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    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – Sen. Charles Schumer says the COVID relief bill also includes billions of dollars in funding for the MTA. “For subway and bus riders, you know the MTA was running into real trouble. I promised/ I tried to get $4 billion for them. That is in this budget, and it should keep our subways running, and our buses running without the kind of cutbacks that people were very worried about,” Schumer said. The MTA would still face a $8 billion deficit as the agency confronts what the MTA chairman and CEO calls the “worst financial crisis in its history.” More: MTA Outlines Layoffs, Massive Service Cuts That Could Happen Without Significant Funding From Federal Government A final public hearing on proposed MTA fare hikes is being held virtually Monday morning. Some of the proposed changes include increasing all fares on buses, subways the Long Island Rail Road and...
    Madison Summers December 21, 2020 0 Comments Congress reached a deal on an approximately $900 billion coronavirus relief package, and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) is placing blame on her Republican colleagues for the delay in reaching the deal. Pelosi said during Sunday’s press conference, “Let me just say this one thing, because I, from time to time, hear a question here… ‘What took so long?’” She then took aim at Republican lawmakers, “What took so long is because we could not get our Republican colleagues to crush the virus. I couldn’t understand it.” Watch Pelosi’s press conference below: “Why would they not want to invest in the science that has told us so importantly that it required testing, tracing, treatment, separation, sanitation and the rest?” the House speaker added. She continued: “And when we had the bill in the Heroes Act and even in the smaller Heroes Act,...
    Highlights of $900 billion COVID-19 relief, wrapup bills WASHINGTON (AP) — Top Capitol Hill negotiators sealed a deal on a $900 billion COVID-19 economic relief package, finally delivering long-overdue help to businesses and individuals and providing money to deliver vaccines to a nation eager for them. The package, expected to draw votes in Congress on Monday, would establish a temporary $300 per week supplemental jobless benefit and a $600 direct stimulus payment to most Americans, along with a new round of subsidies for hard-hit businesses and money for schools, health care providers and renters facing eviction. It came together Sunday after months of battling and posturing, but the negotiating dynamic changed in Republicans’ favor after the election and as the end of the congressional session neared. President-elect Joe Biden was eager for a deal to deliver long-awaited help to suffering people and a boost to the...
    Washington — Congressional leaders on Sunday reached a deal on a $900 billion COVID-19 economic relief package that includes $600 direct payments to Americans and $300 in enhanced unemployment for the next 10 weeks. The $600 checks will go out to individuals making less than $75,000 a year or couples making less than $150,000. Similar to the CARES Act, the size of the payment will decrease for individuals who make between $75,000 and $100,000 and individuals who make $100,000 or more will not receive checks. Dependents will be receiving $600 this time, rather than $500.  The House and Senate on Sunday night both passed a continuing resolution to extend the funding of the federal government for an extra day, since the deadline to avoid a shutdown was 11:59 p.m. The extension provides time to draft the COVID relief package and add it to a $1.4 trillion spending bill to fund the...
          Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. It is Monday of Christmas week! We get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Al Weaver is newslettering solo while Alexis Simendinger decorates her house Griswold style for the next four days. Readers can find us on Twitter @asimendinger and @alweaver22. Please recommend the Morning Report to friends and let us know what you think. CLICK HERE to subscribe! Total U.S. coronavirus deaths reported this morning: 317,684.  Finally, a deal.    Congressional leaders on Sunday struck an agreement on a mammoth package to provide coronavirus relief funding and fund the government until October, marking the months-long culmination of up-and-down negotiations that plagued lawmakers to the end.   The overall package includes $900 billion in virus relief funds, which were out of reach for lawmakers dating back to July,...
    Shortly after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced that top Capitol Hill negotiators agreed to a $900 billion COVID-19 stimulus package, key Democrats vowed more economic intervention under the Biden administration. The Associated Press reported that if the deal is finalized, it will be the largest spending measure, which combines the COVID-19 relief with a $1.4 trillion government-wide funding plan that the New York Times referred to as a $2.3 trillion behemoth." Congress had also approved a 24-hour extension of government funding on Sunday evening. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP Sen. Chuck Schumer, the Senate minority leader, said, "This is a good bill. Tonight is a good night. But it is not the end of the story, it is not the end of the job. Anyone who thinks this bill is enough does not know what’s going on in America." House Speaker Nancy Pelosi also vowed that...
    By ANDREW TAYLOR, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Top Capitol Hill negotiators sealed a deal on a $900 billion COVID-19 economic relief package, finally delivering long-overdue help to businesses and individuals and providing money to deliver vaccines to a nation eager for them. The package, expected to draw votes in Congress on Monday, would establish a temporary $300 per week supplemental jobless benefit and a $600 direct stimulus payment to most Americans, along with a new round of subsidies for hard-hit businesses and money for schools, health care providers and renters facing eviction. It came together Sunday after months of battling and posturing, but the negotiating dynamic changed in Republicans' favor after the election and as the end of the congressional session neared. President-elect Joe Biden was eager for a deal to deliver long-awaited help to suffering people and a boost to the economy, even though it was less than...
    By The Associated Press Congressional leaders have hashed out a massive, year-end catchall bill that combines $900 billion in COVID-19 aid with a $1.4 trillion omnibus spending bill and reams of other unfinished legislation on taxes, energy, education and health care. The huge, still-unreleased bill is slated for votes on Monday — with lawmakers having only a few hours to read it before casting their votes. Highlights of the measure with overall funding amounts and specific amounts for some but not necessarily all initiatives; some amounts are not yet available and some aspects of the catchall bill do not involve spending. DIRECT ECONOMIC RELIEF ($286 billion) Unemployment insurance ($120 billion). Revives supplemental federal pandemic unemployment benefits but at $300 per week — through March 14 — instead of the $600 per week benefit that expired in July. Extends special pandemic benefits for “gig” workers and extends the maximum period for...
    Congressional leaders have hashed out a massive, year-end catchall bill that combines $900 billion in COVID-19 aid with a $1.4 trillion omnibus spending bill and reams of other unfinished legislation on taxes, energy, education and health care. The huge, still-unreleased bill is slated for votes on Monday — with lawmakers having only a few hours to read it before casting their votes. Highlights of the measure with overall funding amounts and specific amounts for some but not necessarily all initiatives; some amounts are not yet available and some aspects of the catchall bill do not involve spending. DIRECT ECONOMIC RELIEF ($286 billion) Unemployment insurance ($120 billion). Revives supplemental federal pandemic unemployment benefits but at $300 per week — through March 14 — instead of the $600 per week benefit that expired in July. Extends special pandemic benefits for “gig” workers and extends the maximum period for state-paid jobless benefits...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, announced Sunday evening that Congressional leaders have agreed on a $900 billion COVID-19 relief bill that will provide a second stimulus check of $600 to most Americans. Still, late Sunday a vote had still not occurred. “We can finally report what our nation has needed for a very long time. More help is on the way,” McConnell said.” “Our agreement will provide another round of direct impact payments to help households make ends meet and continue our economic recovery,” he added. Democratic leaders said Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pennsylvania, stalled the process over the weekend, pushing for a proposal to end some of the Federal Reserve Bank’s emergency lending programs instituted by the CARES Act. “These are the programs that were funded by the CARES Act, were set up at the time of the CARES Act for this narrow specific purpose, and...
    WASHINGTON - Top Capitol Hill negotiators sealed a deal Sunday on a nearly $1 trillion COVID-19 economic relief package, finally delivering long-overdue help to businesses and individuals and providing money to deliver vaccines to a nation eager for them. The agreement, announced by congressional leaders, would establish a temporary $300 per week supplemental jobless benefit and a $600 direct stimulus payment to most Americans, along with a new round of subsidies for hard-hit businesses and money for schools, health care providers and renters facing eviction. It came after months of negotiating, after the election and as the end of the congressional session neared. President-elect Joe Biden was eager for a deal to deliver long-awaited help to suffering people and a boost to the economy, even though it was less than half the size that Democrats wanted this fall. House leaders informed lawmakers that they would vote on the legislation...
    Top Democrats and Republicans on Sunday said they were optimistic that a nearly $1 trillion coronavirus relief package could be passed by Congress after agreeing on a compromise over the Federal Reserve’s emergency lending powers. Arriving at the Capitol for a rare Sunday session, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) told reporters that both sides are “really, really close.” “We are winnowing down the remaining differences. I think I can speak for all sides when I say I expect and hope to have a final agreement nailed down in a matter of hours,” McConnell said later from the Senate floor. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi echoed McConnell’s sentiments, saying “we’re close. We’re very close.” Rep. Kevin McCarthy, the Republican leader in the House, said it is optimistic that the bill will pass. “The optimism is let’s get it done,” McCarthy said on “Sunday Morning Futures,” adding later that “I am very...
    WASHINGTON -- Top Capitol Hill negotiators sealed a deal Sunday on an almost $1 trillion COVID-19 economic relief package, finally delivering long-overdue help to businesses and individuals and providing money to deliver vaccines to a nation eager for them.The agreement, announced by Senate leaders, would establish a temporary $300 per week supplemental jobless benefits and $600 direct stimulus payments to most Americans, along with a new round of subsidies for hard-hit businesses and money for schools, health care providers and renters facing eviction.Specific items expected in the bill include: $284 billion for the small business loan program (PPP) $25 billion in rental assistance $600 direct payments per adult and child $300 enhanced unemployment benefits $13 billion in enhanced SNAP benefits $82 billion for colleges and schools $10 billion for child care assistance The COVID-19 aid bill also ends the practice of surprise medical billing The House was expected...
    WASHINGTON -- Top Capitol Hill negotiators sealed a deal Sunday on an almost $1 trillion COVID-19 economic relief package, finally delivering long-overdue help to businesses and individuals and providing money to deliver vaccines to a nation eager for them.The agreement, announced by Senate leaders, would establish a temporary $300 per week supplemental jobless benefits and $600 direct stimulus payments to most Americans, along with a new round of subsidies for hard-hit businesses and money for schools, health care providers and renters facing eviction.Specific items expected in the bill include: $284 billion for the small business loan program (PPP) $25 billion in rental assistance $600 direct payments per adult and child $300 enhanced unemployment benefits $13 billion in enhanced SNAP benefits $82 billion for colleges and schools $10 billion for child care assistance The COVID-19 aid bill also ends the practice of surprise medical billing The House was expected...
    WASHINGTON -- Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said that congressional Republican and Democratic leaders have finalized a deal on the almost $1 trillion stimulus package.House Democratic Leader Steny Hoyer also informed the caucus Sunday that a vote on the COVID-19 relief bill will take place Monday.This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.Top negotiators appear on the brink Sunday of agreeing to long-delayed legislation to deliver a new round of aid to pandemic-slammed businesses, $300 bonus jobless benefits and a $600 direct payment to most Americans, an aid package that is smaller than Democrats and President-elect Joe Biden would like.The must-pass measure, coming in at more than $900 billion, is expected to be released late Sunday and would be brought immediately to the House floor for a vote. It includes tens of billions of dollars to pay for distributing vaccines, help schools reopen, and bail...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Top Capitol Hill negotiators sealed a deal Sunday on an almost $1 trillion COVID-19 economic relief package, finally delivering long-overdue help to businesses and individuals and providing money to deliver vaccines to a nation eager for them. The agreement, announced by Senate leaders, would establish a temporary $300 per week supplemental jobless benefits and $600 direct stimulus payments to most Americans, along with a new round of subsidies for hard-hit businesses and money for schools, health care providers and renters facing eviction. The House was expected to vote on the legislation on Monday, said a spokeswoman for House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md. The House would pass a one-day stopgap spending bill to avert a government shutdown at midnight Sunday. The Senate was likely to vote on Monday, too. Lawmakers were eager to leave Washington and close out a tumultuous year. “There will be another major rescue...
    Senate Republican and Democratic leaders said Sunday afternoon that they had resolved some of the last outstanding issues holding up a coronavirus-relief deal and a year-end omnibus spending package, including a fight over deducting small-business loans and providing scholarship money for private schools. “At long last we have the bipartisan breakthrough that the country has needed. Now we need to probably finalize text and avoid any last-minute obstacles and cooperate to move this legislation through both chambers,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenators reach deal on Fed powers, setting stage for coronavirus relief passage Coronavirus relief deal hinges on talks over Fed lending powers Senate GOP absences snag Trump nominees MORE (R-Ky.) said on the Senate floor. McConnell noted the legislation would provide another round of $600 stimulus checks, money to distribute the coronavirus vaccine and send “billions and billions of dollars to help kids [get] back in school and do so...
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Republican U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said on Sunday an agreement had been reached by congressional leaders of both parties on a roughly $900 billion COVID-19 relief bill. "More help is on the way," McConnell said on the Senate floor of the measure to provide assistance to address a number of coronavirus-related issues. (Reporting by David Shepardson; Editing by Peter Cooney) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: United States, coronavirus
    Congress reached a deal Sunday on a roughly $900 billion coronavirus relief package, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced. “More help is on the way,” McConnell (R-Ky) said on the Senate floor, adding that lawmakers only have to “promptly finalize text” and “avoid any last-minute obstacles” on the bill. The legislation comes as the death toll from COVID-19 in the US approaches 317,000 and the economy is still reeling from the effects of the coronavirus downturn.
    Congress reached a deal Sunday on a roughly $900 billion coronavirus relief package, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced. “More help is on the way,” McConnell (R-Ky) said on the Senate floor, adding that lawmakers only have to “promptly finalize text” and “avoid any last-minute obstacles” on the bill. The legislation comes as the death toll from COVID-19 in the US approaches 317,000 and the economy is still reeling from the effects of the coronavirus downturn. Filed under congress ,  Coronavirus ,  mitch mcconnell ,  12/20/20
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Top congressional leaders announce agreement on COVID-19 relief package, government funding bill. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    WASHINGTON -- Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said that congressional Republican and Democratic leaders have finalized a deal on the almost $1 trillion stimulus package.This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.Top negotiators appear on the brink Sunday of agreeing to long-delayed legislation to deliver a new round of aid to pandemic-slammed businesses, $300 bonus jobless benefits and a $600 direct payment to most Americans, an aid package that is smaller than Democrats and President-elect Joe Biden would like.The must-pass measure, coming in at more than $900 billion, is expected to be released late Sunday and would be brought immediately to the House floor for a vote. It includes tens of billions of dollars to pay for distributing vaccines, help schools reopen, and bail out struggling transit systems and the Postal Service.Propelling optimism on Sunday was a Saturday night agreement on the last major obstacle...
    More On: Coronavirus Cuomo rips UK-to-JFK air travel as London shuts down over new strain of COVID-19 Surgeon general pick discusses UK’s new COVID-19 strain Surgeon general pick outlines COVID-19 vaccine timeline Prominent Russian scientist working on COVID-19 vaccine found dead Top Democrats and Republicans on Sunday said they were optimistic that a nearly $1 trillion coronavirus relief package could be passed by Congress after agreeing on a compromise over the Federal Reserve’s emergency lending powers. Arriving at the Capitol for a rare Sunday session, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) told reporters that both sides are “really, really close.” “We are winnowing down the remaining differences. I think I can speak for all sides when I say I expect and hope to have a final agreement nailed down in a matter of hours,” McConnell said later from the Senate floor. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi echoed McConnell’s sentiments, saying...
    WASHINGTON -- Editor's note: A previous headline implied that a congressional agreement on a COVID-19 economic relief package had been reached. That headline was a mischaracterization and has been corrected.Top Washington negotiators, propelled by a late-night agreement on the last major obstacle to a COVID-19 economic relief package, said a Sunday agreement is all but inevitable to deliver long-overdue pandemic aid of almost $1 trillion."I am very hopeful that we get this done today," House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., told Fox News Channel's "Sunday Morning Futures."The breakthrough involved a fight over Federal Reserve emergency powers that was resolved by the Senate's top Democrat and a senior conservative Republican. Aides to lawmakers in both parties said the compromise sparked a final round of negotiations on a handful of remaining issues.An aide to a key GOP lawmaker said it would likely require all of Sunday to finalize and draft the final...
    WASHINGTON -- Editor's note: A previous headline implied that a congressional agreement on a COVID-19 economic relief package had been reached. That headline was a mischaracterization and has been corrected.Top congressional lawmakers struck a late-night agreement on the last major obstacle to a COVID-19 economic relief package costing nearly $1 trillion, clearing the way for votes as early as Sunday.The breakthrough involved a fight over Federal Reserve emergency powers and was resolved by the Senate's top Democrat and a senior conservative Republican.Congressional aides confirmed the agreement late Saturday, which clears the way for an expected deal Sunday on the aid bill. The measure is finally nearing passage amid a frightening spike in cases and deaths and accumulating evidence that the economy is struggling through the pandemic."We're getting very close, very close," Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., as he left the Capitol late Saturday. Schumer spent much of the day going...
    (CNN)Congress is once again up against a shutdown deadline amid an eleventh-hour effort to secure a much-needed $900 billion pandemic relief deal with government funding set to expire at midnight.A late-night Saturday breakthrough to resolve a key dispute holding up a rescue package signaled major progress toward a deal, but congressional leaders are still trying to hammer out the final details of an agreement and believe it could take much of the day to iron out the last remaining disagreements before finally unveiling the text to the rest of Congress shortly before votes occur, aides said Sunday.oThe amount of work that still remains to be done and the looming midnight deadline increases the odds that a sweeping pandemic deal may not be finalized and approved in time to avert a shutdown this evening. If finalizing the bill drags on Sunday, as many expect, Congress may -- for the fourth time...
    Congress is on the brink of an agreement on a long-awaited $900 billion COVID-19 relief package, thanks to a last-minute compromise over a key loan provision that has been struck by Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-NY. The bipartisan compromise means a final deal was now “very close,” Schumer said as he emerged from negotiations close to midnight, Fox News reported. “If things continue on this path and nothing gets in the way, we’ll be able to vote tomorrow,” he said, meaning Sunday. The stumbling block lifted as negotiations stretched into Saturday night, when Toomey and Schumer struck an agreement on whether the Federal Reserve could restart emergency lending programs to help corporate, municipal and medium-size businesses. Toomey had insisted the Fed and the Treasury Departement to be barred from setting up any loan program similar to those set up this year, The New...
    By ANDREW TAYLOR and CHRISTOPHER RUGABER, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Top congressional lawmakers struck a late-night agreement on the last major obstacle to a COVID-19 economic relief package costing nearly $1 trillion, clearing the way for votes as early as Sunday. A Democratic aide said in an email that an agreement had been reached late Saturday and that compromise language was being finalized to seal a deal to be unveiled on Sunday. The breakthrough involved a fight over Federal Reserve emergency powers that was defused by an odd couple: the Senate’s top Democrat and a senior conservative Republican. “We’re getting very close, very close," Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said earlier Saturday as he spent much of the day going back and forth with GOP Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania. Toomey had been pressing a provision to close down Fed lending facilities that Democrats and the White House said...
    More On: Coronavirus Chicago hospital pauses COVID-19 vaccinations following allergic reactions Missouri mom shares bloody images of eighth-grade son’s COVID-19 hospital room What virus? More than 1 million travelers screened by TSA Friday Israel PM Benjamin Netanyahu receives COVID vaccine With COVID still raging and public officials idiotically closing vast swaths of the economy, now shouldn’t be the time to start pinching pennies with another massive pandemic relief package, as Congress is doing while this column goes to press. Or maybe it is time. The deal on the table isn’t the largest of the stimulus packages that have been passed since the pandemic started. It’s “just” $900 billion — down from the $2.2 trillion the Democrats initially pushed, and the $2.4 trillion deal reached during the early days of the pandemic. But it does raise some thorny questions: When will all this spending be paid off, and who will...
    Prospects for a $900 billion coronavirus relief deal in Congress hit a snag Saturday over a Republican provision that would sharply limit the ability of the Federal Reserve to restart emergency lending programs. Pennsylvania GOP Sen. Pat Toomey, who is pushing the change, told reporters that his goal was “preventing the Fed from being politicized.” Both sides appear to have dug in on the issue. In a call with his caucus Saturday afternoon, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told fellow Republicans to stand behind Toomey, the Washington Post reported. Democrats meanwhile have increasingly indicated the central bank is a red line, and say attempts to constrain its lending power are nothing more than partisan politics designed to undermine a future Biden administration. “We count on the Fed’s emergency powers to get us through economic crises. To limit these powers risks a ton of jobs and lives...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork/AP) — Gov. Andrew Cuomo is calling on President Donald Trump to secure more economic relief for families suffering through the pandemic. The governor issued a letter to the president Saturday, writing that time is short and that Congress must act on a COVID-19 bill in the next 48 hours. Cuomo calls on the president to get Republican lawmakers behind the bill, writing, “Senator McConnell is irrelevant. You control the Republican Party.” Click here to read the full letter. This comes as the number of New Yorkers hospitalized with coronavirus has risen to the highest level since mid-May, according to state figures released Saturday. CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC Ask CBS2’s Dr. Max Your Vaccine Questions COVID Vaccine FAQ From CDC Find A New York City Testing Site Near You Check NYC Testing Wait Times Explanation Of N.Y.’s Yellow, Orange, Red Zones (.pdf) Resources: Help With Unemployment, Hunger,...
    More On: Coronavirus FDA looking into reports of allergic reactions after COVID-19 shot Like a good neighbor, New Zealand is there — to buy vaccines for nearby nations Temp travel nurses are making $11K a week to give COVID-19 vaccines He’s got Santabodies! Fauci tells kids Kris Kringle received COVID vaccine Prospects for a $900 billion coronavirus relief deal in Congress hit a snag Saturday over a Republican provision that would sharply limit the ability of the Federal Reserve to restart emergency lending programs. Pennsylvania GOP Sen. Pat Toomey, who is pushing the change, told reporters that his goal was “preventing the Fed from being politicized.” Both sides appear to have dug in on the issue. In a call with his caucus Saturday afternoon, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told fellow Republicans to stand behind Toomey, the Washington Post reported. Democrats meanwhile have increasingly indicated the central...
    Senators are still in the nation’s Capitol, as Congress works to approve funding for the long-awaited coronavirus relief package by Sunday afternoon. Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., hit the Senate floor Saturday with a list of grievances on the $900 billion package - the latest hold-up in Congress passing the bill. "We’ve never asked the Fed to engage in fiscal policy or social policy, or to allocate credit based on political standing," Toomey said. WHERE DOES CORONAVIRUS RELIEF STAND IN CONGRESS? Toomey has requested that language be added to the latest bill that would ensure termination of three federal lending programs established in March to help credit markets function during massive U.S. economic shutdowns. The CARES Act created a corporate bond credit facility, along with municipal and mainstream lending programs, that were originally intended to expire Dec. 31, but that Democrats want extended. Toomey argued Saturday that extending the programs would be superfluous...
    WASHINGTON -- When asked if Congress will announce a deal on the almost $1 trillion COVID-19 economic relief package by end of day Saturday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi responded: "That's the plan, that's the plan."This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.The Fed programs at issue provided loans to small and mid-sized businesses and bought state and local government bonds, making it easier for those governments to borrow, at a time when their finances are under pressure from the pandemic.Negotiators reported continued progress on an almost $1 trillion COVID-19 economic relief package on Saturday, with optimism rising that the overdue talks would soon produce an agreement. The Senate convened a Saturday session, while House members stood by for a vote that will arrive no earlier than Sunday.A new government shutdown of midnight Sunday was serving as a backstop for the tortuous negotiations, which were...
    WASHINGTON -- The Fed programs at issue provided loans to small and mid-sized businesses and bought state and local government bonds, making it easier for those governments to borrow, at a time when their finances are under pressure from the pandemic.Negotiators reported continued progress on an almost $1 trillion COVID-19 economic relief package on Saturday, with optimism rising that the overdue talks would soon produce an agreement. The Senate convened a Saturday session, while House members stood by for a vote that will arrive no earlier than Sunday.A new government shutdown of midnight Sunday was serving as a backstop for the tortuous negotiations, which were being conducted in secret largely among the top four leaders of Capitol Hill's warring tribes.A key negotiator said the talks continued in good faith."But the American people cannot feed their families or pay their bills with Congress' good faith discussions," said Majority Leader Mitch McConnell,...
    WASHINGTON -- Congress passed a two-day stopgap spending bill Friday night, averting a partial government shutdown and buying yet more time for frustratingly slow endgame negotiations on an almost $1 trillion COVID-19 economic relief package.The virus aid talks remained on track, both sides said, but closing out final disagreements was proving difficult. Weekend sessions were on tap, and House leaders hoped for a vote on Sunday on the massive package, which wraps much of Capitol Hill's unfinished 2020 business into a take-it-or-leave-it behemoth that promises to be a foot thick - or more.The House passed the temporary funding bill by a 320-60 vote. The Senate approved it by voice vote almost immediately afterward, and President Donald Trump signed it late Friday.Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said both sides remain intent on closing the deal, even as Democrats launched a concerted campaign to block an effort by Republicans to rein...
    President TrumpDonald TrumpJill Biden: Doctorate is one of the things I'm 'most proud of' Azar tells Health Department staff his wife has COVID-19: 'Mild symptoms but otherwise doing well' Michigan reinstates pandemic-related moratorium on water shutoffs MORE on Friday signed a stopgap funding measure that will keep the government funded for another 48 hours while lawmakers attempt to finalize an agreement on an economic relief bill. Trump signed the bill just after 10 p.m., according to the White House. The House passed the continuing resolution (CR) by a vote of 320-60, while the Senate passed it unanimously. Government funding would have expired at midnight had Congress not passed the stopgap measure.   Congressional leaders are planning to attach the coronavirus relief to a massive spending package to keep the government funded through the rest of the fiscal year. Lawmakers have in recent days insisted they are close to a final agreement on...
    The U.S. House of Representatives skirted a government shutdown for the second time in a week by passing a two-day stopgap funding bill to allow Congress more time to agree on a COVID relief bill. The continuing resolution (CR), which passed the House and Senate with just hours to spare for Trump’s signature, will prevent a government shutdown and allow Congress more time to iron out sticking points in the $900 billion COVID-19 relief bill that Americans have been awaiting for months.  House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., said that the public should not expect a bill to be agreed to sooner than 1 p.m. on Sunday. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., blamed Republicans for the inability to reach a deal Friday, saying the stimulus checks have proven to be the sticking point. "We want $1200 at least," she told the Hill. "And Republicans are fighting it back down to $600,...
    Congress passed a stopgap, two-day spending bill Friday night to avert a partial government shutdown, a measure that will buy time for ongoing negotiations over a $900 billion COVID-19 economic relief package. The House and Senate passed the bill allowing the funding deadline to extend from Friday to the end of Sunday. The extension came on the brink of a midnight government shutdown, and gives Congress more time to finish a year-end spending agreement and coronavirus aid package. It is now being rushed to President Trump’s desk to be signed into law. After months of fruitless negotiations, optimistic party leaders earlier in the day said they believed they were “very close” to passing the aid bill, which includes a $300 per week federal boost to unemployment and more small business loans. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said early in the day he was “even more optimistic now than I...
    More On: congress AOC passed over by Dems for spot on key House committee McConnell: COVID-19 relief deal ‘very close,’ Congress won’t leave till its done Rep. Dan Crenshaw called out for following escort on Twitter Swalwell evades reporter asking if he’ll resign over China spy scandal WASHINGTON — Congress was on the brink of shutdown on Friday evening as lawmakers, unable to agree on a desperately needed next wave of COVID-19 relief, voted for a two-day funding extension. The House passed the stopgap spending bill Friday night to avert a partial government shutdown, trying to buy time for negotiations on a $900 billion COVID-19 economic relief package.  The House passed the temporary funding bill by a 320-60 vote as frustrated lawmakers headed for a weekend session. Senate action wasn’t guaranteed but appeared likely before the midnight deadline. It would then be put on President Trump’s desk to be...
    WASHINGTON -- The House passed a two-day stopgap spending bill Friday night to avert a partial government shutdown, trying to buy time for frustratingly slow endgame negotiations on an almost $1 trillion COVID-19 economic relief package. Senate action wasn't guaranteed but appeared likely before the midnight deadline.The House passed the temporary funding bill by a 320-60 vote as frustrated lawmakers headed for a weekend session.Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said early in the day he was "even more optimistic now than I was last night," but Democrats launched a concerted campaign to block an effort by Republicans to rein in emergency Federal Reserve lending powers. They said the GOP proposal would deprive President-elect Joe Biden of crucial tools to manage the economy.Believing a deal could be reached Friday "would be a triumph of hope over experience," said a downbeat No. 2 Senate Republican, John Thune of South Dakota.Funding for...
    WASHINGTON -- Bearing down on a midnight shutdown deadline, top negotiators on a must-pass, almost $1 trillion COVID-19 economic relief package are committed to sealing an agreement Friday as they resolve remaining differences in hopes of passing the legislation this weekend.The pressure is on. Government funding lapses at midnight Friday and a partial, low-impact shutdown would ensue if Congress fails to pass a stopgap spending bill before then. That's not guaranteed, said Senate GOP Whip John Thune, who said some Republicans might block the stopgap measure to keep the pressure on if the talks haven't borne fruit.Democrats came out swinging at a key obstacle: A provision by conservative Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., that would close down more than $400 billion in potential Federal Reserve lending powers established under a relief bill in March. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin is shutting down the program at the end of December but Toomey's language...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — House approves 2-day funding bill to avert federal shutdown as leaders continue wrangling over COVID-19 relief. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    The House on Friday passed a two-day, stopgap spending bill to avert a government shutdown and provide negotiators additional time to iron out details on a larger funding and COVID-19 relief package.  Both parties are still feverishly negotiating a long-stalled coronavirus relief package, but acknowledged that they needed more time to iron out remaining sticking points.  The House passed the continuing resolution (CR) by a vote of 320-60. House Democrats unveiled the measure to keep the government open through Sunday less than eight hours before current funding expires at midnight. Senate GOP leaders are hoping to similarly move the CR through the upper chamber before the midnight deadline.  But at least one senator, Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyOn The Money: Fight over Federal Reserve powers holding up year-end deal | Congress set to blow past shutdown deadline amid coronavirus talks | Experts say stimulus deal could head off double-dip recession...
    With a key issue proving difficult to resolve, a midnight government shutdown loomed Friday, though congressional negotiators seemed tantalizingly close to agreement on an almost $1 trillion COVID-19 economic relief package. An air of exhausted frustration infused the Capitol.  Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky said early in the day he was "even more optimistic now than I was last night," but Democrats launched a concerted campaign to block an effort by Republicans to rein in emergency Federal Reserve lending powers. They said the GOP proposal would deprive President-elect Joe Biden of crucial tools to manage the economy.  U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky, walks to his office from the Senate Floor at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Dec. 18, 2020.Believing a deal could be reached Friday "would be a triumph of hope over experience," said a downbeat No. 2 Senate Republican, John Thune of South...
    House Democrats on Friday filed a two-day continuing resolution (CR) to prevent a government shutdown come midnight. The bill would put off the deadline for both an omnibus bill to fund the government through the 2021 fiscal year, and the $900 billion COVID-19 relief bill that is supposed to pass alongside it. “The American people urgently need coronavirus relief and this short stopgap bill will allow bipartisan, bicameral negotiators to complete their work on this important issue,” said House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyDeLauro intends to be 'strong chair' as Appropriations leader Pelosi bullish on COVID-19 relief: 'We cannot leave without it' The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - Congress inches closer to virus relief deal MORE (D-N.Y.). “I look forward to swiftly passing omnibus appropriations and coronavirus relief legislation through the House as soon as possible,” she added. The House is expected to take up...
    Senator Bernie Sanders has been a key part of a bipartisan push to get $1200 checks in the coronavirus relief package Congress is taking up, something that is somehow not being universally agreed upon. On the Senate floor Friday, Sanders talked about how millions of Americans are struggling and in need of relief in the middle of the pandemic. “We cannot turn our backs on this suffering,” he said. “Not in any state in this country where people are hurting in an unprecedented way. It means we cannot leave Washington as Senators for the holidays to go back to our families unless we address the pain and anxiety of other families throughout this country.” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer briefly spoke to share his support for the amendment Sanders was pushing. Sanders made a point of highlighting how both President Donald Trump and President-elect Joe Biden, not to mention the...
    Washington Monument closed down after Interior Secretary tests positive for COVID-19 Biden vows to impose costs for Russian aggression when he becomes president Dow trades 200 points lower as clock ticks for Congress to pass another spending bill, round of economic relief © Spencer Platt/Getty Images MARKET SNAPSHOT Load Error Benchmark U.S. stock indexes were trading slightly lower Friday afternoon, after closing at record highs Thursday, as Wall Street awaited an update from Washington lawmakers on another round of economic relief and on a government spending bill to avert a shutdown. Friday also marks what is known as “quadruple witching day” — the date when stock-index futures, stock-index options, stock options, and single-stock futures expire simultaneously, a potential source of volatility. The inclusion of Tesla Inc. into the S&P 500 at the conclusion of trading Friday and a rebalancing of portfolios likely also adds some choppiness to markets,...
    COVID-19 relief and getting the economy back on track must be top priorities in the next legislative session, incoming lawmakers from both parties said Thursday. Congress early in the pandemic passed a large relief bill and a few pieces of supplemental legislation to address the economic fallout from shutdowns and business closures. But some of that assistance has already expired with other programs set to end in the coming weeks. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPelosi to get COVID-19 vaccine in 'next few days' as vaccination program begins for lawmakers McConnell says he will get coronavirus vaccine in 'coming days' McConnell tees up weekend votes on nominations as coronavirus talks drag MORE (R-Ky.) said Friday morning that he was “‘more optimistic’” about reaching an agreement on the $900 billion coronavirus relief bill that legislators are trying to pass attached to a government funding bill. The new relief bill...
    NORTH TEXAS (CBSDFW.COM) – With the deadline quickly approaching, relief for struggling North Texans appears to finally be in sight. Congress is in the final negotiations on a more than $900 billion COVID relief bill that includes another round of stimulus checks. The latest change to the proposed relief package took money out for states and local governments and added money for a second round of direct payments. Stimulus checks will likely be $600 this time – smaller than $1,200 per person most Americans received from the CARES Act. Direct payments could go out as early as the end of the month if the bill is signed into law by the end of the week. There is also money in the relief plan to help those who are out of work. An estimated 300,000 Texans are set to lose unemployment benefits by the end of the month. The relief bill includes...
    WASHINGTON -- It's a hurry up and wait moment on Capitol Hill as congressional negotiators on a must-pass, almost $1 trillion COVID-19 economic relief package struggled through a handful of remaining snags. The holdups mean a weekend session now appears virtually certain, and a top lawmaker warned that a government shutdown this weekend can't be ruled out.All sides appeared hopeful that the wrangling wouldn't derail the legislation, even as the chances for announcing a deal Thursday slipped away. After being bogged down for much of the day, negotiators reported behind-the-scenes progress Thursday night.The central elements of a hard-fought compromise appeared in place: more than $300 billion in aid to businesses; a $300-per-week bonus federal jobless benefit and renewal of soon-to-expire state benefits; $600 direct payments to individuals; vaccine distribution funds and money for renters, schools, the Postal Service and people needing food aid.But a temporary funding bill runs out Friday...
    WASHINGTON (KDKA) – With just a few weeks left in the year, the earliest that Americans may see a second stimulus payment would be early next month. If you received your first stimulus check by mail, you’ll want to sign up for direct deposits to ensure you get the payment quicker. It’s likely that paper checks will not arrive until weeks after payments are sent out to those who set up direct deposit. The biggest factor in all of this depends on when Congress and President Donald Trump approve the legislation. This means nothing will be sent out until Congress comes to an agreement on a stimulus package and Mr. Trump signs it. The current temporary spending bill is set to expire at midnight tonight and many are hoping Congress will agree on a completed COVID-19 relief proposal. Congressional leaders may need to pass...
    As congressional leaders continue to engage in negotiations over a coronavirus relief bill, Democratic Senator Amy Klobuchar says she feels "positive" that there will be a deal soon. "I am very positive about this," Klobuchar said in an interview with CBS News chief Washington correspondent Major Garrett for this week's episode of "The Takeout" podcast. Garrett also spoke with Republican Congressman Tom Emmer for this week's episode, a forum discussion hosted by Economic Club of Minnesota. Highlights from this week's episode: Senator Amy Klobuchar on the prospects of getting a deal on coronavirus relief: "I am very positive about this." Congressman Tom Emmer on timeline for passing relief bill: "We're hopeful maybe with a short CR we could be lucky over the weekend." Klobuchar on effects of pandemic: "This pandemic put a big magnifying glass on some of the needs we have in our country." Emmer...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — It’s a hurry up and wait moment on Capitol Hill as congressional negotiators on a must-pass, almost $1 trillion COVID-19 economic relief package struggled through a handful of remaining snags. The holdups mean a weekend session now appears virtually certain, and a top lawmaker warned that a government shutdown this weekend can’t be ruled out. All sides appeared hopeful that the wrangling wouldn’t derail the legislation, even as the chances for announcing a deal Thursday slipped away. After being bogged down for much of the day, negotiators reported behind-the-scenes progress Thursday night. The central elements of a hard-fought compromise appeared in place: more than $300 billion in aid to businesses; a $300-per-week bonus federal jobless benefit and renewal of soon-to-expire state benefits; $600 direct payments to individuals; vaccine distribution funds and money for renters, schools, the Postal Service and people needing food aid. But a temporary funding...
    WASHINGTON - It's a hurry up and wait moment on Capitol Hill as congressional negotiators on a must-pass, almost $1 trillion COVID-19 economic relief package struggled through a handful of remaining snags. The holdups mean a weekend session now appears virtually certain, and a top lawmaker warned that a government shutdown this weekend can't be ruled out. All sides appeared hopeful that the wrangling wouldn't derail the legislation, even as the chances for announcing a deal Thursday slipped away. After being bogged down for much of the day, negotiators reported behind-the-scenes progress Thursday night. The central elements of a hard-fought compromise appeared in place: more than $300 billion in aid to businesses; a $300-per-week bonus federal jobless benefit and renewal of soon-to-expire state benefits; $600 direct payments to individuals; vaccine distribution funds and money for renters, schools, the Postal Service and people needing food aid. But a temporary funding...
    WASHINGTON - It's a hurry up and wait moment on Capitol Hill as congressional negotiators on a must-pass, almost $1 trillion COVID-19 economic relief package struggled through a handful of remaining snags. The holdups mean a weekend session now appears virtually certain, and a top lawmaker warned that a government shutdown this weekend can't be ruled out. All sides appeared hopeful that the wrangling wouldn't derail the legislation, even as the chances for announcing a deal Thursday slipped away. After being bogged down for much of the day, negotiators reported behind-the-scenes progress Thursday night. The central elements of a hard-fought compromise appeared in place: more than $300 billion in aid to businesses; a $300-per-week bonus federal jobless benefit and renewal of soon-to-expire state benefits; $600 direct payments to individuals; vaccine distribution funds and money for renters, schools, the Postal Service and people needing food aid. But a temporary funding...
              Senator Mark Warner (D-Virginia) is confident that the Senate will soon pass the two-part COVID-19 relief package he helped develop. In a Thursday telephone press conference, Warner described key provisions of the plan and addressed controversy over a stimulus check added to the package while also limiting provisions to extend federal unemployment benefits past Christmas. Warner described a give-and-take compromise that has shifted some of the provisions of the bills. “It appears that our deal, while still in that $900 billion range, will include direct payments of close to $600 per person for adults and every child. Unfortunately, the price of that is to take away some of the expanded unemployment benefits,” Warner said. He said the expanded unemployment benefits will probably last for only ten weeks instead of 16. “I think that’s a mistake morally, in terms of taking away these additional...
    As the coronavirus pandemic roared to new record highs across the United States, it lit a fire in the U.S. Congress, where Republicans and Democrats were scrambling to pass a new round of aid after months of partisan finger-pointing and inaction.  Even as they contemplated passing a third stopgap measure to give them a few more days to agree on final amounts, lawmakers from both parties said COVID-19's worsening toll meant that failure to agree was no longer an option.  Multiple lawmakers floated the possibility the federal government would run out of money early Saturday morning while the COVID-19 relief negotiations continue if Congress is unable to pass a temporary government funding bill before Friday at midnight.  FILE - Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., answers reporters questions outside his office at the U.S. Capitol, Jan 29, 2020.The Senate's No. 2 Republican, John Thune, said there could be an objection to...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBiden plans to get COVID-19 vaccination publicly as early as next week Pence, other Trump officials to get vaccine publicly Sweeping COVID-19, spending deal hits speed bumps MORE (R-Ky.) on Thursday teed up votes on several more nominations, signaling to senators that they should prepare to be in Washington through the weekend.  McConnell teed up seven nominations. Absent an agreement, the earliest the Senate could start voting on them is Saturday.  "The Senate's not going anywhere until we have COVID relief out the door. We're staying right here until COVID relief is out the door. In the meantime, we're going to stay productive while these negotiations are going on," McConnell said from the Senate floor.  "We should expect continuing votes on nominations throughout the weekend ... until we can act on the major rescue package," McConnell added.  McConnell teed up votes on a nominee for the...
    Congress is barreling toward a rare weekend session as lawmakers race to wrap up a sweeping agreement to fund the government and provide badly needed coronavirus relief.  Leadership is honing in on a deal that would attach roughly $900 billion in coronavirus relief to a $1.4 trillion bill to fund the government until Oct. 1, 2021, in what is the last major piece of legislation Congress needs to pass before it wraps up its work for the year.  But lawmakers appear poised to drive over Friday night’s funding cliff, when the government will shut down at least temporarily without new legislation. Even if talks wrap by Friday night it’s expected to take days for Congress to pass it.  “There’s still just a lot of loose ends we’re trying to tie down. ...It’s a little bit of whack of mole, whack it here and something else pops up. There’s a lot...
    Bradley Cortright December 17, 2020 0 Comments Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) is responding to criticism of a proposed $900 billion COVID-19 relief package coming from progressive members of his own party.  During an interview on MSNBC on Thursday, Warner, who has been part of the negotiations on the package, reacted to criticism from Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.), who argued the bill was too small. “These are folks who’ve never negotiated any deal, that I think, has ever been successful,” Warner said. “We’re dealing with a Senate that is still unfortunately controlled by the Republicans. We still have Donald Trump as president — controlling two-thirds, in a sense, of the federal government, the executive, and the Senate.” He continued, “The alternative would have been to have people get kicked off of unemployment, get kicked out of their apartments, not get the kind of food assistance that’s needed.” “We put...