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    CNN anchor John Berman on Tuesday morning blasted Tucker Carlson for attempting to “suppress the memory” of what happened during the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, mockingly calling the far-right Fox News host’s show “Fantasy Island.” Carlson, who has long played down the seditious riot as nothing more than “political protest that got out of hand,” took his revisionism a step further on Monday: He claimed “it’s a lie” that white supremacists were at all involved in the violence and said there was “no evidence” of an “armed insurrection” at the Capitol. With the Senate holding hearings on the security breakdown during the deadly riot, Berman brought on Punchbowl News founder Anna Palmer and columnist Errol Louis to discuss the latest push by Republicans to memory-hole the events of Jan. 6. “I don’t think this could come at a more important time because you are seeing a wave of revisionism among...
    Ex-Capitol Police chief says pro-Trump mob 'came prepared for war'
    WASHINGTON -- Testifying publicly for the first time about the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, former security officials say that bad intelligence was to blame for the disastrous failure to anticipate the violent intentions of the mob. That left them unprepared for the attack that was unlike anything they had ever seen before.The officials, including the former chief of the Capitol Police, are blaming other federal agencies - and each other - for their failure to defend the building as supporters of then-President Donald Trump overwhelmed security barriers, breaking windows and doors and sending lawmakers fleeing from the House and Senate chambers.Former Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund described a scene that was "like nothing" he had seen in his 30 years of policing."When the group arrived at the perimeter, they did not act like any group of protestors I had ever seen," the ousted chief said, arguing that...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on congressional testimony about the Capitol insurrection (all times local): 11:30 a.m. The former chief of the U.S. Capitol Police says he learned this week that his officers had received a report from an FBI field office in Virginia that forecast in detail the chances extremists could commit “war” in Washington the following day — the day of the Capitol insurrection. The head of the FBI’s office in Washington has said that once he received the Jan. 5 warning from the Virginia office, the information was quickly shared with other law enforcement agencies through the joint terrorism task force, including the Capitol Police. Former Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund testified to Congress on Tuesday that an officer on the joint terrorism task force had received the FBI’s memo and forwarded it to a sergeant working on intelligence for the Capitol Police. But Sund says the...
    Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is co-writing a new novel that appears to have Trump overtones. Clinton is teaming up with author Louise Penny in a deal to pen a new "international political thriller" entitled "State of Terror," publishers Simon & Schuster and St. Martin’s Press announced Tuesday. The book deal was first reported by Axios.  OBAMA ADMINISTRATION BRIEFED ON CLAIMS HILLARY CLINTON DRUMMED UP RUSSIA CONTROVERSY TO VILIFY TRUMP, DISTRACT FROM EMAILS According to the synopsis, the novel features a female "novice Secretary of State'' who joins the administration of a political rival "inaugurated after four years of American leadership that shrank from the world stage." The secretary of state then puts together a team to "unravel a deadly conspiracy" carded as a "scheme carefully designed to take advantage of an American government dangerously out of touch and out of power in the places where it counts the most." EX-CLINTON ADVISER...
    CAPITOL rioters reportedly came "prepared for war," but there was no FBI warning about the coordinated attack, the police chief said. Testifying publicly for the first time about the January 6 insurrection at the Capitol, former security officials say that bad intelligence was to blame for the disastrous failure to anticipate the violent intentions of the mob. 1Former US Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund testifies before the SenateCredit: EPA They say that left them unprepared for the attack that was unlike anything they had ever seen before. The officials, including the former chief of the Capitol Police, are blaming other federal agencies — and each other — for their failure to defend the building. Former Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund described a scene that was “like nothing” he had seen in his 30 years of policing. “When the group arrived at the perimeter, they did not act like any...
    The Senate will get briefed this week on security measures around the Capitol, Majority Leader Chuck SchumerChuck SchumerLawmakers propose draft bill to create Capitol riot commission The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - COVID-19 rescue bill a unity test for Dems OVERNIGHT ENERGY: US officially rejoins Paris climate agreement | Biden Energy Dept orders sweeping review of Trump energy rules | Texas power grid was 'seconds and minutes' from total failure, officials say MORE (D-N.Y.) said on Tuesday. Schumer said Yogananda Pittman, the acting Capitol police chief, and Jennifer Hemingway, the acting Senate sergeant at arms, will brief the Senate on "the current and future security measures around the Capitol." The briefing comes as extra security is still in place in the wake of the January 6 attack, with National Guard members stationed around the building and fencing blocking off public access to the Capitol complex and some...
    CNN host John Berman said Tuesday that denying that the Capitol riot was an armed insurrection is a type of “revisionism.” “It’s happening on opinion television, Tucker Carlson and his show fantasy island last night, questioning whether or not what we saw happen actually happened, saying that it wasn’t an armed insurrection, saying that it wasn’t white supremacists, there were no white supremacists involved with that,” Berman said on CNN’s “New Day.” “How do you deal with that type of revisionism? And what are the dangers of that line of thinking?” Berman asked Democratic Michigan Sen. Gary Peters. WATCH: “Well, it’s clearly dangerous. And it’s clearly outrageous. I lived it. There were a lot of folks who lived that, were in the Capitol that day. We have folks who have died. We have folks who have been injured severely, our Capitol police folks,” Peters told Berman. A mob of...
    An avalanche swept a skier a thousand feet down a mountainside to his death in Grand Teton National Park, officials said. Matthew Brien, 33, of Jackson, Wyoming was leading a group through a narrow couloir known as the Broken Thumb on Monday when an avalanche broke off above him, park officials said. Brien was found by members of his party and others who were skiing in the area. He was partially buried and attempts were made to resuscitate him but Brien died at the scene. The Bridger-Teton Avalanche Center says the avalanche danger for elevations above 7,500 feet is considerable.  "Recent snow and wind events have created dangerous backcountry conditions," park officials said. "Very cautious route finding and expert snowpack evaluation skills are a requirement for safe travel in avalanche terrain."   The Colorado Avalanche Information Center says Brien's death is the 32nd avalanche fatality in the U.S. this...
    WASHINGTON -- Testifying publicly for the first time about the Jan. 6 insurrection, former security officials are poised to cast blame on the Pentagon, the intelligence community and each other for the disastrous failure to anticipate the violent intentions of the mob and defend the Capitol.In prepared remarks before two Senate committees Tuesday, former Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund will describe a scene that was "like nothing" he had seen in his 30 years of policing."When the group arrived at the perimeter, they did not act like any group of protestors I had ever seen," the ousted chief will say, arguing that the insurrection was not the result of poor planning but of failures across the board from many agencies.Congress is set to hear from the former U.S. Capitol security officials for the first time about the massive law enforcement failures on Jan. 6, the day the violent mob laid...
    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — When rioters tore through the U.S. Capitol last month, some of them gripping Confederate battle flags, they didn’t encounter a statue of the most famous rebel general, Robert E. Lee. The Lee statue, which represented the state of Virginia as part of the National Statuary Hall Collection in the Capitol for 111 years, had been removed just weeks before — one of at least 160 public Confederate symbols taken down or moved from public spaces in 2020, according to a new count the Southern Poverty Law Center shared with The Associated Press ahead of releasing it. READ MORE: Marriott Names Anthony Capuano As New CEO RICHMOND, VIRGINIA – JANUARY 15: A general view of the Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee statue on Monument Avenue on January 15, 2021 in Richmond, Virginia. Erected in 1890, and standing 60 feet high, Richmond’s graffitied statue of Robert E. Lee...
    The acting chief of the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington, D.C., said he was "honestly shocked" by how slowly the National Guard responded to his emergency request for help during the Capitol riot last month as he scrambled to mobilize 850 officers from neighboring states. "I was stunned at the response from Department of the Army, which was reluctant to send the D.C. National Guard to the Capitol," acting MPD Chief Robert Contee wrote in a statement submitted ahead of a joint hearing Tuesday between the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee and Senate Rules Committee. "On the call, in an effort to seek clarification, I asked the Capitol Police Chief if he were, in fact, requesting the assistance of the National Guard and then asked the U.S. Army representatives on the call if they were refusing to deploy the Guard to assist. The Army staff responded that they...
    (CNN)USCP Captain Carneysha Mendoza told a Senate committee about her role defending the Capitol on January 6 and described injuries she suffered during the attack.Read her statement here:
    Former Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund in testimony to a Senate joint hearing on Tuesday blamed the Jan. 6 Capitol breach on failures within the intelligence community. Sund said Capitol police were not able to properly prepare for the attack on the Capitol due to a lack of intelligence shared with the U.S. Capitol Police (USCP) in his prepared remarks to lawmakers examining the security failures surrounding the attack. “There has been much conflicting information presented by various officials and the media regarding the preparations for and actions taken at the Capitol that day, and I would like to set the record straight from my perspective. Contrary to some of the reporting, the USCP had an effective plan in place to handle the First Amendment demonstrations and possible pockets of violence that were anticipated for January 6, based upon the available intelligence,” Sund wrote.  But he called the agency “a consumer...
    Loading the player... Testifying publicly for the first time about the Jan. 6 insurrection, former security officials are poised to cast blame on the Pentagon, the intelligence community and each other for the disastrous failure to anticipate the violent intentions of the mob and defend the Capitol. In prepared remarks before two Senate committees Tuesday, former Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund will describe a scene that was “like nothing” he had seen in his 30 years of policing. “When the group arrived at the perimeter, they did not act like any group of protestors I had ever seen,” the ousted chief will say, arguing that the insurrection was not the result of poor planning but of failures across the board from many agencies. Read More: Proud Boys calling Rep. Bennie Thompson’s phone over Capitol riot lawsuit Congress is set to hear from the former U.S. Capitol security officials for...
    Two U.S. Senate committees are holding a hearing Tuesday examining the January 6 attack on the U.S. capitol with a focus on security and the response of law enforcement.  Scheduled to testify before the Homeland Security Committee and Governmental Affairs Committee are the former Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael Stenger and former House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul Irving, as well as former Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund and Metropolitan Police Department acting Chief Robert Contee.  For Stenger and Irving, their testimony will be their first public comments since they resigned just after the attack by a pro-Trump mob. In this image from video, Senate Sergeant at Arms Michael Stenger reads the proclamation during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Jan. 29, 2020.Senator Amy Klobuchar told the Associated Press that lawmakers would be focused on how security agencies shared information ahead of the attack, the timing of the deployment of...
    NEW YORK (AP) — When rioters tore through the U.S. Capitol last month, some of them gripping Confederate battle flags, they didn’t encounter a statue of the most famous rebel general, Robert E. Lee. The Lee statue, which represented the state of Virginia as part of the National Statuary Hall Collection in the Capitol for 111 years, had been removed just weeks before — one of at least 160 public Confederate symbols taken down or moved from public spaces in 2020, according to a new count the Southern Poverty Law Center shared with The Associated Press ahead of releasing it. The law center, which keeps a raw count of nearly 2,100 statues, symbols, placards, buildings and public parks dedicated to the Confederacy, plans to release the latest figures from its “Whose Heritage?” database on Tuesday. It has been tracking a movement to take down the monuments since 2015, when a...
    Reuters February 23, 2021 0 Comments Former U.S. House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul Irving denied Tuesday authorities had rejected having the National Guard deployed at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 because it might look bad, saying the intelligence did not warrant the troops’ presence. Irving made his comments in written testimony for two Senate committees investigating the security preparations and response to the attack on the Capitol by a mob of supporters of former President Donald Trump. The committees began a joint hearing at 10 a.m. EST. Irving said that on Jan. 4, he had discussed the possible use of 125 National Guard troops with then- Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund and former Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael Stenger. “’Optics’ as portrayed in the media did not determine our security posture … We did discuss whether the intelligence warranted having troops at the Capitol, and our collective judgment at that time was...
    The New York Times Future Vaccines Depend on Test Subjects in Short Supply: Monkeys Mark Lewis was desperate to find monkeys. Millions of human lives, all over the world, were at stake. Lewis, the chief executive of Bioqual, was responsible for providing lab monkeys to pharmaceutical companies like Moderna and Johnson & Johnson, which needed the animals to develop their COVID-19 vaccines. But as the coronavirus swept across the United States last year, there were few of the specially bred monkeys to be found anywhere in the world. Unable to furnish scientists with monkeys, which can cost more than $10,000 each, about a dozen companies were left scrambling for research animals at the height of the pandemic. Sign up for The Morning newsletter from the New York Times “We lost work because we couldn’t supply the animals in the time frame,” Lewis said. The world needs monkeys, whose DNA closely...
    NEW YORK — When rioters tore through the US Capitol last month, some of them gripping Confederate battle flags, they didn’t encounter a statue of the most famous rebel general, Robert E. Lee. The Lee statue, which represented the state of Virginia as part of the National Statuary Hall Collection in the Capitol for 111 years, had been removed just weeks before — one of at least 160 public Confederate symbols taken down or moved from public spaces in 2020, according to a new count the Southern Poverty Law Center shared with The Associated Press ahead of releasing it. The law center, which keeps a raw count of nearly 2,100 statues, symbols, placards, buildings and public parks dedicated to the Confederacy, plans to release the latest figures from its “Whose Heritage?” database on Tuesday. It has been tracking a movement to take down the monuments since 2015, when a white...
    Chief Steven A. Sund testifies during the House Appropriations Legislative Branch Subcommittee hearing on the U.S. Capitol Police FY2021 Budget Request, in the Capitol on Tuesday, February 11, 2020.Tom Williams | CQ-Roll Call, Inc. | Getty Images The former chief of the U.S. Capitol Police is set to tell Congress that he asked the sergeants at arms of the Senate and House on Jan. 4 to request the presence of the National Guard at a joint session of Congress two days later for protection. But both officials effectively denied that request by then-Chief Steven Sund, which came two days before the Jan. 6 Capitol riot by a mob of supporters of then-President Donald Trump, according to a copy of testimony that Sund is scheduled to give at a Senate hearing Tuesday. House Sergeant at Arms Paul Irving "stated that he was concerned about the 'optics' of having National Guard present...
    (CNN)Current and former officials are breaking their silence about security failures during the US Capitol attack. Read their opening statements:
    By MATTHEW PERRONE and LAURAN NEERGAARD, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Executives from the major COVID-19 vaccine producers are set to answer questions from Congress on Tuesday about expanding the supply of shots needed to curb the pandemic that has killed more than 500,000 Americans. The hearing comes as U.S. vaccinations continue to accelerate after a sluggish start and recent disruptions caused by winter weather. But state health officials say demand for inoculations still vastly outstrips the limited weekly shipments provided by the federal government. The Energy and Commerce Committee panel will hear from the five companies with contracts to supply COVID-19 shots to the U.S.: Pfizer, Moderna, Johnson & Johnson, AstraZeneca and Novavax. “We want to know what these companies are doing to ramp up production and what else can be done to get these vaccines distributed sooner to those who need them,” Rep. Diana DeGette said in a...
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Former U.S. House sergeant-at-arms Paul Irving Tuesday denied authorities had rejected having National Guard troops working at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 alongside Capitol Police because of "optics," saying the intelligence did not warrant them. Irving made his comments in testimony prepared for two Senate committees investigating security preparations and response to the the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol by a mob of supporters of former President Donald Trump. (Reporting by Susan Cornwell; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama) Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters. Tags: United States, crime
    More On: capitol riot Senate hearing on Capitol riot security breach gets underway Former Florida cop charged with breaching US Capitol Oath Keepers leader charged in Capitol riot claims she met with Secret Service There shouldn’t be a double standard for law & order: Devine Top Capitol security officials will be grilled on Tuesday by two Senate committees investigating law enforcement failures involving planning and response during the Jan. 6 riot when supporters of former President Donald Trump converged on the building as a joint-session of Congress was voting on certifying the November election.  Steve Sund, the former chief of the Capitol Police, will appear along with Paul Irving and Michael Stenger, the former sergeants-at-arms of the House and Senate. The three stepped down after the Jan. 6 siege in which five people, including a Capitol Police officer, died.​ Robert Contee, the acting chief of police for the Metropolitan...
    Former top Capitol security officials are facing a joint-Senate committee to testify about their handling of the deadly Capitol riot on Jan. 6 — when a mob of former President Trump supporters breached the government building.  Steven Sund, the former chief of the Capitol Police, Paul Irving, the former sergeant-at-arms of the House, and Michael Stenger, the former sergeant-at-arms of the Senate will testify.  Steven Sund is the former chief of the Capitol Police.Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call The three stepped down immediately after the attack on the Capitol, which occurred as lawmakers were voting to certify the Electoral College vote for President Biden.​ Five people died in the mayhem, including a Capitol Police officer. A man calls on people to raid the building as Trump supporters clash with police and security forces as they try to storm the US Capitol.JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images Robert Contee, the acting chief of...
    CNN’s John Berman went after Fox News host Tucker Carlson for attempting to “suppress the memory” of the Jan. 6 Capitol attack, calling his primetime show “Fantasy Island.” Berman noted that the Senate will hold the first public hearing about the attack, which will include the top officials responsible for securing the Capitol on Jan. 6 — many of whom are now out of jobs. “And I don’t think this could come at a more important time because you are seeing a wave of revisionism among some Republican senators like Ron Johnson who says it wasn’t an armed insurrection, and Tucker Carlson on his show, which I called Fantasy Island last night, devoted a big chunk of it to saying it wasn’t white supremacists. There was no armed insurrection. There is an effort to really, I think, suppress the memory of what happened.” Punchbowl News founder Anna Palmer agreed with Berman, calling Johnson’s comments...
    Oath Keepers founder Stewart Rhodes has long promoted the idea of the militiamen in his organization serving as Donald Trump's army. As the evidence piles up and the federal indictments from the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol mount, a clearer picture of what actually happened that day is beginning to emerge. At the center of that picture are paramilitary action groups such as the Oath Keepers and the Proud Boys, who played key roles in overwhelming Capitol Police barricades that day and leading the mob inside the building. Ominously, the response to one of the indictments raises the possibility that these groups may have been coordinating with official law-enforcement authorities: Ohio militia leader Jessica Watkins’ attorneys claimed in a filing this week that she had been organizing “security” at the Donald Trump rally at the Ellipse prior to the Capitol siege and had been communicating with members of...
    Washington — Two Senate committees on Tuesday are holding the first hearing examining the January 6 attack on the Capitol, featuring testimony from key officials about security lapses that allowed a pro-Trump mob to overrun the complex. The Senate Rules Committee and Homeland Security Committee are holding a joint hearing with four officials, three of whom resigned almost immediately after the attack: former Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael Stenger, former House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul Irving, former U.S. Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund and Robert Contee, chief of the Metropolitan Police Department.How to watch the Senate hearing today on the Capitol attack What: The Senate Rules Committee and Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hold a hearing on security failures during the January 6 attack on the Capitol Date: Tuesday, February 23, 2021  Time: 10 a.m. ET Location: Capitol Hill Online stream: Live on CBSN in the player above or on your mobile or streaming device ...
    Tucker Carlson ended Monday’s show taking issue with Merrick Garland pledging to prosecute “white supremacists” involved in the January 6 insurrection on the Capitol. The Fox News host called that claim from the would-be attorney general “completely dishonest” and insisted there is “no proof” that white supremacists are responsible for the deadly attack. Garland’s comment that outraged Carlson was made before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday. If confirmed, Garland said, he would “supervise the prosecution of white supremacists and others who stormed the Capitol on January 6th, a heinous attack that sought to disrupt a cornerstone of our democracy and the peaceful transfer of power to a newly elected government.” Carlson was scathing in his response: “The was not a moderate statement. It was dishonest. Completely dishonest. Dishonest enough you should be worried about it. There’s no evidence that white supremacists were responsible for what happened on January 6th....
    The Senate is holding a hearing, Tuesday, about the Jan. 6 on the U.S. Capitol. Tuesday’s proceeding is the first in either chamber of Congress examining the riots. The Senate committees on rules and homeland security are holding the hearing jointly. Four witnesses are slated to appear on Tuesday morning. They are; – acting Chief of Police Robert J. Conte, former chief of Capitol police Steven Sund, former Senate sergeant-at-arms Michael C. Stenger, and former House sergeant-at-arms Paul D. Irving. Sund, Stenger, and Irving all resigned from their positions following the Jan. 6 attack. For his part, Sund has blamed insufficient intelligence as the reason why his agency was not prepared. “Perfect hindsight does not change the fact that nothing in our collective experience or our intelligence – including intelligence provided by FBI, Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and D.C. Metropolitan Police (MPD) – indicated that a...
    MSNBC host Joe Scarborough said Tuesday that Republican Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley “should be under investigation,” if not “in jail,” for his role in “inciting” the Jan. 6 storming of the U.S. Capitol. While discussing the confirmation hearing of Judge Merrick Garland in his broadcast of “Morning Joe,” Scarborough went after Hawley for asking Garland about his views on crime and the police. (RELATED: Josh Hawley ‘Just May Well Be The Dumbest Man In America,’ Says Joe Scarborough After Senator Loses Book Deal) “It was a bit jarring to see Josh Hawley actually asking questions to anybody about what a crime is and what a crime is not when, I mean, he was guilty of inciting sedition against the United States government. And, he should be, if not in jail, he should certainly be under investigation,” Scarborough began. The Capitol was stormed by supporters of former President Donald...
    When rioters tore through the U.S. Capitol last month, some of them gripping Confederate battle flags, they didn’t encounter a statue of the most famous rebel general, Robert E. Lee. The Lee statue, which represented the state of Virginia as part of the National Statuary Hall Collection in the Capitol for 111 years, had been removed just weeks before — one of at least 160 public Confederate symbols taken down or moved from public spaces in 2020, according to a new count the Southern Poverty Law Center shared with The Associated Press ahead of releasing it. The law center, which keeps a raw count of nearly 2,100 statues, symbols, placards, buildings, and public parks dedicated to the Confederacy, plans to release the latest figures from its “Whose Heritage?” database on Tuesday. It has been tracking a movement to take down the monuments since 2015, when a white supremacist entered a...
    (CNN)The "Patriot Party" is somewhere between a meme and a movement of Trump loyalists. The idea and, perhaps just as important, the logo, have been circulating on social media since last summer. But after the Capitol riot and swearing-in of President Joe Biden, Patriot Party groups have formed and multiplied, mostly on Telegram, where they share memes, disinformation and commentary in chaotic channels in all 50 states. Garland vows to prosecute White supremacists and others who attacked Capitol on January 6Before it was removed from Facebook, one Patriot Party group had more than 12,000 members. One post that was removed read: "We need to organize our militia ... Wars are won with guns.. an when they silence your commander in chief you are in a war." On February 6, one Patriot Party group held its first organized public rally in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, which was billed as an "awareness march." Only...
    Attorney General nominee Merrick Garland will face another day of questioning Tuesday on how he’ll oversee probes ranging from the Jan. 6 Capitol breach to Hunter Biden’s business dealings — along with his stance on left-wing rioters in Portland and Seattle. Tuesday’s proceedings will mimic Monday’s, with Garland testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee starting at 9:30 a.m. EST. Garland pledged during Monday’s hearing that handling the investigation into last month’s deadly siege on the Capitol would be his first order of business, telling numerous senators who asked that it was his top priority. “If confirmed, I will supervise the prosecution of white supremacists and others who stormed the Capitol on January 6 — a heinous attack that sought to disrupt a cornerstone of our democracy: the peaceful transfer of power to a newly elected government​,” he said in his opening remarks. Sen. Josh Hawley, a Republican from Missouri, listens...
    More On: merrick garland Federal probe of Cuomo coverup raised at DOJ nominee’s Senate hearing Merrick Garland to face questions on Hunter Biden, Cuomo at Senate AG hearing What to expect from the Merrick Garland confirmation hearing There shouldn’t be a double standard for law & order: Devine Attorney General nominee Merrick Garland will face another day of questioning Tuesday on how he’ll oversee probes ranging from the Jan. 6 Capitol breach to Hunter Biden’s business dealings — along with his stance on left-wing rioters in Portland and Seattle. Tuesday’s proceedings will mimic Monday’s, with Garland testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee starting at 9:30 a.m. EST. Garland pledged during Monday’s hearing that handling the investigation into last month’s deadly siege on the Capitol would be his first order of business, telling numerous senators who asked that it was his top priority. “If confirmed, I will supervise the prosecution...
    WASHINGTON -- Congress is set to hear from former U.S. Capitol security officials for the first time about the massive law enforcement failures on Jan. 6, the day a violent mob laid siege to the building and interrupted the presidential electoral count.Three of the four scheduled to testify Tuesday before two Senate committees resigned under pressure immediately after the deadly attack, including the former head of the Capitol Police.Much remains unknown about what happened before and during the assault, and lawmakers are expected to aggressively question the former officials about what went wrong. How much did law enforcement agencies know about plans for violence that day, many of which were public? How did the agencies share that information with each other? And how could the Capitol Police have been so ill-prepared for a violent insurrection that was organized online, in plain sight?The rioters easily smashed through security barriers on the...
    Two Senate committees are set to meet Monday in the first public congressional inquiry into the Jan. 6 Capitol security failures that allowed a pro-Trump mob to storm the building as lawmakers were certifying the presidential election results in a joint session.  The Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee (HSCAC) and Rules and Administration Committee will convene at 10 a.m. as they seek information about "preparations and response efforts" to the attack.  Invited to the hearing are Metropolitan Police Department Chief Robert Contee and the three former top security officials at the Capitol who have since resigned. Those are former Senate Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper Michael Stenger, former House Sergeant at Arms Paul Irving and former U.S. Capitol Police (USCP) Chief Steven Sund.  "This was an attack on our democracy and must NEVER happen again," Sen. Gary Peters, D-Mich., tweeted last week when the hearing was announced. "As @HSGAC Chairman, I'm...
    Reuters February 23, 2021 0 Comments Two U.S. Senate panels reviewing security failings in the run-up to the deadly assault on the Capitol by supporters of former President Donald Trump are due on Tuesday to interview the top security officials involved in the planning and response. Steven Sund, the former chief of the U.S. Capitol Police, will testify along with the former sergeants-at-arms of the House of Representatives and Senate, Paul Irving and Michael Stenger. All three men resigned in the wake of the Jan. 6 violence that left five people dead. Also appearing will be Robert Contee, the acting police chief in Washington, D.C., whose forces helped the Capitol Police control the mob and eventually clear the Capitol so that lawmakers could return to certify President Joe Biden’s election victory. Senators in the Homeland Security Committee and the Committee on Rules and Administration want to find out where...
    Democrats are proposing a structure for a commission to study the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol that will allow their party to appoint the majority of the commission's members, according to a senior Democratic aide familiar with the discussion draft being circulated among congressional leadership.   Under the current structure, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, and Senate leaders Chuck Schumer and Mitch McConnell will each get to appoint two people to the commission. President Joe Biden will get to appoint three members, including the chair, the aide said. That would allow Democrats to appoint seven commissioners and Republicans to appoint four.  McCarthy's office did not respond to the discussion draft, but the House Republican leader said in a statement last week that Republicans and Democrats should have equal say in appointing the commissioners, as was the case with the commission that studied the September...
    Washington (CNN)Americans could hear for the first time Tuesday why intelligence and operations failed dramatically on January 6 from the very people whose choices contributed to the crisis -- information that will likely help shape the search for new leaders and possibly a new security management structure on Capitol Hill. The Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs and Senate Rules committees are holding an open hearing during which they will likely grill former US Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund, former House Sergeant at Arms Paul Irving, former Senate Sergeant at Arms Michael Stenger, and acting US Metropolitan Police Chief Robert Contee about how such a catastrophic failure occurred, and how to prevent it in the future. Contee has already spoken before lawmakers in a closed-door hearing, but the testimonies of Irving, Stenger, and Sund could be monumental. All three played critical roles in deciding how to prepare for the rally...
    By Susan Cornwell WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Two U.S. Senate panels reviewing security failings in the run-up to the deadly assault on the Capitol by supporters of former President Donald Trump are due on Tuesday to interview the top security officials involved in the planning and response. Steven Sund, the former chief of the U.S. Capitol Police, will testify along with the former sergeants-at-arms of the House of Representatives and Senate, Paul Irving and Michael Stenger. All three men resigned in the wake of the Jan. 6 violence that left five people dead. Also appearing will be Robert Contee, the acting police chief in Washington, D.C., whose forces helped the Capitol Police control the mob and eventually clear the Capitol so that lawmakers could return to certify President Joe Biden's election victory. Senators in the Homeland Security Committee and the Committee on Rules and Administration want to find out where the...
    Two U.S. Senate committees are holding a hearing Tuesday examining the January 6 attack on the U.S. capitol with a focus on security and the response of law enforcement.  Scheduled to testify before the Homeland Security Committee and Governmental Affairs Committee are the former Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael Stenger and former House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul Irving, as well as former Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund and Metropolitan Police Department acting Chief Robert Contee.  For Stenger and Irving, their testimony will be their first public comments since they resigned just after the attack by a pro-Trump mob. In this image from video, Senate Sergeant at Arms Michael Stenger reads the proclamation during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Jan. 29, 2020.Senator Amy Klobuchar told the Associated Press that lawmakers would be focused on how security agencies shared information ahead of the attack, the timing of the deployment of...
    Mother Jones illustration; Getty Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.For a moment last month, it looked like Telegram was finally doing something about its neo-Nazi problem. The secure messaging app, whose largely untraceable platform has laudably provided a safe haven of communication for people in autocratic countries even under government pressure, has also proven popular among racists who have been kicked off other platforms. Telegram largely did nothing about those users until last month, when, shortly after the January 6 riot at the Capitol, the company finally started taking down white supremacist and neo-Nazi channels, the app’s term for public-facing chat groups which, similar to Twitter, allow creators to send messages to anyone who signs up. “Banned groups just immediately reformed and gained back huge numbers.” But within weeks, Telegram appears to...
    FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Kentucky's governor and first lady are asking the state's artists to submit work to be exhibited at the Capitol in Frankfort. Selected pieces will be displayed for a six-month rotation in the Capitol and on a digital art gallery. "This art exhibit will be by Kentuckians and for Kentuckians – just the way it should be,” Gov. Andy Beshear said in a news release. After the the work is displayed, it will be returned to the artist. Submission deadline is May 15. Photos of artwork can be submitted online. First lady Britainy Beshear said she has been “so impressed by extraordinary artists in every region of our state.” The exhibit is open to professional and amateur artists, she said. Interested buyers will be able to contact artists for information about purchase once the artwork is returned. Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may...
    Two U.S. Senate committees are holding a hearing Tuesday examining the January 6 attack on the U.S. capitol with a focus on security and the response of law enforcement.  Scheduled to testify before the Homeland Security Committee and Governmental Affairs Committee are the former Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael Stenger and former House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul Irving, as well as former Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund and Metropolitan Police Department acting Chief Robert Contee.  For Stenger and Irving, their testimony will be their first public comments since they resigned just after the attack by a pro-Trump mob. In this image from video, Senate Sergeant at Arms Michael Stenger reads the proclamation during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Jan. 29, 2020.Senator Amy Klobuchar told the Associated Press that lawmakers would be focused on how security agencies shared information ahead of the attack, the timing of the deployment of...
    By AARON MORRISON, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — When rioters tore through the U.S. Capitol last month, some of them gripping Confederate battle flags, they didn’t encounter a statue of the most famous rebel general, Robert E. Lee. The Lee statue, which represented the state of Virginia as part of the National Statuary Hall Collection in the Capitol for 111 years, had been removed just weeks before — one of at least 160 public Confederate symbols taken down or moved from public spaces in 2020, according to a new count the Southern Poverty Law Center shared with The Associated Press ahead of releasing it. The law center, which keeps a raw count of nearly 2,100 statues, symbols, placards, buildings and public parks dedicated to the Confederacy, plans to release the latest figures from its “Whose Heritage?” database on Tuesday. It has been tracking a movement to take down the...
    FBI agents took a Kansas man into custody on Monday for his alleged connection to last month’s riot at the Capitol just one day before the government looks for answers regarding security readiness leading up to the attack. A joint hearing of two Senate committees, the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee and the Rules and Administration Committee, will question the officials who were in charge of securing the Capitol.FAST FACTS There had been bipartisan calls for a commission on the causes of the Capitol insurrection, similar to the one Congress established following the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The senator said he expects there to be a follow-up hearing taking into account the lack of primary information. The senator said he expects there to be a follow-up hearing taking into account the lack of primary information. Testimony is scheduled to be heard Tuesday from former U.S. Capitol Police Chief...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress is set to hear from former U.S. Capitol security officials for the first time about the massive law enforcement failures on Jan. 6, the day a violent mob laid siege to the building and interrupted the presidential electoral count. Three of the four scheduled to testify Tuesday before two Senate committees resigned under pressure immediately after the deadly attack, including the former head of the Capitol Police. Much remains unknown about what happened before and during the assault, and lawmakers are expected to aggressively question the former officials about what went wrong. How much did law enforcement agencies know about plans for violence that day, many of which were public? How did the agencies share that information with each other? And how could the Capitol Police have been so ill-prepared for a violent insurrection that was organized online, in plain sight? The rioters easily smashed through...
    By MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress is set to hear from former U.S. Capitol security officials for the first time about the massive law enforcement failures on Jan. 6, the day a violent mob laid siege to the building and interrupted the presidential electoral count. Three of the four scheduled to testify Tuesday before two Senate committees resigned under pressure immediately after the deadly attack, including the former head of the Capitol Police. Much remains unknown about what happened before and during the assault, and lawmakers are expected to aggressively question the former officials about what went wrong. How much did law enforcement agencies know about plans for violence that day, many of which were public? How did the agencies share that information with each other? And how could the Capitol Police have been so ill-prepared for a violent insurrection that was organized online, in plain...
    America watched as hordes of rioters broke into the U.S. Capitol on January 6 — crushing through windows, pressing up stairways, and sending lawmakers and law enforcement running for their lives. The flood of protesters who streamed into the Capitol that day left federal authorities with an equally immense task: finding and charging those responsible. So far, federal prosecutors have charged at least 238 people for their alleged roles in the riot and opened over 400 investigations into possible criminals. Acting U.S. Attorney Michael Sherwin said last month, "The scope and scale of this investigation in these cases are really unprecedented, not only in FBI history but probably DOJ history."   As law enforcement continues to round up alleged attackers, here's what CBS News has learned about the over 235 people who were arrested: How many have been charged?At least 238 defendants have been charged in federal court. Of...
    FBI agents took a Kansas man into custody on Monday for his alleged connection to last month’s riot at the Capitol, reports said. Ryan Keith Ashlock, who lives in Gardner, was arrested after a warrant was issued by the United States Court District of Columbia, KMBC News reported. He faces several charges, including conspiracy and knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority. DEFENSE SEC. SAYS NATIONAL GUARD TROOPS TO LEAVE BY MID-MARCH, BUT LONG-TERM SECURITY CONCERNS LINGER KSHB reported that he appeared in a video conference and was appointed a public defender. He was told not to contact others allegedly tied to the riot. PENNSYLVANIA COP ARRESTED IN CONNECTION TO CAPITOL RIOT, ALLEGEDLY CHARGED LINE OF OFFICERS The deadly incident on Jan. 6, led to dozens of arrests and former President Trump’s second impeachment trial.  Edmund DeMarche is a senior news editor for...
    MSNBC analyst Claire McCaskill said Monday that prosecuting former President Donald Trump or his family for any crimes they may have committed “would merely be following the instructions of Mitch McConnell.” “Deadline: White House” host Nicolle Wallace asked McCaskill about the attorneys at the Department of Justice (DOJ) who removed themselves from cases they saw as political under the Trump administration, as well as what Attorney General nominee Merrick Garland’s task will be regarding workforce morale at the DOJ. “Well, there’s a lot of muscle memory there. I mean, the ethos of a prosecutor is you don’t try your cases for political reasons, you don’t charge cases for political reasons, you don’t avoid charging cases for political reasons. You keep your head down. You do the investigation. You get the facts, you apply the law and you go forward. Sometimes that means no case. Sometimes it means a...
    By Joseph Ax (Reuters) - A leader of the far-right group Oath Keepers who is charged with participating in the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol reversed her story on Monday about having met with Secret Service agents in Washington on the day of the insurrection. Jessica Watkins, 38, had said in court papers over the weekend that she had traveled to Washington to provide security for the march, had received a VIP pass to then-President Donald Trump's rally and had met with the Secret Service. But in a filing on Monday, Watkins' attorney said she had merely spoken with some agents while passing through a security checkpoint. "Counsel in no way meant to imply that Ms. Watkins met with the Secret Service," A.J. Kramer, Watkins' court-appointed defense lawyer, wrote. "A better verb would have been 'encountered.'" Watkins, an Afghanistan war veteran who has pleaded not guilty, is among...
    The internet giant Google announced on Monday that it will accept the publication of political ads in the United States as of Wednesday, thus ending the veto it had held since the assault on the Capitol last January. By Miamimundo / telemundo51 In a statement, the Mountain View, California firm indicated that on February 24 it will change its rule on “sensitive events” and will once again allow advertisers to send political messages, although it will maintain a “rigorous” surveillance on the information that may be show that they are false, and that they are prohibited. The veto on political ads was established on January 13, a week after thousands of supporters of former President Donald Trump, some of them with firearms, stormed the Capitol to protest the election results – claiming without evidence that there was fraud-, in which the Republican lost to Democrat Joe Biden. Previously, Google had...
    WASHINGTON -- Merrick Garland, President Joe Biden's attorney general nominee, vowed Monday to prioritize combating extremist violence and said his first focus would be on the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol as he sought to assure lawmakers that the Justice Department would remain politically independent on his watch.A federal appeals court judge who was snubbed by Republicans for a seat on the Supreme Court in 2016, Garland appeared Monday before the Senate Judiciary Committee and is widely expected to sail through his confirmation process with bipartisan support."The attorney general represents the public interest, particularly and specifically as defined by the Constitution and the statutes of the United States," Garland said. "I do not plan to be interfered with by anyone."Garland will inherit a Justice Department that endured a tumultuous era under Trump - rife with political drama and controversial decisions - and that faced abundant criticism from Democrats over what...
    By Helen Coster (Reuters) - A suspect charged in the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riot partially blamed the "right-wing media" for her actions, as conservative news outlets face accusations that they spread misinformation ahead of the violence that left five people dead. In a motion for release to home confinement pending the outcome of her case, filed Saturday, Jessica Watkins said she "fell prey to the false and inflammatory claims of the former president, his supporters, and the right wing media." She did not identify the media outlets by name or give more details about what the claims were that led her to take part in the protest. Watkins, a leader of the far-right 'Oath Keepers' group, has been charged with conspiring to storm the Capitol to prevent Congress from certifying President Joe Biden's election victory. She has pleaded not guilty to the conspiracy charges. The role the media may...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- For President Joe Biden's first 100 days in office, Eyewitness News will have a special election edition of "The Countdown" to get you caught up with all of the day's political and campaign news.You can watch it online, on the ABC7NY app or on our Connected TV apps for Fire, Roku, Apple TV and Android TV. Click here to learn more.Monday, Feb. 22US COVID death toll tops 500,000, matching the toll of 3 warsThe COVID-19 death toll in the U.S. topped 500,000 Monday, a staggering number that all but matches the number of Americans killed in World War II, Korea and Vietnam combined. The lives lost, as recorded by Johns Hopkins University, are about equal to the population of Kansas City, Missouri, and greater than that of Miami; Raleigh, North Carolina; or Omaha, Nebraska. The U.S. recorded an estimated 405,000 deaths in World War II, 58,000...
    By MARGARET STAFFORD, Associated Press LIBERTY, Mo. (AP) — A man linked to the Kansas City metro chapter of the Proud Boys was charged Monday with conspiring with members of the group to participate in the riots at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Ryan Ashlock, of Gardner, Kansas, was arrested Monday without incident, the FBI said. An affidavit alleges Ashlock conspired with five other members of the Proud Boys who have already been charged in the riots. They were among hundreds of supporters of former President Donald Trump who stormed the Capitol after Trump spoke at a rally, forcing lawmakers to be taken to safety. Five people died in the melee. It was unclear Monday if Ashlock has an attorney. Ashlock traveled to the riots with other Proud Boy members, marched with them to the Capitol, and helped knock down metal barricades between police and protesters outside the Capitol,...
    By MICHAEL BALSAMO, ERIC TUCKER and MARY CLARE JALONICK WASHINGTON (AP) — Merrick Garland, President Joe Biden’s attorney general nominee, vowed Monday to prioritize combating extremist violence with an initial focus on the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol as he sought to assure lawmakers that the Justice Department would remain politically independent on his watch. A federal appeals court judge who was snubbed by Republicans for a seat on the Supreme Court in 2016, Garland is now among Biden’s most widely supported nominees, putting him on track for a quick confirmation potentially within days. He will inherit a Justice Department that endured a tumultuous era under former president Donald Trump — rife with political drama and controversial decisions — and that faced abundant criticism from Democrats over what they saw as the politicizing of the nation’s top law enforcement agencies. Garland sought repeatedly Monday to assure members of the Senate...
    Democrats have drafted a proposal to create a commission that would examine the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. The temporary panel would be tasked with providing a report by the end of 2021 on the attack, and it would disband 60 days later, according to a discussion of draft details provided by a senior Democratic aide. Under the draft legislation, Democrats would appoint seven members of the commission via the leadership in both chambers and President Biden. The GOP leadership in the House and Senate would pick a total of four members. Republicans had called for the creation of a bipartisan panel and have not responded to a request for a comment on the Democratic plan. The top Republican on the House Administration Committee last month introduced a measure to create a commission with five Republicans and five Democrats. Lawmakers in both parties have called for...
    Officials charged with protecting the Capitol the day a mob overwhelmed police and forced the evacuation of lawmakers are expected to be grilled at a Tuesday hearing as Congress begins a public examination into the security lapses of the Jan. 6 insurrection. The much-anticipated hearing — a collaboration of the Senate Rules and Homeland Security committees — will provide lawmakers their first chance to confront officials on the available intelligence and the day’s monumental security failures. Three of the officials slated to testify — former Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund, former House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul Irving and former Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael Stenger — resigned in the days immediately following the attack. A fourth witness, Robert Contee, the acting chief of the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department, will also appear before the Senate panels on Tuesday. The grilling moves to the House on Thursday, when the Appropriations subcommittee that oversees Capitol Police will...
    Attorney general nominee Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandGarland expected to become Biden's AG after high court hold up Merrick Garland vows to fight discrimination, domestic extremism as attorney general Read: Merrick Garland outlines priorities if confirmed as attorney general MORE vowed Monday to steer clear of politics as the country’s top lawyer, seeking to turn the page from the Trump-era Justice Department. Garland — who testified nearly five years after Senate Republicans blocked his Supreme Court nomination — pledged to confront domestic terrorism and racial inequalities while rebuilding the department as he outlined his vision during an hours-long confirmation hearing before the Judiciary Committee. With confirmation on the Senate floor expected as soon as next week, Garland will take charge of the Justice Department at a critical moment. On Monday, the federal appeals court judge sought to reassure senators in both parties, who voiced concerns that the Department of Justice (DOJ)...
    LIBERTY, Mo. (AP) — A man linked to the Kansas City metro chapter of the Proud Boys was charged Monday with conspiring with members of the group to participate in the riots at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Ryan Ashlock, of Gardner, Kansas, was arrested Monday without incident, the FBI said. An affidavit alleges Ashlock conspired with five other members of the Proud Boys who have already been charged in the riots. They were among hundreds of supporters of former President Donald Trump who stormed the Capitol after Trump spoke at a rally, forcing lawmakers to be taken to safety. Five people died in the melee. It was unclear Monday if Ashlock has an attorney. Ashlock traveled to the riots with other Proud Boy members, marched with them to the Capitol, and helped knock down metal barricades between police and protesters outside the Capitol, according to the...
    By ANDREW SELSKY, Associated Press SALEM, Ore. (AP) — A far-right senator who's rebelled against coronavirus restrictions and said he supported protesters who stormed the Oregon Capitol has been elected chairman of the state Republican Party. State Sen. Dallas Heard’s rise comes days after one of Oregon’s most prominent Republicans, Knute Buehler, left the party in disgust. Buehler, who was the Republican candidate for governor in the 2018 election and the GOP nominee for a congressional seat last year, told reporters that he left the party because Donald Trump tried to overturn the presidential election and incited the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. The final straw, Buehler said, came when the Oregon Republican Party said the violence at the U.S. Capitol was a “false flag effort” designed to discredit Trump, his supporters and all conservative Republicans. Heard did not immediately respond to a request for comment on his...
    SALEM, Ore. (AP) — A far-right senator who’s rebelled against coronavirus restrictions and said he supported protesters who stormed the Oregon Capitol has been elected chairman of the state Republican Party. State Sen. Dallas Heard’s rise comes days after one of Oregon’s most prominent Republicans, Knute Buehler, left the party in disgust. Buehler, who was the Republican candidate for governor in the 2018 election and the GOP nominee for a congressional seat last year, told reporters that he left the party because Donald Trump tried to overturn the presidential election and incited the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. The final straw, Buehler said, came when the Oregon Republican Party said the violence at the U.S. Capitol was a “false flag effort” designed to discredit Trump, his supporters and all conservative Republicans. Heard did not immediately respond to a request for comment on his election as chairman of...
    A left-wing activist indicted on federal charges related to his role in the Capitol Hill riots has found a new way to monetize his time in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 6. John Sullivan, who goes by the online moniker Jayden X, is releasing a book titled Insurrection: Uncovering the Storming of the United States Capitol on July 30, which will detail "the hidden truths of [antifa's'] plot to overthrow Democracy." ACTIVIST, ANTIFA, OR GRIFTED? SELF-STYLED BLM SUPPORTER FROM UTAH FINDS HIMSELF AT CENTER OF THE CAPITOL FALLOUT "As he uncovers, the alt-right community is identified as Proud Boys, Oath Keepers, and Trump Supporters. Who are hell-bent on Stopping The Stolen election by orchestrating the Insurrection at The United States Capitol," Sullivan's website reads. "In their last desperate attempt to halt the elected officials in the congressional meeting who are counting the electoral votes to declare...
    Bradley Cortright February 22, 2021 0 Comments Capitol Police Officer Harry Dunn is publicly sharing what he experienced as a mob of pro-Trump rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. In an interview with ABC’s “Good Morning America,” Dunn recalled how he would look at the Capitol with a sense of awe, and what he saw during the riot, “This time you look up, it’s just a cloud of smoke, fire extinguishers have been going off.” “The floors are covered in white dust, water bottles, broken flagpoles, mask, empty canisters of pepper spray, helmets, Trump flags, everything in the rotunda, just laying there on the floor,” he added. Dunn said he told his colleagues after the violence, “‘I got called a [N-word] a couple dozen times today protecting this building.'” “Is this America? They beat police officers with Blue Lives Matter flags. They fought us. They had Confederate...
    Joe Saunders, The Western Journal February 22, 2021 0 Comments This is one Joe Biden story that raises questions Democrats don’t want to answer. The man who’s now the president of the United States took to the “Late Show with David Letterman” in 2007 with a story for the late-night comic about his purported arrest as a young man for illegally entering the U.S. Senate chamber on a visit to Washington and sitting in the presiding officer’s chair. It was meant as an amusing anecdote, no doubt, but a viewer in 2021 will be struck by something else entirely. Check out the Biden story here. Oh the irony. Biden said that he was arrested for trespassing at the Capitol. pic.twitter.com/cUid5QAIQ6 — Michael Moore (@mbracemoore) February 21, 2021 In the wake of the Jan. 6 Capitol incursion that has left a deep imprint on the nation’s politics as well...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – A former North Miami Beach police officer has been charged with taking part in the January 6 riot at the Capitol. Nicholas Lentz, 41, is charged with entering a restricted building and disorderly conduct. READ MORE: We Dont Even Get Chance To Play: COVID Sidelines Sunset & Gables High Basketball Teams For Infections On Other Teams An FBI affidavit said he was identified though Facebook photos and told agents he was trying to control the crowd. READ MORE: BSO Looking For Accused Arsonist’s Accomplice In Pompano Beach Waste Facility Attack A photo from the FBI that the agency said shows Lentz taking part in the January 6 riot at the Capitol (Source: FBI) Lentz has been released on $25,000 bail. MORE NEWS: Third Stimulus Check: Will Your Next Relief Payment Be $1,400? CBS4 news partner the Miami Herald reports he left the North Miami Beach Police Department...
    Democratic Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin criticized the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) and its attendees Monday, saying they’re “a bunch of people with a theory and a conspiracy for every issue facing America” and that he “wouldn’t consider even walking through the door” of the conference. Durbin appeared on CNN’s “New Day” and discussed with host John Berman which Republicans will be speaking at CPAC and how one of the major topics at the conference will be election fraud. Berman began by noting that former President Donald Trump, as well as various Republican senators, will be in attendance. He also mentioned that the agenda for part of the conference will focus on protecting elections, the “refusal” by judges and media to look at “evidence” of election fraud, as well as “the left’s” involvement in the alleged fraud. A USA Today/Suffolk University poll conducted in December found that 78%...
    Former Republican National Committee (RNC) Chair Michael Steele said Monday that conservatives who do not wish to be part of the party without former President TrumpDonald TrumpFormer Florida officer arrested after live streaming from inside US Capitol during breach, FBI says Schumer says he's working to find votes to confirm Biden's OMB pick Pence declined invitation to attend CPAC: reports MORE leading it are free to leave.  "You have 46 percent of the folks saying they will follow Trump," Steele said Monday on MSNBC's "Morning Joe." "I'm like, OK, there's the door. Y'all go do your thing and we'll just pick up the pieces on this side and keep moving. And that's the battle."  Steele was referring to a new Suffolk University-USA Today poll released Sunda that found 46 percent of Republicans would abandon the GOP and join a Trump party if the former president decided to create one. Only 27 percent of respondents said they would stay with...
    Congressional leaders are discussing draft legislation for a bipartisan commission that would investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, with the latest proposal giving Democrats more sway over its membership. According to a senior Democratic aide, a draft bill under discussion would allow each of the four top House and Senate leaders of each party to appoint two members. President BidenJoe BidenBiden to hold moment of silence for 500K COVID-19 deaths Publix offers employees who get COVID-19 vaccine a 5 store gift card Schumer says he's working to find votes to confirm Biden's OMB pick MORE would also choose three additional members, including the commission's chair. That would give Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDemocrats face unity test on Biden's .9T bill Progressive caucus chair: I think minimum wage will be included in COVID-19 aid package Enough is enough: It's time to impose term limits on Congress MORE (D-Calif.), Senate Majority...
    WASHINGTON - U.S. Attorney General nominee Merrick Garland on Monday called the January 6 storming of the U.S. Capitol by supporters of former President Donald Trump the “most heinous” attack on democracy and vowed to pursue investigative leads “wherever they take us.” “I never expected to see that in my lifetime,” the 68-year-old Garland told the Senate Judiciary Committee Monday at his confirmation hearing to become the country's top law enforcement official as head the Justice Department. “I can assure you this will be my main priority [and the subject of] my first briefing” if confirmed, said Garland, a former deputy assistant attorney general in the Justice Department’s Criminal Division during the Clinton administration. Supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump clash with police at the west entrance of the Capitol during a "Stop the Steal" protest outside of the Capitol building in Washington D.C., Jan. 6, 2021.More than 200...
    UConn Student Body President Mike Hernandez, a hispanic, has been accused of supporting “white supremacy” after vetoing a resolution that called on the university to defund the campus police. “When you veto this bill, you veto a call against white supremacy,” said former student senate member, Sam Zelin, in reaction to President Mike Hernandez’s veto of the legislation, according to a report by the Daily Campus. Jessica Delgado, a student senator, also expressed her dismay, stating, “I thought USG was about moving forward but this feels like a step backwards.” “If you are against racism as an organization, I don’t understand why we are debating a veto to make a statement denouncing white supremacy and the capitol riots,” she added. The resolution condemning white supremacy in the wake of the January 6 Capitol Hill riot also included a demand for the university to defund the campus police. “USG condemns UConn for issuing...
    Google said on Monday that it would lift a ban on political and campaign ads that had been put into effect after the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, according to a report from The Hill. The “sensitive events” ban went into effect on Jan. 13 and is expected to be repealed on Wednesday, Axios reported. NEW: Google will resume accepting all political ads this week after banning them following last month’s insurrection at the Capitol, according to an email obtained by Axios. https://t.co/2PyPD56So2 — Axios (@axios) February 22, 2021 “We are currently enforcing a sensitive event for the US elections. Advertisers are not permitted to run ads which reference the candidates, the election, its outcome, the upcoming presidential inauguration, the ongoing presidential impeachment process, violence at the US Capitol, or future planned protests on these topics,” a statement from the tech company read on Jan. 14. (RELATED: Google’s New Fact-Check...
    CNN’s Brian Stelter has updated Hoax: Donald Trump, Fox News, and the Dangerous Distortion of Truth, his bestselling book about the relationship between former President Donald Trump and Fox News, to include coverage of the end of Trump’s presidency, the growing influence of right-wing media outlets Newsmax and One America News Network, and other post-election topics. The changes to the book include coverage of the end of Trump’s presidency, false claims of voter fraud which culminated in the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, and the apparent increased influence of Newsmax and OAN, according to a report by Associated Press media writer David Bauder. “With Trump out of office and Fox out of its usual first place spot in the ratings, the story now seems complete,” Stelter said in the Sunday edition of his Reliable Sources newsletter. “So I wrote a brand new beginning; updated the text throughout;...
    As a mob of Trump-supporting insurrectionists attacked the U.S. Capitol on January 6, the Capitol Police were not ready, and a National Guard deployment was delayed. Those are facts that cannot be seriously contested. The details of how and why law enforcement agencies were so unprepared and by whom the National Guard deployment was delayed, though, are questions that are going to be fought out for some time to come. The New York Times has a new effort at a timeline of the requests for help from the National Guard, a question that Steven Sund, the former chief of the Capitol Police, will no doubt face when he testifies to Congress on Tuesday.  This is how this timeline breaks down: 1:09 PM: The mob breaks through police barriers and Sund calls the House sergeant-at-arms, Paul Irving, to ask for the National Guard. (Irving, like Sund, has since resigned.) Irving tells Sund he needs...
    By MICHAEL BALSAMO, ERIC TUCKER and MARY CLARE JALONICK WASHINGTON (AP) — Merrick Garland, President Joe Biden’s attorney general nominee, vowed Monday to prioritize combating extremist violence and said his first focus would be on the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol as he sought to assure lawmakers that the Justice Department would remain politically independent on his watch. A federal appeals court judge who was snubbed by Republicans for a seat on the Supreme Court in 2016, Garland appeared Monday before the Senate Judiciary Committee and is widely expected to sail through his confirmation process with bipartisan support. “The attorney general represents the public interest, particularly and specifically as defined by the Constitution and the statutes of the United States,” Garland said. “I do not plan to be interfered with by anyone.” Garland will inherit a Justice Department that endured a tumultuous era under Trump — rife with political drama...
    Chairman Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS)(Photo by Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images) A member of the Proud Boys has been ringing Rep. Bennie Thompson’s phone wanting a conversation with him since the Mississippi congressman filed a lawsuit against the white nationalist group. The suit also names former President Donald Trump, Rudy Giuliani and the militia group, the Oath Keepers, as defendants. Committee Chairman Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., speaks during a House Committee on Homeland Security hearing on ‘worldwide threats to the homeland’, on Capitol Hill Washington. (John McDonnell/The Washington Post via AP, Pool) The civil suit, backed by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is in direct response to the Jan. 6 deadly insurrection on the U.S. Capitol building. As of last Friday, Congressman Thompson had not answered the calls from the white supremacists.   Read More: Democratic congressman Bennie Thompson sues Trump over role in Capitol riot Congressman...
    A Florida woman was arrested after she, in a whiskey-fueled rant on TikTok, allegedly threatened to shoot FBI agents who called to ask her if they could come to her home to interview her about her activity in Washington, D.C. on Jan. 6 during the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Suzanne Kaye, 59, from Boca Raton, Fla., was charged with making a communication in interstate commerce that threatened to kill agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Florida said in a statement Friday. DEFENSE SEC. SAYS NATIONAL GUARD TROOPS TO LEAVE BY MID-MARCH, BUT LONG-TERM SECURITY CONCERNS LINGER The FBI received an online tip to the National Threat Operation Center (NTOC) on Jan. 16 that Kaye posted information on her Facebook page that she was present at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, according to the criminal complaint affidavit filed last week....
    The mother of the US Capitol police officer who died following the insurgence on January 6 believes that her son succumbed to a fatal stroke - that he was not bludgeoned to death by a fire extinguisher as reported. Yet more than one month after Officer Brian Sicknick's death on January 7, she has admitted that they are still in the dark as to what exactly caused that catastrophic episode. Speaking exclusively to DailyMail.com Gladys Sicknick, 74, was unequivocal in her assertion that Officer Brian Sicknick was not struck on the head and that as far as the family knows her son had a fatal stroke. She said, ‘He wasn’t hit on the head no. We think he had a stroke, but we don’t know anything for sure. ‘We’d love to know what happened.' Because, while politicians have grandstanded and rushed to judgment no one has yet given the family...
    Photograph: REX/Shutterstock Donald Trump will reportedly tell the Conservative Political Action Conference in Florida this week he is Republicans’ “presumptive 2024 nominee” for president. Related: Republicans failing to toe the Trumpist line feel wrath of their state parties Trump will address CPAC on Sunday, his subject the future of the party he took over in the 2016 primary then led from the White House through four tumultuous years. On Monday, citing anonymous sources, the news site Axios reported his plan to assume the mantle of challenger to Joe Biden – or another Democrat, should the 78-year-old president decide not to run for a second term. An unnamed “longtime adviser” was quoted as saying Trump’s speech to the rightwing event will be a “show of force” with the message: “I may not have Twitter or the Oval Office, but I’m still in charge.” A named source, close adviser Jason...
    Nominee for U.S. Attorney General, Merrick Garland, during his swearing in confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Washington, DC, February 22, 2021.Demetrius Freeman | Pool | Reuters Judge Merrick Garland pledged on Monday to pursue a robust investigation into the leaders of the Jan. 6 Capitol riot if he is confirmed as head of the Department of Justice, calling it his No. 1 priority. Speaking to the Senate Judiciary Committee on the first day of his confirmation hearings, President Joe Biden's attorney general nominee told lawmakers that he would "pursue these leads wherever they take us." "We begin with the people on the ground and we work our way up to those who were involved and further involved," Garland said in an exchange with Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I. The senator has pushed for probes of tax-exempt conservative groups involved in organizing the rally that preceded the riot. Overseeing the...
    The GOP’s House campaign arm outraised its Democratic counterpart last month despite an exodus of corporate donors in the wake of the Jan. 5 riots at the Capitol.  Filings with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) show that the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) pulled in nearly $7.5 million in the first month of 2021, outpacing the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) by about $500,000.  The NRCC’s January fundraising haul suggests that the fallout from the Capitol riots had little practical effect on the group’s finances.  Dozens of corporate political action committees (PACs) halted donations to Republican lawmakers who challenged President BidenJoe BidenBiden to hold moment of silence for 500K COVID-19 deaths Publix offers employees who get COVID-19 vaccine a 5 store gift card Schumer says he's working to find votes to confirm Biden's OMB pick MORE’s Electoral College victory last month after a mob of then-President TrumpDonald TrumpFormer Florida officer...
    Google will resume accepting all political ads starting Wednesday, following its temporary ban put in place after the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. The Jan. 6 riot involved hundreds of pro-Trump demonstrators storming the Capitol, resulting in the deaths of five people. For the temporary ban, the tech giant cited its "sensitive events" policy which aims to stop advertisers from profiting off events that have a significant social, cultural, or political impact, according to its ad policies. Such events could include civil emergencies, national disasters, terrorism incidents, or public health emergencies. FACEBOOK PURGES MYANMAR MILITARY PAGE AMID COUP In an email obtained by Axios, Google said the resumption of political ads means the sensitive events policy has been lifted. However, advertisers need to use the self-service appeals tool in the Google Ads portal to have their existing ads re-reviewed. "If they are otherwise policy compliant, then our reviewers...
    An Oath Keepers leader claims she attended former President Donald Trump’s Jan. 6 rally with a VIP pass to provide security to officials and to meet with Secret Service, Reuters reported Sunday. Jessica Watkins, 38, was charged with conspiring to storm the U.S. Capitol building in an attempt to block the congressional certification of the 2020 presidential election, Reuters reported. “Ms. Watkins was present not as an insurrectionist, but to provide security to the speakers at the rally, to provide escort for the legislators and others to march to the Capitol as directed by the then president, and to safely escort protesters away from the Capitol to their vehicles and cars at the conclusion of the protest,” Watkins’s attorney said, Reuters reported. One of the leaders in the Oath Keepers conspiracy in the US Capitol attack is claiming she met with Secret Service agents on Jan. 6 — tying the...