a Tuesday appearance on “Inside Politics” that the First Amendment does not protect an individual’s “right to lie.” Host John King began by asking Rodgers about the brief that former President Donald Trump’s legal team filed Tuesday. King pointed out that the brief claimed the upcoming impeachment trial is unconstitutional because Trump is no longer president. He also mentioned that the brief stated Trump has a First Amendment right to speak, so he can’t be held accountable for people attacking the Capitol after he held a rally. (RELATED: Impeachment-Supporting Republican Says Capitol Is ‘Walled Off’ Because People Can’t Be Trusted To Not ‘Try To Overrun It’) “Yeah, those are wrong, and they are well countered by the very long brief the House filed earlier today,” Rodgers said. “You don’t have a First Amendment right to lie. You don’t have a First Amendment right...
    Former President Trump's legal team on Tuesday filed its response to the House article of impeachment ahead of next week's trial, denying wrongdoing and calling for the Senate to acquit Trump of the charge. The answer denies that Trump violated his oath of office while also saying that he was protected by the First Amendment in response to claims he incited an insurrection. "It is denied that the 45th President of the United States ever engaged in a violation of his oath of office," the Trump legal team brief says. "To the contrary, at all times, Donald J. Trump fully and faithfully executed his duties as President of the United States, and at all times acted to the best of his ability to preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States, while never engaging in any high Crimes or Misdemeanors." 45th President's Answer... by Fox News Trump's legal...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — In legal brief, Trump’s lawyers deny that he incited the Capitol riot and call Senate impeachment trial unconstitutional. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    DEMOCRATS said that Donald Trump "aimed a loaded cannon" of MAGA supporters at the Capitol riot in impeachment brief. The legal brief forcefully links Trump’s baseless efforts to overturn the results of the presidential election to the deadly January 6 riot at the Capitol, saying he bears “unmistakable” blame for actions that directly threatened the underpinnings of American democracy. 1Credit: AP:Associated Press It argues that he must be found guilty when his impeachment trial opens before the Senate next week on a charge of inciting the siege. “His conduct endangered the life of every single Member of Congress, jeopardized the peaceful transition of power and line of succession, and compromised our national security,” the Democratic managers of the impeachment case wrote. "This is precisely the sort of constitutional offense that warrants disqualification from federal office." The legal brief lays out for the first time the arguments House lawmakers...
    Lawyers representing California parents filed an appeal at the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in an effort to reopen schools the state has kept closed after their initial suit was dismissed. The parents, represented by the Center for American Liberty (CAL), initially filed their lawsuit in district court in July 2020. The case, Brach v. Newsom, was dismissed on Dec. 1 after the district court judge ruled that the “[p]laintiffs have not established that the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment contains a fundamental right to basic education,” as explained in the CAL’s brief requesting relief at the Circuit Court. The @Liberty_Ctr strikes again, this time filing our opening 9th Circuit brief challenging California’s ban on in person schooling for most children. Click the link to read about it and see the brief we filed with the Eimer Stahl firm and @dhillonlaw! https://t.co/NhpCKMPFvF — Harmeet K. Dhillon (@pnjaban) January...
    Lin Wood, an attorney who has pushed Donald Trump’s unfounded claims of election fraud in a series of failed lawsuits, may believe that he is the second coming of Jesus Christ, former partners claim. Wood has attracted attention this week for a number of extraordinary claims, including a suggestion that Vice President Mike Pence is guilty of treason for not backing the plans to overturn the results of the presidential election. As The Independent reported, he also appeared to suggest earlier in the week that Jeffrey Epstein is still alive and that Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts may have been involved in the death of fellow justice Antonin Scalia. But a report suggests that Wood’s erratic behavior stretches back even longer. As the legal news website Law & Crime reported, his former law partners wrote in a legal brief that Wood associated himself with “God Almighty” and suggested that...
    President Donald Trump’s last-ditch efforts at undoing the vote in Pennsylvania suffered a series of significant setbacks on Tuesday. One of those obstacles was the Keystone State’s certification of the 2020 election results, which finally and official determined Joe Biden the winner of the commonwealth’s electoral votes. The fact of that certification, of course, makes the campaign’s ongoing litigation in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit ever more tenuous and unlikely to succeed. To that end, Democrats and Pennsylvania officials each filed their own scathing briefs that invoked pop cultural references like Monty Python’s famous Inquisition sketch and Frankenstein’s monster’s monster, respectively. Those briefs were viewed as “super-strong.” This is what i was mentioning earlier. The Democrats Abroad very good amicus brief was bolder and snappier. PAs and the DNCs brief were, as Brad says, sober. The whole package is super-strong. https://t.co/VJyR1P7tWx — Raffi Melkonian (@RMFifthCircuit)...
    Pieces from the movie “Frankenstein” on display during the exhibition “Guillermo del Toro, At Home with My Monsters”—a collection of personal items and some that he used in his movies—in Guadalajara, State of Jalisco, Mexico, on May 29, 2019.  The Trump campaign’s lawsuit has already been ridiculed by one federal judge for creating a “Frankenstein’s Monster” of legal theories. Pennsylvania went a step further on Tuesday afternoon, urging a federal appellate court to put the beast out of its misery. “If [the campaign’s] first amended complaint is like Frankenstein’s Monster, ‘haphazardly stitched together from… distinct theories in an attempt to avoid controlling precedent,’ … their proposed second amended complaint is Frankenstein’s Monster’s Monster, randomly re-cobbled together, even more illogical and haphazard than the first,” Pennsylvania’s assistant attorney general Keli Neary wrote in a 43-page legal brief on Tuesday. The evocative image came courtesy of U.S. District Judge Matthew Brann on...
    Rudy Giuliani came off a bizarre, sweaty, fact-free press conference Thursday with a legal play just as wild: Instead of providing a speck of evidence for the Trump campaign’s claims of voter fraud, he’s now calling on Pennsylvania to prove the ballots it counted were legal. It’s a desperate gambit to solve the problem that has bedeviled the president and his team since before the election: a lack of concrete documentation of any wrongdoing. Despite Giuliani’s rants in federal court on Tuesday about “widespread, nationwide voter fraud,” the campaign’s lawsuits have focused on obscure technical matters or oft-recanted innuendo about allegedly suspicious activities at vote-counting sites. The strategy of hurling legal Hail Marys into the electoral end zone has this far failed. So now Giuliani and co-counsel Marc Scaringi are arguing in a new brief filed in federal court on Thursday that they don’t have to prove anything at all....
    Republican attorneys general from across the U.S. are taking legal action in Pennsylvania to challenge mail-in ballots. Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry, Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt, and Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter spoke about the subject during a virtual press conference Monday afternoon. “We have constantly reminded the American people that we represent and stand up for the rule of law,” Landry, the chairman of the Republican Attorneys General Association, said. “As such, we believe the voting system should be free of outside, undue influence.” Landry compared President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden’s presidential race to “referees getting to change the rules midway through the football game.” “We believe that’s exactly what the Pennsylvania Supreme Court did,” Landry said. Schmitt, who was instrumental in bringing this brief forward, said the attorneys general filed this brief Monday “seeking the Supreme Court to take the Pennsylvania case and...
              Roughly 50 or more Monument Avenue residents who live nearby the Robert E. Lee statue intend to file an amicus brief with the Virginia Supreme Court in support of Governor Ralph Northam’s plan to remove the controversial monument, a lawyer representing the group said. Local residents organized the group called Circle Neighbors after a Richmond Circuit Court judge ruled earlier this week against three plaintiffs, who also live near the monument, seeking to block the Commonwealth from removing the statue. Patrick McSweeney, the plaintiffs’ attorney, told The Virginia Star that he filed a notice of appeal to the state Supreme Court on Thursday, signifying that his clients plan to appeal Judge W. Reilly Marchant’s decision to a higher court. Filing the legal brief on the behalf of Circle Neighbors are Richmond lawyers Greg Werkheiser and Will Cook, from Cultural Heritage Partners LLC. Werkheiser...
    By MARYCLAIRE DALE, Associated Press PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Legal advocates are lining up on both sides of actor Bill Cosby’s appeal as the Pennsylvania Supreme Court prepares to review his 2018 sex assault conviction. Cosby was the first celebrity to go on trial in the #MeToo era, and his appeal could resolve lingering questions about how the cases should be tried. For starters, the high court will try to clarify when other accusers can testify against a defendant — and when the additional testimony amounts to character assassination. Public defenders in Philadelphia, in a friend-of-the-court brief filed in Cosby's appeal, noted that courts have given conflicting guidance on the issue. "Courts repeatedly fail to analyze how uncharged misconduct is relevant to prove, for example, intent or identity," the Defender Association of Philadelphia wrote in the amicus brief, one of several filed in the case this past month. They say the...
    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Legal advocates are lining up on both sides of actor Bill Cosby’s appeal as the Pennsylvania Supreme Court prepares to review his 2018 sex assault conviction. Cosby was the first celebrity to go on trial in the #MeToo era, and his appeal could resolve lingering questions about how the cases should be tried. For starters, the high court will try to clarify when other accusers can testify against a defendant — and when the additional testimony amounts to character assassination. Public defenders in Philadelphia, in a friend-of-the-court brief filed in Cosby’s appeal, noted that courts have given conflicting guidance on the issue. “Courts repeatedly fail to analyze how uncharged misconduct is relevant to prove, for example, intent or identity,” the Defender Association of Philadelphia wrote in the amicus brief, one of several filed in the case this past month. They say the testimony should only be allowed...
    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Legal advocates are lining up on both sides of actor Bill Cosby’s appeal as the Pennsylvania Supreme Court prepares to review his 2018 sex assault conviction. Cosby was the first celebrity to go on trial in the #MeToo era, and his appeal could resolve lingering questions about how the cases should be tried. For starters, the high court will try to clarify when other accusers can testify against a defendant — and when the additional testimony amounts to character assassination. Public defenders in Philadelphia, in a friend-of-the-court brief filed in Cosby’s appeal, noted that courts have given conflicting guidance on the issue. “Courts repeatedly fail to analyze how uncharged misconduct is relevant to prove, for example, intent or identity,” the Defender Association of Philadelphia wrote in the amicus brief, one of several filed in the case this past month. They say the testimony should only be allowed...
    PHILADELPHIA – Legal advocates are lining up on both sides of actor Bill Cosby’s appeal as the Pennsylvania Supreme Court prepares to review his 2018 sex assault conviction. Cosby was the first celebrity to go on trial in the #MeToo era, and his appeal could resolve lingering questions about how the cases should be tried. For starters, the high court will try to clarify when other accusers can testify against a defendant — and when the additional testimony amounts to character assassination. Public defenders in Philadelphia, in a friend-of-the-court brief filed in Cosby's appeal, noted that courts have given conflicting guidance on the issue. "Courts repeatedly fail to analyze how uncharged misconduct is relevant to prove, for example, intent or identity," the Defender Association of Philadelphia wrote in the amicus brief, one of several filed in the case this past month. They say the testimony should only be allowed if...
    Shoshana WodinskyJust now•Filed to:LawsuitsLawsuitshomeland securitycovid-19SavePhoto: Maddie Meyer (Getty Images) More than a dozen of the biggest names in tech have thrown their support behind last week’s lawsuit pushing back against ICE’s proposed plans to deport any foreign students planning to attend online-only classes in the coming semester. That’s according to a brief filed yesterday and signed by 19 different tech orgs—including the likes of Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and Adobe—have called the move into question, pointing out that it wouldn’t only fuck over the students they rely on for their own operations, but would also devastate the “next generation of investors.” As the brief explains, the giants “face the additional challenge of ensuring that their headquarters teams embody the diversity of background, language, and culture needed to create and sell products and services in a host of very different markets around the world.” These tech giants (and many others)...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA/AP) — The City of Pittsburgh is backing Harvard University and MIT’s lawsuit challenging ICE and the Trump administration’s decision to make international students leave the country if they have to take online courses this fall due to the coronavirus pandemic. Like Carnegie Mellon University last week, the City of Pittsburgh today signed onto an amicus brief in support of the Harvard-MIT suit. Pittsburgh is one of 26 municipalities nationwide to sign on. Mayor Bill Peduto released a statement last week denouncing the order to suspend international visas under the Student and Exchange Visitor Program if the student takes classes entirely online this fall. “This matter will have a direct and deep impact on amici [cities] and their communities. First, amici care deeply about their foreign-born populations (some of the largest in the country) and have a strong interest in protecting the rights and well-being of all students and...
    Attorney General Letitia James joined a coalition on Monday of 19 attorneys general and one governor to advocate that the Equal Rights Amendment be ratified as the 28th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. The Equal Rights Amendment is nearly 100 years old. Initially proposed in 1923, it was designed to guarantee equal legal rights for U.S. citizens regardless of sex. It would remove legal distinctions between men and women in matters of divorce, property and employment, among others. Congress did not propose the ERA to states for ratification until 1972. At the time, Congress gave the states only seven years to pass it. Only 35 states had ratified it by 1979. That deadline was then extended until 1982, but no other states joined.
    Ansel Elgort posted a short reply on Saturday to claims that he sexually assaulted a 17-year-old girl. The 26-year-old Baby Driver star claimed that his relationship was 'legal and entirely consensual' in an iPhone notes message shared to his Instagram account. On Friday, a Twitter user calling herself Gabby claimed the actor sexually assaulted her in 2014 and left her 'sobbing and in pain,' though the account was later deleted. Having his say: Ansel Elgort, 26, denied claims that he sexually assaulted a 17-year-old girl named Gabby in an Instagram statement posted on Saturday; pictured in September 2019 Elgort wasted little time in denying the original claims. 'I was distressed to see the social media post about me that have been circulating in the past 24 hours,' he began. RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next James Gandolfini once threatened to 'beat the f***' out of... Aaron Carter shares...
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