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    A Utah man has been arrested for allegedly abducting his ex-girlfriend's family dog, setting the animal on fire and abandoning it in the middle of a road following an argument with its owner over money. Michael Busico, 40, from West Valley, was booked into the Tooele County Jail on Monday on charges of torture of a companion animal, arson, theft and trespassing. The injured dog, a four-year-old red tick heeler named Dixie, was listed in critical condition as of Tuesday, having suffered second- and third-degree burns to its head, pelvis, belly and mouth.  Michael Busico, 40 (left), faces charges of torture of a companion animal, arson, theft and trespassing, accused of setting his ex-girlfriend's family dog, Dixie (right), on fire The 4-year-old red tick heeler suffered second- and third-degree burns to its head, pelvis , belly and mouth Dixie remained in critical condition and was being treated...
    Donald Trump Jr. is expected to testify in Michael Cohen’s lawsuit seeking over $750,000 in legal fees from the Trump Organization, according to Cohen’s attorney. Cohen — a former lawyer and “fixer” to Trump’s ex-president dad — originally sued the Trump Organization for $2 million in legal fees he said he ran up because of his cooperation and testimony during probes into the then-commander-in-chief by special counsel Robert Mueller and several congressional committees. Two of the five law firms that were seeking payment have since settled their claims, leaving roughly $766,000 in legal bills to be covered, Cohen’s lawyer Hunter Winstead explained during a video hearing in Manhattan Supreme Court Tuesday. Winstead told the court that while they have taken five depositions in the case already, they have sought more, one of which is for “Donald Trump Jr., which we have been told would be provided, although we haven’t been...
    FALMOUTH, Mass. (AP) — A defense attorney argued last week that race and mental health played a role in the case of a Massachusetts man charged with the shooting of two Falmouth police officers in July 2018. Brian Kelley, the attorney representing Malik Koval, requested that his client receive a sentence between 5 and 7 1/2 years and requested a change of venue to take the case out of Barnstable County, the Cape Cod Times reported. Falmouth police officers Donald DeMiranda and Ryan Moore were wounded when responding to a report of a man yelling and throwing trash in the street outside Koval's mother's home. DeMiranda was shot in the shoulder and Moore was grazed on the neck. According to the defendant’s sentencing memorandum, Koval was diagnosed with bipolar disorder with elements of paranoia and grandiose thoughts. Koval was indicted by a Barnstable County grand jury on charges including armed...
    Rep. Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanCPAC, all-in for Trump, is not what it used to be Democrats don't trust GOP on 1/6 commission: 'These people are dangerous' The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Divided House on full display MORE (R-Ohio) called on Monday for the House Judiciary Committee to hold a public hearing on "cancel culture," arguing that the committee should investigate what he claimed was a wave of "censorship" occurring in private companies, on college campuses, and other facets of American life. Jordan, the committee's ranking member, did not give a reason in his letter why the Judiciary Committee, which is tasked with overseeing the federal court system and law enforcement, would have purview over this issue. The Ohio Republican argued instead in his letter that "cancel culture's long-term consequences to our democracy and our constitutional framework are serious and substantial." He referenced a number of issues including...
    CHESAPEAKE, Va. (AP) — A Virginia man has been convicted of murder and now faces up to life in prison for strangling his wife with his hands and some pajama pants. At the close of a weeklong bench trial, a judge on Friday convicted William Khine, 42, of murder in the 2017 killing of 39-year-old Khin Shwe, The Virginian-Pilot of Norfolk reported. Lawyers on both sides of the case had agreed that Circuit Court Judge Rufus Banks Jr. would decide the case instead of a jury, which Virginia law allows. Sentencing is set for June 15. Prosecutors argued during the trial that Shwe’s killing was deliberate and premeditated. Khine’s public defenders contended that he was legally insane at the time of the slaying, and that Banks should find him not guilty by reason of insanity. Police found Shwe’s body inside the couple’s apartment in Chesapeake on March 10, 2017. Khine...
    Jessica Watkins, an Oath Keeper accused of preparing and training for at least two months to “fight hand to hand” to take over the Capitol, spoke out publicly for the first time in court Friday afternoon, claiming she plans to leave the far-right paramilitary group behind. “My fellow Oath Keepers have kind of turned my stomach against it,” Watkins said during a hearing that will decide whether she remains behind bars ahead of her trial. “We’re done with that lifestyle ... I did it out of love for my country but it’s time to let all of that go.” Watkins, a 38-year-old Army vet, is among several Oath Keepers who have been charged with conspiring and recruiting others to storm the Capitol on Jan. 6 as Congress met to certify President-elect Joe Biden’s electoral victory. Prosecutors have argued that Watkins’ continued loyalty to the Oath Keepers justifies their request to...
    MILWAUKEE (AP) — The case of a 15-year-old Milwaukee boy charged with shooting and wounding eight people at a suburban mall last year will remain in juvenile court, a judge has ruled. In a petition for juvenile delinquency, the teen faces eight felony counts of first-degree reckless injury and one misdemeanor count of possessing a firearm while under 18 in connection with the Nov. 20 shooting at Mayfair Mall in Wauwatosa. Before Milwaukee County Circuit Judge Brittany Grayson issued her ruling Thursday, prosecutors argued that because of the seriousness of the shooting, and the trauma it inflicted on the victims and the community, the teen should be locked up longer than the few months he would face if he is found delinquent in juvenile proceedings. “It’s only by luck, and perhaps the grace of God, that no one was killed,” said Assistant District Attorney Sara Waldschmidt. Assistant Public Defender Paul...
    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Bankrupt coal company Blackjewel has been ordered by a federal judge to clean up a Kentucky mine site. In a bankruptcy court ruling issued Wednesday, Judge Benjamin Kahn said the Bell County site presented a potential threat and ordered Blackjewel to excavate and treat coal mining ponds until the company is allowed to abandon them, the Courier Journal reported. The state had argued the mine presented an imminent danger, which the judge rejected. Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet inspectors found coal mining ponds this year that were overfull, contained high levels of iron and manganese and could breach at any time. Officials argued that threatened drinking water, a state highway, a railroad and the environment. Scott Kane, a lawyer for Blackjewel, said the company was working to mitigate the problem. Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or...
    Former President Donald Trump derided the Supreme Court after it gave a green light to New York investigations into his tax returns Monday. SCOTUS rejected Trump’s requests to both shield his taxes and contest the result of the 2020 election Monday. Trump argued in a statement that the investigations, led by New York Attorney General Letitia James and New York City District Attorney Cy Vance, were “with hunts” aimed at political revenge. (RELATED: Trump Cannot Block The Release Of His Financial Records To Prosecutors, Supreme Court Rules) “This investigation is a continuation of the greatest political Witch Hunt in the history of our Country,” Trump argued. “This is something which has never happened to a President before, it is all Democrat-inspired in a totally Democrat location, New York City and State, completely controlled and dominated by a heavily reported enemy of mine, Governor Andrew Cuomo.” Trump went on to argue...
    A federal judge has rejected an appeal from a former University of Virginia lacrosse player who argued that his 2012 murder conviction should be thrown out over an allegation that the jury improperly used a dictionary. George Huguely V, 32, is serving a 25-year sentence for the 2010 beating death of 22-year-old Yeardley Love, who was herself a lacrosse player at UVA and was two weeks away from graduation when she was killed. Huguely, of Maryland, has filed multiple unsuccessful appeals. But in a ruling in December, US District Judge Thomas Cullen in Roanoke opened up a narrow window for Huguely and ordered an evidentiary hearing to be held to determine whether the jury improperly consulted used a dictionary to look up the definition of 'malice.' Scroll down for video  A federal judge has rejected an appeal from convicted killer George Huguely V (left), who argued that his...
    The Supreme Court on Monday ​declined to step in to halt the release of former President Donald Trump’s tax returns from Manhattan prosecutors who are probing the Trump Organization. Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance is investigating alleged insurance and bank fraud by Trump’s real estate company and has subpoenaed eight years’ worth of financial records from Trump’s accounting firm Mazars USA LLP. Trump’s tax records are not supposed to become public as part of prosecutors’ investigation In a statement responding to the Supreme Court’s decision, Vance’s office said, “The work continues.” Trump has called Vance’s probe the “continuation of the worst witch hunt in American history.” The Supreme Court did not offer an explanation for its decision. Vance had been seeking the tax returns and other financial information since 2019, but Trump’s legal team argued that he could not be investigated because he was a sitting president at the...
    Before fatally shooting a Black man in San Clemente last year, two Orange County sheriff’s deputies argued over whether the man had illegally crossed the street and if it was necessary to stop him, a newly released recording reveals. The Orange County Sheriff’s Department on Wednesday released dashcam video and security camera footage from a motel that shows the fatal encounter with Kurt Andras Reinhold, who was shot to death on Sept. 23. A previously released bystander cellphone video shows the two deputies confronting Reinhold in the middle of El Camino Real. The deputies, part of a detail that specializes in homelessness issues, are seen trying to stop Reinhold from walking away before wrestling him to the ground. A voice is heard yelling, “He’s got my gun,” followed by two shots several seconds apart. The dashcam video provides new insight into what prompted the deadly confrontation with the 42-year-old father...
    ‘Survivors 2021’ is getting closer and closer. The lack of confirmation of the start date and of the official contestants by Telecinco, makes the rumors about who will participate in the new edition of the reality show they are increasing. Although there is speculation with all kinds of public figures, One of the most famous possible incorporations was Zayra Gutiérrez. Rafa Mora with Zayra Gutiérrez in ‘Save me’ Guti’s daughter, former Real Madrid footballer, and the television presenter Arantxa de Benito he is in the spotlight of the news of the pink press for his involvement in different controversies in recent months. In fact, Zayra Gutiérrez rose to fame for the high standard of living that the 20-year-old has not counted on financial help from her parents. It was Makoke in ‘Viva la vida’ who claimed that both Zayra and her brother Aitor inherited from the maternal grandfather a...
    Congress held its first hearing on reparations for slavery since the May 2020 death of George Floyd, which reignited the Black Lives Matter movement.  Members of the Judiciary subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Civil Liberties met over Zoom Wednesday to discuss H.R. 40, which aims to 'establish a commission to study and consider a national apology and proposal for reparations for the institution of slavery.'     Democratic Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, who's spearheading the effort, argued her case with images, holding up pictures of a beaten slave and lynched black Americans.  Democratic Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee is spearheading the effort to get H.R. 40 passed. If the resolution gets signed it would form a commission to study reparations for slavery  The Republicans brought in witnesses Herschel Walker (left), a former National Football League player, as well as conservative talk show host Larry Elder (right), who both argued against...
    New York has filed a lawsuit against Amazon, saying it showed a “flagrant disregard” for COVID-19 safety rules and retaliated against employees who complained, the New York Times has reported. Attorney general Letitia James said that Amazon failed to properly disinfect two of its facilities and follow proper contact tracing procedures for sick employees. “Amazon’s extreme profits and exponential growth rate came at the expense of the lives, health and safety of its frontline workers,” she argued in the New York supreme court complaint. Amazon filed an injunction to stop the lawsuit last week, and said it disagreed with the suit. “We don’t believe the attorney general’s filing presents an accurate picture of Amazon’s industry-leading response to the pandemic,” Amazon spokesperson Kelly Nantel told the NYT, adding that the company cared “deeply about the health and safety” of its employees. In the lawsuit, New York said Amazon had been...
    After the Head of State Francisco Sagasti announced through a message to the nation, on Monday night, that the former Minister of Health Pilar Mazzetti received the two doses of the Sinopharm vaccine, we will remember the day that the galena stated that it would be the last to be inoculated within its sector. On Wednesday 10 of this month, a firm Pilar Mazzetti assured, through a press conference together with Minister Violeta Bermúdez, that the members of the Executive would wait for the right moment to be immunized against the COVID-19. This means that they would wait for the phase that corresponds to them, according to the plan established at the national level. Consequently, the then holder of the Minsa He argued that, being part of the administrative area of ​​said sector, he would have to receive the first dose next week. After emphasizing the batch of 700,000 that...
    There’s been a great deal of frustration aimed at Democrats over the decision not to call witnesses in Donald Trump’s impeachment trial. Democrats have argued in response that it wouldn’t have made a difference in the end — an argument Mehdi Hasan pushed back on in talking with Chris Hayes Monday night. Hasan said it’s a “bizarre argument” because if the idea is that they never would have gotten 67 votes in the first place, “why have a trial at all, then?” “Why bother doing any of this stuff if the argument is we are going to let the Republicans decide what is and isn’t acceptable in this trial,” he continued. Hasan noted how some Democrats have argued that ultimately “history will judge the Republicans” and said, “I’m fed up of waiting for history to judge the Republicans. Why can’t we judge them in the here and now?” And while...
    SAN FRANCISCO — A California appeals court ruled that Twitter had the right to ban a Canadian writer for her “hateful” tweets about transgender women, court records show. The 42-page published opinion by the First District Appellate Court, issued late last month, upholds the dismissal of a 2019 lawsuit by Meghan Murphy, a writer, journalist and founder of the Canadian-based website Feminist Current. Murphy was banned from Twitter for tweets that referred to a transgender woman as “a man” — in a post that tagged her — and accused her of extortion for filing complaints against estheticians who refused to perform a Brazilian wax. Murphy had been previously locked out of her account for tweeting, “men aren’t women,” and “How are transwomen (sic) not men? What is the difference between a man and a transwoman?” Twitter argued it was protected from liability under Section 230 of the 1996 Communications Decency...
    The Senates top Democrat says Jan. 6 will live as a "day of infamy" in American history and  the vote to acquit Donald Trump "will live as a vote of infamy in the history of the United States Senate." Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., took to the Senate floor Saturday to decry the Senates acquittal of the former president on a charge that he incited the deadly insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. He applauded the seven Republicans who joined all 50 Democrats in voting to convict Trump. He called the day of the riot the "final, terrible legacy" of Trump and said the stain of his actions will never be "washed away." The Senate acquitted Trump of inciting the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol, bringing his trial to a close and giving the former president a historic second victory in the court of impeachment. Trump is the first...
    Loading the player... Enough senators have cast “not guilty” votes to acquit Donald Trump of inciting the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. The vote will give the former president a historic second acquittal in an impeachment trial. House Democrats, who voted a month ago to charge Trump with “incitement of insurrection,” needed two thirds of the Senate, or 67 votes, to convict him. Read More: Stacey Plaskett slams Trump’s impeachment defense: ‘Black women are sick and tired’ House impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., speaks about the motion to call witnesses during the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Saturday, Feb. 13, 2021. (Senate Television via AP) The Democrats argued in the short trial that Trump caused the violent attack by repeating for months the false claims that the election was stolen from him, and then...
    The Senate voted to acquit former President Donald Trump of the charge that he incited the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol, ending a week-long attempt by Democrats to block the former president from ever seeking higher office again. In a 57-43 vote, seven Republicans voted to convict the president in an historic second impeachment trial. But it was short of the 17 GOP Senators who were needed to join all 50 Democrats in order to convict Trump, with a two-thirds majority as required by the Constitution. Republican Sens. Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska, and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania voted to convict Trump. The vote followed a five day impeachment trial featuring riveting video evidence and a last-minute fight over whether to call new witnesses. But Democrats ultimately decided...
    Former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial ended on Saturday afternoon with him being acquitted of the single charge of inciting supporters to storm the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. The decision to acquit Trump came after five days of contentious proceedings, hours of edited videos, and a bizarre abandoned plan on Saturday to call witnesses on the House Democrats’ behalf. While impeachment managers provided a systematic breakdown on how Trump’s rhetoric throughout his four-year term culminated in his incitement of the Capitol riots, they failed to garner the 67 votes needed to convict. The outcome was hardly a surprise. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell told colleagues on Saturday morning he planned to join 43 other GOP senators who had already said the unprecedented trial was unconstitutional. Six Republicans had voted that the impeachment trial was constitutional—Sens. Susan Collins (R-ME), Bill Cassidy (R-LA), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Ben...
    (CNN)Former President Donald Trump's defense team used just a few of the 16 hours they were allotted to make their case for his acquittal on Friday, and encouraged senators to use the rest of the time on Covid relief.It was simple and it was quick. Here's what they argued:The political speech defense. Their basic thrust was that Trump was totally misconstrued. He didn't mean tell his supporters to literally go "fight" on Capitol Hill before they turned into a riotous mob that sacked the Senate. He meant they should be fighters in the political sense of the word and find primary challengers to Republicans. (Don't think the Republican senators in the chamber didn't hear that word -- primary -- and shudder.) The free speech defense. They detailed the importance of freedom of expression and argued that Trump's words should be protected. They cited multiple court cases, including Brandenburg v....
    Former President Trump's legal team took just about three hours of their 16-hour allotted time to lay out their defense Friday in the Senate's impeachment trial, claiming there was no insurrection during the riotous breach of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.Fast Facts Attorney Bruce Castor, who closed out the arguments on the fourth day of the trial, argued there was no insurrection Castor said Trump and his entire legal team denounce the violence that day and believe the actions of individual criminals were "horrific." Still, they argued Trump had nothing to do with inciting violence and his true supporters understand he wouldn't want that Castor said Trump and his entire legal team denounce the violence that day and believe the actions of individual criminals were "horrific." Still, they argued Trump had nothing to do with inciting violence and his true supporters understand he wouldn't want that Attorney Bruce Castor,...
    Trump defense lawyer David Schoen speaks on the fourth day of Donald Trump's second impeachment trial at the U.S. Capitol on Feb. 12, 2021. Donald Trump's impeachment lawyers on Friday centered their defense around several embarrassingly incoherent video montages of Democrats repeatedly using the word "fight" in speeches over the years. One 11-minute montage alone featured some 238 utterances of the word, none of which included a lick of context. Frankly, it should have been an embarrassing defense presentation. But once wasn't enough for the shoddy lawyering of Trump's defense team—they played three separate montages of the recycled clips aimed at absolving Trump of culpability for inciting the murderous mob at the Capitol on Jan. 6. The flimsy idea was that Democrats repeatedly employing the word got Trump off the hook for telling his rally goers to “fight like hell” and then directing them to Capitol, where they proceeded to beat, bludgeon, and kill...
    PHOENIX (AP) — A federal appeals court has sided with a lower court that ruled against an Arizona man who says he was denied the right to vote in 2016 because the registration deadline fell on Columbus Day. Plaintiff David Isabel, then a new Arizona resident, registered to vote at a Motor Vehicle Division office on Oct. 11, 2016. That was the day after the deadline under state law, which is 29 days before the election. Isabel argued that Arizona's voter registration deadline was illegally early that year. Because it fell on a holiday when government offices were closed, it was, in effect, more than 30 days before the election, which violates federal law, he argued. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rejected that argument in a ruling issued Thursday. Arizona lawmakers have since changed the law to ensure that the situation won't repeat. Legislation passed in 2017 says...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The Minnesota Court of Appeals on Friday dismissed prosecutors’ request to delay the trial of a former Minneapolis police officer charged in the death of George Floyd. The appeals court also dismissed the state’s request to hold a joint trial for Derek Chauvin and the other three former officers who face charges. Chauvin is scheduled to stand trial March 8 on charges of second-degree murder and manslaughter. The other defendants are due to stand trial Aug. 23 on aiding and abetting charges. The appeals court said that although the state argued delaying Chauvin’s trial would be in the best interest of public health due to COVID-19 concerns, prosecutors did not show that holding Chauvin’s trial in March would have a “critical impact” on their ability to prosecute the case. A message left with prosecutors was not immediately returned. Chauvin’s attorney, Eric Nelson, had no comment on the...
    Attorney Alan Dershowitz has criticized the House impeachment managers for going on 'too long' in presenting their case against Donald Trump to the Senate, where he is charged with inciting the January 6 Capitol riot. Dershowitz, who defended Trump in his first impeachment trial but is on the sidelines for the second, was reacting after House Democrats acting as prosecutors rested their case on Thursday. Trump's defense team will make their case on Friday.  'The Democrats overplayed their hand today, they went on too long, too repetitious, they should have rested yesterday,' Dershowitz told Fox News host Sean Hannity on Thursday. 'I think the Republicans -- the lawyers [on Trump's defense team] -- will do a good job by making it neat and clean, and to the point and short,' he added. Attorney Alan Dershowitz has criticized the House impeachment managers for going on 'too long' in presenting their...
    The Duchess of Sussex has won her claim that her privacy was breached over the publication of a letter to her father Thomas, the High Court ruled today. Meghan, 39, is suing Associated Newspapers Limited (ANL), publishers of the Mail On Sunday and MailOnline, for misuse of private information, and infringement of copyright for publishing extracts of a letter she sent her father Mr Markle, 76, after her royal wedding in 2018. Following today's ruling, The Mail on Sunday and MailOnline said they would be considering an appeal. A spokesman said: 'We are very surprised by today's summary judgment and disappointed at being denied the chance to have all the evidence heard and tested in open court at a full trial. We are carefully considering the judgement's contents and will decide in due course whether to lodge an appeal.' Mr Justice Warby ruled the issue over ownership of copyright of...
    The deal for the biggest fight in British boxing history between Anthony Joshua and Tyson Fury is set to be completed next week. The two British heavyweights have been on a collision course since Joshua knocked out Kubrat Pulev in the ninth round at the end of last year. 3Fury and Joshua are set to fight to become the first undisputed heavyweight champion since Lennox LewisCredit: AFP or licensors And according to The Mail, both parties are nearing the point now where everything can be signed, but there are still three key details which need to be agreed. One thing that needs to be sorted is who will ringwalk first, while the fighter who gets their name first on the billboard is also up for discussion. And then the final major hurdle to overcome is the location of the fight. Joshua's promoter Eddie Hearn has named Saudi Arabia as a...
    Sen. Rob Portman, R-OH, argued Wednesday that there are "serious constitutional questions" with the Senate’s decision to move forward with impeachment proceedings against former President Donald Trump over his alleged role in the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol. The Senate voted 56-44 to affirm the constitutionality of the impeachment trial targeting Trump, the first of its kind involving a non-sitting president. Portman, who will retire from office in 2022, was one of the 44 Republicans who voted against proceeding with the trial. SIX GOP SENATORS VOTE THAT TRUMP TRIAL IS CONSTITUTIONAL AND CAN PROCEED Portman asserted that Trump "bears some responsibility" for the events of Jan. 6, when his supporters stormed the Capitol complex as lawmakers met to confirm President Biden’s election victory. However, the Ohio senator argued that impeachment, as detailed in the Constitution, is reserved for elected officials who can still be removed from office. VideoPortman pointed...
    President Biden on Wednesday changed the federal government's position in a Supreme Court case where former President Donald Trump challenged the Affordable Care Act's constitutionality. The case, California v. Texas, was argued about a week after the 2020 election, and many legal experts predicted that Biden would switch the government's position to support the act soon after he took office. And in a letter to the court, Deputy Solicitor General Edwin Kneedler did just that, writing that the Biden Justice Department "reconsidered" the facts of the case. Trump, along with a series of Republican-led states, argued in November that Obamacare was unconstitutional because its individual mandate, a tax which propped up the law’s constitutionality in past cases, was wiped out by Congress in 2017. They argued that the individual mandate was "inseverable" from the rest of the act and that because of that fact, it all must fall. Under Biden,...
    Lead House impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD), who objected to the certification of 2017 election results, and promised to impeach President Donald Trump as soon as he took office, argued Tuesday that is is constitutional to impeach a former president. Raskin told the Senators assembled for the trial that if they did not hold a trial, they would be creating a “January exception,” allowing presidents to commit misconduct before leaving office. (He did not note that presidents are still subject to ordinary criminal law, including for crimes committed during their presidencies, after leaving office.) In addition, Raskin argued, the House had impeached Trump before he left office, suggesting that meant the process was legitimate for that reason. He also cited examples of states that intended impeachment to apply to former officials. And he argued that the Founders believed that challenges to elections were particularly grave abuses of power by...
    MOSCOW (AP) — Russian film director Andrei Fenochka says his online series about queer young people is important for LGBTQ people in a country that bans gay “propaganda” among minors. Fenochka’s “Here I Come” series that debuted last fall is marked as only available to people older than 18 in accordance with Russian law. Fenochka said Tuesday that the Russian audience has welcomed the series, which he described as a romantic story that mixes “mystics, dreams and everyday life.” “We have met with a very positive, supportive reaction from young viewers because they finally see the presentation of this part of society not only in English or in Korean, but also in Russian,” he said. “It is important for them to feel that they are not alone, they are not in isolation, they are not banned. Therefore, the interest is very large.” Homosexuality was decriminalized in Russia in 1993,...
    House Democrats on Monday released key portions of their coronavirus relief package, including a section that would provide $1,400 checks to most Americans. As with previous rounds of direct payments, single taxpayers with annual income up to $75,000 and married couples that make up to $150,000 would qualify for the full payment amounts. However, the payment amounts above those thresholds would phase out at a faster rate than the payments from the first two rounds. Single filers with income above $100,000 and married couples with income above $200,000 would not be eligible for any payments. The release of bill text came after policymakers and economists debated what the income eligibility requirements should be for the payments. Republicans and some centrist Democrats argued that the payments should be more targeted to lower-income households because those households are most in need of relief and most likely to spend the money quickly. But progressives...
    APPLETON, Wis. (AP) — A judge on Monday set bail at $1.5 million cash for a teenager charged in a fatal shooting at a shopping mall in eastern Wisconsin. Dezman Ellis, 17, of Oshkosh, made his first appearance in Outagamie County Court on charges of first degree intentional homicide and first degree recklessly endangering safety. Ellis was transferred on Friday from Iowa, where he fled after the Jan. 31 shooting. Ellis is accused of killing Jovanni Frausto, 19, at the Fox River Mall in Grand Chute during an argument over a girl. A bystander was wounded, and the shooting forced people to shelter in place inside the suburban Appleton mall while police combed the building. Frausto's mother and father were allowed to speak during Monday’s hearing, although a judge at one point stopped the victim's mother from talking, WBAY reported. Attorneys for Ellis argued that their client, a senior at...
    By STEPHEN GROVES, Associated Press PIERRE, S.D. (AP) — A South Dakota judge on Monday struck down a voter-approved constitutional amendment that legalized recreational marijuana. Circuit Judge Christina Klinger ruled the measure approved by voters in November violated the state's requirement that constitutional amendments deal with just one subject. Lawyers on both sides have said they expect the issue to be appealed to the state’s Supreme Court. Two law enforcement officers, Highway Patrol Superintendent Col. Rick Miller and Pennington County Sheriff Kevin Thom, sued to block legalization by challenging its constitutionality. Miller was effectively acting on behalf of South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem, who had opposed the effort to legalize pot. Lawyers for the law enforcement officers argued that the ballot initiative violated a rule that constitutional amendments must only address one subject. They also said that by giving the Department of Revenue the power to tax and regulate marijuana,...
    APPLETON, Wis. (AP) — A judge on Monday set bail at $1.5 million cash for a teenager charged in a fatal shooting at a shopping mall in eastern Wisconsin. Dezman Ellis, 17, of Oshkosh, made his first appearance in Outagamie County Court on charges of first degree intentional homicide and first degree recklessly endangering safety. Ellis was transferred on Friday from Iowa, where he fled after the Jan. 31 shooting. Ellis is accused of killing Jovanni Frausto, 19, at the Fox River Mall in Grand Chute during an argument over a girl. A bystander was wounded, and the shooting forced people to shelter in place inside the suburban Appleton mall while police combed the building. Frausto’s mother and father were allowed to speak during Monday’s hearing, although a judge at one point stopped the victim’s mother from talking, WBAY reported. Attorneys for Ellis argued that their client, a senior at...
    PIERRE, S.D. (AP) — A South Dakota judge on Monday struck down a voter-approved constitutional amendment that legalized recreational marijuana. Circuit Judge Christina Klinger ruled the measure approved by voters in November violated the state’s requirement that constitutional amendments deal with just one subject. Lawyers on both sides have said they expect the issue to be appealed to the state’s Supreme Court. Two law enforcement officers, Highway Patrol Superintendent Col. Rick Miller and Pennington County Sheriff Kevin Thom, sued to block legalization by challenging its constitutionality. Miller was effectively acting on behalf of South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem, who had opposed the effort to legalize pot. Lawyers for the law enforcement officers argued that the ballot initiative violated a rule that constitutional amendments must only address one subject. They also said that by giving the Department of Revenue the power to tax and regulate marijuana, it improperly elevated the department...
    In an interview with CNN on Friday, Republican Rep. Carlos Gimenez of Florida explained why he voted to remove his colleague Marjrorie Taylor Greene from House committees. Per Mediaite, speaking with host Wolf Blitzer, Gimenez said that Republicans need to distance themselves from the QAnon conspiracy theory if they want to win in the 2022 midterms. “I had to vote my conscience and I felt that she should not be, especially, on the education committee,” the congressman said, noting that he has not received any criticism from his colleagues. Earlier this week, House Democrats pushed to remove Greene from key House committees, claiming that she poses a danger to other members of Congress because she previously endorsed calls to violence and followed the QAnon movement. Blitzer pointed out that some have argued that Greene’s own party should have disciplined her in order to avoid setting a dangerous precedent for the...
    Former White House trade adviser Peter Navarro said Friday that President Donald Trump should use the upcoming Senate impeachment trial to his advantage. Speaking with Newsmax, Navarro argued that this could be a chance for Trump to prove that the 2020 presidential election was rigged for Democrat Joe Biden. “This is a political trial and the Democrats are coming hard at the president on political grounds. And, this is a free pass for the president because they’ve already acquitted him on the Republican side,” Navarro said, noting that 45 Republican senators have indicated that they won’t vote to convict Trump, deeming the impeachment unconstitutional. Trump was impeached last month, after Democrats and some GOP lawmakers accused him of inciting an insurrection by telling a violent crowd of his supporters to storm the U.S. Capitol building and stop the certification of Biden’s victory. According to Navarro, since most Republican senators will...
    Inmates at New York lockups who are over the age of 65 or “medically frail” can begin receiving the COVID-19 vaccine as of Friday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced — a day after he was served with a lawsuit for failing to include city jailbirds in the inoculation rollout. Public defenders representing two men locked up on Rikers Island hit Cuomo and Health Commissioner Howard Zucker Thursday with class action suit filed on behalf of everyone being held at Big Apple lockups. The lawsuit argued that excluding inmates is a violation of the 14th amendment’s equal protection clause. It also argued that they are at higher risk because “they have no authority to require others in their housing units to wear masks, nor can they ensure that other people will maintain, at a minimum, six feet of distance.” “We are vaccinating people in prisons on the same basis we are...
    (Quebec) We need to ban telecommunications software that allows these “time bombs” to spy on their employees while employers work from home. On February 4, 2021 at 6:12 p.m. Patrice BergeronThe Canadian Press Quebec Solidarity (QS) is currently calling for health and safety reform, Bill 59 currently under study. On Thursday afternoon, QS Labor spokesman Alexandre Ledouk met with Minister in charge of reform Jean-Paul Lett and recommended changes in the legislature. In an interview with the Canadian Press, a member for QS argued that we should take advantage of this reform to better oversee more and more widespread delivery. Companies already provide employers with all kinds of computer tools to monitor the performance of their workers. “Bad” software “These are bad, bad behavior of the employees who manage and especially time bombs, which can lead to psychological...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Outfielder Anthony Santander and the Baltimore Orioles argued the second salary arbitration case of the year Wednesday. Santander asked for a raise from $572,500 to $2,475,000, and the Orioles argued for $2.1 million, the same figures that were exchanged by third baseman/outfielder J.D. Davis and the New York Mets, who argued the first case Tuesday. Santander’s case was heard by arbitrators Melinda Gordon, Richard Bloch and Frederic Horowitz. Santander, 26, hit .261 with 11 homers and 32 RBIs in the pandemic-shortened season. He was eligible for arbitration for the first time. Eleven more players remain scheduled for hearings through Feb. 19. ___ More AP MLB coverage: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    By TRAVIS LOLLER, Associated Press NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The daughter of a Tennessee man executed 14 years ago for murder wants to test DNA evidence to prove his innocence. If the effort is successful, it would be the first time such evidence was used to prove someone was wrongly executed in the U.S. Attorneys for April Alley presented arguments before the state appeals court on Wednesday. Her father, Sedley Alley, died by lethal injection in 2006 after being convicted of the murder of Marine Lance Cpl. Suzanne Collins two decades earlier. Alley confessed to the crime, but later said the confession was coerced. The process would have ended there if investigators in a Missouri murder case hadn't contacted the Innocence Project in 2019 about a possible connection between Collins and a suspect there. Barry Scheck, co-founder of the Innocence Project, had argued unsuccessfully for DNA testing in Alley’s case...
    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The daughter of a Tennessee man executed 14 years ago for murder wants to test DNA evidence to prove his innocence. If the effort is successful, it would be the first time such evidence was used to prove someone was wrongly executed in the U.S. Attorneys for April Alley presented arguments before the state appeals court on Wednesday. Her father, Sedley Alley, died by lethal injection in 2006 after being convicted of the murder of Marine Lance Cpl. Suzanne Collins two decades earlier. Alley confessed to the crime, but later said the confession was coerced. The process would have ended there if investigators in a Missouri murder case hadn’t contacted the Innocence Project in 2019 about a possible connection between Collins and a suspect there. Barry Scheck, co-founder of the Innocence Project, had argued unsuccessfully for DNA testing in Alley’s case shortly before his...
    Former President TrumpDonald TrumpGraham shoots down request for Merrick Garland confirmation hearing Feb. 8 Trump lawyer to make First Amendment case at impeachment trial Biden faces crossroads on virus relief bill MORE and his ex-impeachment lawyer Butch Bowers argued over legal fees in a dispute that compounded disagreements about the defense team’s strategy, Axios reported on Tuesday. The conflict resulted in Bowers, along with four other attorneys, reportedly leaving the team over the weekend and the Trump team announcing David Schoen and Bruce L. Castor Jr. as the new leading attorneys for his defense on Sunday. The disagreements highlighted the challenges the 45th president faces in forming a legal team to argue against his second impeachment.  Sources familiar with conversations between Trump and Bowers, who was connected with the former president through Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham shoots down request for Merrick Garland confirmation hearing Feb. 8 Durbin to Graham: 'Regrettable' no hearing so far...
    A group of New York parents have lost their bid to get their children exempt from school vaccination requirements after Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor rejected the effort. The anonymous group of parents had sought to have their kids skip being vaccinated because they were learning remotely instead of in classrooms. But even kids who take classes online must be vaccinated, State Health Commissioner Howard Zucker’s office said, prompting the parents to pursue their case in court. “Excluding medically fragile children from distance learning because they are missing a vaccine that might harm or kill them serves no valid state interest and will cause irreparable harm,” the parents argued in federal court last summer. Anti-vaxx advocate Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is among the legal team representing the families. The state argued that even children learning remotely are required to be vaccinated, according to court papers.  “The...
    Animal rights activist group PETA is the target of a barrage of jokes on social media after it claimed that calling people names such as ‘chicken’, ‘pig’ and ‘sloth’ is insulting to animals. PETA, otherwise known as the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, argued in a tweet Tuesday that using animal names as an insult promotes the ‘myth that humans are superior’ and ‘normalizes violence against other animals’. The group also argued that the ‘anti-animal slurs’ are inaccurate and suggested other non-animal-based insults that could be used. The tweet sparked a wave of backlash for the advocacy group, known for their provocative statements and campaigns, with social media users arguing that animals have ‘no concept of words’ and accusing it of using language meant for human rights. Some vegans claimed the tweet was making them all look ‘ridiculous’ while Texas Senator Ted Cruz simply called the idea ‘Bull****’,...
    A federal appeals court on Wednesday reinstated a verdict that found Connecticut’s Department of Correction violated the Constitutional rights of an inmate by forcing him to wear full shackles during his outside exercise periods. A jury had concluded that convicted killer Michael Edwards was subjected to cruel and unusual punishment by the department and then-warden Angel Quiros while at the maximum-security Northern Correctional Institution between September 2010 and March 2011. U.S. District Court Judge Stefan Underhill, citing a lack of evidence, later tossed out that verdict along with a $500,000 judgment against the state and a $250,000 judgment against Quiros, who is now the acting commissioner of the Department of Correction. In reinstating the verdict, the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan said testimony by Quiros at the 2018 trial provided sufficient proof for a jury to conclude that he was a hands-on warden who...
    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The San Francisco school board has voted to remove the names of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln from public schools after officials deemed them and other prominent figures, including Sen. Dianne Feinstein, unworthy of the honor. After months of controversy, the board voted 6-1 Tuesday in favor of renaming 44 San Francisco school sites with new names with no connection to slavery, oppression, racism or similar criteria, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. Feinstein’s name was added to the list because as mayor she replaced a vandalized Confederate flag that was part of a long-standing flag display in front of City Hall. Critics called the process slapdash, with little to no input from historians and a lack of information on the basis for each recommendation. In one instance, the committee didn’t know whether Roosevelt Middle School was named after Theodore or Franklin Delano. “I must admit...
    AN INFLUENCER was allegedly shot dead by her husband during a row over her raunchy social media snaps. Eliane Ferreira Siolin is believed to have been shot 14 times by Alejandro Antonio Aguilera Cantallupi, who then took his own life. 4Eliane Siolin was shot 14 times at a house in BrazilCredit: @eliane.siolin/Newsflash 4Eliane's page on TikTok has more than 58,000 followers where she often posted short videosCredit: Newsflash Bodies of the 35-year-old social media star and Cantallupi, 41, were found on the back porch of a property in Ponto Pora, Brazil on Sunday. Eliane's body was found with at least 14 gunshot wounds and her right arm was apparently broken, while Antonio's body was found with a single gunshot to the head. According to police the couple argued often, including about Eliane's social media posts. Officer Analu Ferraz said: "Close friends said they fought a lot, even in public." 4Eliane...
    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — A judge has refused to toss out six criminal complaints filed against a Louisiana pastor charged with violating coronavirus gathering capacity rules put in place during the early days of the pandemic. Nineteenth Judicial District Judge Eboni Johnson-Rose on Monday dismissed pastor Tony Spell’s motion to have the case against him dropped, news outlets reported. The judge’s ruling sided with a special assistant to the District Attorney who argued that when the charges were filed in the early days of the outbreak, New Orleans was a national coronavirus hotspot and Louisiana was under a declared emergency, The Advocate reported. Prosecutors alleged Spell violated public gathering capacity limits Gov. John Bel Edwards put in place during that emergency last spring by continuing to host worship services at his Life Tabernacle Church in Baton Rouge with hundreds in attendance. He was accused six times in March 2020...
    Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) dealt a major setback to progressives on Monday in their efforts to abolish the filibuster in the United States Senate. Sinema, a moderate who holds the Senate seat once occupied by the late John McCain, told Washington Post, through her office, that she was opposed to eliminating the legislative procedure. “Kyrsten is against eliminating the filibuster, and she is not open to changing her mind about eliminating the filibuster,” a spokesperson for the senator relayed to the outlet when asked about the topic. The filibuster, which requires three-fifths of the chamber—usually 60 votes—to end debate on a piece of legislation, has become a point of contention between Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) and his Republican counterpart, Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY). McConnell and Republicans are requesting that any agreement on how to organize the newly elected chamber, in which each party will have exactly 50 seats,...
    Washington (CNN)The Supreme Court on Monday denied an appeal by former New York State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver for his bribery conviction. It is the latest case in which the nine justices have considered exploring the reach of federal prosecutors when it comes to policing public officials. Silver's petition had been pending before the justices for several weeks and they discussed it most recently at their private conference last Friday.Justices Clarence Thomas and Neil Gorsuch dissented from the order.In advising the justices to deny the appeal from Silver, a Democrat, former Acting Solicitor General Jeff Wall argued that he engaged in "multiple schemes to use his political positions to enrich himself." In one example, the government alleges Silver accepted thousands of dollars from two real estate developers in exchange for taking official action that benefited developers.In court papers asking the justices to take up his case, Silver's lawyer argued his...
    The Texas Supreme Court rejected Infowars founder Alex Jones's request to toss out four defamation lawsuits filed by parents whose children were killed during the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting in 2012. The court rejected the request on Friday without comment. The rejection is another defeat in court for Jones regarding the Sandy Hook shooting, which Jones said was staged by the government, accusing the parents who lost children in the shooting of being actors hired to "sell the coverup and exploit the event to attack gun rights," according to the Austin American-Statesman. Jones, a noted conspiracy theorist who built his Austin-based show into a syndicated program airing on radio stations across the country, peddled falsehoods in the wake of the massacre that killed 20 children and six staff members at the school in Newtown, Connecticut. Jones lost his appeal to the Texas Court of Appeals in March 2020...
    Appearing on Fox News Sunday to chat with host Chris Wallace, Sen. Marco Rubio delved into his feelings on former President Donald Trump. What about Trump, specifically? Oh, just the articles of impeachment against him. In a word, Rubio said he finds the trial “stupid.” In a very slightly more eloquent attempt to express himself, Rubio said he feels, “We already have a flaming fire in this country,” and that a trial would amount to “a bunch of gasoline.” Basically, just another way of arguing that a trial would rupture unity efforts, even though as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi argued last week, ignoring all that’s gone is actually what is more likely to sow division in the country. Why? Because we need accountability.  As of Sunday morning, at least one Republican sees the impeachment trial differently than Rubio, however. We can check out more of what Rubio said below, as...
    In an interview with Fox News on Sunday, Republican Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida described the upcoming Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump as “stupid” and slammed Democratic Party politicians. The House of Representatives impeached Trump last week, claiming that he incited an insurrection against the U.S. government when he told his supporters to storm the Capitol building and overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election. Trump’s trial in the U.S. Senate will start next month, but it remains unclear how many Republicans are open to defecting and convicting the former commander-in-chief. Speaking with anchor Chris Wallace, Rubio argued that the push to convict Trump could further divide the American people and inflame partisan passions. “Well, first of all, I think the trial is stupid. It’s counterproductive. We already have a flaming fire in this country, and it’s like taking a bunch of gasoline and pouring it...
    Former Michigan Rep. Justin Amash took aim at Donald Trump Jr. on Friday evening for touting his father’s foreign policy accomplishments. “Donald Trump is the first president in modern history did not start a new war,” Trump Jr. tweeted. In response, Amash underlined the less impressive aspects of the president’s career. “He just massively escalated existing ones, while working to conceal troop numbers, drone strikes, and civilian casualties from the public. What a guy!” Amash continued to highlight various reports on Trump’s foreign policy record. Notably, Forbes pointed to U.S. Air Forces Central Command data that found that 2019 was a record year for the number of bombs the United States dropped on Afghanistan. Notably, both manned and unmanned coalition aircraft munitions and sorties that were flown by strike aircraft increased from 2018 to 2019 “Towards the end of Obama’s presidency, the number of bombs dropped continued to fall, reaching...
    Trust in traditional news media has hit an all-time low, according to new research from the communications firm Edelman. Per Axios, Edelman’s annual trust barometer found that slightly more than a quarter of the American public still trust traditional news organizations. The firm’s poll showed that 56 percent of Americans agree that “Journalists and reporters are purposely trying to mislead people by saying things they know are false or gross exaggerations.” It also established that 58 percent believe that “most news organizations are more concerned with supporting an ideology or political position than with informing the public.” Edelman found that the public is divided along partisan lines, with more than half of Democrats saying that they have confidence in the media and only 18 percent of Republicans saying the same. As Axios noted, the staggering decline does not seem to have anything to do with former President Donald Trump’s attacks...
    One of President Joe Biden’s top nominees for a senior post within the Department of Justice (DOJ) previously argued for the “strategic” defunding of police. Kristen Clarke, who is Biden’s choice to helm the DOJ’s powerful civil rights division, penned a guest editorial for Newsweek last year at the height of the protests against racial injustice. Using the platform provided by the magazine, Clarke argued that calls to “defund the police”—emanating as a result of George Floyd’s death at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer—spoke to the “urgency” that communities of color felt was needed to reform law enforcement. “As a former prosecutor in the Department of Justice office who investigated law enforcement killings of civilians and police brutality … I know that we must find solutions that enhance public safety and advance the cause of justice,” wrote Clarke, then the president of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights...
    US coronavirus: Biden warns death toll will likely top 500,000 next month Coronavirus: Joe Biden signs executive actions aimed at ending pandemic Parler’s Glow Dims After Losing Quick Return to Life With Amazon (Bloomberg) -- © Bloomberg The Parler logo on a smartphone arranged in the Brooklyn borough of New York, U.S., on Friday, Dec. 18, 2020. Parler bills itself as a non-biased social network that protects free speech and user data. John Matze, chief executive officer, says the platform saw great growth during the 2020 election as many conservatives moved away from products like Facebook and Twitter. Parler LLC remains hobbled while it relies on a Russian-owned service for a bare-bones web presence after a judge refused to immediately order Amazon.com Inc. to restore hosting for the social media platform popular with conservatives. Load Error Thursday’s ruling is a significant blow for the site that’s become...
    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Texas should be allowed to halt a common second-trimester abortion procedure, the state’s lawyers told a federal appeals court Thursday in a hearing punctuated by debates over fetal pain and the rights of women to medically safe abortion. A 2017 Texas law, which has never been enforced, prohibits the use of forceps to remove a fetus from the womb — what supporters of the law call a “dismemberment abortion” — without first using an injected drug or a suction procedure to ensure the fetus is dead. The state has long argued that it has a legal interest in barring what it calls a “brutal” procedure. Abortion rights advocates argue that the law effectively outlaws what is often the safest method of abortion for women in the second trimester of pregnancy — a procedure medically known as dilation and evacuation. They also argue that fetuses...
    Savannah Rychcik January 21, 2021 0 Comments Former FBI Director James Comey is attributing the decline of trust in American institutions to what he believes is former President Donald Trump’s lack of honesty. “A large part of the drop in trust in our institutions, and in our civil society, has been the product of relentless lying by a demagogue president,” Comey said during an interview with ABC 7.30 He added, “It’s a depressing thing to admit but lying works when it comes from the top office in the land, and then it’s echoed in media and by other enablers in and outside of government.” Comey suggested it is “normally a healthy thing” for individuals to believe what a leader says in a democracy. He proceeded to call it “unhealthy” when the leader is a “sociopath.” “That shapes, unfortunately, millions of people in a harmful way,” Comey continued....
    What a difference two weeks make. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) said Tuesday that Donald Trump is not to blame for inciting the deadly Capitol insurrection — weeks after saying Trump was the problem. On Fox News, Graham argued against convicting Trump in his second impeachment trial, saying it would be bad for the GOP. "You can be disappointed with the president's behavior, but applaud his actions. And the people who defiled the Capitol — they did that, not me, not Donald Trump. And that does not represent the 74 million people who stood behind President Trump and would vote for him again today," he argued. "So to my Republican colleagues in the Senate, we have to rise to the occasion. If we don't, we are going to destroy the party."
    The newly formed President’s Advisory 1776 Commission just released its report. The group was chaired by Churchill historian and Hillsdale College President Dr. Larry P. Arnn. The vice chair was Dr. Carol M. Swain, a retired professor of political science. (Full disclosure: I was a member of the commission.) The unanimously approved conclusions focused on the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, the historical challenges to these founding documents and the need for civic renewal. The 16-member commission was diverse in the widest sense of the familiar adjective. It included historians, lawyers, academics, scholars, authors, former elected officials and past public servants. Whether because the report was issued by a Donald Trump-appointed commission, or because the conclusions questioned the controversial and flawed New York Times-sponsored 1619 Project, there was almost immediate criticism from the left. Yet at any other age than the divisive present, the report would not have been seen...
    Rep. Nancy Mace, R-S.C., described her first 100 hours on Congress as "hell" Monday, telling "The Story" that the deadly Capitol riot, the fight over the Electoral College vote count and the second impeachment of President Trump represented an unbelievable series of events. I couldn't imagine being in this situation in my lifetime ... it was heartbreaking and made me really angry," Mace, who unseated Democrat Joe Cunningham in November, told host Martha MacCallum. "I have spoken out strongly against the president and my own colleagues ... we have a Constitution as our guide. The vote to certify the Electoral College is in our Constitution," she said of the political battle that precipitated the riot. "That was a ceremonial vote to certify all 50 states that were legally certified." While Mace voted against objections to the election results in Arizona and Pennsylvania, she also voted against impeaching Trump on the single count of "inciting insurrection." She argued that House Democrats had tarnished the tool of impeachment by...
    Republican Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton faced a barrage of criticism on three occasions amid a wave of riots and a global pandemic. Yet Cotton’s allegedly controversial opinions have been largely vindicated by recent events. As a flurry of racial justice protests turned from peaceful democratic demonstrations to violent riots, Cotton penned an immediately controversial Op-Ed. In a piece published June 3 by the New York Times, Cotton argued that President Donald Trump should invoke the Insurrection Act to restore order in parts of the country set aflame by outrage and opportunism. Cotton argued that rioters were effectively encouraged by elites who labeled it an “understandable response to the death of George Floyd.” “Those excuses are built on a revolting moral equivalence of rioters and looters to peaceful, law-abiding protesters,” Cotton wrote. “A majority who seek to protest peacefully shouldn’t be confused with bands of miscreants.” Cotton laid out for readers...
    New York (CNN Business)Apple, along with Amazon and Google, effectively kicked Parler off the internet in the wake of the January 6 US Capitol siege. Despite criticism that Big Tech wields too much power over speech, Apple CEO Tim Cook defended his decision. "We looked at the incitement to violence that was on there," Cook told Chris Wallace on "Fox News Sunday.""We don't consider that free speech and incitement to violence has an intersection."Parler, the alternative social network popular with conservatives, had been surging in popularity in recent months. But the platform failed to rein in hate-filled, violent speech, which Big Tech companies said could lead to another violent attack. Apple (AAPL) and Google (GOOGL) booted Parler off their app stores and Amazon (AMZN) stopped hosting the service.The ability to stop billions of people from easily accessing a social network is a weighty responsibility -- one that critics of all...
    Comedian and political commentator Jimmy Dore appeared on Tucker Carlson’s show on Friday and argued for the release of imprisoned journalist Julian Assange. Dore began by touching on the recent censorship happening on technology platforms and argued that it violates American free speech protections. In a YouTube clip of his appearance, the commentator claimed that George W. Bush’s War on Terror already showed the dangers of government overreach in the name of fighting domestic terror and suggested that the new push for censorship could lead to the same abuses. The political commentator’s remarks echoed warnings from journalist Glenn Greenwald, who argued in a recent Twitter thread that the events at the U.S. Capitol have accelerated the “new War on Terror” that President-elect Joe Biden’s administration is purported planning to pursue. From here, Dore highlighted the censorship of Assange and called for the journalist to be pardoned. “The first person to...
              Attorneys representing Christian wedding photographer Bob Updegrove spoke before the Eastern District Court of Virginia on Friday, where they argued that the pro-LGBTQ Virginia Values Act threatened Updegrove’s freedom of religion. “Today before the court we argued for Bob Updegrove, and really for all Virginians, to have the freedom to choose the messages they promote,” Alliance Defending Freedom Senior Counsel Jonathan Scruggs said in a Friday press call. In Updegrove v. Herring, the lawsuit against Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring, Updegrove argued that he uses his photography as an artistic expression of his religious beliefs. “Bob has always viewed his business as a ministry, allowing him to create art with messages he believes in. One of the ways he does this is by photographing weddings between one man and one woman,” Scruggs said told reporters. “Virginia passed a new law this last year...
    The Department of Justice (DOJ) argued in a new court filing that President TrumpDonald TrumpEx-Trump lawyer Cohen to pen forward for impeachment book Murkowski says it would be 'appropriate' to bar Trump from holding office again Man known as 'QAnon Shaman' asks Trump for pardon after storming Capitol MORE should be granted immunity against a defamation suit brought against him by author E. Jean Carroll, who has accused him of raping her. In a filing with the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan, the DOJ argued it should be substituted in the suit as the defendant, replacing Trump, and that the president should be classified as “an employee of the government” and receive immunity from the suit under what is known as the Westfall Act. The federal statute grants federal employees "absolute immunity" from claims that arise "in the course of their official duties." The DOJ argued the...
    In a Friday piece for Raw Story, Dr. Bandy X. Lee, a psychiatrist at Yale University, argued that Donald Trump is in the midst of a “psychotic spiral.” “Donald Trump has a history of recklessness, impulsivity, lack of empathy, a loose grip on reality, and intolerance of challenges to his fragile sense of self,” she wrote. “His defeat as president of the United States has plunged him into a violent, psychotic spiral, and he is now fighting for his psychic survival. This has now escalated to inciting his followers to commit acts of violence against elected officials and the general public.” Lee noted that she and other psychological health experts from the World Mental Health Coalition called for Trump’s removal from office by any means possible back in March. Although she claimed a second impeachment is a “step in the right direction,” she argued that the U.S. leader must be...
    DOJ internal watchdog opens investigation into Capitol riots Airlines cull South Africa routes as virus flares Jackie MacMullan and Kyrie Irving Once Argued About Whether NBA Players Were Property Jackie MacMullan joined The Ringer podcast network late last year. This week, she and Bill Simmons appeared on The Ryen Russillo Podcast to discuss the James Harden trade to the Brooklyn Nets. During the show, MacMullan shared a story about a conversation she once had with Kyrie Irving in which she argued that NBA players were "property." This was meant to be an example of why Kyrie doesn't get it. © Provided by The Big Lead Kyrie Irving | Maddie Meyer/Getty Images Here’s the audio of Jackie MacMullan’s story about her telling Kyrie that he’s an NBA owner’s property because they pay him millions pic.twitter.com/p1U5Euiz1n https://t.co/2JRfzrKKAy— gifdsports (@gifdsports) January 14, 2021Even if MacMullan was trying to explain her perspective on...
    TERRE HAUTE, IND. - A U.S. appeals court ordered that the last two scheduled federal executions of President Donald Trump's administration could proceed on Thursday and Friday, overturning a lower court's suspension until March to allow the condemned men to recover from COVID-19. The U.S. Department of Justice announced last month that Corey Johnson, 52, and Dustin Higgs, 48, had been diagnosed with COVID-19 but that it would proceed with their executions. Both men, convicted in separate murders, are being held on death row at a federal prison in Terre Haute, Indiana. On Tuesday, Judge Tanya Chutkan of the U.S. District Court ordered the executions be delayed until at least March 16 to allow the condemned men to recover, siding with medical experts who said their coronavirus-damaged lungs would result in inordinate suffering if they were to receive lethal injections. This would breach the U.S. Constitution's Eighth Amendment prohibiting "cruel...
    When lawyers representing Moreno Valley Unified School District argued that 13-year-old Diego Stolz and his family were partly to blame for his death at the hands of two bullies, it wasn’t the first time such an argument was used — and likely won’t be the last. “I think it’s a disgusting strategy,” said lawyer Morgan Stewart, whose Irvine firm has sued districts whose defense attorneys have responded by blaming his clients for their alleged abuse. “It bothers me at a core level.” Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard and Smith, the Los Angeles law firm representing Moreno Valley Unified, was removed from the case in December. According to Superintendent Martinrex Kedziora, their new attorneys won’t be saying that Stolz or his family were partly complicit in his death. That original strategy drew condemnation from Stolz’s family and community members. It’s not hard to find other examples of the strategy used by law firms...
    Bradley Cortright January 13, 2021 0 Comments House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) is going on the record to shoot down claims that Antifa was behind the riot in the U.S. Capitol and blame President Donald Trump for the violence. During a speech on the House floor on Wednesday as lawmakers debate impeaching Trump, McCarthy said, “Some say the riots were caused by Antifa. There is absolutely no evidence of that, and conservatives should be the first to say so.” He vowed that the individuals responsible for the violence “will be brought to justice.”  Still, he argued the House should not vote to impeach the president, “I believe impeaching the president in such a short timeframe would be a mistake. No investigations have been completed, no hearings have been held.” Watch the video below: WATCH: Complete remarks from @GOPLeader during impeachment debate. pic.twitter.com/cP7Qv7B9h6— CSPAN (@cspan) January 13, 2021 The California lawmaker noted...
    In undercover Project Veritas footage released on Tuesday, former PBS principal counsel Michael Beller — who was fired after his comments — suggested that Donald Trump supporters be sent to “re-education camps,” Bounding Into Comics reported. “Even if Biden wins, we go for all the Republican voters, and Homeland Security will take their children away,” he said. “And we’ll put them into re-education camps.” Beller compared Trump to Adolf Hitler and suggested that the children influenced by Trump will require intervention to help them reintegrate into society. “Kids who are growing up, knowing nothing but Trump, for four years, you’ve got to wonder what they’re going to be like. They’ll be raising a generation of intolerant, horrible people — horrible kids.” He continued to describe the purported “enlightenment camps.” “They’re nice, they have Sesame Street characters in the classrooms and they watch PBS all day,” he said. As reported by...
    President-elect Joe Biden’s appointment to the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department argued in a 1994 letter to Harvard’s student newspaper that black people have “greater mental, physical and spiritual abilities” than white people, and also was accused of inviting a professor to campus that Jewish groups denounced as anti-Semitic. Kristen Clarke, who was president of the Black Students Association at Harvard when she wrote the letter to the editors of the Harvard Crimson, explained how blacks have superior abilities following the release of “The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life,” a book that linked intelligence to class and race. The letter was in response to those who defended the book, written by Harvard psychologist Richard Herrnstein and American Enterprise Institute (AEI) scholar Dr. Charles Murray. The authors argue in the book that IQ is largely a genetic phenomenon and that low IQs can be...
    Rachel Maddow said Monday night she still thinks President Donald Trump could resign early, while acknowledging some of her viewers probably rolled their eyes as she said it. Maddow reviewed the push for impeachment and the concerns flagged by the FBI of armed protests across the country before getting around to what the current president’s next moves are, with the prospect of being the first twice-impeached president in history likely days away. But she added, “There remains the possibility that the president might head all of this off by resigning of his own accord.” Maddow immediately added, “And I can hear you, I can see you giving me the hand on this. ‘Oh, please, Maddow, as if. This guy feels no shame. He would never resign. Something for the good of the country, he’s incapable.’ I know. I hear you.” “The reason I continue to believe it’s a live prospect...
    On Sunday, members of both parties accused President Donald Trump of inciting Wednesday’s riots at the United States Capitol and called on him to resign. As reported by The Hill, Republican Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania appeared on NBC’s Meet the Press, telling anchor Chuck Todd that the commander-in-chief should put the country first and leave office. “I think the best way for our country, Chuck, is for the president to resign and go away as soon as possible.” Toomey noted that the 25th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution does not appear to be a realistic option, since members of Trump’s Cabinet seem unwilling to use it. He argued that there is no point in impeaching the commander-in-chief since he will leave office in 10 days. Toomey repeated the same arguments on CNN, during an interview with host Jake Tapper, saying that Trump has “disqualified himself” from ever serving in...
    As Democrats reportedly prepare to impeach Donald Trump again, legal analyst Jonathan Turley argued in an op-ed for The Hill that the process would “damage the Constitution.” “With seeking his removal for incitement, Democrats would gut not only the impeachment standard but also free speech, all in a mad rush to remove Trump just days before his term ends,” he argued. As The Inquisitr reported, the articles of impeachment allegedly focus on Trump’s incitement of violence against the U.S. capitol as well as his phone call with Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, which saw him try to coax the state official to overturn the region’s electoral results. In his piece, Turley noted that the focus of the impeachment is Trump’s remarks at Wednesday’s rally that led to the storming of the Capitol. Although the attorney condemned the U.S. leader’s remarks, he suggested that the address does not meet the...
    “Pharma Bro” Martin Shkreli shouldn’t get sprung from prison early — because he’s a jerk to women and isn’t sorry for his crimes, Brooklyn federal prosecutors argued in a new court filing. Assistant US Attorney Alixandra Smith filed a motion Thursday opposing Shkreli’s second bid for compassionate release. She argued that his “demonstrated disdain for the criminal justice system, both in threats of violence made against women” and “his lack of remorse” weighed against freeing him from FCI Allenwood nearly three years early. Despite his trolling of female reporters and bizarre threats against Hillary Clinton, Shkreli has retained some admirers. Shkreli became involved with former Bloomberg reporter Christie Smythe — who professed her love for the convicted fraudster in a tell-all Elle magazine article last month. Smythe, who said she gave up her job and marriage to pursue a relationship with Shkreli, once defended his treatment of...
    In 2005, when Democrats objected to presidential electors from Ohio, then-House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi argued the move was “democracy at work.” Today, over 100 Republican members of the House and a dozen senators are expected to object to electors from several states. Pelosi will undoubtedly be critical of that stand afforded by the U.S. Constitution. But back then, Pelosi praised the nobility of her colleagues’ opposition. “Today we are witnessing democracy at work,” she declared, before disputing the notion some Republicans thought it was “frivolous.” “This debate is fundamental to our democracy,” she argued, adding she did not intend to try to change the outcome of the 2004 election that saw President George W. Bush reelected. Instead, she said she wanted to use to objection to highlight “the real problems” in the electoral system. “The members of Congress who have brought this challenge are speaking up for their aggrieved constituents,...
    A new animated Danish television show meant for children featuring a man with a gigantic, uncontrollable penis has sparked a heated conversation regarding what may or may not be appropriate for kids. The television show, John Dillermand, is featured on the Danish TV network DR. The show is aimed at children aged four to eight, The Guardian reported. In the show, Dillermand reportedly uses his enormous penis to perform heroic missions and take ice cream from kids as well as to overcome challenges he comes across. (RELATED: Danish Children’s TV Show Asks Kids To Evaluate Naked Adult Bodies) Denmark’s new kids TV show John Dillermand has raised a few eyebrows https://t.co/eUtPctlUmK — Metro Entertainment (@Metro_Ents) January 6, 2021 The show sparked backlash, with advocates and detractors pointing to various reasons the show may or may not be good for children to watch. “It’s perpetuating the standard idea of a...
    Journalist Kelli Boyle on Monday addressed top House Democrat Rep. Hakeem Jeffries’ suggestion that the House of Representatives will not be impeaching Donald Trump for his phone call with Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger. “[I]f this were the other way around the GOP would have Biden in prison tomorrow,” she tweeted. “[I]t’s never surprising but it’s always mind-numbing to see how bad Dems in congress are at their jobs.” The Republican Party and its supporters have suggested an impeachment probe into Joe Biden on many occasions. As The Inquisitr reported, radio host Jesse Kelly recently argued that the GOP should already have a plan ready for Biden’s impeachment — whatever the reason might be. Elsewhere, Fox News host Sean Hannity claimed Biden could be impeached for his son’s business dealings in China, and Breitbart Editor-in-Chief Alex Marlow argued that the Democrat should face charges as a government official on...
    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The Ohio Supreme Court has reversed course and decided not to hear an appeal by a convicted school shooter. The court dismissed Ely Serna’s case in an opinion Thursday that listed the case as “improvidently accepted,” without further explanation. Serna was sentenced to more than 23 years in prison for a 2017 shooting that critically wounded another teen at a high school in West Liberty, roughly 45 miles northwest of Columbus. Serna was 17 at the time of the shooting. His lawyers argued that his age should have been taken into account in his sentencing for charges that included attempted murder. A state appeals court concluded the judge acted properly in his sentencing. Prosecutors in Champaign County had argued that Serna’s lawyers were making arguments already rejected by the appeals court and that the state’s high court didn’t need to get involved. (Copyright 2020 The Associated...
    Sen. Pat Toomey objected this week to the push to pass legislation upping the value of stimulus checks from $600 to $2,000. Toomey (R-Pa.), widely known as a budget and deficit hawk, repeatedly slammed efforts by President Trump, Democrats and some Republicans to increase direct payments on Tuesday. “Blindly borrowing or printing another two-thirds of a trillion dollars so we can send $2,000 to children, the deceased, and tens of millions of workers who haven’t missed a paycheck, like federal and state employees, is not sound economic policy nor is it something I am willing to support,” Toomey, who will retire after his term ends in 2022, said in a statement. Pledging not to “consent to a vote on that,” the Pennsylvania senator also rejected allowing any non-targeted relief in a Tuesday tweet. “Congress should continue helping workers who’ve lost their jobs,” he argued, calling the borrowing necessary to pay...
    More On: senate Biden, Kamala Harris heading to Georgia ahead of Senate runoffs Raphael Warnock preached that Brexit was ‘ethnocentrism and hate’ Georgia Sens. Loeffler, Perdue back Trump’s $2,000 stimulus check push Congressional staffers next to receive COVID-19 vaccine Sen. Pat Toomey objected this week to the push to pass legislation upping the value of stimulus checks from $600 to $2,000. Toomey (R-Pa.), widely known as a budget and deficit hawk, repeatedly slammed efforts by President Trump, Democrats and some Republicans to increase direct payments on Tuesday. “Blindly borrowing or printing another two-thirds of a trillion dollars so we can send $2,000 to children, the deceased, and tens of millions of workers who haven’t missed a paycheck, like federal and state employees, is not sound economic policy nor is it something I am willing to support,” Toomey, who will retire after his term ends in 2022, said in a statement....
    In a Monday piece for The Intercept, journalist Ryan Grim argued that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell didn’t want Donald Trump to win re-election. Grim noted McConnell’s longtime opposition to a second round of stimulus checks before the election and his focus on helping Sens. Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue, whose Senate races next month will determine whether the Republican Party holds onto the upper chamber. In particular, Grim pointed out that the GOP lawmaker could have agreed to additional checks before the election, which Trump had expressed openness to on multiple occasions. “The option was available to him. Even if Democratic leaders would have preferred to pass the stimulus after the election, their obstruction beforehand would either have been politically untenable or, if held firm, politically suicidal,” he wrote. “So McConnell had the option to press the button, and he knew the button would help Trump, yet he didn’t...
    A MOM is facing murder charges after she used meth before giving birth to a stillborn fetus. Chelsea Becker, from Hanford, California, has remained in custody on $2 million bail since the 2019 birth as courts wrangle over her charges. 3Chelsea Becker has remained in custody on $2 million bail since 2019 3Becker admitted using drugs while pregnant before the stillbirth The California Supreme Court has now declined to stop her prosecution after an legal appeal. Police say methamphetamine was found in the baby that Becker give birth to when she was eight and a half months pregnant. The 26-year-old has acknowledged using the drug while she was pregnant, but has pleaded not guilty to murder. And the court on Wednesday rejected the challenge against the charge by state attorney general Xavier Becerra, reports The San Francisco Chronicle. Becerra, nominated by President-elect Joe Biden to head the U.S. Department...
    The United Nation’s human rights office criticized President Trump this week for pardoning four Blackwater guards who were convicted in connection with the killing of Iraqi civilians -- claiming that the pardons contribute "to impunity." "We are deeply concerned by the recent U.S. presidential pardons for four security guards from the private military firm Blackwater who were convicted for killing 14 Iraqi civilians," the statement by U.N. Human Rights Office spokesperson Marta Hurtado said. FORMER REP. CHRIS COLLINS RELEASED FROM PRISON AFTER TRUMP PARDON  "These four individuals were given sentences ranging from 12 years to life imprisonment, including on charges of first-degree murder. Pardoning them contributes to impunity and has the effect of emboldening others to commit such crimes in the future," Hurtado said. The four men were working as U.S. State Department contractors in 2007 when they opened fire in a crowded traffic circle -- killing 14 Iraqis, including a child....
    MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — A Memphis-based health care system won't acquire two area hospitals after the Federal Trade Commission opposed the $350 million deal. In a statement Wednesday, Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare CEO Michael Ugwueke says his organization and Tenet Healthcare Corporation decided to cancel Methodist’s acquisition of Saint Francis Hospital-Memphis and Saint Francis Hospital-Bartlett. Ugwueke said "we would prefer to focus on continuing our commitment to provide compassionate and high quality care to patients rather than costly and protracted litigation that would have lasted at least 18 months and distracted from our core mission." Attorney General Herbert Slatery joined the FTC's challenge. The FTC argued the plan would have eliminated competition between two of only four Memphis-area hospital providers, spurring higher health care costs and lessening incentive to expand and improve offerings. Methodist has argued the acquisition had broad support locally and would've lead to lower prices, improved quality...
    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The arrest of a man handling a weapon while he was drunk in his own home was constitutional, a divided Ohio Supreme Court ruled Wednesday. An attorney for defendant Fred Weber had argued his 2018 arrest was unconstitutional because he was at home and the weapon was unloaded at the time. Weber never should have been charged or convicted under current law, since there was no evidence the shotgun was being carried with an intent to use it, his attorney argued. Prosecutors disagreed and said the law was constitutional as applied to his situation. By handling his weapon while he was drunk, Weber scared his wife enough that she felt compelled to call police, prosecutors argued. The Supreme Court ruled 4-3 that the state law banning the possession of a weapon while intoxicated regulates “inherently dangerous” conduct and does not impinge on broader Second Amendment rights....
    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The arrest of a man handling a weapon while he was drunk in his own home was constitutional, a divided Ohio Supreme Court ruled Wednesday. Frederick M. Weber (Clermont County Sheriff’s Office)  An attorney for defendant Fred Weber had argued his 2018 arrest was unconstitutional because he was at home and the weapon was unloaded at the time. Weber never should have been charged or convicted under current law, since there was no evidence the shotgun was being carried with an intent to use it, his attorney argued. Prosecutors disagreed and said the law was constitutional as applied to his situation. By handling his weapon while he was drunk, Weber scared his wife enough that she felt compelled to call police, prosecutors argued. The Supreme Court ruled 4-3 that the state law banning the possession of a weapon while intoxicated regulates “inherently dangerous” conduct and does...
    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The arrest of a man handling a weapon while he was drunk in his own home was constitutional, a divided Ohio Supreme Court ruled Wednesday. An attorney for defendant Fred Weber had argued his 2018 arrest was unconstitutional because he was at home and the weapon was unloaded at the time. Weber never should have been charged or convicted under current law, since there was no evidence the shotgun was being carried with an intent to use it, his attorney argued. Prosecutors disagreed and said the law was constitutional as applied to his situation. By handling his weapon while he was drunk, Weber scared his wife enough that she felt compelled to call police, prosecutors argued. The Supreme Court ruled 4-3 that the state law banning the possession of a weapon while intoxicated regulates “inherently dangerous” conduct and does not impinge on broader Second Amendment rights....
    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The arrest of a man handling a weapon while he was drunk in his own home was constitutional, a divided Ohio Supreme Court ruled Wednesday. An attorney for defendant Fred Weber had argued his 2018 arrest was unconstitutional because he was at home and the weapon was unloaded at the time. Weber never should have been charged or convicted under current law, since there was no evidence the shotgun was being carried with an intent to use it, his attorney argued. Prosecutors disagreed and said the law was constitutional as applied to his situation. By handling his weapon while he was drunk, Weber scared his wife enough that she felt compelled to call police, prosecutors argued. The Supreme Court ruled 4-3 that the state law banning the possession of a weapon while intoxicated regulates “inherently dangerous” conduct and does not impinge on broader Second Amendment rights....
    President Donald Trump has shown no intention of conceding the 2020 presidential election, despite the fact that Democrat Joe Biden’s victory has already been certified by the Electoral College. According to Bandy Lee, a forensic psychiatrist at Yale, the commander-in-chief is simply incapable of admitting defeat. In an interview with Politico published on Sunday, Lee argued that the American public should not expect Trump to concede because his greatest fear is being perceived as a “loser.” “We continue to wait for him to accept reality, for him to concede, and that is something he is not capable of doing,” Lee said explaining that, for Trump, admitting that he lost would be tantamount to “psychic death.” Lee argued that Trump should be removed from office because the chances of him accepting reality and peacefully surrendering power are very low. “The probability of something very bad happening is very high, unacceptably high,...
    It’s uncertain if the proposed split will move forward. Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Mark Milley said through a spokesperson that he had yet to review or back the split. There’s certainly pressure for him to do so — Trump has dismissed multiple officials since the November election, and defying the outgoing President’s proposal could cost Gen. Milley his position. The Biden administration might soften or reverse the decision, though. Whether or not it’s a good idea isn’t clear. Split supporters have long argued that Cyber Command is draining NSA resources and creates inefficiencies with unified leadership. Opponents, however, have argued that the two are closely integrated. A separation could damage national security, House Armed Services Committee chairman Rep. Adam Smith said in a letter to Milley. The timing might be less than ideal. Cyber Command is one of the key agencies grappling with the wave of cyberattacks, and a change...