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    (CNN)An Iowa bill aimed at limiting voting and making it harder for voters to return absentee ballots is headed to Gov. Kim Reynolds' desk this week after passing both Republican-controlled chambers of the state legislature. The bill, introduced by a Republican state senator, specifically would reduce the number of early voting days from 29 days to 20 days. It would also close polling places an hour earlier on Election Day (at 8 p.m. instead of 9 p.m.).The bill also places new restrictions on absentee voting including banning officials from sending applications without a voter first requesting one and requiring ballots be received by the county before polls close on Election Day. The Republican-controlled House passed the measure on Wednesday night in a party line vote of 57-37. That vote came a day after the GOP-controlled Iowa Senate, where the legislation was introduced, also passed the bill on a party line...
    Reuters February 20, 2021 0 Comments Democrats and voting rights groups condemned on Friday a broad proposal by Georgia Republicans to limit absentee and in-person voting in the state, the latest salvo in a national fight over efforts to place new restrictions on casting a ballot. Republicans said the sweeping measure was needed to bolster confidence in election integrity after former President Donald Trump disputed November’s results that saw Joe Biden become the first Democratic presidential candidate to win the state in 28 years. The legislation, one of dozens of restrictive voting measures pending in Georgia, would have “devastating consequences” for voters, a coalition of voting rights groups said in an open letter to Republican state legislators. They said it was designed to reduce the influence of Black voters, whose heavy turnout helped propel Biden to victory and delivered Democrats two U.S. Senate wins in January. The bill includes...
    By BEN NADLER and JEFF AMY, Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — Democrats in Georgia’s state Senate are slamming their Republican colleagues for holding subcommittee votes on high-profile bills that seek to limit voting with little public notice given and without a livestream option for the public to watch. A Senate subcommittee Wednesday approved bills that would curtail who can vote absentee by mail and require a photo ID for absentee voters. The bills could soon be taken up by the full Senate Ethics Committee. The subcommittee meeting was held at 7 a.m. No agenda for the meeting was posted online beforehand and the meeting was not livestreamed. Public access to committee rooms has also been restricted because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Democrats quickly criticized the lack of access on the consequential bills, which were introduced by Republicans after a surge in absentee voting helped Democrats win the presidential contest in...
    Loading the player... The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has long championed the constitutional rights of all Americans, which include freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and one’s right to privacy. This week, the nonpartisan organization launched its multi-year initiative, Systemic Equality, which specifically challenges the Biden-Harris administration to bring forth policies that will address the needs and concerns of Black and Indigenous citizens across the nation. Read More: Biden considers Dr. Lisa Cook to be first Black woman on Federal Reserve Board: report (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) The Systemic Equality plan also definitively targets America’s history of racism and oppression by way of working to strike down discriminatory laws that present barriers to the people they harm most. Coupled with advocacy efforts on the local level, Systemic Equality will also aim its efforts in dousing the still-warm embers of Jim Crow across the South with a focused core of...
    A worker is seen during the vote-by-mail ballots scanning process at the Miami-Dade County Election Department on October 21, 2020. Earlier this month, Ari Berman wrote about the tsunami of voter suppression bills that state legislators have introduced in the first weeks of 2021, tweeting “This is huge scandal that should be getting as much attention as Trump’s plot to overturn election.” Indeed. As of Monday, according to the Brennan Center for Justice, which has for years closely followed and analyzed voter laws across the nation, 33 states had filed, pre-filed, or carried over from last year 165 bills restricting the vote. These focus mainly on limiting mail voting access, imposing stricter voter ID requirements, slashing voter registration opportunities, and enabling more aggressive voter roll purges. All part of reinventing Jim Crow. Writes the Brennan team, “These bills are an unmistakable response to the unfounded and dangerous lies about fraud that followed the 2020 election.” The worst of the lot: Arizona with 19 bills, Pennsylvania...
    Members of the Georgia state Senate introduced legislation on Monday intended to ensure election integrity, CNN reported. The legislation consists of eight proposals including measures that would require photo IDs to vote and a sufficient reason to vote with an absentee ballot, according to CNN. It would additionally increase poll watching security, ban drop boxes and automatic registration, and update election officials monthly of registered voters who have died.(Related: Trump Team’s Allegations Of Widespread Fraud Are Not Supported By His Own Lawsuits) Democratic critics of the bills claim that this is a form of voter suppression. This is what happens when Democrats win in GA. These bills introduced today by the GA Senate GOP are a laundry list of #votersupression tactics meant to roll back voter participation, aimed specifically at reversing the impact Black voters and other voters of color. #gapol pic.twitter.com/njk2Q4QIcR — GA Senate Democrats (@GASenateDems) February 2, 2021...
    Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich is siding with Republican legislators who are requesting access to election materials in Maricopa County. "Our filing today in the subpoena dispute between the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors and the legislature details why the Arizona Legislature has constitutional authority to investigate the County's administration of elections," Brnovich tweeted. Our filing today in the subpoena dispute between the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors and the legislature details why the Arizona Legislature has constitutional authority to investigate the County's administration of elections. Read amicus brief: https://t.co/lE1Tx9gOZu pic.twitter.com/M0i7NBjO88— Mark Brnovich (@GeneralBrnovich) December 30, 2020 The amicus curiae brief filed by Brnovich argues Maricopa County's contention that the Legislature lacks the power to issue subpoenas is mistaken. "The County incorrectly takes a narrow view of the legislative subpoena power," the amicus brief says. "The legislative power to issue subpoenas is inherent in the power to legislate. ... Consequently,...
    A Maricopa County Superior Court judge tossed out the Arizona state Senate's request that he order local officials to allow access to voting machines and records to aid a GOP-led effort to audit the county's election results. In a ruling on Wednesday, Judge Randall Warner said state Senate President Karen Fann and Sen. Eddie Farnsworth did not follow the appropriate procedures to enforce a legislative subpoena. But they are allowed to refile their case, according to KTAR. Unless an update is filed, the matter will be dismissed on Feb. 1. The ruling is a setback for supporters of President Trump, as Congress is set to count and certify the Electoral College results on Jan. 6. Trump refuses to concede the election to President-elect Joe Biden, claiming the contest was stolen through massive voter fraud, although federal and state officials have said there is no evidence to support such a...
    DOVER, Del. (AP) — Measures pre-filed by Democratic Delaware lawmakers would expand voting access and move the state’s primary election to April. The Delaware State News reports that a House measure would eliminate the state’s restrictions on absentee voting. It would strike the specific list of reasons allowing someone to vote remotely. Another measure would allow same-day voter registration. Legislation also would move Delaware’s primary election from September to coincide with the April presidential primary, even in off years. The change would take effect in 2024. The Delaware General Assembly returns Jan. 12, though the first few weeks will likely be held virtually. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Delaware, Maryland, Associated Press
    Editor’s note: This coverage is made possible through Votebeat, a nonpartisan reporting project covering local election integrity and voting access. The article is available for reprint under the terms of Votebeat’s republishing policy. Lawmakers and voting rights groups have been fighting over updates to Texas’ election systems for years, but issues heightened by the coronavirus pandemic have launched a new conversation over voter access. This January, primarily Democratic lawmakers heading into the next legislative session are honing in on problems like backlogs in processing voter registrations, an unprecedented flood of mail-in ballots and applications that overwhelmed some elections offices, and a lack of viable alternatives to voting in person. Outnumbered by GOP members in both chambers, Texas Democrats have seen their efforts to expand voter accessibility thwarted at virtually every turn for years. But the pandemic-era challenges combined with strong Republican performance at the polls — which may have been...
    Early on Thursday morning, Donald Trump shared a One America News segment on Twitter that spoke to cyber analyst Ron Watkins, who Gizmodo claimed used to be an administrator for 8kun. According to a tweet by NBC News reporter Ben Collins, the website — owned by the analyst’s father, Jim Watkins — was rebranded from its previous name, 8chan, due to its link to the manifestos of mass murderers. In addition to these reported manifestos, Mother Jones reported that the site was also known for user swaps of child pornography and profiting from domains that contained this material. “The domains’ names include terms such as ‘preteen,’ ‘schoolgirl,” and ‘child’ alongside graphic terms for genitalia and words like ‘rape’ and ‘love.’ It’s unclear what, if anything, is currently being served at the domains. However, an analysis of metadata collected years ago from one by archive.org shows dozens of filenames and links...
    Remember the Federalists? They were a pretty big deal at one point. They were the earliest dominant political party in the U.S., and their candidate won the first contested presidential election. Yet not even 20 years after Federalist president John Adams left office, the party had shuffled off the stage. They couldn’t even manage to nominate a presidential candidate in 1820, and they no longer existed by the next election. There are many reasons for their disappearance, but one of the most important is that the Federalists distrusted democracy, and thus opposed the removal of property restrictions on voting. Although neither they nor their Democratic-Republican opponents considered enacting true voting rights equality and universal suffrage for Americans of every race and gender, the Federalists clung too long to the elitist idea of Hamilton (sorry, Lin-Manuel) that only propertied white men should vote. As more poor white men gradually did gain the...
    Jonathan Lai - Samantha Melamed - Michaelle Bond October 28, 2020 9:29PM (UTC) This article originally appeared on ProPublica. Rem Em emigrated from Cambodia in 2002 to help take care of a grandchild with leukemia. Twelve years later, she became a U.S. citizen. It was one of the proudest moments of her life. Ever since, she's made sure to vote, even though the native Khmer speaker isn't fluent in English. She talks to her family, other Cambodian immigrants in her South Philadelphia neighborhood and community groups about the candidates and the races. Before she votes, she studies what her preferred candidate's name looks like in English, noting as well the shapes that form the word "VOTE." : Then she goes to the polls, where she hands her ID to a poll worker she can't understand, signs a poll book she can't read and scrutinizes the shapes on the voting...
    SAN ANTONIO – Deaf voters in Bexar County can only get interpreter assistance at two polling locations, despite disability advocates saying voters should have the ability to get help at the location of their choice. Deaf people who rely on American Sign Language may need an interpreter’s help at the polls since English is, for them, a second language, and their ability to actually read the ballot can vary widely. While voters can bring their own interpreter to the polls, those who cannot should contact their local elections officials to request assistance, according to the Secretary of State’s Office. Bexar County Elections Administrator Jacquelyn Callanen said ASL interpreter assistance is available at the Bexar County Elections Department on Frio Street through a video remote interpreter (VRI) service, and a live interpreter is available at the San Antonio College Victory Center. Though there are 48 early voting locations, and 302 planned...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — The U.S. Attorney’s Office says they will monitor Los Angeles County’s vote centers for their compliance with federal disability access laws. Early in-person voting in California begins Saturday and continue through Nov. 3. The ongoing pandemic changed voting practices this year, and a large number of votes are being cast by mail and at voting centers being set up at large venues like Dodger Stadium and Staples Center to allow for social distancing. The U.S. Attorney’s Office says they will specifically monitor LA County’s vote centers for their compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA, for people with mobility and vision disabilities. They say the monitoring is part of the Justice Department’s ADA Voting Initiative, which works to protect the voting rights of people with disabilities. Anyone who believes they may have been victims of discrimination in voting, including because of disability, can make...
    With less than a week until early voting begins in Maryland, voting rights advocates say they’ll be keeping an eye out for voter confusion and intimidation as voters head to the polls in what promises to be an unconventional general election. Several voting rights groups told Maryland Matters what they are focused on and their concerns, as the Nov. 3 election looms. Fighting voter confusion Voter confusion is at the top of Maryland Common Cause Executive Director Joanne Antoine’s concerns as in-person voting begins. She worries that some voters, confused by the state’s switch from regular polling locations to larger voting centers, will head to their usual polling location on Election Day. “We’re expecting a lot of people to, unfortunately, just kind of wake up the day before Election Day or on Election Day,” Antoine said. “And they’re finding out that their regular polling location isn’t open.” Fearing a massive...
    A Donald Trump-appointed federal judge in Pennsylvania on Saturday dismissed a lawsuit filed by the president’s re-election campaign which sought to prevent Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar (D) from implementing changes aimed at increasing access to mail-in voting. In a lengthy 138-page order, U.S. District Judge J. Nicholas Ranjan, whom Trump appointed to the bench last year, reasoned that the campaign’s theory of harm was too speculative to meet the standing requirements under Article III necessary to pursue its claim. “Federal courts adjudicate cases and controversies, where a plaintiff’s injury is concrete and particularized. Here, however, Plaintiffs have not presented a concrete injury to warrant federal-court review,” Ranjan wrote. The president’s re-election campaign filed the lawsuit in June. The Republican National Committee (RNC), three members of Congress from Pennsylvania, and two Republican voters later joined the suit. The complaint asked the court to require guards at all ballot drop-boxes,...
    President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign on Wednesday threatened to sue unless it is granted access to observe activity inside opened satellite election offices in Philadelphia. Philly Election Official says City Hall is NOT a public building!! TRUMP observer thrown out of City Hall! what are they doing?? pic.twitter.com/QufmAfdSIA — Mike Roman (@mikeroman) September 30, 2020 The Associated Press reported: A letter, sent late Tuesday night by a lawyer representing the Trump campaign, insisted the campaign has a legal right to observe the voting process in the heavily Democratic city’s satellite election offices. “If we have not satisfactorily resolved this matter by tomorrow at 5 p.m., the campaign will seek court intervention,” the lawyer, Linda Kerns, wrote. Election lawyers say there is no right under Pennsylvania law, even for a certified poll watcher, to observe inside an election office where someone is registering to vote, applying for a mail-in ballot or filling one...
    Arnold Schwarzenegger has offered up his own money to help improve voting access and reopen polling locations across the country. In a series of tweets, the former California governor outlined his objectives. "Today I sent a letter to nearly 6,000 elections officials and county commissioners in states formerly covered by Voting Rights Act Section 5 inviting them to apply for grants, funded by me, to reopen polling centers and improve voting access," wrote Schwarzenegger, a Republican. "This country gave me everything, and I truly believe this could be one of the best investments I have ever made. All of us can do our part to give back and fight for equality. "The grants are completely non-partisan and will be offered to those who demonstrate the greatest need and ability to close gaps in voting access. The process will be run through @GovArnoldUSC." Schwarzenegger teased his idea earlier this month. ...
    SoFi Stadium, the new home of the NFL’s Los Angeles Rams and Los Angeles Chargers, will host a voting center for use during the presidential election in November, stadium officials said Tuesday. The voting center will be located next to the stadium for a five-day period ahead of the election. The center will be open from Oct. 30 to Nov. 2 from 10 a.m. PT to 7 p.m. PT and on Tuesday, Nov. 3 from 7 a.m. PT to 8 p.m. PT, according to the announcement. NFL TO CLOSE TEAM FACILITIES ON ELECTION DAY IN VOTING PUSH “We are proud to work with the Los Angeles Chargers, Los Angeles Rams and the Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk to turn SoFi Stadium and Hollywood Park into a Vote Center,” said Jason Gannon, managing director of SoFi Stadium and the Hollywood Park complex. “Our goal is to help expand polling access for our local community and...
    SAN ANTONIO – Bexar County leaders officially announced Wednesday that the AT&T Center will serve as a voting site during the upcoming election cycle, including early voting days from Oct. 13-30 and Election Day on Tuesday, Nov. 3. “As stewards of the AT&T Center, it was important for our organization to pursue this opportunity and collaborate with the county for safe voting locations in our community,” said Spurs Sports & Entertainment CEO RC Buford. “We firmly believe that voting is one of the most important and effective steps towards achieving equity for all." Bexar County Precinct 2 Commissioner Justin Rodriguez spoke with KSAT last week about what the transformation of the Spurs home arena to a mega polling site would possibly entail. “We had conversations with the Spurs and their general counsel going back to probably May,” said Rodriguez. Rodriguez said the key discussions surrounding the use of the East...
    SAN ANTONIO – In the latest KSAT Q&A, County commissioner Justin Rodriguez talked about the precautions being taken to ensure the safety of voters as the threat of COVID-19 continues to loom into election season. Vote by mail Texas is one of just six states that has not opened up mail-in voting for all voters amid the pandemic. To be eligible to vote by mail in Texas, voters must be 65 years or older. You might also qualify if you are disabled, or in jail but still eligible to vote. Anyone seeking to vote by mail has to apply. To help make the application process easier, Rodriguez says Bexar County is automatically sending the vote-by-mail application to all residents over 65. “They don’t have to do anything on their end to request it,” he said. The county is also paying for the postage to send the application to the Elections...
    This article was written by WTOP’s news partners at Maryland Matters and republished with permission. Sign up for Maryland Matters’ free email subscription today. Voting rights advocates announced Monday that the Maryland State Board of Elections is partnering with nonprofit organizations to expand absentee ballot access to eligible incarcerated voters. “We know that each election cycle, countless voters are excluded from participating in the electoral process, and these are individuals who are pre-trial and misdemeanor status,” said Nicole Hanson-Mundell, executive director of Out For Justice. “They are prevented from access to voter registration forms; they are prevented from having access to mail-in request forms; and they are prevented from accessing the ballot.” Hanson-Mundell said at a news conference that the State Board of Elections has “committed” to sending letters with voting instructions, voter registration applications, mail-in ballot applications and envelops with return postage to all eligible voters held in local jails. These materials will be...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — The Expand the Ballot Coalition announced Monday morning a statewide campaign to have voting materials sent to every local jail in Maryland. “Individuals, sitting in our prisons in jail who are pre-trial, not yet convicted of anything, are individuals who are sitting in our jails with misdemeanor convictions- these are individuals who are eligible to vote,” a representative from the coalition sent Monday. It’s an education effort to remind Marylanders that people who are not currently serving a sentence for a felony conviction do have the right to vote
    There are growing calls to expand vote-by-mail to protect voters from exposure to COVID-19, despite opposition from President Trump and many conservatives. Apart from their protests, civil rights and voter protection activists warn that while vote-by-mail would expand access in some cases, it could also disenfranchise vulnerable voting blocs if security measures are not put in place. "As we seek to expand voting by mail, we can't think about it as a panacea that's going to solve our access problems and be equally open to everyone," said ACLU Voting Rights Project Director Dale Ho. "The biggest concern that I have is if states — in seeking to replace in-person opportunities — don't ensure that those mail-in options are accessible to everyone." Five states already conduct elections primarily by mail, and 29 allow anyone to vote absentee without an excuse, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL). A recent...
    SACRAMENTO (CBF SF) — California Secretary of State Alex Padilla spoke to reporters Wednesday about voting access and safety this year during the pandemic. “To say this is an unprecedented year” with the political climate and the pandemic “would be an understatement,” said Padilla, who is the state’s chief elections officer. The Nov. 3 presidential election is approaching and is less than eight weeks away. Padilla described the date as “the last day to vote,” and stressed voting by mail. He said voting by mail is the safest choice. Every registered voter will get a ballot in the mail if their address on file is correct. Vote-by-mail ballots will be sent out during the first week of October. The last day for mailing out ballots to voters is Oct. 5, but for military and overseas voters, ballots are mailed out 45 days in advance. Ballots typically would be counted if...
    SAN ANTONIO – The AT&T Center will have a different look this fall. Instead of being filled with cheering Spurs fans, it will host voters as it’s transformed this October and November into a mega voting site for the first time in its history. The NBA and National Basketball Players Association agreed on Aug. 28 to allow teams to use their home arenas as polling places after a walkout by players in response to the police shooting of Jacob Blake in Wisconsin. But Spurs Sports and Entertainment and Bexar County, which owns the AT&T Center, had already been discussing the use of the arena for election purposes for months. “We had conversations with the Spurs and their general counsel going back to probably May,” said Justin Rodriguez, Precinct 2 county commissioner. Rodriguez said the key discussions surrounding the use of the East Side arena came down to voter access, maximizing...
    The NBA playoffs will resume Saturday after play was suspended on Wednesday night when the Milwaukee Bucks boycotted their postseason game against the Orlando Magic in response to the police shooting of Jacob Blake. NBA commissioner Adam Silver and National Basketball Players Association executive director Michele Roberts ended the three-game halt with a joint statement on Friday afternoon, detailing plans to work together for social justice and easier access to voting locations for the upcoming 2020 presidential election. A 29-year-old father of three, Blake was shot in the back seven times and left paralyzed by Kenosha, Wisconsin police officers who were responding to a domestic disturbance call on Sunday. Since the shooting, the WNBA, Major League Baseball, and MLS have also postponed games in protest, while demonstrators have marched every night in Kenosha, a lakeside town 40 miles south of Milwaukee. The NBA playoffs will resume Saturday after play...
    President Donald Trump railed against voting in a Thursday night tweet, and again in a speech in Arlington, VA on Friday and claimed that Democrats required picture I.D. to attend the virtual convention this week — seemingly referencing a comment Fox News anchor Sean Hannity made while interviewing the president last night. Trump took to Twitter right before the major speeches of DNC night four to fault the Democrats for requiring people to “have an ID with a picture” to attend, which they didn’t, considering the convention was virtual. “Yet the Democrats refuse to do this when it come [sic] to your very important VOTE!” Trump added. “Gee, I wonder WHY???” To get into the Democrat National Convention, you must have an ID card with a picture…Yet the Democrats refuse to do this when it come to your very important VOTE! Gee, I wonder WHY??? — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 21,...
    As Democrats gear up for the finale of the Democratic National Convention, party leaders are accusing President Trump and his handpicked Postmaster General Louis DeJoy of making changes to the U.S. Postal Service to hinder voting access.  DeJoy is due to testify before Congress about these changes, and he has now agreed to halt the overhaul until after the election. Recent delays in mail delivery, a management shakeup and reports of mail-sorting equipment being dismantled sparked widespread concerns about whether the U.S. Postal Service would be able to handle an expected flood of absentee ballots this fall. Mr. Trump has denied involvement in the overhaul — a claim Democratic National Committee chairman Tom Perez found hard to believe.  Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox "We have lost faith in the Postal Service because of the sabotage of the president," Perez told CBSN anchor Vladimir Duthiers Wednesday. "We are not going...
    Washington (CNN)The US Supreme Court continues to send a clear message when it comes to emergency requests to block or change state actions and regulations tied to Covid-19: not interested.Whether it's voting access, attendance limits on churches or prison crowding, the court -- steered by Chief Justice John Roberts -- is not yet stepping in to second-guess state or local officials. The current track could make it harder for Republicans and President Donald Trump to stop states from expanding absentee voting in blue states and could hurt Democrats and liberals in red states who want to loosen voting restrictions due to coronavirus.So far, however, the pattern has mainly benefited GOP interests and generally limited voting access. But on Thursday, the justices again backed a state's position when they sided with Rhode Island to turn away a Republican attempt to block an agreement to no longer require two signatures to vote...
    (CNN)President Donald Trump and former President Barack Obama spoke loud and clear Thursday about voting rights, highlighting their polar positions on an issue that has only become more fraught with the backdrop of the coronavirus pandemic.Trump suggested the presidential election should be delayed "until people can properly, securely and safely vote" and Obama, speaking at the funeral of civil rights legend Rep. John Lewis, said that those in power are "attacking our voting rights with surgical precision." Attention will increasingly turn to the courts. But the Supreme Court, which often splits 5-4 on election related issues, has not seemed receptive to pleas to address the intersection between a plethora of voting rights issues including absentee ballots, polling place hours and voter ID with the age of Covid-19. The court has shown little inclination this year to ease ballot rules in states such as Wisconsin, Texas, Alabama and Idaho. It's a...
    President Donald Trump has been vehemently railing against voting by mail, making the baseless claim that it is a recipe for voter fraud — and even making the outrageous suggestion, on July 30, that perhaps the United States should delay its 2020 presidential election because of it. Trump, however, has a history of voting by mail. And an “Access Hollywood” video from 2004 shows Trump threatening to vote by mail after struggling with voting machines. CNN’s Paul LeBlanc explains that the “Access Hollywood” segment “shows Trump alongside TV host Billy Bush visiting multiple New York City polling locations. Trump, however, is blocked from voting at each location because he is not on any of the voter rolls at each stop.” Trump, according to LeBlanc, becomes “increasingly frustrated” and says, “I’m going to fill out the absentee ballot.” When the segment ends, Trump is seen filling out a provisional ballot in...
    VIDEO40:4640:46President Obama delivers remarks at civil rights icon, Rep. John Lewis's funeralNews Videos WASHINGTON -- Former President Barack Obama delivered an impassioned eulogy for the late congressman and civil rights leader John Lewis on Thursday, and called on Congress to honor Lewis' legacy by expanding the Voting Rights Act.  Speaking in Atlanta, the nation's first Black president warned that the same forces which empowered and motivated some of the most infamous segregationists in American history are still at work today.  Lewis, said Obama, "knew that the march is not over. That the race is not yet won," and "we have to be vigilant against the darker currents of this country's history." "Bull Connor may be gone, but today, we witness with our own eyes police officers kneeling on the necks of Black Americans," said Obama, referring to the police killing of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man in Minneapolis this...
    U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to the news media before departing on Marine One for travel to Midland, Texas from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, July 29, 2020.Leah Millis | Reuters WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump on Thursday suggested that perhaps the United States would need to "delay the election" on November 3, claiming that mail-in voting would make this fall's election "the most inaccurate and fraudulent in history."  Trump has no power to unilaterally delay elections, which were set for the first Tuesday in November through a 19th century law passed by Congress.  As states grapple with how to let citizens vote safely during the coronavirus pandemic, many have turned to mail-in voting as a potential solution that allows people to cast their ballots without waiting in long lines at potentially crowded polling places.  But Republicans, led by Trump, have strongly objected to expanding...
    New York state Sen. Zellnor Myrie (D), who chairs the Senate Elections Committee The Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest is compiled by David Nir, Jeff Singer, Stephen Wolf, Carolyn Fiddler, and Matt Booker, with additional contributions from David Jarman, Steve Singiser, Daniel Donner, James Lambert, David Beard, and Arjun Jaikumar. Leading Off ● New York: New York's Democratic-run Senate has passed a number of bills to make voting more accessible this fall, including measures to: Allow all voters to request absentee ballots due to concerns about any epidemic; Notify voters of any issues with their absentee ballots and give them a chance to fix them; Authorize New York City to set up its own online voter registration system (a statewide system likely will not come online until 2021); Allow officials to begin processing requests for absentee ballots earlier than the current start date, which is 30 days before Election...
    The far left, led by Reps. Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) and Ayanna Pressley (D-MA), is championing a reform measure dubbed the “BREATHE Act,” which contains a slew of radical proposals, including the call to incentivize states to pass laws that expand voting access, allowing “local and State resident voting for undocumented people.” The proposal, drafted in partnership with the Movement for Black Lives, aims to overhaul the U.S. criminal justice system, providing a range of radical changes — from defunding the police and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to establishing a commission tasked with designing reparations for victims of “mass criminalization.” An overview of the proposal devotes a section to ensuring “democratic, fair, and secure voting processes that are free from racial discrimination and voter suppression in every State.” The proposed measures include “enfranchising all formerly and presently incarcerated people in federal elections,” “creating a public financing program for campaigns that are powered by small...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Miami-Dade school teachers are in the midst of a three-day contract ratification vote. The contract is controversial as it gives a salary boost to first year teachers but reportedly not much of an increase to veteran educators. Teachers are voting via internet and need a pin to access their ballot. Some teachers are complaining that the PINs have been slow in coming and the election closes at 5 p.m. Friday. They are voting by email due to the pandemic. Teacher union officials urge patience and if the delivery issue is not solved they say they will extend the election deadline. “If we hear that people within the next 24 hours still do not have access to it, then we will do what we have to do and extend the voting so everyone has access to it, absolutely,” said Karla Hernandez-Mats, the president of the United Teachers of...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The ballot is deployed to replace the bullet, to decide peacefully who will lead, to resolve divisive issues and to empower individual citizens. Whether by voice or shards of pottery in ancient Greece, by ball, by corn and beans, lever and gear machines or touch screens, ballots were often cast in public until the United States and many other nations adopted the Australian model and allowed people to vote to private. The ballot seals the covenant of democracy. Now that civic ritual of casting a ballot has been disrupted by a pandemic and dramatically animated by social unrest. If the results of a frustrating, chaotic primary in Georgia this month are a measure, the notion of democracy itself will also be on the ballot in the November election. Congress is now considering sending $3.6 billion to states to help facilitate safe and fair elections as part of...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The ballot is deployed to replace the bullet, to decide peacefully who will lead, to resolve divisive issues and to empower individual citizens. Whether by voice or shards of pottery in ancient Greece, by ball, by corn and beans, lever and gear machines or touch screens, ballots were often cast in public until the United States and many other nations adopted the Australian model and allowed people to vote to private. The ballot seals the covenant of democracy. Now that civic ritual of casting a ballot has been disrupted by a pandemic and dramatically animated by social unrest. If the results of a frustrating, chaotic primary in Georgia this month are a measure, the notion of democracy itself will also be on the ballot in the November election. Congress is now considering sending $3.6 billion to states to help...
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