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      Dr. Celine Gounder, a prominent infectious diseases specialist and epidemiologist, said Friday that President TrumpDonald John TrumpSecret Service members who helped organize Pence Arizona trip test positive for COVID-19: report Trump administration planning pandemic office at the State Department: report Iran releases photo of damaged nuclear fuel production site: report MORE's Fourth of July celebration at Mount Rushmore is "beyond irresponsible" as the nation sees record-breaking outbreaks of the novel coronavirus. "I'm highly concerned. This is beyond irresponsible," Gounder, CNN's medical analyst, said when asked what she thought of the Friday evening event.  "This is the behavior of a cult leader who is jumping off the cliff, except he's jumping off into a safety net where he has protections around him. People around him are being tested. He's being tested on a regular basis. While he asks his followers to jump off a cliff into nothing," she continued. "I mean this is...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – More than 52 thousand new cases of COVID-19 were reported across the country on Thursday. Since Memorial Day, cases are up an alarming 64 percent. In Florida this week, the state hit a 10 thousand case increase in a single day, after an aggressive re-opening plan was rolled out last month. “Right now, we are heading a million miles an hour in the wrong direction,” said Dr. Aileen Marty, an infectious disease specialist at Florida International University. Dr. Marty helped Miami-Dade write its re-opening rules, but she said not enough people are following them. Download The New CBS4 News App Here To help stem the increasing number of cases, beaches have closed for the holiday weekend and the county implemented new restrictions and a 10 p.m. curfew. “It’s absolutely the saddest thing, the most unnecessary situation that we’re finding ourselves in and it’s behaviorally driven,” she...
    Coronavirus — The President of Honduras, Juan Orlando Hernández, was released on Thursday (07.02.2020), after being hospitalized for COVID-19 for more than two weeks. The president had been in the Tegucigalpa Military Hospital since June 16, and claimed to have felt that he was “between life and death.” You will now remain in isolation at your residence. It may interest you: The President of Honduras is hospitalized, a day after he reported that he had Covid-19 “I do not wish this on anyone, I would like none of our compatriots to catch it, that no human being goes through the anguish of being between life and death, as we infected people do,” said the head of state. He added that “the vision of life definitely changes when you feel that death surrounds you,” and that he also thought a lot about his relatives. The Honduran president during the taking...
    (CNN) — As the Fourth of July weekend nears, an infectious disease doctor said the United States could be heading into “the perfect storm” for a spike in new coronavirus cases. “It’s set up a perfect storm: the combination of travel, the combination of reopening — perhaps in some cases, too early — and the combination of people not necessarily following some of these preventive guidelines,” Dr. Joshua Barocas, an infectious disease physician at Boston Medical Center, said during a Wednesday briefing by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Barocas said cases spiked in some states after Memorial Day. Thirty-seven states now trend upward in the number of cases from last week and only two states, New Jersey and Rhode Island, trend downward. “I’m very concerned, especially given this coming weekend, that the same types of spikes, the same types of surges could be seen — not just in the...
    Miami Beach, Florida, on June 26, 2020 In the midst of the worst outbreak, New York admitted that it had undercounted the number of people who died from COVID-19. In Florida, Gov. Ron DeSantis has been covering up the true toll of the disease for months. But these states were far from the full picture, as a new study from the National Institutes of Health shows the number of deaths from COVID-19 across the nation being undercounted by almost 30%. At the end of May, the number of deaths attributed to COVID-19 was already 95,000, but the real number likely should have been over 120,000. Despite continued Republican attempts to underplay the disease, COVID-19 is even worse than the official tally suggests. As the temporary effect of statewide lockdowns evaporates under a blaze of new cases, some governors are belatedly pumping the brakes on reopening and a number of prominent Republicans have,...
    Iron accumulation in the outer layer of the brain could lead to mental deterioration in people with Alzheimer's disease, scientists report.  MRI scans over the course of 17 years showed people with Alzheimer's have higher levels of iron in some regions of the brain – including deep grey matter, temporal lobes and neo-cortex – than those of the same age without the disease.  Iron concentrations correlate with a key protein known as amyloid beta, which clumps in and around brain cells and causes Alzheimer's.  The results suggest that drugs that reduce the iron burden in the brain, known as chelators, could have a potential role in Alzheimer's disease treatment.   Iron from the blood is essential for the brain's neurological function, but the chemical element needs to be tightly regulated to prevent adverse effects.  Brain maps of healthy control participants and participants with Alzheimer disease. Iron accumulation was associated with cognitive...
    As the world continues to fight the coronavirus, scientists have identified a new flu strain that could create another pandemic — and it comes from China. The virus is the latest development of the swine flu, which last hit the U.S. in 2009. The new virus has been named G4 EA H1N1, is currently carried and passed by pigs, and can also infect humans, the BBC reported Tuesday. However, it is believed the virus cannot currently be passed from human to human. Commuters wear face masks to prevent the infection by the swine flu virus in while travelling aboard Mexico City’s subway. (Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP via Getty Images) If the strain successfully mutates into a virus that can be passed by humans to other humans, the likelihood of a pandemic that can reach global proportions is significantly increased. Researchers recommend in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that all those...
    American researchers have provided more details on the mysterious Covid-19 disease affecting at least 1,000 children worldwide. A more documented description Currently, more than a thousand children suffer from a new disease coronavirus, called multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). Two American studies, published Monday June 29 in the New England Journal of Medicine, have provided a more detailed description of the symptoms of this mysterious disease. The researchers relied on nearly 300 children and youth, under the age of 21. They had all contracted the Covid-19 or strong suspicions. This disease has already killed two children in France and at United Kingdom. On May 15, the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control identified 230 cases in Europe, reports Le Figaro. Black children more affected than whites According to studies, the syndrome begins to appear weeks after infection with the new coronavirus. The disease is thus confirmed to be...
    More than a third of New York kids who contracted a Kawasaki disease-like ailment linked to the coronavirus were obese or suffered from other underlying medical conditions, according to a study published Monday. The analysis of the 99 patients with Multi-Symptom Inflammatory Syndrome in Children, or MIS-C, was published in the New England Journal of Medicine. It  was conducted by the state Health Department in concert with the University of Albany and the US Centers for Disease Control. Of the 99 cases studied, 36 of the under-age-21 patients had other underlying or pre-existing conditions — with 29 being obese. Two of the 99 patients died from the disease. The syndrome has been compared to Kawasaki disease, which can have similar symptoms. Researchers determined that Kawasaki-like symptoms were more common in younger children than in adolescents. They concluded that further research could explore whether post-COVID-19 inflammatory syndrome exists among adults....
    Hand washing and physical distancing may play an equal role in defeating Covid-19 as finding a vaccine, a global health chief said yesterday. Dr Hans Kluge said it is ‘possible’ a vaccine will be available within a year but warned that this would not be a ‘silver bullet’. The Europe chief of the World Health Organisation made his comments in an interview with the Daily Mail. Dr Hans Kluge does not believe a vaccine will automatically end the pandemic as there are no guarantees it will work for everybody He does not believe a vaccine will automatically end the pandemic as there are no guarantees it will work for everybody. Dr Kluge also raised fears that not all countries will get ‘equal access’ to one. This means measures like hand washing and distancing may be the most effective weapon until the virus becomes endemic or people develop immunity, he said....
    More than a third of New York kids who contracted a Kawasaki disease-like ailment linked to the coronavirus were obese or suffered from other underlying medical conditions, according to a study published Monday. The analysis of the 99 patients with Multi-Symptom Inflammatory Syndrome in Children, or MIS-C, was published in the New England Journal of Medicine. It  was conducted by the state Health Department in concert with the University of Albany and the US Centers for Disease Control. Of the 99 cases studied, 36 of the under-age-21 patients had other underlying or pre-existing conditions — with 29 being obese. Two of the 99 patients died from the disease. The syndrome has been compared to Kawasaki disease, which can have similar symptoms. Researchers determined that Kawasaki-like symptoms were more common in younger children than in adolescents. They concluded that further research could explore whether post-COVID-19 inflammatory syndrome exists among adults. Symptoms...
    Two friends in Texas received two drastically different bills when they were tested for the novel coronavirus.  Pamela LeBlanc and Jimmy Harvey were about to go camping and kayaking along the Texas east coast with three friends and wanted some peace of mind. Both went to get drive-through tests at Austin Emergency Center in Austin and, luckily, both tested negative. While Harvey was charged $199, and paid in cash, LeBlanc - who paid with her private insurance - was billed $6,408, reported The New York Times.  Pamela LeBlanc (left) and Jimmy Harvey (right), from Austin, Texas, were tested for the coronavirus at Austin Emergency Room. Harvey paid in cash and was charged $199 while LeBlanc, who paid with insurance, was charged $6,408 UnitedHealthcare claims it used the wrong code, suggesting LeBlanc had had her blood drawn for different test. Pictured: LeBlanc, left, with Chris LeBlanc Harvey has health...
    Mayor Bill de Blasio called for New York City jails to end solitary confinement Monday — as he limited further which inmates could be placed in punitive segregation. “We have proven that we can keep jails safe with much less use of solitary confinement punitive segregation,” de Blasio said Monday in a press conference. “So let’s take the next step, let’s end solitary confinement altogether.” The city will create a working group — which will include the Department of Correction Commissioner Cynthia Brann, Board of Correction Vice President Stanley Richards, President of JustLeadershipUSA Deanna Hoskins and a member of the correction officers’ union — that will present a report on ending the practice in the fall. “[W]e have a lot to do to create more safety for people who are incarcerated and for correction officers and employees alike,” Hizzoner added. The mayor also expanded the list of preexisting conditions...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Monday new restrictions on the use of solitary confinement at New York City jails. It is also known as “punitive segregation.” Following the death by suicide of Kalief Browder, New York City banned the use of solitary confinement for young people. Browder was jailed at Rikers for three years for a crime he was never convicted of. He took his own life in 2015. “We all remember the tragedy of Kalief Browder. We acted on the lesson of that tragedy. He did not die in vain,” the mayor said. De Blasio also cited the death of Layleen Polanco, who he said “should not have been in Rikers to begin with. Layleen Polanco should not have been in solitary confinement.” The mayor said 17 correction officers have been disciplined and four suspended without pay following her death. The mayor announced more changes...
    Sunday on CNN’s “Inside Politics,” Sen. Lamar Alexander (R- TN) called on President Donald Trump to wear a mask. According to the Tennessee lawmaker, it would be an example to the country amid the coronavirus pandemic. Guest host Manu Raju said, “Studies also show that wearing masks has a significant impact on preventing the spread of the disease. You, I see you wearing your red and black plaid mask throughout the Capital, your staff does as well. The president, however, he refuses to wear one. The vice president continues to say this is an issue states should decide. Should the White House do more and the president do more to urge Americans to wear masks?” Alexander said, “I wish the president would wear a mask when it’s appropriate because millions of Americans admire him. And they would follow his lead. And his experts have told all of us that social...
    Coronavirus — The coronavirus remains a mystery in many ways to scientific researchers. Over the months, knowledge about how the disease works has been increasing, but there are still questions that have not yet found an answer. One of them is the reason that people without symptoms can count on the ability to transmit the disease for longer than the most affected patients. That at least was what a study with 40 volunteers in China revealed, which also found that the levels of antibodies against the virus in these people was lower than in those who were ill. Likewise, this work found that the presence of antibodies in the body decreased rapidly, so that these individuals could no longer have this tool to block COVID-19 in the future.. And it is that these proteins are one of the elements that the immune system uses to beat the coronavirus. However,...
    First came Brexit. Then came COVID-19 and now the Brits are having to battle hordes of disease-ridden horse flies that have invaded parks and gardens in the UK, according to the Mirror. The half-inch long flies, which usually are found in the country have invaded the cities during the coronavirus lockdown, congregating around pools, ponds, and gardens– and urbanites are feeling the sting. Unfortunately, the flies, which thrive in hot and humid conditions are expected to multiply with upcoming thunderstorms predicted. Some people who were bitten required hospitalization and a round of antibiotics, according to the paper. The bites can also lead to cellulitis, a skin infection. The gargantuan flies who strike without warning are, according to the British Pest Control Association, “Literally designed to eat a horse, their bite is both impressive and painful. … They can persistently chase you at a flying speed of around 15 mph,...
    First came Brexit. Then came COVID-19 and now the Brits are having to battle hordes of disease-ridden horse flies that have invaded parks and gardens in the UK, according to the Mirror. The half-inch long flies, which usually are found in the country have invaded the cities during the coronavirus lockdown, congregating around pools, ponds, and gardens– and urbanites are feeling the sting. Unfortunately, the flies, which thrive in hot and humid conditions are expected to multiply with upcoming thunderstorms predicted. Some people who were bitten required hospitalization and a round of antibiotics, according to the paper. The bites can also lead to cellulitis, a skin infection. The gargantuan flies who strike without warning are, according to the British Pest Control Association, “Literally designed to eat a horse, their bite is both impressive and painful. … They can persistently chase you at a flying speed of around 15 mph, and...
    As infection rates continue to grow in areas across the country, President Donald Trump has reportedly demanded a dramatic increase in protections to prevent him from contracting the novel coronavirus. As CNN reports, the more aggressive measures come even as the president has sought to downplay the seriousness of the pandemic. Trump is reportedly afraid of contracting COVID-19 in part because he reportedly understands that it would look bad for him as he ramps up his fight against opponent Joe Biden, who has criticized his work in addressing the virus, in the upcoming election. It also contradicts his message of wanting the country to reopen and for people to gather in crowds at his rallies. In order to ensure that he doesn’t catch the disease that has killed over 127,000 Americans, he has put in place medical and security teams that head out in advance to inspect any venue where...
    Coronavirus — Since the coronavirus pandemic broke out, we have become familiar with words like SARS-CoV-2 and especially COVID-19. Both scientific terms are related to each other, but they are different and do not allude to the same thing, although sometimes they have been used as synonyms. The first thing to note is that the new coronavirus that is affecting practically everyone is called SARS-Cov-2. This virus is a new type that can affect people and was first detected in December 2019 in Wuhan City, China.. SARS-CoV-2, which has also been called 2019-nCOV, falls within the family of viruses called coronaviruses that normally only affected animals, but also have the ability to transmit from animals to people, as we have seen that it has happened. These viruses produce clinical pictures that go from the common cold to more serious diseases. Before SARS-CoV-2, other coronaviruses arose within this family.. One...
    NEW YORK – The top US public health agency has updated its list of those who are most at risk of serious COVID-19, and has now included pregnant women and eliminated age as a factor. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has also amended its list of pre-existing conditions that make some people more likely to become seriously ill and die from COVID-19. Sickle cell anemia was added to the list, for example. And it lowered the threshold for dangerous levels of obesity. The changes did not include race as a risk factor for developing the disease in a serious way, although evidence has accumulated that blacks, Hispanics, and Amerindians have the highest rates of infection, hospitalization, and death. CDC officials said the update was necessary due to medical studies published since the agency began making its list of high-risk groups. Officials attempted to spread the information...
    IF you have watched Coronation Street this week you will have seen the heartbreak of Leanne Battersby and Steve McDonald as they come to terms with their son, Oliver’s diagnosis with the rare genetic condition, mitochondrial disease. It's a tragic storyline, particularly at this time when we are all are getting a taste of living with a deadly disease that currently has no cure. The fear and uncertainty that Leanne and Steve are facing is something we can all relate to on some level. 5Coronation Street's tragic storyline of mitochondrial disease will help shine a light on the rare genetic condition, says Liz CurtisCredit: ITV 5Liz Curtis founded The Lily Foundation in memory of her daughter Lily who died aged eight monthsCredit: Oliver Dixon - The Sun Our charity, The Lily Foundation, helped advise on the Corrie script, and as someone who's been through it myself, I can tell you...
    Coronavirus — NEW YORK – The top US public health agency has updated its list of those who are most at risk of serious COVID-19, and has now included pregnant women and eliminated age as a factor. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has also amended its list of pre-existing conditions that make some people more likely to become seriously ill and die from COVID-19. Sickle cell anemia was added to the list, for example. And it lowered the threshold for dangerous levels of obesity. The changes did not include race as a risk factor for developing the disease in a serious way, although evidence has accumulated that blacks, Hispanics, and Amerindians have the highest rates of infection, hospitalization, and death. CDC officials said the update was necessary due to medical studies published since the agency began making its list of high-risk groups. Officials attempted to spread...
    Infectious disease expert American doctor Anthony Fauci admitted in a Washington Post interview published on Friday that the United States should change its approach to stem the Covid-19 pandemic, which is in full swing in a large part of the country. “There is something wrong,” said the director of the Institute of Infectious Diseases, and a member of the White House crisis cell on the coronavirus. “We can make as many tables as we want, it will always remain that it does not work.” The United States is doing more and more tests (more than 640,000 in one day reported Thursday, according to the Covid Tracking Project) but the number of confirmed cases has been increasing at an even higher rate in recent weeks. California, Arizona, Texas and Florida, highly populated states, are at the heart of this rebound. “We need to find the penetration of infections in our...
    Coronavirus — NEW YORK – The top US public health agency has updated its list of those who are most at risk of serious COVID-19, and has now included pregnant women and eliminated age as a factor. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has also amended its list of pre-existing conditions that make some people more likely to become seriously ill and die from COVID-19. Sickle cell anemia was added to the list, for example. And it lowered the threshold for dangerous levels of obesity. The changes did not include race as a risk factor for developing the disease in a serious way, although evidence has accumulated that blacks, Hispanics, and Amerindians have the highest rates of infection, hospitalization, and death. CDC officials said the update was necessary due to medical studies published since the agency began making its list of high-risk groups. Officials attempted to spread...
    BELGRADE (Reuters) - A month after it was declared coronavirus-free, Montenegro reintroduced restrictions late on Thursday, including a ban on sports events and outdoor political rallies, to try to contain a spike of new cases. In a statement, the national body tasked with combating the disease said it had also banned religious gatherings outside places of worship. "Funerals will be performed exclusively within family circles," it added. Montenegro's authorities have also introduced an array of additional restrictions in two municipalities in the north of the country which have been hardest hit by the disease, including a curfew from 6 p.m. to 5 a.m. On May 25, Montenegro which is dependent on revenues from tourism along its Adriatic coast, declared itself coronavirus-free, but the number of infections spiked 10 days ago. The authorities have since reported 100 new cases. The COVID-19 disease has so far killed nine people and infected 424...
    REDONDO BEACH (CBSLA) — Rhys Devine was born in the pandemic — a quarantine baby — full of love and the apple of her parents’ eyes. “She is happy,” Ceri Devine, Rhys’ mother, said. “She is smiley.” But a few months after she was born, her parents noticed something seemed off. “Everyone kept telling me, ‘It’s nothing. She’s just behind on her development, and I kind of just,” Ceri said. “I felt like there was something wrong.” Rhys was struggling to hold herself upright, so her parents took her to the doctor. “The pediatrician had us come in right away, and she examined her and that was when she expressed her concern that it might be spinal muscular atrophy,” Ceri said. “I remember googling it on my way home from the pediatrician and the first thing that came up was, you know, most infants diagnosed with SMA do not live...
    REDONDO BEACH (CBSLA) — Rhys Devine was born in the pandemic — a quarantine baby — full of love and the apple of her parents’ eyes. “She is happy,” Ceri Devine, Rhys’ mother, said. “She is smiley.” But a few months after she was born, her parents noticed something seemed off. “Everyone kept telling me, ‘It’s nothing. She’s just behind on her development, and I kind of just,” Ceri said. “I felt like there was something wrong.” Rhys was struggling to hold herself upright, so her parents took her to the doctor. “The pediatrician had us come in right away, and she examined her and that was when she expressed her concern that it might be spinal muscular atrophy,” Ceri said. “I remember googling it on my way home from the pediatrician and the first thing that came up was, you know, most infants diagnosed with SMA do not live...
    The menopause could make women more prone to Alzheimer’s disease than men, research suggests. Middle-aged women were found to have more early signs of the dementia than men during brain scans – possibly because the menopause reduces their oestrogen level. Researchers compared the women and men in four key areas of brain health to assess their risk of having Alzheimer’s biomarkers – and women scored worse in all of them. New research suggests that women are more prone to Alzheimer's than men due to the menopause reducing their levels of oestrogen Scientists had thought more women got Alzheimer’s because they lived longer. The study involved 85 women and 36 men with an average age of 52 and no cognitive impairment.  They had similar scores in memory tests and health measures, as well as family histories of Alzheimer’s. RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Hope for...
    Donald Trump may be ready to move past their bruising mishandling of America’s coronavirus response, but the sweeping threat of COVID-19 is far from over. That was the point that Dr. Anthony Fauci and a host of senior administration health officials told Congress again and again over a six-hour pandemic hearing on Tuesday, Members of the House Energy and Commerce Committee hoping for good news quickly adjusted their expectations as Fauci, Centers for Disease Control Director Robert R. Redfield, Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Stephen Hahn, and Health And Human Services Assistant Secretary for Health Admiral Brett P. Giroir repeatedly warned of a sustained pandemic likely to disrupt American lives into the early months of 2021.  Redfield, a Trump loyalist criticized by Democrats for sugar-coating White House inaction, minced no words: COVID-19 “brought this country to its knees.” Redfield warned that even with improvements in rapid testing and contact tracing,...
    A breakthrough that led to the creation of new neurons in mice could be used to transplant brain cells in Parkinson's patients and cure them of the disease. University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers created neurons in mice using a new, much simpler method that involved rewriting genes.   Parkinson's disease is characterised by a loss of dopaminergic neurons in a region of the brain responsible for reward and movement - replacing those cells could help to reduce or even reverse the symptoms of the degenerative disease. A small study involving mice with Parkinson's saw those given the 'new neuron treatment' return to normal within three months and stay disease free for life. The researchers said it could one day be used to 'cure' any disease caused by the loss of neurons but warned this was a long way off and hadn't been tested. Left: mouse cells...
    Coronavirus — The Chinese Ministry of Health has assured this Wednesday that the rebound of coronavirus infections arisen in el Beijing Fengtai District Wholesale Market in Beijing it is under control, after the last cases recorded in the capital were not directly related to this focus. The deputy director of the Ministry of Health, Feng Zijian, noted that “the new cases are mainly due to the spread of those who in some way or another had been exposed to the market.” “Transmission level is very low”Feng announced, explaining that the cases of those who were directly exposed to the Xinfadi market “are coming to an end.” “The Beijing outbreak was discovered very early and strong control measures have slowed the spread of the disease,” said Feng during a televised intervention that was reported by the ‘South China Morning Post’ newspaper. According to the last balance, Beijing has added seven...
    Being obese in your fifties could significantly raise the risk of developing dementia, a study has found. Obesity increased the chances of developing the disease by almost a third compared to those of a healthy weight. The risk was even higher for women with bulging waistlines, according to researchers from University College London. Experts have warned the UK is facing a dementia timebomb unless we do more to tackle obesity.  Britain’s spiralling obesity crisis means two in three adults and one in three children are now overweight or obese (file photo) RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Having a genetic mutation linked to dementia may DOUBLE the... Revealed, the reason why obese people may be more at risk of... Women are living longer but men are catching up as females'... Intermittent fasting could make you live longer and help... Share...
    A mother-of-four, who is the first American patient to have her genes edited with the controversial CRISPR technology to treat her sickle cell disease, says the technology is working. Victoria Gray, 34, of Forest, Mississippi, has suffered from the debilitating blood disorder her entire life.   She was in so much pain at one point that she wasn't even able to lift a spoon, let alone take care of her children. Sickle cell disease affects as many as 100,000 Americans - a disproportionate number of whom are black, like Gray - and while treatments may alleviate symptoms, they do nothing to address the underlying disease. But the genetically modified cells that doctors have inserted into her body seem to be reversing and relieving the symptoms of the debilitating illness, NPR reported. Tests show no signs that Gray's DNA has changed, and she says she no longer experiences the severe bouts of pain...
    On Tuesday, a Brazilian federal judge ordered President Jair Bolsonaro to obey local regulations and to put on the protective mask when he goes out or meets other people in Brasilia. Bolsonaro has been seen in recent days without a mask, amid crowds protesting Congress and the Supreme Court. He has also visited patisseries and food kiosks, attracting groups of fans and curious. In the federal district of Brazil there is a rule that everyone must wear the protective mask in public to avoid the spread of the coronavirus, or else they will have to pay a fine equivalent to $ 390. Judge Renato Coelho Borelli ordered Bolsonaro to put on face masks, stating that the president “has exposed other people to the spread of a disease that has shaken the nation.” Bolsonaro has also been seen with the mask, unlike other heads of state such as the American Donald...
    Coronavirus — The main concern of researchers when faced with a virus is managing to control the spread of the pathogen and the coronavirus, the problem before them is very great. The reason is simple: When a person who has become infected begins to have symptoms, they have already been transmitting COVID-19 for several days. Also, then there are the asymptomatic, which do not present any evidence of having been infected, so they spread the disease without knowing it and without being able to take concrete measures to stop the infections. That is, whether they have symptoms or not, the virus fulfills its evolutionary function, which is none other than spreading. In this sense, as the researchers Athena Aktipis, from the University of Arizona, and Joe Alcock, from the University of Mexico, highlight in The Conversation, the coronavirus acts similarly to how sexually transmitted diseases do. When an individual...
    (CNN) — Cities, states and nations have been turning to sugar taxes as a potential way to improve public health in their communities, but the jury has been out on how best to implement the fine. Taxes on sugary drinks, a new study has revealed, can lead to major health gains and reductions in health care costs — but just how much of a benefit they provide can vary by the design of the tax. Many sugar-sweetened beverage taxes are volume-based, meaning the tax may be 2 cents per ounce of the beverage’s overall volume, for instance, or 3 cents per teaspoon of sugar, which aims to reduce the consumption of a product by increasing its cost. The city of San Francisco and the nations of Mexico, Norway and the Philippines have implemented such tax designs, according to the study. Yet a tiered tax, which the study noted are in...
    CNN – Cities, states and nations have been turning to sugar taxes as a potential way to improve public health in their communities, but the jury has been out on how best to implement the fine. Taxes on sugary drinks, a new study has revealed, can lead to major health gains and reductions in health care costs — but just how much of a benefit they provide can vary by the design of the tax. Many sugar-sweetened beverage taxes are volume-based, meaning the tax may be 2 cents per ounce of the beverage’s overall volume, for instance, or 3 cents per teaspoon of sugar, which aims to reduce the consumption of a product by increasing its cost. The city of San Francisco and the nations of Mexico, Norway and the Philippines have implemented such tax designs, according to the study. Yet a tiered tax, which the study noted are in...
    (CNN) — Cities, states and nations have been turning to sugar taxes as a potential way to improve public health in their communities, but the jury has been out on how best to implement the fine. Taxes on sugary drinks, a new study has revealed, can lead to major health gains and reductions in health care costs — but just how much of a benefit they provide can vary by the design of the tax. Many sugar-sweetened beverage taxes are volume-based, meaning the tax may be 2 cents per ounce of the beverage’s overall volume, for instance, or 3 cents per teaspoon of sugar, which aims to reduce the consumption of a product by increasing its cost. The city of San Francisco and the nations of Mexico, Norway and the Philippines have implemented such tax designs, according to the study. Yet a tiered tax, which the study noted are in effect in...
    A personalised cancer vaccine designed to boost the body's own natural defences when used alongside chemotherapy shows 'promising signs' after a clinical trial.   The treatment is created by taking a biopsy of a tumour and then using artificial intelligence to identify certain proteins not recognised by the immune system. They use these proteins to create tailor-made vaccines for each individual cancer patients and then administer them alongside immunotherapy drug atezolizumab. So far researchers have only tested it on patients with advanced cancers and just 8 per cent saw their tumours shrink - with 49 per cent seeing no change. An international team of researchers found the treatment, known as RO7198457, was 'well tolerated' by patients and the they experienced 'low-to-moderate' side effects.  The treatment is created by taking a biopsy of a tumour and then using artificial intelligence to identify certain proteins not recognised by the immune system This is early...
    A New York City father-of-two learned that his back pain and loss of movement was actually from a genetic heart condition and not nerve problems. Rick Weber, 52, was an active cyclist for years but, in 2016, he began feeling pain in his back and legs. Doctors repeatedly misdiagnosed him and attributed his condition to back problems and neurological issues. The pain got so bad that Weber went from using a cane to eventually being confined to a wheelchair. Finally, three years after his pain first began, doctors noticed a build-up of an abnormal protein in his nerves and, specifically, his heart. It turns out that Weber was actually suffering from a condition known as cardiac amyloidosis ('stiff heart syndrome'), which occurs when these abnormal protein deposits replace normal heart muscle. The organ becomes stiff and is unable to pump blood properly, which is the early stages of heart failure....
    Coronavirus — Health ignored the protocol of the World Health Organization (WHO), which makes clear its preference that residential patients be treated in a hospital center “especially those with risk factors” that could aggravate the disease, which included, according to the body, “over 60 years of age and with morbidities ». The documents of the Ministry of Health insist on the isolation measures of patients infected by coronavirus, within the residence itself, and little reference is made to the hospital transfer. The Ministry’s guidelines for residences – in the version of March 5 and 24 – establish “as a general rule” that “residents with acute respiratory symptoms must restrict their movements as much as possible and stay in a room with good ventilation -preferably at outside – and ideally with its own bathroom ”. Health hardly mentions the transfer to a hospital center, despite the special situation of vulnerability...
    An anorexia survivor has claimed social isolation as a result of Covid-19 has created 'safe havens' for some people battling eating disorders.   Marissa Pendlebury, 28, from Warrington, Cheshire, founder of the Nourishing Routes programme, warned great care must to be taken to ease these individuals back into society when lockdown ends to avoid painful relapses. Some eating disorder charities have argued that the pandemic has heaped pressure onto sufferers, with Beat reporting a 73 per cent rise in contact across all of their channels in May compared with February.   But Marissa, a graduate and ambassador for Liverpool Hope University, said it's important to remember that for a great many sufferers, lockdown could have come at the perfect time. Marissa Pendlebury, 28, from Warrington, Cheshire, pictured, founder of the Nourishing Routes programme, says social isolation as a result of Covid-19 has created 'safe havens' for people battling eating disorders The author and self-help...
    Coronavirus — Freelance journalist Emiliano Chamorro is already a survivor of Covid-19. On the days he had the disease, he felt tiredness and a constant smell of blood and tobacco that will always be related to the coronavirus. Anxiety and depression were also added to the condition. Chamorro will never know where he got Covid-19, but he admits that before he got sick he did not take seriously the recommendations to prevent it: he did not use a mask or alcohol gel. Now he regrets his stubbornness. Also read: Covid-19 does not stop expanding in Nicaragua: Citizen Observatory reports almost 6 thousand cases He had to go through all the stages of acceptance to admit that he was sick: denial, sadness, depression, stress and talk about it to accept his condition. The symptoms began to be felt in mid-May: back pain and headache at first, but she refused to...
    President Donald Trump made it a point to blame China for the Covid-19 outbreak to his Saturday night Tulsa, Oklahoma rally, repeatedly calling it “the Chinese virus” and at one point referring to the disease as “Kung flu.” “If you could have heard the reports, the reports, oh, it’s Covid — it’s a disease without question that has more names than any disease in history,” Trump said. “I can name Kung flu. I can name 19 different versions of names.” “Many call it a virus which it is. Many call it a flu. I think we have 19 or 20 versions of the name.” Trump went to say testing for the virus was a “double-edged sword” because it increases the count of cases in the United States, which leads the world in cases. He claimed the count is inflated by “minor cases” adding “I said to my people, ‘Slow the...
    Lord of the Rings star Sir Ian Holm has died aged 88 following a battle with Parkinson's disease. The award-winning actor passed away in hospital surrounded by his family and was remembered as 'charming, kind and ferociously talented'.  He famously played Bilbo Baggins in the hit trilogy and revived the role for the later Hobbit film series.   But his career spanned both screen and stage, where he notably portrayed King Lear for which he bagged a Tony Award.  His agent said : 'It is with great sadness we can confirm that the actor Sir Ian Holm CBE passed away this morning at the age of 88. 'He died peacefully in hospital, with his family and carer. His illness was Parkinson's related. 'He was a genius of stage and screen, winning multiple awards and loved by directors, audiences and his colleagues alike. 'His sparkling wit always accompanied a mischievous twinkle in...
    A genetic analysis of COVID-19 patients suggests that blood type might influence whether someone develops severe disease. Scientists who compared the genes of thousands of patients in Europe found that those who had Type A blood were more likely to have severe disease while those with Type O were less likely. Wednesday’s report in the New England Journal of Medicine does not prove a blood type connection, but it does confirm a previous report from China of such a link. “Most of us discounted it because it was a very crude study,” Dr. Parameswar Hari, a blood specialist at the Medical College of Wisconsin, said of the report from China. With the new work, “now I believe it,” he said. “It could be very important.” Other scientists urged caution. The evidence of a role for blood type is “tentative … it isn’t enough of a signal to be sure,”...
    (CNN)Hoof-and-mouth disease (also known as foot-and-mouth disease) is a communicable virus affecting cattle, pigs and other cloven-hoofed animals. Hoof-and-mouth disease is not related to hand, foot, and mouth disease, a virus that infects humans.AboutIt is a member of the genus Aphthovirus in the family Picornaviridae. There are seven types of hoof-and-mouth disease and more than 60 subtypes or strains.The disease can lead to severe losses in milk and meat production. The death rate is usually less than 1% in adult livestock but the rate may be higher in calves and piglets, according to the Center for Food Security & Public Health at Iowa State University.Symptoms include fever, along with lesions in the mouth and around the hooves. Read MoreHoof-and-mouth disease is transmitted from animal to animal directly and indirectly. The virus can also be passed from human to animal.The virus is one of the subjects studied at Plum Island, New...
    (CNN)Here's a look at Mad Cow Disease, a fatal brain disease found in cattle. FactsIt has been linked to a fatal brain disease in humans called variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD).The official name of mad cow disease is bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). BSE lesions are characterized by sponge-like changes seen under an ordinary microscope.Eating contaminated meat or other products from cattle (excluding dairy products) with BSE is thought to be the cause of vCJD.Read MoreBSE is passed between cows through the practice of recycling bovine carcasses for meat and bone meal protein, which is fed back to other cattle.Both mad cow disease and vCJD are fatal. Symptoms of vCJD involve psychiatric symptoms and behavioral changes, movement deficits, memory disturbances and cognitive impairments.BSE Statistics (Cattle)(source: CDC)BSE cases in North America 1993-August 2018: 26 cases confirmed, 20 in Canada, and six in the United States. One of the infected cows that died in...
    SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) - Hundreds of workers are still absent from the Smithfield meatpacking plant in Sioux Falls because of the coronavirus pandemic, according to union leaders. AFL-CIO secretary treasurer BJ Motley says between 800 and 1,200 of the plant’s 3,700 employees are either quarantined, have tested positive for the virus or fall into a high-risk category. Those in the high-risk category were previously going to be asked to return to work June 15, but after discussions with the union that date was extended to June 29. High risk individuals would be those over age 60 who have a medical condition like diabetes that would make them susceptible to the disease. Motley tells the Argus Leader Smithfield will continue to pay workers who were either quarantined or had the disease while they stay home until July 31. State health officials said Monday South Dakota has confirmed 30...
    by Erik J. Dahl, Naval Postgraduate School As the coronavirus pandemic continues to unfold, it’s clear that having better information sooner, and acting more quickly on what was known, could have slowed the spread of the outbreak and saved more people’s lives. There may be finger-pointing about who should have done better – and President Donald Trump has already begun laying blame. But as a former naval intelligence officer who teaches and studies the U.S. intelligence community, I believe it’s useful to look at the whole process of how information about diseases gets collected and processed, by the U.S. government but also by many other organizations around the world. The role of traditional US intelligence agencies The U.S. intelligence community has for many years considered the possible threat of disease among the potential risks to national stability and security. For instance, then-Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats told Congress in...
    Death rates are 12 times higher for coronavirus patients with chronic illnesses than for others who become infected, a new U.S. government report says. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report released Monday highlights the dangers posed by heart disease, diabetes and lung ailments. These are the top three health problems found in COVID-19 patients, the report suggests. The report is based on 1.3 million laboratory-confirmed coronavirus cases reported to the agency from January 22 through the end of May. Information on health conditions was available for just 22% of the patients. It shows that 32% had heart-related disease, 30% had diabetes and 18% had chronic lung disease, which includes asthma and emphysema. Among patients with a chronic illness, about 20% died compared with almost 2% of those who were otherwise healthy. Virus patients with a chronic condition were also six times more likely to be hospitalized...
    State and local governments’ acceptance of widespread protests over the last couple of weeks is an admission that society is ready to reopen from its coronavirus-induced shutdown. The mass protests (as well as local soft reopenings and recent Memorial Day gatherings) around the country have not shown an exponential increase in coronavirus death rates. The curve has flattened. Therefore it is time to reopen America. Reopening is justified not only because the curve has flattened but also because the latest epidemiological data demonstrate that Covid-19 is not as deadly as first thought. The CDC recently revised its death rate down to just 0.4 percent. That’s roughly an order of magnitude lower than the original World Health Organization estimate of 3.4 percent, which was used to justify widespread lockdowns. Even this topline death rate overestimates the risk. Nearly half of all Covid deaths nationwide have come in nursing homes. In some states, including...
    BEIJING (AP) — China on Sunday reported its highest daily total of new coronavirus cases in two months after the capital’s biggest wholesale food market was shut down following a resurgence in local infections. There were 57 confirmed cases in the 24 hours through midnight Saturday, the National Health Commission reported. That was the highest daily toll since mid-April and included 36 in Beijing, the capital. The new cases illustrated how the virus can come back as anti-disease controls are relaxed. The Xinfadi market on Beijing’s southeastern side was closed Saturday and neighboring residential compounds locked down after more then 50 people in the capital tested positive for the coronavirus. They were the first confirmed cases in 50 days in the city of 20 million people. China, where the pandemic began in December, had relaxed most of its anti-virus controls after the ruling Communist Party declared victory over the disease...
    Experiencing COVID-19-like symptoms after venturing into nature? It may not be the coronavirus, but a tick-borne disease with similar symptoms. Anaplasmosis is caused by a bacteria primarily contracted via tick bites that can lead to fever, headache, chills and muscle aches, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — all symptoms the CDC also lists for the coronavirus. If untreated, anaplasmosis can be fatal, and there’s recently been an uptick in cases in New York state. “That’s one that’s really on the rise, particularly in the northeastern part of New York,” Byron Backenson, deputy director of the state Health Department’s Bureau of Communicable Disease Control, tells the Adirondack Explorer. “[There] are areas of the state where we see ticks that are much more infected with the bacteria that cause anaplasmosis.” Warning the public of the uptick has been difficult due to the infodemic of COVID-19 news, Backenson notes,...
    Cases of the deadly mosquito borne virus Eastern Equine Encephalitis — along with other insect-carrying diseases– are expected to skyrocket in the northeast in the coming years, a troubling new report claims. Last year, the US recorded 38 confirmed cases of the mosquito-borne disease and 15 deaths. In the northeast, Massachusetts saw 12 cases, and four each in Connecticut and New Jersey, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. By comparison, in the last decade, the highest number of total cases in the country was 15, with five deaths, in 2012. As winters grow warmer and the spring and summer seasons get hotter and wetter, EEE spreads, according to a deep dive on the virus posted Wednesday on Medium. “These conditions are predicted to both persist and become more extreme in the Northeast over the coming decades,” the author, Australian researcher Oscar Schwartz, wrote. “By 2035, the region...
    As scientists around the world race to develop effective drugs or potential vaccines for COVID-19, they have been hindered by the limited number of laboratory mice that are susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have come up with a mouse model of COVID-19 that replicates the illness in humans. They believe that approach could be adopted by other scientists to speed up the testing of treatments and vaccines for the disease. Their work is described in a paper published online today in the journal Cell. "There's been a huge push to develop vaccines and therapeutics as quickly as possible, and since animal models have been limited, these investigational drugs and vaccines have been put directly into humans, and many of them haven't panned out," said principal investigator Michael S. Diamond, the Herbert S. Gasser Professor of Medicine and an expert on viral...
    Protein biomarkers in the blood of COVID-19 patients could be used to predict the severity of the disease and potentially save lives, according to researchers in Germany and the U.K. Scientists at the hospital Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Francis Crick Institute in London have identified biological characteristics in the blood that could help predict the progression of COVID-19 and its degree of severity in patients. Researchers used mass spectrometry to analyze patients’ proteomes, or sets of proteins, in biological material. Blood plasma samples were analyzed from 31 men and women who were receiving treatment at the Charité hospital, which is also a prominent research institution. The patients’ symptoms had varying degrees of severity. THESE INDICATORS IN A PATIENT'S BLOOD COULD HELP DETERMINE HOW SICK THEY MIGHT GET FROM COVID-19, STUDY FINDS “The researchers were able to identify 27 proteins in the blood which varied in quantity depending on disease...
    SULEIMAN KHEL, Pakistan (AP) - When Tariq Nawaz’s daughter was born a year ago, he borrowed money to pay for his wife’s cesarean delivery. Seven months later, they learned their baby had polio and sold the little bit of jewelry his wife had received for her wedding to pay mounting medical bills. Then the new coronavirus pandemic struck Pakistan, prompting a countrywide lockdown. Still in debt, Nawaz lost his job, his monthly paycheck of $95 and the means to provide treatment for the baby’s polio. “It’s all I can think of. I feel like my head is going crazy,” he said. TOP STORIES Abraham Lincoln monument torched in Chicago: An absolute disgraceful act Coronavirus hype biggest political hoax in history Defund police movement divides Democrats, disrupts Biden VP derby For millions of people like Nawaz who live in poor and troubled regions of the world, the novel coronavirus is...
    (CNN)A profound and unexpected disparity in Covid-19 death rates has emerged among different countries. In South Korea, Norway and Australia, for example, less than 3% of confirmed cases die, while in Belgium, Italy and the United Kingdom, the case fatality rate is as high as 14%. The reasons for this disparity remain unclear. Theories have included differences in the quality of healthcare and its accessibility, population testing rates or age, differences in mutations of the virus, rates of concurrent conditions such as heart or lung disease and, for some countries, concerns about the inconsistent reporting of deaths. As clinicians and epidemiologists continue to analyze the data, a new group of scientific experts with a different set of tools has begun to look into genes and whether genetic differences might protect some or endanger others. Last week, a group of American and British researchers with a primary interest in Alzheimer's disease...
    ATLANTA (AP) - An Emory University infectious disease specialist says he has serious concerns that police could be spreading the coronavirus by spraying tear gas on demonstrators. Mass arrests and confining people in small spaces dramatically increases the risk of infecting others with the coronavirus, Dr. Jay Varkey said Friday. Tear gas and other chemical agents causes people to immediately rub their eyes, putting demonstrators at risk of being infected, Varkey said. TOP STORIES Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam defends bill allowing abortion during labor Lincoln Memorial, WWII Memorial defaced by vandals in rioting Twitter removes Trump campaigns George Floyd tribute Varkey says he thinks law enforcement agencies should at least consider alternatives to tear gas and similar chemical agents during protests amid the pandemic. Varkey and Emory professor Hank Klibanoff, who studies topics related to racism, offered their perspective on the virus and the nationwide protests over police misconduct...
    A serious multisystem inflammatory syndrome that might be linked to the new coronavirus appeared to affect an “unusually high proportion” of children of African ancestry, according to a small study from a Paris hospital. Out of 21 children and adolescents who were admitted to the hospital with the inflammatory syndrome, 12 patients (57%) were of African ancestry, says the study, published Wednesday in the BMJ. The patients ranged from 3 to 16 years of age, with an average age of 7 years. The disease has similar symptoms of toxic shock syndrome and Kawasaki disease, a rare illness of unknown origin that causes blood vessels to become inflamed. It can cause persistent fever, abdominal symptoms, rash and cardiovascular symptoms, as well as heart-related or blood vessel-related shock requiring intensive care. TOP STORIES Lindsey Graham to James Mattis: Youre missing something here, my friend AG Barr says evidence of foreign actors involved...
    (CNN)Still taking a daily aspirin to ward off heart attacks? You might want to think again, according to a new review. Aspirin is still one of the most commonly used medications in the world, even though it's no longer recommended as a preventative by many health authorities.There is no evidence that low-dose aspirin — less than 325 milligrams a day — should be taken by most adults in good cardiovascular health, according to a new review of existing research that published Wednesday in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. The review, which focused on the risks and benefits of low-dose daily aspirin, found that the risk of a major bleeding event as a result of the drug's blood-thinning effects outweighs the benefit. Daily aspirin to prevent heart attacks no longer recommended for older adultsUS guidance on a daily dose of aspirin changed last year, with the American College of Cardiology...
    Dr. Michael Baden, one of two doctors to declare George Floyd's death a homicide by asphyxiation, challenged the findings of the Hennepin County medical examiner's office, who reported that underlying medical issues -- including heart disease -- could have contributed to Floyd's May 25 death. "In my opinion, if he had heart disease, it was minimal, didn’t cause or contribute to the death," Baden, the former New York City chief medical examiner, told "Bill Hemmer Reports" Tuesday. BADEN SAYS FLOYD WAS DEAD 'MANY MINUTES' BEFORE TRANSFERRED TO HOSPITAL' Baden noted that he was only allowed to examine two-thirds of Floyd's heart while the medical examiner's office keeps the remainder for additional tests. However, he told Hemmer that he is certain of his findings and does not anticipate the determined cause of death to be "a point of contention" in a court of law. "The medical examiner's press release did say that they found some heart disease. We didn’t find it in the heart that...
    West Nile-positive mosquitoes have officially reached a well-known county in Southern California for the first time this year. Officials with the Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District (GLACVCD), a public health agency that focuses on preventing human infection associated with mosquito-transmitted diseases, announced on Monday that mosquitoes carrying the West Nile virus were identified in Los Angeles County for the first time this year. Susanne Kluh, director of Scientific-Technical Services at GLACVCD, noted that the find “should serve as a reminder that West Nile virus is endemic” in the county. WHAT IS WEST NILE VIRUS? 3 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT THE MOSQUITO-SPREAD AILMENT  “As temperatures increase, so do mosquito populations and disease risk, which poses a serious public health threat in our communities,” she continued. Late rainfalls and warm temperatures have made the perfect breeding ground for mosquitoes, added officials. The West Nile virus – which was first reported in the...
    As Kaapo Kakko is on the ice in Finland preparing to rejoin the Rangers for the qualifying round against Carolina if the NHL is indeed able to stage its summer Stanley Cup tournament, president John Davidson isn’t alone in monitoring conditions that would apply to the 19-year-old who has Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. “We are in constant communication with [Kakko],” Andy Scott, Kakko’s agent, told The Post via email on Monday. “He is skating, working out and feeling great. “As you can appreciate, we are monitoring everything closely for all of our players, including Kaapo, and we will be listening to the advice of our medical experts, and those of the Rangers, regarding his particular situation.” According to the main page of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) website, “Current evidence suggests that individuals with well-managed T1D are NOT at higher risk of contracting COVID-19. Experts further say...
    (CNN)The world is desperate for a vaccine against coronavirus. If and when it is discovered, will the voices of the anti-vaccine movement tell their adherents to turn it down?If you asked this question of parents in the US in the 1950s, the response would likely be unequivocal. John HewkoPeter J. HotezThis is because of the fear that gripped a nation, fear caused by the lethal poliovirus. When the US polio epidemic was at its highest, the country reported more than 21,000 cases of paralysis, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and more than 3,000 lives were lost.Whereas today children — though in rare cases vulnerable to a little-known and frightening inflammatory disease -- seem to be mainly transmitters of coronavirus, in 1952 they were the primary victims of polio. Our history books paint a bleak picture of life during the polio epidemic: Deserted playgrounds, empty swimming...
    (CNN)Here is a look at the life of actor, author and advocate Michael J. Fox.PersonalBirth date: June 9, 1961 Birth place: Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaBirth name: Michael Andrew FoxRead MoreFather: Bill Fox, a military officer (Canadian Armed Forces)Mother: Phyllis (Piper) Fox Marriage: Tracy Pollan (July 16, 1988-present) Children: Esme, 2001; Schuyler and Aquinnah, 1995 (twin girls); Sam, 1989Other FactsNominated for 18 Emmy Awards, has won five.Nominated for three Grammy Awards including one win.There was already another Michael A. Fox in the Screen Actors' Guild, so he changed his middle initial to a "J" in honor of actor Michael J. Pollard.Fox and his wife met on the set of "Family Ties." She played Alex Keaton's girlfriend, Ellen.Wanted to become a professional hockey player.Became an American citizen in 2000. Best known for his roles as Alex P. Keaton on TV's "Family Ties" and as Marty McFly in the "Back to the Future" trilogy.Suffers...
    (CNN)Donald Trump has spent decades spreading and sowing dangerous misinformation about disease outbreaks -- from falsely suggesting AIDS can be transmitted through kissing to warning Americans not to get vaccinated and falsely suggesting vaccines can cause autism.Long before advising Americans to ingest disinfectant to treat the coronavirus as President, Trump demonstrated a pattern of spreading unsupported medical claims that preyed on the public's fears of getting sick, a CNN KFile review of the President's statements on past epidemics and pandemics found. In 1993, Trump promoted the widely-debunked claims that AIDS could be spread by kissing and that AIDS patients intentionally spread the virus. As the swine flu pandemic began in 2009, he warned Americans against taking flu vaccines. When the Ebola virus outbreak devastated West Africa in 2014, he disputed guidance by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on how it spreads.Today as the nation's chief executive overseeing his...
    BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — The passenger from Spain that Sonia Sanchez picked up at the airport in Colombia’s capital in March did not seem well. He coughed during the Uber ride in her small, red Chevrolet Spark, as he sat next to her, a precaution many of the app’s drivers use to avoid attracting the attention — and harassment — of police. A few days later, the mother of two had a soaring fever, her relatives say. Within three weeks, she was dead — the first coronavirus patient to die in Bogota’s working-class Kennedy neighborhood, now a hot spot of infections. “The only thing we have of her is her ashes,” her brother, Oscar Sanchez, said. Sonia Sanchez’s story illustrates a phenomenon emerging in Latin American nations and other developing countries: The virus initially brought to the region largely by wealthy citizens or visitors coming from Europe and the...
    BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) - The passenger from Spain that Sonia Sanchez picked up at the airport in Colombia’s capital in March did not seem well. He coughed during the Uber ride in her small, red Chevrolet Spark, as he sat next to her, a precaution many of the app’s drivers use to avoid attracting the attention - and harassment - of police. A few days later, the mother of two had a soaring fever, her relatives say. Within three weeks, she was dead - the first coronavirus patient to die in Bogota’s working-class Kennedy neighborhood, now a hot spot of infections. TOP STORIES You are not going to die from COVID-19 Glorious: Kayleigh McEnany receives praise as White House press secretary Joe Bidens racism a Democratic Party tradition “The only thing we have of her is her ashes,” her brother, Oscar Sanchez, said. Sonia Sanchez’s story illustrates a...