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    A federal judge in Indiana granted a stay of execution on mental-health grounds to Lisa Montgomery, the only woman on federal death row in the US — though her scheduled Tuesday death sentence remained in the balance. In granting the stay late Monday, Judge Patrick Hanlon cited the need to determine Montgomery’s mental competence to face execution, the Topeka Capital-Journal reported. Later Tuesday night, the Supreme Court vacated a separate stay put in place by the US Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. The Supreme Court is also expected to rule on the 8th Circuit stay Tuesday night. If the Supreme Court clears the second stay, she will be the first federally executed woman in the US since 1953. Montgomery the so-called “womb raider,” was convicted in 2007 of strangling Bobbie Jo Stinnett in Missouri and then cutting her unborn baby from her womb.
    THE "womb raider" killer Lisa Montgomery has been executed after the Supreme Court cleared all stays just after midnight Wednesday and upheld her sentence. Montgomery, who was convicted of killing a pregnant woman and carving out her child, was put to death by lethal injection at a federal prison complex in Indiana. 9Lisa Montgomery is set to be put to death on TuesdayCredit: 2004 Wyandotte County Sheriff's Department 9The Supreme Court backed the sentenceCredit: Twitter On Tuesday night, the Supreme Court vacated stays put on the case in an effort to delay the execution until Donald Trump leaves office. The Trump administration restarted federal executions for the first time since 2003 over the summer, and has since carried out 10. The administration has been heavily critiqued by opponents of the death penalty, who believe they are trying to push through as many executions as they can before they leave...
    (Adds quotes from Montgomery’s lawyer, background) By Bhargav Acharya and Kanishka Singh Jan 13 (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court has overturned astay on convicted murderer Lisa Montgomery’s execution by the8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, clearing the way forapplication of the death penalty for the only woman on federaldeath row in the United States, who doctors say is brain-damagedand mentally ill. Montgomery’s execution would mark the first time the U.S.government has implemented the death sentence for a femaleprisoner since 1953. Challenges were fought across multiple federal courts onwhether to allow execution of Montgomery, 52, who had initiallybeen scheduled to be killed by lethal injections ofpentobarbital, a powerful barbiturate, at 6 p.m. EST (2300 GMT)on Tuesday in the Justice Department’s execution chamber at itsprison in Terre Haute, Indiana. Kelley Henry, Montgomery’s lawyer, in scathing remarks,called the pending execution, “vicious, unlawful, andunnecessary exercise of authoritarian power.” “No one can credibly dispute...
    TERRE HAUTE, Ind. — The U.S. Supreme Court has cleared the way for the Justice Department to carry out the first execution of a female death-row inmate in almost seven decades.  The rulings, handed down just after midnight on Wednesday, allow the federal Bureau of Prisons to proceed with the execution of Lisa Montgomery.  The court lifted an injunction that had been put in place by the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that had temporarily halted Montgomery’s execution. It came hours after the Supreme Court also lifted a separate injunction by the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia.  Montgomery is scheduled to be put to death at the federal prison complex in Terre Haute, Indiana.  Her lawyers have argued she is not mentally competent and should not be executed. They say she suffered from years of physical and emotional abuse and is severely mentally...
    The Supreme Court has issued an order allowing the execution of the only woman on federal death row to proceed. The order just before midnight on Tuesday allows the execution of Lisa Montgomery to proceed, removing the final legal barriers to what may be the final federal execution under President Donald Trump. Montgomery's execution had been scheduled for Tuesday at the Federal Correctional Complex in Terre Haute, Indiana. It was not immediately clear how quickly the execution would proceed early on Wednesday, following the ruling. Because Montgomery's scheduled execution date passed before the death penalty could be carried out, the Bureau of Prisons is required to issued a new execution date, according to Robert Dunham, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center. However, reporters in Terre Haute said that witnesses were being moved into the execution area early on Wednesday. The order just before midnight on Tuesday allows the execution...
    More On: supreme court Fate of death row ‘womb raider’ hangs in balance as legal fight continues Supreme Court rules women must pick up abortion pill in person Ted Cruz proved that GOP won’t simply return to Reaganism after Trump Big Tech’s sinister pro-Biden bias and other commentary TERRE HAUTE, Ind. — The U.S. Supreme Court has cleared the way for the Justice Department to carry out the first execution of a female death-row inmate in almost seven decades.  The rulings, handed down just after midnight on Wednesday, allow the federal Bureau of Prisons to proceed with the execution of Lisa Montgomery.  The court lifted an injunction that had been put in place by the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that had temporarily halted Montgomery’s execution. It came hours after the Supreme Court also lifted a separate injunction by the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District...
    More On: death row Judge blocks execution of only woman on federal death row Only 5 women have been federally executed — and Lisa Montgomery could be next Court OKs execution of ‘womb raider’ who killed, cut baby out of pregnant mom Murderer who survived botched execution dies of possible COVID-19 complications The Supreme Court ruled Tuesday night ruled “womb raider” Lisa Montgomery be put to death, a day after a federal judge in Indiana put a hold on her execution due to the state of her mental health. The six to three vote, means Montgomery will become the first woman to be executed by the federal government in nearly 70 years. The decision comes eight days before President Trump, who has been on an execution spree since last year, leaves office. President-elect Joe Biden adamantly opposes the death penalty. On Monday, federal judge Judge Patrick Hanlon...
    THE execution of the "womb raider" killer Lisa Montgomery will go ahead tonight as the Supreme Court made a last minute decision to back the sentence. Montgomery was convicted of strangling a pregnant woman to death, then savagely slicing open her body to retrieve the unborn child, in Missouri in 2004. 9Lisa Montgomery was set to be put to death on TuesdayCredit: 2004 Wyandotte County Sheriff's Department 9The Supreme Court backed the sentenceCredit: Twitter On Monday night, a federal judge in Indiana blocked Montgomery's execution on mental health grounds just hours before she was due to become the first woman put to death by the federal government in almost 70 years. However, a 6 to 3 Supreme Court vote on Tuesday will let the execution move forward. The decision on the execution would have been pushed into Biden’s administration had the Supreme Court not intervened tonight. Biden opposes the...
    Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice Thomas Saylor, a Republican, will leave the court this year when he hits the mandatory retirement age of 75. Democrats currently hold a 5-2 majority on the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, but they could strengthen their grip further in November because Republican Justice Thomas Saylor will hit the mandatory retirement age of 75 this year, creating an open seat. At least two Democrats and one Republican who currently sit on the Superior Court, the more prominent of the state's two intermediate appellate courts, are already running for Saylor's seat, while the AP reports that one GOP judge on Pennsylvania's other appellate court, the Commonwealth Court, is considering. Primaries are scheduled for May 18, though state parties will convene before then to consider endorsements, which could clear the field on either side. Democrats won a trio of races to flip the court in 2015, which opened the way...
    WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court ordered Tuesday that women must visit a doctor's office, hospital or clinic in person to obtain an abortion pill during the COVID-19 pandemic, though similar rules for other drugs have been suspended during the public health emergency.Eight days before President Donald Trump leaves office, the justices granted a Trump administration appeal to be able to enforce a longstanding rule on getting the abortion pill, mifepristone. The pill need not be taken in the presence of medical professionals.The court split 6-3, with the liberal justices in dissent. The new administration could put the in-person requirement on hold after Joe Biden takes office on Jan. 20.A federal judge had suspended the rule since July because of the coronavirus, in response to a lawsuit from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and other groups.MORE: Bill legalizing abortion passed in pope's native ArgentinaEMBED More News Videos Crowds in...
    By Andrew Chung | Reuters The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday reinstated a requirement that women visit a hospital or clinic to obtain a drug used for medication-induced abortions, lifting an order by a lower court allowing the drug to be mailed or delivered as a safety measure during the coronavirus pandemic. The justices granted a request by President Donald Trump’s administration to lift a federal judge’s July order that had suspended the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) rule requiring in-person visits for the duration of the pandemic. The pandemic is still raging nationwide. Coronavirus infections remain at record highs in many U.S. states. Nearly 130,000 Americans were hospitalized with COVID-19 as of midnight on Monday and the country had reported 22.5 million infections and 376,188 deaths. The court’s three liberal justices said they would have denied the Trump administration’s request while litigation over the dispute continues in lower...
    WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court ordered Tuesday that women must visit a doctor's office, hospital or clinic in person to obtain an abortion pill during the COVID-19 pandemic, though similar rules for other drugs have been suspended during the public health emergency.Eight days before President Donald Trump leaves office, the justices granted a Trump administration appeal to be able to enforce a longstanding rule on getting the abortion pill, mifepristone. The pill need not be taken in the presence of medical professionals.The court split 6-3, with the liberal justices in dissent. The new administration could put the in-person requirement on hold after Joe Biden takes office on Jan. 20.A federal judge had suspended the rule since July because of the coronavirus, in response to a lawsuit from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and other groups.MORE: Bill legalizing abortion passed in pope's native ArgentinaEMBED More News Videos Crowds in...
    Activists protest outside the Supreme Court on March 4, 2020, as it hears oral arguments regarding a Louisiana law about abortion access. Caroline Brehman/AP Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.The Supreme Court issued its first abortion-related ruling since Justice Amy Coney Barrett took the bench in the fall, and it’s a win for abortion foes. The justices ruled to reinstate a federal restriction on medication abortion, one that requires women pick up the medication in person; the regulation had been temporarily lifted in July to reduce the potential spread of the coronavirus. The Supreme Court’s timing couldn’t really be worse: The United States is experiencing a new horrible peak in the pandemic right now, as the United States has begun to average 3,000 deaths per day due to the virus.  Now, people seeking medication...
    The United States Supreme Court reinstated a requirement Tuesday that women seeking to obtain abortion pills must pick up the pills in person from a hospital or medical office rather than receiving them by mail. The case is the Supreme Court’s first ruling on abortion since Associate Justice Amy Coney Barrett joined the court, the New York Times reported, and the three liberal justices dissented. (RELATED: World Health Organization: Abortion Is ‘Essential’ During Coronavirus Pandemic) “The question before us is not whether the requirements for dispensing mifepristone impose an undue burden on a woman’s right to an abortion as a general matter,” Chief Justice Roberts wrote in the unsigned ruling. “The question is instead whether the District Court properly ordered the Food and Drug Administration to lift those established requirements because of the court’s own evaluation of the impact of the COVID–19 pandemic.” Breaking News: The Supreme Court reinstated an...
    (CNN)The Supreme Court on Tuesday granted the Trump administration's request to reinstate long-standing restrictions for patients seeking to obtain a drug used for abortions early in pregnancy -- with the three liberals dissenting in a potential preview of a new chapter in the court's rulings on the procedure.The order's timing was a surprise, coming after close of business in the waning days of the Trump administration and ahead of Wednesday's possible House impeachment vote. READ: Supreme Court ruling on FDA abortion drug ruleIt also marks the first abortion case to come before Justice Amy Coney Barrett, backing abortion rights supporters' fears that she will move the court to the right in cases related to the divisive issue. Federal courts, citing the Covid-19 pandemic, had previously blocked the enforcement of Food and Drug Administration rules that require an in-person visit with a medical professional to pick up the medication. Tuesday, the...
    (CNN)The Supreme Court on Tuesday granted the Trump administration's request to reinstate long-standing restrictions for patients seeking to obtain a drug used for abortions early in pregnancy.Read the ruling and dissent here:
    Enlarge Image The Supreme Court has ordered that women must visit a doctor’s office, hospital or clinic in person to obtain an abortion pill during the COVID-19 pandemic, though similar rules for other drugs have been suspended during the public health emergency. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File The Supreme Court on Tuesday ruled women must pick up an abortion pill in person during the COVID-19 pandemic. In a 6-to-3 vote, the justices ordered that if women want to obtain the drug mifepristone, they need to visit a doctor’s office, hospital or clinic in person. Women don’t have to take it in front of a medical professional, the court added. Mifepristone was approved by the Food and Drug Administration to be taken with another drug, misoprostol, to terminate a pregnancy or deal with a miscarriage. The ruling, eight days before President Trump leaves office, grants a Trump...
    The Supreme Court on Tuesday renewed a requirement for women to obtain abortion pills at medical facilities, following a request from the Trump administration. In a 6-3 decision split along conservative versus liberal bloc lines, the court decided that a July ordinance allowing women to receive the pills in the mail, per the coronavirus pandemic, is no longer in effect. The Trump administration asked for the requirement to be reinstated late last year. Chief Justice John Roberts wrote in a concurrence with the unsigned majority opinion that the "courts owe significant deference to the politically accountable entities with the 'background, competence, and expertise to assess public health,'" referring to a Food and Drug Administration rule requiring women to pick up abortion pills in person. Justice Sonia Sotomayor, in a dissent joined by Justice Elena Kagan, decried the decision as "unnecessary, unjustifiable, irrational, and undue burden on women seeking an abortion...
    (CNN)The Manhattan district attorney's criminal investigation into President Donald Trump's business has slowed as investigators wait for a ruling by the US Supreme Court, according to people familiar with the investigation, making it likely that a decision on whether there is a case to bring will be weeks or months away.A fight over a subpoena for the President's tax returns has churned through the courts since September 2019, which has handicapped investigators' efforts, people familiar with the investigation say. Prosecutors can't confront key witnesses without the documents or determine whether there is evidence that any laws have been broken, the people say. New York prosecutors also don't have the type of leverage that federal investigators have when interviewing people, since New York state law does not have an equivalent of the federal false statements law, which makes it a crime to lie to federal officials.Prosecutors, led by Manhattan District Attorney...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court reimposes rule forcing women to obtain abortion pill in person during COVID-19 pandemic. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    In 2016, Chike Uzuegbunam, a former Georgia Gwinnett College student, was told that if he wanted to share his faith on campus, he would need to get permission to use one of two “speech zones.” When Uzuegbunam complied, campus police officers arrived at the “speech zone” he was using and threatened to discipline him if he continued speaking about his faith. “School officials violated his constitutional rights when they stopped him twice from speaking in an open area of campus,” Tyson Langhofer, the director of ADF’s Center for Academic Freedom told The Daily Caller News Foundation. “The only permit students need to speak on campus is the First Amendment.” The Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday in a key case concerning free speech and religious liberty rights on college campuses. The case involves Chike Uzuegbunam, a former Georgia Gwinnett College student who sought to share Christian pamphlets on...
    The Supreme Court on Tuesday shut down a last-minute attempt to halt one of the last executions to take place during the Trump administration. The court, in an unsigned order, denied an application for stay of the death sentence that had been presented to Chief Justice John Roberts. The woman set to be executed, Lisa Montgomery, will likely face her sentence tonight, as originally scheduled. The court is set to weigh in on several other stays before Tuesday ends. The decision comes a day after a lower court judge issued a stay for Montgomery's execution on the grounds that her "mental competence" needed to be evaluated. More than 1,000 anti-death penalty advocates lobbied against her sentence, arguing that her history of mental illness, being abused, and her experience being sexually trafficked as a child should be taken into account. The Justice Department appealed the stay on the execution on Tuesday,...
    The U.S. Supreme Court has thrown out the manslaughter conviction for the man who shot former New Orleans Saints star Will Smith to death in 2016. Monday's order in favor of Cardell Hayes had been expected. In December 2017, a jury convicted Hayes by a vote of 10-2 on charges of manslaughter and attempted manslaughter in the death of Smith and the wounding of Smith's wife, who was struck in the leg by gunfire. But the Supreme Court has since ruled that such convictions must be unanimous. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM A state appeals court gets the case next but, ultimately, it will be up to the new district attorney in New Orleans, Jason Williams, to decide whether to put Hayes, 33, on trial again. Hayes is serving a 25-year sentence. The shootings followed arguments after a traffic crash. Hayes said he shot in self-defense. A...
    ATLANTA (AP) — Georgia’s highest court heard arguments Tuesday on whether taxpayers should cover portions of the legal defense for a man facing trial in the 2005 slaying of a high school teacher whose disappearance remained a mystery for more than a decade. Ryan Duke had been scheduled to stand trial on murder charges in April 2019 in the killing of teacher and beauty queen Tara Grinstead. The COVID-19 pandemic that’s shuttered courtrooms statewide has contributed to the long delay. But it’s rooted in an ongoing dispute over whether Duke is entitled to state funding. Duke’s attorneys asked the Georgia Supreme Court to overrule the trial judge, who twice has refused to provide the defense team with funding for expert witnesses in DNA, false confessions and psychology. Duke’s lawyers argue he won’t get a fair trial without them. Tift Judicial Circuit Superior Court Judge Bill Reinhardt has ruled Duke gave...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Tuesday wrestled with whether to revive a lawsuit brought by a Georgia college student who sued school officials after being prevented from distributing Christian literature on campus. The school, Georgia Gwinnett College, has since changed its policies and the student has graduated. A lower court dismissed the case as moot and an appeals court agreed, but the student, Chike Uzuegbunam, is urging the justices to allow the case to move forward. He’s seeking just $1 and says he wants the Lawrenceville, Georgia, school to be held accountable for its past policies. Groups across the political spectrum including the ACLU say the case is important to ensuring that people whose constitutional rights were violated can continue their cases even when governments repeal the policies they were challenging. During arguments the justices heard by phone because of the coronavirus pandemic, both conservative and liberal justices...
    The Supreme Court on Tuesday heard a college campus freedom of speech case that has gained support from both religious and explicitly secular groups. The case, Uzuegbunam v. Preczewski, arose after Chike Uzuegbunam, a student at Georgia Gwinnett College, faced censorship for passing out religious pamphlets on campus. Uzuegbunam sued in 2016, alleging that the college’s free speech policies violated the First Amendment because they restricted the ability to preach to only a few spots on campus. Along with fellow student Joseph Bradford, he asked that a court declare the policy unconstitutional and award him the nominal damage of a dollar. But only months after the case was filed, Gwinnett changed its rules to favor more permissive speech on campus, leading a district court to dismiss the case as moot. The 11th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld that decision. Uzuegbunam was unsatisfied, however, and appealed the case to the Supreme...
    Sen. Joe Manchin indicated he still has no plans of supporting Democratic plans to pack the Supreme Court or do away with the legislative filibuster. “It’s all the same. Nothing's changed,” Manchin said in response to Fox News's Special Report host Bret Baier asking if the West Virginia Democrat stood behind his November commitment not to do away with the filibuster or to pack the Supreme Court. “My job right now … is to do everything in my power to bring this country together, to heal the country, and to work in a bipartisan fashion, which is the reason we have the Senate.” Following President Trump’s push to speed through the nomination of Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett, many prominent Democrats pushed the idea of packing the Supreme Court to even what had become a 6-3 conservative majority. Despite previously indicating he opposed the idea of packing the Supreme...
    The New York Post and Gothamist identified Mostofsky in pictures from the Capitol siege, where he can be seen in fur pelts and with a police shield. Mike Theiler/Reuters Aaron Mostofsky, the son of Kings County Supreme Court Judge Shlomo Mostofsky, was arrested by agents of the New York chapter of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. His father, Shlomo Mostofsky, a prominent figure in the local modern Orthodox community was last year elected to the court with the support of local Democrats, according to Gothamist.  According to the report, FBI agents were seen exiting Mostofsky's home carrying animal skins and a walking stick, items Mostofsky was seen holding during the riot at the Capitol. At least five people died as a result of the violent insurrection last week, led by supporters of the baseless conspiracy theory that widespread voter fraud was responsible for President Donald Trump's loss to...
    The son of a Brooklyn Supreme Court judge was arrested Tuesday in connection with last week's riot at the U.S. Capitol, a source familiar with the case confirmed to Fox News. Aaron Mostofsky was reportedly "arrested by the FBI at his brother's residence in Brooklyn" and will appear before an Eastern District magistrate judge on Tuesday afternoon.  NYC MAN WHO BREACHED US CAPITOL IS SON OF PROMINENT BROOKLYN JUDGE Mostofsky faces multiple charges for his role in Wednesday's siege, including the theft of government property.  In viral photos, a maskless Mostofsky can be seen holding a police riot shield and wearing a bulletproof vest over his own fur pelts.  Mostofsky's appearance will be virtual. He will then be extradited to Washington, D.C., where the case is being prosecuted.  Mostofsky is the son of Shlomo Mostofsky, a prominent modern Orthodox figure in the borough and the former president of the National Council of Young Israel. The elder Mostofsky was elected to the Kings County Supreme Court last January,...
    The son of a Brooklyn Supreme Court judge has been arrested by the FBI on four federal charges in connection with the riot at the US Capitol last week.  FBI agents arrested Aaron Mostofsky, who is the son of Judge Shlomo Mostofsky, in New York Tuesday morning.  The younger Mostofsky has been hit with multiple charges, including theft of government property for allegedly stealing a police riot shield and bulletproof vest.  He is expected to appear in Brooklyn federal court on the charges Tuesday afternoon.   FBI agents arrested Aaron Mostofsky (right), who is the son of Judge Shlomo Mostofsky, in New York Tuesday morning Video of Mostofsky's arrest showed agents walking out of a home carrying the fur pelts that he wore while inside the Capitol on Wednesday BREAKING: Aaron Mostofsky, the son of a NY Supreme Court judge was arrested in Midwood Brooklyn on Tuesday morning...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff HARRISBURG (KDKA) — A federal judge expected to rule on a lawsuit over the 45th District Senate seat Monday will now release his opinion by noon Tuesday. Senate Republican leaders refused to swear-in the certified winner, Democrat Jim Brewster, last week. RELATED STORIES:  Constituents In 45th District Without Representation In State Senate Over Heated Election Dispute Pa. Sen. Jim Brewster Not Sworn In As State Senate Dissolves Into Chaos Over Contested Election Republican State Senate May Refuse To Seat Certified Winner Of Local Race As Legal Battle Continues Disputed Pennsylvania State Senate Election May Leave Seat Vacant In January State Senate Race Between Jim Brewster And Nicole Ziccarelli May Be Decided In Court Ziccarelli Asks Pa.’s Supreme Court To Reconsider Vote-By-Mail Decision; Kelly-Parnell Lawsuit Gets Challenged By Republicans And Democrats Pennsylvania Supreme Court Rules Certain Mail-In Ballots Without Declaration Dates May Be Counted State Senate...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- The son of a Brooklyn Supreme Court judge was arrested Tuesday morning in connection with the Capitol riot.The FBI arrested Aaron Mostofsky at his brother's home in Brooklyn, according to a source with knowledge of the case.He faces four charges, including felony theft of government property, the source said.TOP NEWS | FBI: Armed protests planned in all 50 states between now and Inauguration DayEMBED More News Videos Pierre Thomas has more on a warning from the FBI about possible armed protests planned in all 50 states over the next 10 days. He was photographed inside the Capitol last Wednesday in fur pelts and a bullet-resistant vest emblazoned with the word "Police."Mostofsky gave an interview to the NY Post in which he said he stormed the Capitol because he believed the election had been stolen from President Donald Trump.He also gave his first name and said he...
    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A school district that voted to allow employees to be armed after a deadly shooting is fighting a court ruling that says they must first provide police-level training to those employees. Madison Local Schools in southwestern Ohio permitted the arming of its employees after a 2016 shooting in which two students were shot and wounded by a 14-year-old boy. A group of parents sued the district in September 2018 to prevent teachers from being armed without extensive training. A Butler County judge dismissed the lawsuit, saying that school staff did not need extensive training because they are not law enforcement officers. The district’s policy requires 24 hours of training for staff carrying concealed weapons. The parents appealed to the 12th District Court of Appeals, which ruled last March that Ohio law requires anyone who carries firearms in schools to have undergone a minimum of 728 hours...
    Fearing more violence, DC, statehouses beef up security Reeling from a riot, Washington faces rising coronavirus cases Supreme Court vacates conviction of man who shot and killed former Saint Will Smith © Provided by Yahoo! Sports Supporters of Cardell Hayes stand outside a New Orleans courthouse during his 2016 trial in the killing of former Saint Will Smith. (AP) She was laying down on a wooden bench, at the end of a grand, marble hallway inside the Orleans Parish Courthouse. The mood outside Courtroom 8 was already tense, as it tends to be when a jury has a murder case, when the fates of one defendant and two families and, in this case, two communities that share the same city hang in the balance.  It was late on a Sunday Night, a week-long trial running into unusual hours. Family and friends and lawyers and observers tried to pass the...
    Heres how the real ages of the Bridgerton cast compare to their characters Chipotle’s Huge Workforce Expansion to Create 15,000 Jobs Supreme Court tosses verdict in killing of Saints Will Smith The United States’ Supreme Court vacated the manslaughter conviction of Cardell Hayes in the 2016 killing of New Orleans Saint defensive lineman Will Smith. © Provided by Touchdown Wire Smith was shot to death after an automobile incident. His car hit Hayes’ car and the Saint drove off. Hayes followed Smith and shot him in the subsequent altercation. #SCOTUS officially vacates manslaughter conviction of Cardell Hayes for killing @Saints star Will Smith in 2016, after non-unanimous jury verdicts found unconstitutional. @WWLTV pic.twitter.com/DS02CFZBV0— David Hammer (@davidhammerWWL) January 11, 2021 Hayes was charged with second-degree murder after shooting Smith during an altercation that followed a traffic incident in the Lower Garden District. But an Orleans Parish jury ended up...
    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday steered clear of more cases involving bids by President Donald Trump and some Republican allies to overturn his election loss. The justices, as expected, declined to expedite consideration of eight Trump-related cases including three filed by his campaign challenging the election results in Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, two of the states he lost to Democratic President-elect Joe Biden.   The high court also wouldn't listen to a Michigan-based case that 'Kraken' lawyer Sidney Powell was shepherding through the court system.  The Supreme Court refused to expedite considering eight Trump-related election cases, including from the swing states of Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin  Trump ally, lawyer Sidney Powell, was not successful in getting her Michigan case expedited by the Supreme Court  President Donald Trump's bid to overturn the 2020 election results has been unsuccessful in court  In December, Powell threatened to 'release the Kraken,' which she...
    The Supreme Court rejected Monday requests to expedite consideration of election lawsuits that challenge election results in battleground states. In an unsigned order, the court wrote that “the motion of petitioners to expedite consideration of the petition for writ of mandamus is denied” for several cases, including one filed against Pennsylvania Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar and one against the Wisconsin Elections Commission. There was no explanation or opinion given with the order and there were no noted dissents from any of the justices. President Donald Trump’s lawyers have worked tirelessly to get the court to take up the cases prior to Jan. 6 when Congress met to certify Biden’s win. John Eastman, the president’s attorney representing him in the case against Boockvar, which challenges Pennsylvania’s election procedures, warned that if the court didn’t take that case before Jan. 20 “it will be impossible to repair election results,” according to...
    The Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a challenge to laws in Pittsburgh requiring free speech "buffer zones" around abortion clinics. The laws, which require that anti-abortion demonstrators leave a 15-foot space between themselves and abortion clinics, faced scrutiny in 2019. At that time, the Third Circuit Court of Appeals held that protests are not allowed in these zones, but one-on-one "sidewalk counseling" is permissible. Anti-abortion groups appealed the decision to the Supreme Court, receiving support from a coalition of Republican senators and congressmen. They argued that the buffer zones violated their First Amendment right to free speech. Justice Clarence Thomas commented on the court's decision to turn away the case, saying that, while he agreed with his fellow justices, he hoped that the court would soon weigh in on the issue. "These zones often impose serious limits on free speech," Thomas wrote, referencing Hill v. Colorado, a...
    The Supreme Court rejected requests to speedily hear a number of challenges to the 2020 presidential election brought by President Trump and others. In a series of orders issued Monday morning, the court said it would not expedite consideration of whether it will ultimately hear the cases, which included challenges of the election results in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Arizona and Georgia. "The motions of petitioners to expedite consideration of the petitions for writs of certiorari are denied," the Supreme Court said regarding each one. The move will effectively prevent the issue being considered for full review by the high court before President-elect Joe Biden takes office next week. TRUMP ATTORNEY OVERSEEING PENNSYLVANIA LAWSUIT QUITS AFTER 'REPUGNANT' CAPITOL RIOTS One case was a Michigan lawsuit in which attorney Sidney Powell on behalf of Republican electors that alleged "unlawful counting of hundreds of thousands of illegal, ineligible, duplicate or purely fictitious ballots." This...
    The Supreme Court on Monday declined to expedite a series of election challenges raised by President Trump and his allies. The court's orders mean it won't weigh in on the merits of the cases until after President-elect Joe Biden is inaugurated, essentially shutting down the last efforts to overturn his win. The cases, filed in Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin, disputed the states' mail-in ballot procedures as unconstitutional. Trump last year demanded that the Supreme Court throw out mail-in votes, hoping that the move would push the swing states in his favor. Trump's legal team, however, turned up little success in its fight against Biden's win. Trump sought especially to overturn the election results by Jan. 6, a date many of his legal advisers referred to as the date of "ultimate significance." When that did not occur, and when Vice President Mike Pence did not attempt to throw out the...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is declining to get involved in a case about free speech outside a Pittsburgh abortion clinic. The high court turned away the case Monday. The court’s decision not to hear the case leaves in place a 2019 appeals court decision that upheld a Pittsburgh ordinance creating a 15-foot “buffer zone” where protests are barred around entrances to health care facilities. The decision by the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals allowed “sidewalk counseling” within that zone. The appeals court said the city can restrict congregating, picketing, patrolling and demonstrating in the immediate vicinity of clinics, but the zone restrictions do not apply to “calm and peaceful” one-on-one conversations by anti-abortion activists seeking to speak with women entering a clinic. Justice Clarence Thomas wrote that he agreed with the court’s decision not to take up this particular case because it “involves unclear, preliminary questions about...
    Washington — The Supreme Court on Monday rejected requests to fast-track a bevy of election-related disputes brought by President Trump and other Republicans, effectively foreclosing any action from the justices before President-elect Joe Biden is inaugurated next week. The court declined to expedite consideration of the lawsuits brought by Mr. Trump and GOP allies, including lawyers Lin Wood and Sidney Powell, that targeted the election results from battleground states he lost: Arizona, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Georgia. There were no noted dissents. In refusing to speed up review of the legal battles, the cases will effectively be moot by the time the justices consider them during its regular schedule. Mr. Biden will be sworn in January 20.  As litigation related to the election wound through the federal court system, the Supreme Court, now with a 6-3 conservative majority, rejected disputes that sought to reverse the outcome of the presidential...
    People listen to speakers during a Stop the Steal rally in front of the Supreme Court on Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2021 in Washington, DC.Kent Nishimura | Los Angeles Times | Getty Images The Supreme Court on Monday rejected efforts by President Donald Trump and his allies to get the court to quickly consider challenges to President-elect Joe Biden's victory in the November election. The move effectively shut the door on the president's last-ditch legal strategy to overturn his defeat. The court released an order in the morning denying expedited consideration to suits filed by Trump's campaign challenging election procedures in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. It similarly denied a request from the conservative conspiracy theorist L. Lin Wood to expedite his challenge to the election in Georgia, as well as other suits filed by Trump allies. The action by the court was widely expected and was not accompanied by any explanation or...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday formally refused to put on a fast track election challenges filed by President Donald Trump and his allies. The court rejected pleas for quick consideration of cases involving the outcome in five states won by President-elect Joe Biden: Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. The orders, issued without comment, were unsurprising. The justices had previously taken no action in those cases in advance of last week’s counting of the electoral votes in Congress, which confirmed Biden’s victory. The court still could act on appeals related to the Nov. 3 election later this winter or in the spring. Several justices had expressed interest in a Pennsylvania case involving the state Supreme Court’s decision to extend the deadline for receipt of mailed ballots by three days, over the opposition of the Republican-controlled legislature. But even if the court were to take up an...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff HARRISBURG (KDKA) — A federal judge is expected to rule on a lawsuit over the 45th District Senate seat. Senate Republican leaders refused to swear-in Democrat Jim Brewster last week. Related stories Pa. Sen. Jim Brewster Not Sworn In As State Senate Dissolves Into Chaos Over Contested Election Republican State Senate May Refuse To Seat Certified Winner Of Local Race As Legal Battle Continues Disputed Pennsylvania State Senate Election May Leave Seat Vacant In January State Senate Race Between Jim Brewster And Nicole Ziccarelli May Be Decided In Court Ziccarelli Asks Pa.’s Supreme Court To Reconsider Vote-By-Mail Decision; Kelly-Parnell Lawsuit Gets Challenged By Republicans And Democrats Pennsylvania Supreme Court Rules Certain Mail-In Ballots Without Declaration Dates May Be Counted State Senate Race Between Democrat Jim Brewster GOP Challenger Nicole Ziccarelli Tied Brewster defeated Republican challenger Nicole Ziccarelli by 69 votes. Ziccarelli challenged that result,...
    (CNN)Chief Justice John Roberts will swear in Joe Biden on January 20 as the next president of the United States. But that historic ritual on the West Front of the US Capitol will not free Roberts of Donald Trump.The nation's 17th chief justice, who has tried to shield the Supreme Court from the politics of the day, seems destined to be entangled with the destructive 45th president for years to come.Most immediate, there is some chance Roberts would have the unwelcome task of overseeing -- for the second time -- a Senate impeachment trial of Trump. This one based on the deadly insurrection Trump instigated at the Capitol on January 6.Stephen Breyer gifted the chance for a liberal successor -- when will he take it?Even if that Senate possibility does not materialize for Roberts because of timing or other factors, the chief justice and judicial colleagues could face a barrage...
    You weren’t the only one who missed it when the newly radicalized Supreme Court issued a stark warning last month that it may use the coronavirus pandemic to attack the power of the executive branch, potentially hamstringing President Joe Biden and Democratic governors in the midst of the greatest crisis America has faced since World War II. The threat went mostly unnoticed because it came as the nation’s highest court passed on the opportunity to rule upon an audacious challenge to a governor’s power to protect the public health during the height of the outbreak. But the decision made the court’s intentions clear, and also raised a warning flag about the imminent threat the court poses to both public health and America’s constitutional order.
    (CNN)A new Democratic-controlled Senate boosts the chances Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, 82, would retire this year and offer new President Joe Biden an early opportunity to put his imprint on America's high court.Breyer, who before becoming a judge was chief counsel to the Senate Judiciary Committee, knows better than most how last week's surprise Georgia election has transformed the prospects for Biden to fulfill a progressive agenda related to the judiciary.The Supreme Court is controlled by a 6-3 conservative-liberal majority. So replacing Breyer, currently the eldest justice, with another liberal would not alter the 6-3 dynamic or diminish the force of the three justices President Donald Trump installed on the right wing.Joe Bidens new chief of staff knows how to get a Supreme Court justice confirmedStill, a Biden choice would enhance the diversity and youth of the bench and open a new chapter for justices who have the last...
              A newly-elected member of the Arizona House of Representatives Tuesday announced a resolution calling for a Constitutional amendment against court-packing. “Democrats’ stated intentions to abuse our nation’s constitutional separation of powers by packing the Supreme Court are not merely an assault on the rule of law, they are a blatant attempt to politicize the world’s most respected legal body,” State Representative-elect Jake Hoffman (R-AZ-12) said in a press release. “Protecting the independence and integrity of the United States Supreme Court is an ethical and moral imperative that rises to a level of public policy importance rivaled by few other issues.” President-elect Joe Biden, when asked whether his administration plans to lead the charge on packing the Supreme Court, said he will convene a commission “how to reform the court system,” which he says is “getting out of whack.” Court-packing refers to adding Supreme...
              The Republican National Committee (RNC) has come out in support of the proposed “Keep Nine Amendment” that, if enacted, would prevent packing the U.S. Supreme Court. The Resolutions Committee adopted the resolution of support, the RNC said in a statement Friday. U.S. Reps. Collin C. Peterson (D-MN-07) and Denver Riggleman (R-VA-05) introduced the proposed amendment in October, The Virginia Star reported. Their stated purpose was to permanently set the court’s makeup at nine to make sure that neither political party can ever pack the Supreme Court. Their legislation is House Joint Resolution 95, and tracking information is available here. The proposed amendment states: “The Supreme Court of the United States shall be composed of nine Justices.” In September, former Tennessee Attorney General Paul Summers, one of the organizers of the Keep Nine Amendment, appeared on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast...
    Rev. Raphael Warnock, who will take Georgia’s Senate seat in the coming weeks, did not answer a significant question throughout his entire campaign: whether or not he would support adding more justices to the Supreme Court.  Asked twice during a Dec. 6 debate with Sen. Kelly Loeffler, Warnock dismissed the court-packing issue as a Washington obsession.  "As I move all across the state, people aren’t asking me about the courts and whether we should expand the court," he told the Atlanta Press Club debate moderator. "I know that’s an interesting question for people inside the Beltway to discuss, but [people in Georgia] are wondering what in the world are they going to get some COVID-19 relief." Nine justices on the Supreme Court became the standard number in 1869, though no number is specified in the Constitution.  "Packing" the court with extra justices was attempted unsuccessfully by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in...
    Webb Simpson overcomes COVID-19, no practice rounds to get into contention in Sentry TOC Sports collectibles that scored big at auction Supreme Court to Review Refinery Waivers From Biofuel Quotas (Bloomberg) -- The Supreme Court will review the ability of oil refineries to win exemptions from federal biofuel-blending quotas, a blow to producers of ethanol and biodiesel that had challenged the waivers. © Bloomberg The U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Dec. 7, 2020. Bipartisan negotiators on a $908 billion pandemic relief package are planning to unveil more details of their proposal on Monday, aiming to settle on language that can satisfy enough Republicans and Democrats to secure passage of one final tranche of Covid-19 aid before Congress breaks for the year. The justices, without comment, agreed to hear an appeal by units of HollyFrontier Corp. and Wynnewood Refining Co., which said a 10th U.S. Circuit...
    Joe Biden's selection of Judge Merrick Garland as his attorney general likely gives the president-elect the opportunity to begin reworking the powerful U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Garland, who received the nod from Biden on Wednesday, was previously nominated to the Supreme Court by President Barack Obama after Justice Antonin Scalia's death in 2016. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell blocked his nomination for nearly a year, paving the way for President Trump to fill the vacancy on the high court with Justice Neil Gorsuch. But now, by elevating Garland to the Justice Department, Biden has a shot at putting someone on a court that often acts as a stepping stone to the Supreme Court. Chief Justice John Roberts, as well as Justices Clarence Thomas and Brett Kavanaugh, served on the D.C. circuit before ascending to the Supreme Court. So did the late Supreme Court Justices...
    Members of Congress like to remind people that under the system of checks and balances crafted by our Constitution’s Founding Fathers, the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the federal government are “coequal.” But to paraphrase George Orwell, some are more coequal than others. Over his four years as president, Donald Trump learned to maximize his powers as commander in chief far beyond that of any of his modern-era predecessors, allowing him to muscle through his policy initiative over a sometimes-reluctant Congress mostly controlled by his own party. With a few exceptions, Trump effectively imposed his will on Congress, especially when it came to defense issues, making the executive the most powerful of the three branches. Trump is an extreme example of what’s known as “unitary executive theory,” the idea that despite its oversight role, Congress is limited in how much power it has over the executive branch. It’s what...
    WEST HOLLYWOOD (KABC) -- The West Hollywood City Council has approved the submission of a request that paves the way for the renaming of the West Hollywood Library.They want it to be called the "Ruth Bader Ginsburg West Hollywood Library."The West Hollywood City Council decided on the name to honor the life, work, and contributions of the late Supreme Court Justice.
    One of the more colorful invaders in Wednesday's assault on the Capitol is the son of a Brooklyn Supreme Court judge. Aaron Mostofsky, dressed in fur pelts and a police flak jacket streamed into the Capitol with hundreds of other pro-Trump protesters, is the son of Shlomo Mostofsky, a well-connected Orthodox politico who last year ascended to the Kings County Supreme Court. The connection, first reported by Gothamist, came after the younger Mostofsky became one of the most photographed participants in the impromptu raid. "I'm here today to express my opinion as a free American — my belief that this election was stolen," Aaron Mostofsky told the New York Post in an interview, singling out his home state of New York. He added that he had found a police riot shield on the ground, which he decided to carry around with him as he roamed the halls of the Capitol....
    The Supreme Court on Thursday shut down an attempt led by Texas Rep. Louie Gohmert to allow Vice President Mike Pence to throw out the Electoral College's certification of President-elect Joe Biden's win. In an unsigned order, the court denied injunctive relief in Gohmert's appeal after a Texas judge previously ruled against his case. The decision came a day after Pence led both chambers of Congress in certifying Biden's win. The Washington Examiner reached out to Gohmert's office for comment. Gohmert raised the suit in December, along with a contingent of President Trump's "shadow electors" who cast protest Electoral College votes for him in Arizona. They argued that Pence had "exclusive authority" to choose which votes are certifiable and the "sole discretion" to determine the legitimacy of votes, per the 12th Amendment. "Vice-President Pence determines which slate of electors’ votes count, or neither, for that State," Gohmert's attorneys wrote...
    (CNN)Judge Merrick Garland will finally get his just deserts. A man who waited in the hallways of Congress for the dignity of a hearing, only to receive the indignity of a dream deferred. A man who watched not one, but three Supreme Court nominees receive the political courtesies he was blatantly and boldly denied before they were ultimately confirmed. Indeed, the most recent Supreme Court nominee, now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett, was the beneficiary of the very hypocrisy spewed by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell when he expedited, let alone entertained, a Supreme Court nomination during an election year -- a suggestion he found politically despicable when President Barack Obama was in office. JUST WATCHEDWhat happens to SCOTUS vacancy in election year? ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHWhat happens to SCOTUS vacancy in election year? 07:03A man who now stands poised to be the next Attorney General of the United States, and...
    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — A new justice made her public debut Wednesday as the Michigan Supreme Court heard arguments in five cases. Election victories by Elizabeth Welch and Chief Justice Bridget McCormack gave Democratic nominees a majority on the seven-member court for the first time since 2010. They campaigned as a team. “We are all eager to have her contributions to our work,” McCormack said at the start of the day. Because of coronavirus restrictions, the Supreme Court still is hearing cases by video conference and not in its Lansing courtroom. Welch, a Grand Rapids-area lawyer, took the seat of Stephen Markman, 71, a conservative justice who served for 21 years but couldn’t seek re-election because of age limits. “I am not a textualist,” Welch said before the election, referring to a philosophy favored by conservatives of looking strictly at a law’s text for meaning. “I believe you do have to sometimes look at...
    Illinois House Republicans are making another effort to take the process of redrawing legislative districts out of the hands of lawmakers and place the duty on an independent 11-person commission. State Reps. Tim Butler of Springfield, Ryan Spain of Peoria and Jackie Haas of Kankakee held a press conference Tuesday to propose legislation creating an Independent Redistricting Commission and called for action during the upcoming Lame Duck session. “This gives us an opportunity going into veto session to put this on the books, to pass something quickly and hold the governor’s feet to the fire in his promise to enact fair maps,” said Butler. In his 2018 gubernatorial candidate questionnaire in the Northwest Herald, then-candidate J.B. Pritzker said, “I support ending the gerrymandering of districts to encourage more competitive elections.” A similar remapping proposal failed to make the ballot in November. The Illinois Supreme Court has...
    (CNN)Here's some background information about the US Capitol. Located at 100 Constitution Avenue NW in Washington, DC, it is the meeting place of the US Congress.Other FactsThroughout history, the US Capitol has been destroyed by fire, reconstructed, expanded and restored.The US Capitol Police is charged with protecting Congress' members, employees, visitors, and all facilities. Each chamber has a sergeant at arms who serves as the chief law enforcement officer and protocol officer.Read MoreThe Office of Security Programs manages security operations and supports US Capitol Police.All visitors are screened by a magnetometer and their belongings screened by an x-ray machine.The BuildingThe Capitol building has more than 540 rooms and has 658 windows.The Dome is 8,909,200 pounds of cast-iron with 108 windows and was constructed between 1855 and 1866. The statue at the top of dome is the Statue of Freedom.The Rotunda stands 180 feet, three inches tall and is 96 feet...
    FORMER Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland has been married to his wife Lynn since 1987. The couple married at the Harvard Club in New York, as the New York Times reported. 5Judge Merrick Garland was a Supreme Court nominee during Barack Obama's presidencyCredit: AFP or licensors Who is Merrick Garland’s wife Lynn? Lynn Rosenman Garland, 59, is the wife of US Court of Appeals Circuit Judge Merrick Garland.  She is the granddaughter of Samuel Irving Rosenman, who served as a justice on the New York Supreme Court. Rosenman also worked as special counsel to Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry Truman. 5Lynn Rosenman Garland is the granddaughter of Samuel Irving Rosenman, who served as a justice on the New York Supreme CourtCredit: AFP - Getty Lynn went on to attend Harvard University and then to Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Sloan School of Management to earn a Master of Science in...
    In a last-ditch bid, Rep. Louie GohmertLouis (Louie) Buller GohmertTrump attorney Jay Sekulow refutes claims of Pence authority over electors National lawyers group seeks to have Gohmert disciplined over election suit Trump raises pressure on Pence, incorrectly stating he could throw out electors MORE (R-Texas) on Wednesday asked the Supreme Court to take up a far-fetched effort to expand Vice President Pence's legal authority to effectively overturn President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Memo: Georgia voters deliver blow to Trump Warnock win puts Democrats within reach of Senate majority Eric Trump warns of primary challenges for Republicans who don't object to election results MORE’s electoral win. Election law experts said the request was almost certain to fail. Gohmert’s suit was recently dismissed in quick order by lower federal courts, and his Supreme Court bid came just moments before Vice President Pence began presiding over a joint session of Congress to finalize Biden’s...
    Supporters of President Donald Trump chanted “bullshit,” echoing a line from his speech at a rally Wednesday contesting the results of the 2020 election. The president recalled his big leads in important swing states on election night before more votes came in late for President-elect Joe Biden. “We are leading Pennsylvania, Michigan, Georgia, by hundreds of thousands of votes and then late in the evening or early in the morning, boom, these explosions of bullshit,” Trump said. His comment sparked chants of “bullshit” and “stop the steal” from his supporters ahead of the Congressional certification of the votes from the electoral college. Trump berated state and federal Republican leaders for refusing to fight the results of the election and urged his supporters to support their primary challengers in future elections. “You have to get your people to fight and if they don’t fight we have to primary the hell out...
    Judge Merrick B. Garland speaks after being nominated to the US Supreme Court in the Rose Garden at the White House, March 16, 2016 in Washington.Getty Images President-elect Joe Biden will name federal appeals court judge Merrick Garland to be his attorney general, two people familiar with the matter told CNBC. Former President Barack Obama nominated Garland to the Supreme Court but his nomination was blocked by the Republican Senate, which refused to even hold hearings for the judge. Garland, a widely respected lawyer, has served as the chief judge on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals since 2013. The 68-year-old appointee of former President Bill Clinton is considered a centrist, though he has often ruled conservatively in criminal cases. Garland will face pressure from liberals to prosecute President Donald Trump after Biden takes office on Jan. 20. Biden has said he will leave such decisions to the Department of...
    OBAMA's Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland who was blocked by GOP has been selected as Joe Biden's attorney general. Politico reported the news on Wednesday, citing two people with knowledge of the decision. 1Credit: AP:Associated Press Most read in NewsBreakingCAPITOL THREAT'Suspicious package' near pro-Trump DC rally as cops warn 'AVOID THIS AREA'BreakingON NOTICEDon Jr warns GOPers 'this isn’t their party anymore' and 'we’re coming for you'ALL OUT WARRudy threatens 'trial by COMBAT' in Congress & says Pence can reject Biden winJEALOUS RAGEWoman ‘killed & dismembered by ex-boyfriend’ after posting bikini pics onlineLAST STANDRepublicans in fight to overturn Biden win TODAY as Trump urges extreme courage'TERROR THREAT'Trump demands Antifa is declared a foreign TERROR group in plan to stop it More to follow... For the latest news on this story keep checking back at Sun Online. The Sun is your go to destination for the best celebrity news, football news, real-life...
    (CNN)Here's a look at the life of Merrick Garland, Supreme Court nominee and former chief judge of the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit.PersonalBirth date: November 13, 1952 Birth place: Chicago, IllinoisBirth name: Merrick Brian GarlandRead MoreFather: Cyril Garland, founder of an advertising agencyMother: Shirley (Horwitz) Garland, community volunteerMarriage: Lynn (Rosenman) Garland (1987-present)Children: Jessica, 1992; Rebecca, 1990Education: Harvard University, A.B., 1974, graduated summa cum laude; Harvard Law School, J.D., 1977, graduated magna cum laudeReligion: JewishOther FactsGarland supervised the investigation of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing and oversaw the prosecution of Timothy McVeigh. He also led the investigations of the 1996 Olympics bombing in Atlanta and the Unabomber, Ted Kaczynski.He paid for law school by working in a shoe store, selling his comic books and tutoring undergraduates.He was a candidate for the Supreme Court twice before President Barack Obama nominated him, considered for seats ultimately filled by Elena Kagan...
    Back in November, Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) pledged that if Democrats won control of the U.S. Senate, he would block any attempt to pack the Supreme Court or kill the filibuster. The context here is crucial. Manchin made this pledge on Fox News right after the presidential election. At that point, it was pretty clear Joe Biden would become president and Democrats would hold the House of Representatives. It was also clear that the then-upcoming January 5 runoffs in Georgia would determine control of the U.S. Senate. So what Manchin was doing was reassuring everyone that if Democrats won those runoffs and seized control of the Senate (and it now looks as though this has indeed happened), he would be the bulwark against the insanity of packing the Supreme Court and killing the filibuster. What Manchin said was especially meaningful because all it takes to block that madness in a...
    With results from Georgia's Senate runoff elections appearing to indicate that Democrats will take control of the chamber, liberals are quickly making their wishes known when it comes to the Supreme Court. Demand Justice, a liberal group that supports Supreme Court reform, is already pushing liberal Justice Stephen Breyer to retire so that President-elect Joe Biden can replace him with a Black, female jurist who would presumably be much younger than the 82-year-old Breyer. SUPREME COURT JUSTICE STEPHEN BREYER, 82, SAYS HE WILL RETIRE 'EVENTUALLY': 'HARD TO KNOW EXACTLY WHEN' "Justice Breyer's service on the court has been remarkable, and history will remember him even more fondly if he ends up playing a critical role in ensuring the appointment of the first Black woman to the court," Demand Justice executive director Brian Fallon told Politico. "Timing his retirement in the coming year would guarantee that opportunity, and it would be wise to...
    (CNN)Attorneys for Lisa Montgomery, the only woman on federal death row, said on Tuesday that they plan to go to the Supreme Court after losing their latest legal attempt to stop next week's execution. Montgomery, 52, is scheduled to die by lethal injection on January 12 at the Federal Correctional Complex in Terre Haute, Indiana. Her attorneys, family and supporters pleaded on Tuesday with President Donald Trump to read their clemency petition and make an executive decision to commute her sentence to life without the possibility of parole.Montgomery was sentenced to death in 2008 by a Missouri jury for the 2004 murder of a pregnant woman, cutting the fetus out and kidnapping it. The baby survived. Execution date for the only woman on federal death row is reinstatedShe will be the 11th person scheduled to be executed after the federal government took a 16-year break. In November, the Justice...
    HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Eight Republican members of Congress from Pennsylvania, falling in line with President Donald Trump, said that they will oppose the state’s electoral votes being cast Wednesday for President-elect Joe Biden. Those eight will join dozens of other Republicans around the country whom Trump has enlisted to challenge the Electoral College vote when Congress convenes in a joint session to confirm Biden’s 306-232 win. As one of six states that flipped from Trump in 2016 to Biden in 2020, Pennsylvania could have a spotlight on it during debate over the Electoral College vote. The eight representatives have already gone to court multiple times unsuccessfully — as has Trump’s campaign — seeking to block Biden’s victory in Pennsylvania. In statements released last week, they complained about election-related policies of Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf’s administration and decisions by the state Supreme Court, generally concerning the collection and counting of...
    Democrats will turn America into a one-party country if they win the Senate runoff elections, President Donald Trump said Monday in Dalton, Georgia. “They’ll make Washington, DC, and other liberal places the 51st, 52nd, 53rd states of the union, guaranteeing the radical left a permanent majority of the U.S. Senate and the House, and the electoral college,” he said at a rally for Republican Sens. Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue. “It will make it really a one-party country and the party will be the wrong party,” the president continued: They will pack the Supreme Court with crazed extremists, and I’m not happy with the Supreme Court. They are not stepping up to the plate … They’re not stepping up. How about that? We don’t have … look at the Supreme Court. President of the United States, I want to file suit … and they said, “Sir, you can’t. You really...
    SAN FRANCISCO —  A federal appeals court appeared likely Monday to overturn some of California’s coronavirus restrictions on places of worship, following a U.S. Supreme Court decision that sided with churches over New York health authorities. During an online hearing, a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals grappled with the constitutionality of Gov. Gavin Newsom’s pandemic restrictions on places of worship. Pasadena-based Harvest Rock Church asked the court to block restrictions on indoor worship following a federal judge’s refusal to do so last month. Although the panel did not issue a ruling Monday, the tenor of the questioning suggested it might reverse its previous decision upholding the constitutionality of the California restrictions. In late September, the appeals court upheld the state rules in a 2-1 vote, with two Democratic appointees in the majority, and a Republican dissenting. At the time, the U.S. Supreme Court had...
    New York court leaders violated the state constitution when they decided to summarily terminate 46 older judges across the state, a Suffolk County Supreme Court justice ruled Dec. 30. The decision by Justice Paul Baisley extends a career lifeline to judges over 70 who were denied recertification in a cost-cutting move by Office of Court Administration leadership. After Gov. Cuomo ordered the court system to slash 10 percent of its budget, or $300 million, OCA leaders sought to deny new two-year terms to 46 of 49 judges seeking recertification. Two groups of judges, some in Appellate Division and others in state Supreme Court, sued to reverse the decision, claiming the move was age discrimination and would impede the court system.
    JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Three Mississippi Supreme Court justices are beginning new eight-year terms. Those being inaugurated Monday are Chief Justice Mike Randolph, Presiding Justice Leslie D. King and Justice Josiah Dennis Coleman. Randolph is the longest-serving current member of the nine-person court, and he has been chief justice since February. Randolph was appointed to the Supreme Court in April 2004 by then then-Gov. Haley Barbour. Randolph was elected in November 2004, November 2012 and November 2020. He has homes in Hattiesburg and Ocean Springs. King lives in Greenville. He served in the Mississippi House from 1980 to 1994 and was one of the original members elected to the Mississippi Court of Appeals in 1994. King became chief judge of the 10-member appeals court in April 2004, and he remained in that role until Barbour appointed him to the Supreme Court in March 2011. King was elected to the Supreme...
    PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — A recently retired Rhode Island Supreme Court justice has tested positive for the coronavirus, prompting a change in at least two swearing-in ceremonies. Francis X. Flaherty, who retired on Dec. 31, was supposed to swear in new House speaker, K. Joseph Shekarchi and Warwick Mayor-elect Frank Picozzi on Tuesday. News of the positive test came in a news release about Picozzi's ceremony. “RI Supreme Court Justice and former Warwick Mayor Francis X. Flaherty was to administer the oath of office to Mayor-Elect Picozzi on Tuesday, January 5th, but has tested positive for Covid-19," the statement said. Picozzi on his Facebook page said he has spoken with Flaherty and “he's as disappointed as I am." District Court Judge Stephen Isherwood will take Flaherty's place. House spokesman Larry Berman told The Providence Journal on Monday that Flaherty called Shekarchi on Saturday to advise him that he would not...
    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The first Black woman to serve as chief justice of North Carolina's Supreme Court has become a partner in the law firm McGuireWoods. The firm said in a statement on Monday that Cheri Beasley will work in the firm's Raleigh office in its litigation and appellate groups. Beasley recently stepped down from the court, which she joined in 2012 after serving on state trial and appellate benches. Last summer, she publicly called out racial disparities in the nation’s judicial system. “Cheri Beasley is a distinguished jurist who has dedicated her career to ensuring our justice system works for everyone,” said McGuireWoods Managing Partner J. Tracy Walker IV. “Her leadership, wisdom, and experience will be tremendous assets for our appellate and litigation practices and our clients.” Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: North Carolina, Associated...
    THOMASVILLE, Georgia — Before a small crowd gathered at the Thomas County, GA Republican Party headquarters on Sunday, former Gov. Haley Barbour (R-MS), also the former chairman of the Republican National Committee, stressed the importance of Tuesday U.S. Senate runoff elections in Georgia between Sen. Kelly Loeffler (R-GA) and Democrat Raphael Warnock, and Sen. David Perdue (R-GA) and Democrat Jon Ossoff. The veteran campaigner and politician declared the two U.S. Senate races to have higher stakes than any campaigns with which he had ever been involved. “We’ve talked about campaigns that I’ve been involved in since 1968, and I will tell you sincerely, and without any hesitation, the stakes of this election are higher than any I’ve ever worked, including races for the presidency,” Barbour said. “Why? If you can imagine — 52 years in politics, how many times have I been asked the question: What do you worry about...
    Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, said Sunday that the Supreme Court is a "better forum" than Congress for vetting election fraud concerns. "I wish the court had taken one or both of those cases," Cruz told "Sunday Morning Futures" host Maria Bartiromo. "I think the Supreme Court would be a better forum for resolving those issues. That obviously was the forum which resolved issues similarly in 2000 in Bush v. Gore." HAWLEY SAYS HE'LL OBJECT TO ELECTORAL COLLEGE CERTIFICATION OF BIDEN VICTORY ON JAN. 6 A group of GOP senators led by Cruz will object to the Jan. 6 certification of the presidential election results next week unless there is an emergency 10-day audit of the results by an electoral commission.  "Voter fraud has posed a persistent challenge in our elections, although its breadth and scope are disputed," the lawmakers said Saturday in a statement. "By any measure, the allegations of fraud and irregularities in the 2020 election exceed any...
    DACA recipient and Rhodes Scholarship Santiago Tobar Potes Columbia University graduate Santiago Tobar Potes told NPR’s Morning Edition that he was initially cautious about applying for Rhodes Scholarship—not because he was unqualified, but because of his status as a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipient. He knew there was a chance the Supreme Court would allow the Trump administration to strike it down, putting his future here at risk. But then everything changed this past summer. When the Supreme Court ruled this past June that Trump administration officials has unlawfully ended the program, Potes went for his chance, and applied in August. Last month, he found out he’d been selected, becoming the first Latino DACA recipient to become a Rhodes scholar. "I just couldn't believe it," he told NPR. "I just thought that they were going to call me, and say 'Oh, we made a mistake. Sorry about that, we actually didn't choose you.'” Jin Park made...
            by Rick Manning  Congressional Democrats have promised to pack the Supreme Court if they take control and Joe Biden’s fraud-ridden election stands. Senate stalwarts like Ted Cruz (R-Texas), Kelly Loeffler (R-Ga), and David Perdue (R-Ga.) are leading the charge to end this threat by amending the United States Constitution to specify that the number of Supreme Court Justices will be nine, ending the court packing threat once and for all. While Washington, D.C. is roiled in political uncertainty, incoming Arizona state representative Jake Hoffman has taken the bull by the horns by introducing a resolution calling for Congress to pass this constitutional amendment. Hoffman, a rising star in conservative, constitutional political circles has gotten the support of virtually every state representative and state senator, including the speaker of the Arizona house, senate president, house majority leader, majority whip, speaker pro tempore, senate president pro tempore, and senate majority leader....
    The Texas Supreme Court blocked local orders establishing an overnight curfew for restaurants to help limit the spread of the coronavirus, according to reports. The court issued the order Friday, conditionally granting state Attorney General Ken Paxton’s petition to block enforcement of orders in Austin and surrounding Travis County. The area currenty has more than 4,500 active cases of COVID-19, and the disease has killed more than 500 people there. Nationwide, the U.S. leads all nations in both coronavirus infections and deaths, accounting for nearly 25 percent of cases around the globe and more than 348,000 fatalities. A Texas appeals court temporarily granted a request filed by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton and restaurant owners to halt coronavirus lockdown orders issued in El Paso County. (Photo by Robert Daemmrich Photography Inc/Corbis via Getty Images) Response to the outbreak has become a topic of partisan contention, with...
    BRASILIA (AP) — Brazil’s pugnacious president, Jair Bolsonaro, survived 2020 in surprisingly good shape personally and politically, with buoyant popularity ratings despite his own bout of COVID-19 and a broader pandemic that has killed nearly 200,000 of his countrymen. But the new year — and a looming reelection campaign — bring risks on all sides for the populist who has fought to limit environmental protections and rein in leftist influence on government and culture while feuding even with fellow conservatives in Latin America’s largest nation. Resurgent COVID-19 has lifted Brazil’s death rate to its highest in three months, despite the president’s insistence the pandemic is petering out. His sons face corruption investigations. He has no firm block of support in congress. And he’s losing his main international ally with the exit of U.S. President Donald Trump, whose off-the-cuff rhetoric and tendency to test democratic norms had emboldened the Brazilian leader....
    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Paul Newby is now on the job as head of North Carolina's judicial branch. Newby took the oath for chief justice of the state Supreme Court early Friday, shortly after midnight at a small ceremony at his home, according to the Administrative Office of the Courts. Newby, 65, has been on the court since 2005 and most recently was senior associate justice. He is the 30th chief justice in North Carolina history. Newby, a Republican, was elevated to the top position after defeating Chief Justice Cheri Beasley in November by just 401 votes from nearly 5.4 million cast. Beasley, a Democrat and first Black woman to serve as chief justice, is no longer on the seven-member court. Newby will participate in a public swearing-in ceremony next Wednesday that will be broadcast online. Two other new associate justices are joining the court following their election victories —...
    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The Ohio Supreme Court has reversed course and decided not to hear an appeal by a convicted school shooter. The court dismissed Ely Serna’s case in an opinion Thursday that listed the case as “improvidently accepted,” without further explanation. Serna was sentenced to more than 23 years in prison for a 2017 shooting that critically wounded another teen at a high school in West Liberty, roughly 45 miles northwest of Columbus. Serna was 17 at the time of the shooting. His lawyers argued that his age should have been taken into account in his sentencing for charges that included attempted murder. A state appeals court concluded the judge acted properly in his sentencing. Prosecutors in Champaign County had argued that Serna’s lawyers were making arguments already rejected by the appeals court and that the state’s high court didn’t need to get involved. (Copyright 2020 The Associated...
    In his annual year-end report, Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts praised how courts across the U.S. responded to the coronavirus pandemic and the "unsung heroes" who kept the judicial branch moving in a mostly virtual system. The pandemic forced nationwide court closures in March. By April, judges were performing court functions from their home offices or "kitchen tables," Roberts wrote in his seven-page report. As court hearings went virtual, judges quickly, "or at least eventually," became familiar with a wide range of audio and video conferencing tools." WISCONSIN SUPREME COURT TOSSES TRUMP CAMPAIGN LAWSUIT In this Jan. 16, file photo Chief Justice of the United States, John Roberts walks to the Senate chamber at the Capitol in Washington. Roberts praised state and federal courts in his year-end report. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File) Roberts commended the nation's judges for working "with court staff to admit participants to virtual hearings,...
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – The Florida Supreme Court on Thursday revamped a key legal standard as its conservative majority continued to show a willingness to undo previous decisions that have guided the state’s courts. Justices, in a 6-1 ruling, decided to scrap a state standard for determining whether lower-court judges should grant summary judgment in civil lawsuits. The Supreme Court said Florida should align with a federal summary-judgment standard — an approach backed by business groups that have pushed for ways to cut down on litigation. “This is the Holy Grail of lawsuit reform in Florida,” William Large, president of the business-backed Florida Justice Reform Institute, said in a prepared statement after the Supreme Court issued the ruling. Summary judgment generally involves judges being able to decide lawsuits before they go to jury trials. The issue in Thursday’s ruling dealt with the standards that judges should use in determining whether to...
    By JESSICA GRESKO, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts is praising federal courts nationwide for their flexibility in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, acknowledging in his annual year-end report the role technology has played in keeping courts running. The high court has in the past been slow to embrace technology, but the justices conducted their first arguments by phone in May because of the pandemic and allowed the world to listen live, an unprecedented step. Other courts around the country have held video and audio hearings. Roberts did not speculate in his report whether changes made as a result of the pandemic would have a lasting impact or when the high court might resume-in person sessions. At least some justices have received the first doses of the coronavirus vaccine, however, court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg said in an email Thursday in response to a question from...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts is praising federal courts nationwide for their flexibility in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, acknowledging in his annual year-end report the role technology has played in keeping courts running. The high court has in the past been slow to embrace technology, but the justices conducted their first arguments by phone in May because of the pandemic and allowed the world to listen live, an unprecedented step. Other courts around the country have held video and audio hearings. Roberts did not speculate in his report whether changes made as a result of the pandemic would have a lasting impact or when the high court might resume-in person sessions. At least some justices have received the first doses of the coronavirus vaccine, however, court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg said in an email Thursday in response to a question from The Associated Press....
    (CNN)Chief Justice John Roberts sidestepped the roiling controversy over election results on Thursday instead using his annual report to recall the nation's early history combating pandemics and to praise the "unsung heroes" in the judicial branch as they confronted Covid-19.Roberts' report reflects a clear desire to keep the court and its work out of the headlines at a fraught time while carefully and deliberately ignoring attacks from President Donald Trump, who recently tweeted that the Supreme Court has been "totally incompetent and weak" for failing to act on his erroneous claims of massive election fraud.Whats happening with the latest Trump appeals to the Supreme CourtTrump and his allies have suffered blistering losses in the courts, but continue to petition for the justices to overrule election results. This week, the Trump campaign launched two appeals targeting returns in battleground state of Wisconsin, even though the justices have sent a clear signal...
    Washington (CNN)The Supreme Court will enter a new year Friday but there's still election drama from 2020 on its plate.The Trump campaign this week twice asked the court to overturn President-elect Joe Biden's win in Wisconsin. And cases from the President and allies looking to throw out Biden's victories in Pennsylvania, Georgia, Michigan, Wisconsin and Arizona are pending on the court's docket. Justices have shown no interest in changing the outcome of the election but even if they don't act now, there are still some legal issues that may ensure we hear about the 2020 campaign in the months to come. Here's what to know:Didn't the Supreme Court just rule on election challenges?Read MoreYes. The court rejected a lawsuit from Texas against four states -- Pennsylvania, Georgia, Michigan and Wisconsin -- seeking to overturn Biden's victories there. The court said Texas lacked the standing to sue. And the Electoral College...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The Minnesota Supreme Court has upheld the state’s revenge porn law, ruling that sharing nude images of a person without their consent is not constitutionally protected free speech. The unanimous ruling Wednesday reverses an earlier order by the state Court of Appeals, which struck down the 2016 law which made it a crime to publish, sell or disseminate private explicit images and videos without the person’s consent. That means outstanding cases that were on hold for about a year can now be prosecuted. The challenge to the state law followed the 2017 conviction of a man, who was found guilty of felony nonconsensual dissemination of private sexual images. (© Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)
    The Connecticut Supreme Court upheld Gov. Ned Lamont’s authority to close certain businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic to “ensure the health, safety, and welfare of the citizens of the state.” Lamont, who has come under fire for his executive orders limiting or closing some businesses during the pandemic, was challenged by the owner of Casey’s Irish Pub in Milford, who questioned the governor’s public health and civil preparedness orders. In March, despite an outcry from business owners, Lamont ordered bars and nightclubs closed, while limiting occupancy at restaurants, gyms, salons, and other high-risk locales in an effort to curtail the spread of COVID-19. Lamont first declared a public health emergency and civil preparedness emergency on March 10, which was renewed on Sept. 2 and will be in effect until Feb. 9, 2021. In the lawsuit, Casey’s Pub owner Kristine Casey and Black Sheep Enterprise, LLC, declared that Lamont...
    By RYAN J. FOLEY, Associated Press IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — The Iowa Supreme Court on Thursday severely limited the financial damages that can be awarded for injuries and deaths caused by state police officers who are found to have used excessive force. The court ruled 6-1 that punitive damages, which are intended to punish and deter future misconduct, are not available in cases in which officers use excessive force in violation of constitutional rights. Justice Edward Mansfield wrote for the majority that compensatory damages for victims, including for emotional distress and attorney fees, would still be available and offer “an adequate remedy.” The court ruled that lawsuits brought by injured individuals and the families of those killed by state police are subject to limits in the Iowa Tort Claims Act, which governs claims against state employees. The act bars punitive damages, has a two-year statute of limitations and requires...
    MADISON, Wis. (AP) — President Donald Trump on Wednesday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn his election loss in Wisconsin, his second appeal in as many days to the high court over the result in the key battleground state. Trump's newest appeal is over the loss of a lawsuit he filed in federal court seeking to void the state's election and have the Republican-controlled Legislature appoint electors to cast the state's 10 electoral votes. The lawsuit was rejected first by a federal judge whom Trump had appointed and then by the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, adding to dozens of defeats for Trump in electoral challenges around the U.S. Trump's campaign on Tuesday asked the high court to take on his lawsuit brought in state court that sought to toss out hundreds of thousands of absentee ballots cast in Wisconsin's two largest liberal counties. The Wisconsin Supreme Court...