Saturday, Mar 06, 2021 - 00:14:18
45 results - (0.000 seconds)

an insurrection:

    The insurrection could cost taxpayers an extra $71 million
    CNN host John Berman said Tuesday that denying that the Capitol riot was an armed insurrection is a type of “revisionism.” “It’s happening on opinion television, Tucker Carlson and his show fantasy island last night, questioning whether or not what we saw happen actually happened, saying that it wasn’t an armed insurrection, saying that it wasn’t white supremacists, there were no white supremacists involved with that,” Berman said on CNN’s “New Day.” “How do you deal with that type of revisionism? And what are the dangers of that line of thinking?” Berman asked Democratic Michigan Sen. Gary Peters. WATCH: “Well, it’s clearly dangerous. And it’s clearly outrageous. I lived it. There were a lot of folks who lived that, were in the Capitol that day. We have folks who have died. We have folks who have been injured severely, our Capitol police folks,” Peters told Berman. A mob of...
    The acquittal of Donald Trump in the second ‘impeachment’ the assault on the Capitol was just the first step by Democrats to hold the former president responsible for a black day in the political history of the United States. The Democratic Party does not want the assault on Congress on January 6 to be forgotten, and has already announced alternatives to try to convict the Republican. On Monday, the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Nancy Pelosi, called for the creation of a independent inquiry commission like the one made after the September 11 attacks to clarify the facts. A day later, a senior Democratic official has sued Trump and his personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, for his alleged conspiracy with far-right nationalist groups in the assault on the Capitol. Independent Commission on the assault on the Capitol Democrats approved impeachment of former President Trump for incitement to insurrection...
    GOP Sen. Ron Johnson appeared to downplay the deadly Capitol riot days after he voted to acquit former President Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial. The Wisconsin senator claimed the events on Jan. 6 “didn’t seem like an armed insurrection to me.” In early January, a large group of Trump supporters came to Washington, D.C., for a rally supporting Trump. Following the rally, thousands descended upon the Capitol to voice their discontent with the certification of the election for President Biden, which occurred the same day. Johnson made the comment during an interview with WISN-AM with talk radio show host Jay Weber. "I mean 'armed,' when you hear 'armed,' don’t you think of firearms? Here’s the questions I would have liked to ask,” he said. “How many firearms were confiscated? How many shots were fired? I’m only aware of one, and I’ll defend that law enforcement...
    (CNN)Every once in a while, a member of Congress says something that makes your eyes bug out of your head.More often than not these days, that person is Wisconsin Republican Sen. Ron Johnson. Here's Johnson over the weekend talking about the January 6 riot at the US Capitol: "This didn't seem like an armed insurrection to me. When you hear the word 'armed,' don't you think of firearms? Here's the questions I would have liked to ask: How many firearms were confiscated? How many shots were fired?" Leading House Democrat sues Donald Trump under a post-Civil War law for conspiracy to incite US Capitol riotWell, as of Monday morning, more than 221 people had been arrested as a result of the Capitol riot, according to CNN's reporting. (Here are some of the most prominent.) Five people died in the riots. And while overrun police were in no position to confiscate...
    MADISON, Wis. -- Wisconsin's Republican U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson downplayed the storming of the U.S. Capitol last month, saying on conservative talk radio Monday that it "didn't seem like an armed insurrection to me."Johnson's comments on WISN-AM in Milwaukee came after he voted Saturday to acquit former President Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial. Johnson said in the interview that Trump's attorneys "eviscerated" legal arguments made by Democrats seeking to convict Trump for instigating the insurrection.Johnson is one of Trump's most ardent supporters. He is up for reelection in 2022 but hasn't said yet whether he will seek a third term.Johnson condemned the violence and five deaths during the Jan. 6 riot but said what happened was not an armed insurrection."When you hear the word 'armed,' don't you think of firearms?" Johnson said. "Here's the questions I would have liked to ask - how many firearms were confiscated? How...
    The North Carolina Republican Party unanimously voted to censure Sen. Richard Burr after he voted to convict former President Donald Trump of inciting an insurrection. "Tonight, the North Carolina Republican Party Central Committee voted unanimously to censure Senator Richard Burr for his vote to convict former President Trump in the impeachment trial which he declared to be unconstitutional," the party’s central committee said in a statement on Monday. "Now that the Senate has voted to acquit President Trump, we hope that Democrats will set aside their divisive partisan agenda and focus on the American priorities of tackling the COVID-19 pandemic, safely reopening schools and restarting the economy," the statement added. Burr joined six other Republicans on Saturday in voting to convict the president of inciting an insurrection ahead of the storming of the Capitol on Jan. 6. Trump was acquitted. “It is truly a sad day...
    Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., signaled in an interview on Monday that identifying last month’s deadly riot at the Capitol as an "armed insurrection" may be an overstatement. TUCKER CARLSON: WHAT WE STILL DON'T KNOW ABOUT THE RIOT Johnson, who voted to acquit former President Trump at his second impeachment trial, condemned the violence at the Capitol in the interview with 1130 WISN. He spoke about the terminology that was used to describe the events and said it seemed that the riot did not reach the level of an "armed insurrection." "I mean armed, when you hear armed, don’t you think of firearms?" he said. "Here’s the questions I would have liked to ask. How many firearms were confiscated? How many shots were fired? I’m only aware of one, and I’ll defend that law enforcement officer for taking that shot, it was a tragedy, but I think there was only one. If that's a planned armed insurrection,...
    Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonThree years later, father of Parkland shooting victim calls for meaningful school safety reform Senate GOP ready to turn page on Trump Johnson confronts Romney after vote on witnesses MORE (R-Wis.) in a new interview said he didn't think the Jan. 6 Capitol riot seemed like "an armed insurrection" and praised former President TrumpDonald TrumpSix people who guarded Roger Stone entered Capitol during attack: NYT Cassidy pens column explaining vote to convict Trump Puerto Rico governor: Congress 'morally obligated' to act on statehood vote MORE's Senate impeachment trial attorneys following his acquittal.  Johnson made the comments to 1130 WISN radio talk show host Jay Weber on Monday following his vote Saturday to acquit Trump. The comments he made in the episode were first reported by the Wisconsin State Journal. “This will get me in trouble, but I don’t care,” Johnson said. He argued that “groups of agitators” are to blame for...
    GOP senator: Capitol attack 'didn't seem like an armed insurrection to me'
    A prominent senator is downplaying the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol — objecting to the media’s characterization of the riots as an “armed insurrection.” Appearing on Milwaukee radio station WISN, Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI) condemned the attack, but said he does not view it as an armed insurrection. “The fact of the matter is, this didn’t seem like an armed insurrection, to me,” Johnson said. “When you hear of armed, don’t you think of firearms? Here’s the question I would’ve liked to ask [at former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial]. How many firearms were confiscated? I’m only aware of one.” Johnson added, “If that was a planned armed insurrection, you really have a bunch of idiots.” Federal prosecutors indicate that the rioters brought a host of guns and explosives to the Capitol on Jan. 6. Five people died in the attack and and according to the Capitol police...
    GOP Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Memo: GOP senators face defining vote on Trump  Trump lawyers say former president did not know Pence was in danger at the Capitol Key GOP senators question when Trump knew Capitol was breached MORE (Maine) said on Saturday that former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE "incited an insurrection" against the Capitol on Jan. 6, and laid the groundwork for months by claiming the election was stolen from him.  "That attack was not a spontaneous outbreak of violence. Rather, it was the culmination of a steady stream of provocations by President Trump that were aimed at overturning the results of the presidential election," Collins said from the Senate floor.  Collins was one of seven GOP...
    Savannah Rychcik February 13, 2021 0 Comments The Senate voted to acquit Former President Donald Trump on the charge of inciting an insurrection on Saturday after falling short of the 67 votes needed to convict him. The majority of senators voted to declare Trump guilty of the charge in a 57-43 vote, including seven Republicans. Sens. Richard Burr (R-NC), Bill Cassidy (R-La.), Susan Collins (R-Maine), Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), Mitt Romney (R-Utah), Ben Sasse (R-Neb.), and Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) all sided with Democrats. The Senate acquitted Donald Trump at his second impeachment trial. Vote is 57-43 aye. Needed 67.These Republicans joined all Democrats:Richard Burr (R-NC)Bill Cassidy (R-LA)Susan Collins (R-ME)Lisa Murkowski (R-AK)Mitt Romney (R-UT)Ben Sasse (R-NE)Pat Toomey (R-PA) pic.twitter.com/8VHZzfRc0a— The Recount (@therecount) February 13, 2021 The failure to convict Trump makes him the only president to be impeached and acquitted twice in the history of the United States. Trump released a statement following the...
    Washington (CNN)Arguing that the Capitol insurrection damaged US national security, one of the House impeachment managers, Rep. Joaquin Castro, spoke Thursday about the theft of a laptop from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office. "At least one of the insurrectionists may have intended to steal information and give it to a foreign adversary. According to charging documents, Riley Williams allegedly helped steal a laptop from Speaker Pelosi's office to 'send the computer device to a friend in Russia, who then planned to sell the device to SVR, Russia's foreign intelligence service,'" Castro said. Facts First: Castro appropriately hedged his claim by saying "may," but it's still worth emphasizing that the allegation that Williams intended to send the Pelosi laptop to Russia has not been proven. While the FBI has alleged that Williams had a role in the theft of the laptop, the FBI said in a January court document that that...
    Wednesday on FNC’s “Hannity,” conservative talker Mark Levin slammed the impeachment trial underway in the U.S. Senate by calling it “one of the stupidest events” in American history. Levin highlighted some of the abnormal circumstances surrounding the January 6 Capitol Hill riot and argued the proceedings were unconstitutional act by a “rogue” Congress. Transcript as follows: LEVIN: First of all, we are watching one of the stupidest events by some of the stupidest people in American history, and history will fix this. We have a man who slept with a Chinese spy as one of the House Democrat managers. We have a man in Raskin, who was one of the most-loud opponents in one of the recent past elections of certifying the electors. We have a political party that cheered on Antifa and Black Lives Matter and called federal law enforcement storm troopers, and here they are bringing this Soviet-style...
    Sen. Tim Scott said former President Donald Trump is "simply not guilty" of inciting an insurrection at the Capitol building on Jan. 6. “The president is simply not guilty,” Scott said Monday on Fox News. “I was in the chamber when the rioters were coming over. I was taking my jacket off, my tie off, rolling my sleeves up, just in case I had to fight. The chances of me understanding and appreciating the severity of the situation is 100%. The one person I don’t blame is President Trump.” "The Democrats should put the blame where it stands, where it should be," Scott said Monday on Fox News. "And it does not have to do with the president who said go ‘peacefully’ to protest." Scott cited instances where he says Rep. Maxine Waters “told folks to go aggressively toward folks and tell them they’re not wanted,” and how Sen....
    CANDACE Owens has slammed Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez for allegedly trying to cause an insurrection against ICE. Sharing AOC's post on Twitter yesterday the conservative commentator asked Twitter why it wasn't investigating the congresswoman for "inciting violence" over her post. 4Candace Owens slammed the New York Democrat for allegedly trying to cause 'an insurrection'Credit: Getty Images - Getty 4AOC claimed that ICE was refusing to comply when the President attempted to halt deportationsCredit: EPA 4 On January 26, AOC claimed that despite President Biden ordering a half to deportations that the "rogue department" of ICE was not "refusing to comply". In the tweet, she said: "People must understand the depth of what's happening here: the President of the United States has ordered a halt to deportations. "ICE, a federal agency, is refusing to comply. There's no reforming this rogue dept. It's time for a new, just vision." In response Owens,...
    Nine House Democrats, including lead impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD), walked across the Capitol on Monday evening to officially deliver to the Senate floor the article of impeachment accusing Donald Trump of inciting an insurrection, marking the second, unprecedented time a president has been sanctioned by the lower house. Raskin then read out the impeachment article in the well of the Senate. Trump was impeached by a historic, bipartisan majority in the House on January 13th, just one week after a pro-Trump mob laid siege to the Capitol and disrupted the Electoral College certification of Joe Biden’s victory, resulting in five deaths, including one police officer. Trump infamously refused to condemn the rioters in real time and sent several Tweets that appeared to revel in the chaos, among them was a video that expressed sympathy with the violent insurrectionists, saying: “We love you, you’re very special.” Last Friday, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced the schedule for...
    Supporters of US President Donald Trump hold a rally outside the US Capitol as they protest the upcoming electoral college certification of Joe Biden as President in Washington, DC on January 6, 2021. OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images An Orthodox priest in Ohio was suspended after he attended the Trump rally the preceded the Capitol Hill riot. Rev. Mark Hodges was suspended from his priestly duties for three months by the Orthodox Church. Ex-President Trump spoke to his supporters near the White House before a group went on to storm the Capitol. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. A priest of the Orthodox Church in the Midwest was suspended from "all priestly duties" for three months after he attended the January 6 pro-Trump rally in Washington, DC, that preceded the deadly riot at the US Capitol.  Rev. Mark Hodges, of Lima, Ohio, an archpriest associated with the...
    It’s Friday, so here’s a stupid joke for you to enjoy. The Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump is set to begin within weeks, and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer had a rather unfortunate slip-up talking about it on Friday morning. “There will be a trial, and when that trial ends, senators will have to decide if they believe Donald John Trump incited the erection… insurrection… against the United States,” Schumer said. The brief grimace on his face at that moment pretty clearly conveyed he knew exactly what he just said. With all the political turmoil this country is facing, sometimes what we really need is just a very dumb, very silly dick joke: So, on the Senate floor, Chuck Schumer just said that senators must decide if "Donald John Trump incited the erection, uh, insurrection…" Well, it WAS an uprising! — Robert A George (@RobGeorge) January...
    Chuck Schumer said Donald Trump incited an 'erection' instead of an insurrection on the Senate floor Friday, sending social media users laughing that 'we're in for a long, hard trial next week'. The Senate Majority Leader made the hilarious gaffe while announcing that the House's article of impeachment will be sent to the Senate Monday, kicking off the start of Trump's impeachment trial.  Schumer wanted to impress on lawmakers that the former president was responsible for inciting the MAGA mob that stormed the US Capitol on January 6 in a riot that left five - including a Capitol police officer - dead.  But the Democrat stumbled over his words, muddling 'insurrection' for 'erection' and giving his speech another meaning entirely.   Chuck Schumer said Donald Trump incited an 'erection' instead of an insurrection on the Senate floor Friday, sending social media users laughing that 'we're in for a long, hard...
    Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty As a debate rages within the Republican party about how best to handle the looming impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, noted presidential historian Michael Beschloss is now weighing in and putting Trump’s actions on Jan. 6 in perspective. Beschloss is not some partisan hack — though, in our divided media landscape, that will likely be the allegation from the dwindling pro-Trump media set. He is the NBC News Presidential Historian and a frequent commentator on the PBS NewsHour. He is also a trustee of the White House Historical Association and the National Archives Foundation and sits on the board of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History. He is, in laymen’s terms, no joke. He has published nearly a dozen books documenting the legacies of a number of presidents, so his commentary is far more authoritative than that of, say, Dan Bongino or Ana Navarro. And so...
    Win Mcnamee/CNP/ZUMA Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.Today, two weeks after an armed mob stormed the US Capitol, Joe Biden was inaugurated as the 46th president of the United States. Kamala Harris was sworn in as Vice President, making her the first woman, the first Black person, and the first Asian-American to hold the office. In his inaugural address, the new president painted a picture of hope and collective effort, a dramatic contrast with former president Donald Trump’s dystopian “American carnage” speech from four years ago. “This is our historic moment of crisis and challenge,” Biden said in his address. “And unity is the path forward.” Listen to DC Bureau Chief David Corn report live from outside the Capitol on this special inauguration episode of the Mother Jones Podcast: Listen to...
    Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiThe Memo: Trump leaves changed nation in his wake New York court worker arrested, accused of threats related to inauguration GOP Rep Marjorie Taylor Greene referred to Parkland school shooting as 'false flag' event on Facebook MORE (D-Calif.) laid the blame for the deadly violence at the U.S. Capitol squarely at President TrumpDonald TrumpLil Wayne gets 11th hour Trump pardon Trump grants clemency to more than 100 people, including Bannon Trump expected to pardon Bannon: reports MORE's feet late Tuesday, telling MSNBC that the president could be an accessory to murder. In an interview with Joy Reid, the House leader indicated that she thought the rioting by Trump's supporters that overtook the building on Jan. 6 was directly inspired and incited by the president. “[The] president’s words are important, they weigh a ton. And if you’re Donald Trump talking to these people, they believe it and they used...
    Trump’s legacy: two impeachments, an insurrection, countless lies and corruption
    Saul Lobe/Getty Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.In the days after a violent mob stormed the Capitol fueled by the lie that the presidential election had been stolen, a stream of photo and video evidence of what individuals in the mob were actually doing trickled out. One man smiled and waved for a news photographer as he stole House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s (D-Calif.) lectern, another one preened as he sat back with his feet on her desk. One woman posted a series of Instagram photos detailing her participation in the insurrection and bragged about being there. And who could forget Derrick Evans? He’s the Republican delegate in the West Virginia legislature who livestreamed the break-in and, lest anyone mistake him from someone else, was easily identified by police because he shouted “Derrick...
    Representative Scott DesJarlais (R-TN) warns that there could be an ulterior motive behind the media and Democrats’ push to play up last week’s incident at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. During an appearance on FM Talk 106.5 in Mobile, AL, he acknowledged that President Donald Trump’s response could have been much better. However, the Tennessee Republican lawmaker also argued the way the media are playing the incident is part of an effort to tarnish his legacy. “[Y]ou don’t have to like Donald Trump — and I personally thought he could have been quicker on the trigger to get on TV and denounce it as soon as it began to happen,” DesJarlais said. “So I wasn’t thrilled about that — but I don’t lose sight of all the great things he did over four years as president, and they’re just trying, in my opinion, to put a stain on everything...
    The Justice Department described last week’s storming of the Capitol as “a violent insurrection that attempted to overthrow the United States Government” in a detention memo for a self-styled space alien and “QAnon Shaman” who was allegedly armed with a spear, bare-chested, and wearing a buffalo helmet during the siege. Jacob Chansley, also known as Jacob Angeli, a former Navy officer and well-known purveyor of the QAnon conspiracy theory, was arrested and charged with six counts, including disorderly conduct, disrupting government functions, and illegally entering the Capitol "in an effort to prevent the Electoral College votes from being certified.” U.S. Attorney Michael Bailey argued in an 18-page detention memo that Chansley should be jailed pending his trial because he poses a threat. The prosecutor described Chansley, who gained infamy last week for his distinctive costume, as “the radicalized follower-turned-leader of a dangerous extremist group, and a symbol of...
    When I was a child, a burglar smashed a window and broke into my family’s home. A single image is seared in my brain from that incident: One large, muddy footprint on a toilet seat where he had climbed into the house. My younger brother and I slept in our parents’ bed that night, terrified that a faceless stranger had rummaged through our home, looking to steal our possessions or perhaps do us harm.  Our family felt completely violated.  Those same feelings of terror and violation rushed back to me last week after a mob of thousands of pro-President TrumpDonald TrumpGrowing number of GOP lawmakers say they support impeachment YouTube temporarily bars uploading of new content on Trump's channel House passes measure calling on Pence to remove Trump MORE extremists battled police, smashed through windows and doors, and did the unthinkable: storm the U.S. Capitol in a violent attack to...
    Fox News host Mark Levin claimed the American media was to blame for “exploiting” the Capitol riots that occurred this past Wednesday, all with the ominous goal to ultimately silence conservatives. Levin further stated on Life, Liberty, and Levin that President Donald Trump “didn’t incite an insurrection.” “The media have played a huge, huge role in what’s going on in his county, and they are exploiting now what took place on Capitol Hill. Trying to silence, silence conservatives, silence Republicans, and unfortunately, a lot of Republicans are buckling,” said Levin. “We need to speak out against violence, we need to speak out against what happened on Capitol Hill or at the White House or at the Portland courthouse,” he added. “We need to reject all this violence, but what about the media?” Levin then proceeded to hold up a copy of The New York Times’ Thursday front page, which stated, “TRUMP INCITES MOB,”...
    Liberty University sues Virginia Gov. Northam, calls financial aid policy discriminatory Hero Capitol Police cop was killed by blow to the head with a fire extinguisher during Trump-inspired riot McDonalds CEO calls insurrection at the US Capitol an attack on things people associate with America, including McDonalds © Provided by Business Insider McDonald's CEO Chris Kempczinski condemns "unimaginable attacks on democratic norms and institutions in Washington D.C." AP Photo/Richard Drew McDonald's CEO Chris Kempczinski condemned insurrection by pro-Trump supporters in an internal memo viewed by Business Insider.  "As a quintessentially 'American brand,' McDonald's has always benefitted from the respect and admiration that consumers hold for the ideals of this nation," Kempczinski wrote. "It was an attack on all those things that people cherish and associate with America," Kempczinski added. "That includes McDonald's."  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. McDonald's CEO Chris Kempczinski joined other business leaders...
    Fox News host Tucker Carlson fumed on Thursday night over other media outlets accurately describing the pro-Trump U.S. Capitol riot as an “insurrection,” claiming it was nothing more than a “political protest that got out of hand” while conceding that President Donald Trump “recklessly encouraged” it. At the top of his primetime program Thursday night, the far-right Fox News star appeared to place some distance between himself and the outgoing president, noting that all politicians have a “shelf life” and in Trump’s case, “the expiration date arrives in 13 days.” While preparing his audience for the reality that Trump will no longer be in office in two weeks—something the president finally acknowledged for the first time on Thursday—Carlson loudly complained about the way the media has painted the mob of thousands of MAGA followers who stormed the Capitol to stop Congress from certifying Joe Biden’s election victory. Claiming political elites...
    Donald Trump is incapable of reflection, regret, or admitting a mistake. He doesn’t learn. Or at least, he doesn’t learn the way other people do. When Trump puts his hand on a hot burner, his reaction is to press harder. And when he sees that something he has done is causing immense damage and generating widespread criticism, his response is to do it again. Only more so. Still, Trump isn’t so oblivious that he doesn’t realize that he has done many, many terrible things. None may be more terrible than spending weeks encouraging his already delusional, lied-to followers to come to Washington, D.C. so that he could lie to them more, get their blood at full boil, and unleash them in an insurrection designed to overturn the outcome of a lawful election. But that’s not certain, because frankly, we don’t know what’s been in all the Trump phone calls and...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – It is the hot topic coursing through the halls of Congress and apparently within the White House: Should the president be removed making use of the 25th Amendment? “Having a president inciting insurrection, probably, is about as good as an example as you can get,” said Charles Zelden, a political science professor at Nova Southeastern University. Removing a president because he is judged unfit is a simple procedure, at least on paper – the Constitution. Article II, Section 4, provides: The President, Vice President and all Civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors. “The decision is made by the cabinet and the vice president that the president is not fit to do the office of the president for health reason or capacity reasons,” Zelden said. Here is the next...
    WASHINGTON, DC – JANUARY 06: Protesters gather on the U.S. Capitol Building on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. Pro-Trump protesters entered the U.S. Capitol building after mass demonstrations in the nation’s capital during a joint session Congress to ratify President-elect Joe Biden’s 306-232 Electoral College win over President Donald Trump. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images) The mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol was an unacceptable act of violence and insurrection, several key Republicans said, including Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT), Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC), former Gov. Jeb Bush (R-FL), and Gov. Phil Scott (R-VT), and they pointed the finger of blame squarely at President Donald Trump for inciting the unrest. Even former Secretary of Defense James Mattis blamed the president. Mattis, who joined with the nine other living former Defense Secretaries in a scathing Washington Post op-ed a few days ago denouncing the suggestion from Trump allies to involve the military...
    (CNN)Republican Sen. Mitt Romney, who has condemned GOP attempts to subvert the will of the voters in the presidential election, lambasted President Donald Trump on Wednesday for encouraging supporters to disrupt the peaceful transition of power in "an unprecedented attack against our democracy." "We gather today due to a selfish man's injured pride and the outrage of his supporters whom he has deliberately misinformed for the past two months and stirred to action this very morning," Romney wrote in remarks that he would have made in the Senate before Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol. "What happened here today was an insurrection, incited by the President of the United States."He warned that "those who choose to continue to support his dangerous gambit by objecting to the results of a legitimate, democratic election will forever be seen as being complicit in an unprecedented attack against our democracy. They will be remembered...
    Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, issued a scathing statement Wednesday, accusing President Trump of inciting an insurrection and warning other lawmakers not to continue challenging the 2020 election results. "We gather today due to a selfish man’s injured pride and the outrage of his supporters whom he has deliberately misinformed for the past two months and stirred to action this very morning," he said in a press release. "What happened here today was an insurrection, incited by the President of the United States," Romney continued. "Those who choose to continue to support his dangerous gambit by objecting to the results of a legitimate, democratic election will forever be seen as being complicit in an unprecedented attack against our democracy. They will be remembered for their role in this shameful episode in American history. That will be their legacy." TRUMP SUPPORTERS CONFRONT MITT ROMNEY AT AIRPORT, ON PLANE: VIDEO He also seemed...
    Bradley Cortright January 6, 2021 0 Comments President-elect Joe Biden is urging protesters at the U.S. Capitol to leave as he is describing the storming of the building as an “insurrection.” In a speech on Wednesday afternoon address the protesters, Biden said, “At this hour, our democracy is under unprecedented assault. Unlike anything we’ve seen in modern times. An assault on the citadel of liberty — the Capitol itself. An assault on the people’s representatives.” He continued, “Let me be very clear: The scenes of chaos at the Capitol do not reflect the true America. Do not represent who we are. What we are seeing is a small number of extremists dedicated to lawlessness. This is not dissent. It is disorder. It is chaos. It borders on sedition. And it must end. Now.” “I call on this mob to pull back and allow the work of democracy to go forward. You’ve...
    President-elect Joe Biden briefly addressed the nation while Donald Trump's coup continued at the Capitol. "This is not a protest, this is an insurrection" Biden said. "Democracy is fragile and to preserve it requires people of good will." He called on Trump directly "to go on national television now to fulfill his oath, defend the Constitution and demand an end to this siege." "At this hour," Biden said, "our democracy is under unprecedented assault unlike anything we've seen in modern times." He went on: "Let me be very clear, the scenes of chaos at the Capitol do not reflect the true America, do not represent who we are. What we're seeing are a small number of extremists dedicated to lawlessness. This is not dissent, it's disorder, it's chaos. It borders on sedition. And it must end. Now. I call on this mob to pull back and allow the work of...
    President-elect Joe Biden told President Donald Trump to order his 'extremist mob' out of the U.S. Capitol, calling the attack an 'insurrection' and blaming the president for stoking the flames of 'hate and chaos.' 'I call on President Trump to go on national television to fulfill his oath and defend the Constitution and demand an end to this siege,' Biden said Wednesday from Wilmington, Delaware.  The president-elect labeled the group 'extremists' and said they were 'dedicated to lawlessness.'  Trump released a video message after Biden had concluded, telling the rioters to 'go home now' as he fawned on them, 'We love you, you're very special.'  'We had an election that was stolen from us,' Trump also falsely continued to claim.    President-elect Joe Biden called on President Donald Trump to go on television to call off his 'extremist mob' that stormed Capitol Hill as lawmakers were trying to certify the...
    Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) said Monday on the Senate floor that Republicans’ objection to the 2020 election certification amounts to an attempted “coup” and an “insurrection.” Schumer said that objecting to some states’ election results amounts to an attempt to overturn the 2020 presidential election. The Senate Democrat leader referred to the Republican movement as an “insurrection.” Schumer said: It’s a very sad comment on our times that merely accepting the results of an election is considered an act of political courage. Sadder and more dangerous still is the fact an element of the Republican Party believes their political viability hinges on the endorsement of an attempted coup. That anyone, much less an elected official would be willing to tarnish our democracy to varnish to their personal political fortunes. “This insurrection was fortunately discouraged by the leadership of the majority party. But it was not quelled. It is...
    Jack L. Rozdilsky, York University, Canada and Heriberto Urby, Jr., Western Illinois University In the wake of the killing of George Floyd, American cities are coping with strife and civil unrest comparable to 1968. In an apparent attempt to divert attention from a lacklustre White House effort to counter the COVID-19 pandemic and a tone-deaf approach to racial injustice, President Donald Trump has entered into another of his many quagmires where he seems to have spoken first and contemplated later. Despite Trump’s specious symbolic display involving clearing a park of protesters to pose to take photos in front of an empty church, the president’s words at his June 1 news conference were consequential. He specifically named the Insurrection Act of 1807 as a possible remedy to the current crisis. Surprisingly, due to that obscure act, Trump may indeed have the power to send federal troops into states without a request...
    Former Education Secretary and Fox News contributor Bill Bennett joined Fox Nation host Lawrence Jones on "Special Report" Tuesday to discuss the urgency of restoring "law and order" and share their different approaches to moving forward as a country amid the national unrest over the death of George Floyd. "This is an insurrection," Bennett told host Bret Baier. "Let's call it what it is, and it needs to be put down." ANDY MCCARTHY: TRUMP, GOVS MUST DO THIS TO RESTORE ORDER Bennett commended President Trump's commitment to restoring law and order amid the ongoing riots and looting, urging the president's critics to "consider the alternative." "What he's saying is true and essential and, consider the alternative," said Bennett. "Suppose it he said, 'Let it rip, do whatever you want ... ' that would be impossible. So we know it is inevitable and it has to happen. The sooner the better, because the sooner it happens, the less damage will be...
    Former Education Secretary and Fox News contributor Bill Bennett joined Fox Nation host Lawrence Jones on "Special Report" Tuesday to discuss the urgency of restoring "law and order" and share their different approaches to moving forward as a country amid the national unrest over the death of George Floyd. "This is an insurrection," Bennett told host Bret Baier. "Let's call it what it is, and it needs to be put down." ANDY MCCARTHY: TRUMP, GOVS MUST DO THIS TO RESTORE ORDER Bennett commended President Trump's commitment to restoring law and order amid the ongoing riots and looting, urging the president's critics to "consider the alternative." "What he's saying is true and essential and, consider the alternative," said Bennett. "Suppose it he said, 'Let it rip, do whatever you want ... ' that would be impossible. So we know it is inevitable and it has to happen. The sooner the better, because the sooner it happens, the less damage will be...
    Fox News contributor Marc Thiessen said on “America’s Newsroom” on Tuesday that “there's no reason" President Trump cannot lawfully use the U.S. military to assist in trying to control the looting and violent protests taking place across the country. President Trump vowed this week that, if necessary, he would use the U.S. military to try and subdue the violence, which has raised questions on what degree the armed forces can legally get involved with domestic law enforcement. Prohibitions against using the military for domestic law enforcement have several exceptions. If President Trump were to call on them to help quell riots, he would likely do so under the Insurrection Act, which allows the president to call on the U.S. armed forces to assist in law enforcement in certain circumstances. On Tuesday Thiessen pointed out that several presidents have used the Insurrection Act in the past to quell riots. TRUMP VOWS TO MOBILIZE FEDERAL RESOURCES IN...
1