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    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The North Carolina Republican Party is expected to vote Monday on whether to censure Sen. Richard Burr over his vote to convict former President Donald Trump during Trump’s second impeachment trial. Party spokesman Tim Wigginton told multiple news outlets Sunday that the group’s central committee would meet for the vote Monday night. Burr is one of seven Republicans who voted to convict Trump of “incitement of insurrection.” Burr initially voted against the trial’s constitutionality, but said he resolved to be an “impartial juror” once the full Senate decided to proceed. North Carolina GOP Chairman Michael Whatley said in a statement Saturday that Burr’s vote to convict “in a trial that he declared unconstitutional is shocking and disappointing.” Burr said in a statement after the trial that Trump “bears responsibility” for the riot at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. “The evidence is compelling that President Trump...
    Sunday on Fox News Channel’s “America’s News HQ,” George Washington University Law School Professor Jonathan Turley sounded off on the question of whether or not former President Donald Trump could be criminally charged for inciting the riot at the U.S. Capitol in January. The Senate voted Saturday to acquit Trump of inciting an insurrection. Turley acknowledged that Trump as a former president is not immune from being charged with a crime. He argued, however, that Trump’s speech prior to the riot at the Capitol “does not meet the standard” of incitement. “Well, he can be charged, and those statements were refuting of House managers that somehow a president can just get away with it. A president can’t get away with anything that’s a crime,” Turley said of the legality of charging a former president with a crime. “He can be charged, but you have to charge him. so many people...
    Boris Johnson today insisted the impeachment process against Donald Trump shows that US democracy is 'strong and robust'. The PM refused to get into the detail of the extraordinary wrangling that saw the former president acquitted in a partisan vote in the senate over recent days. But he insisted that the US system and constitution had shown its resilience after the 'kerfuffle' over the election result. The Senate voted 57-43 to convict Mr Trump over his role in fuelling the storming of the Capitol, falling far short of the 67 votes needed for a conviction even though seven Republicans joined forces with the Democrats.  In an interview with CBS television today, Mr Johnson - who was seen as a close ally of Mr Trump but condemned him over the action in the Capitol - was asked what 'signal' the verdict sent to the world. 'I think the clear message that...
    In a statement released Saturday evening, President Joe Biden addressed the U.S. Senate’s decision to acquit Donald Trump for the second time, The Hill reported. The upper chamber voted 57-43 to acquit the former commander-in-chief on a charge of incitement of insurrection against the U.S. government, with most Republicans voting not guilty. According to Biden, however, even some of those who voted to acquit Trump acknowledged that his rhetoric contributed to the January 6 riots. “While the final vote did not lead to a conviction, the substance of the charge is not in dispute,” Biden said. “Even those opposed to the conviction, like Senate Minority Leader McConnell, believe Donald Trump was guilty of a ‘disgraceful dereliction of duty’ and ‘practically and morally responsible for provoking’ the violence unleashed on the Capitol.” McConnell, as CNN reported, delivered a scathing speech slamming Trump for his role in the January 6 riots, but...
    President Joe Biden confronted the acquittal of former President Donald Trump on Saturday by declaring that although Republican senators in the main did not vote against Trump, the “substance of the charge” that spawned the impeachment trial to his mind was “not in dispute.” As Breitbart news reported,  the Senate failed to clear the 67-vote barrier necessary to convict Trump of the charge he incited an insurrection on January 6, when Congress was certifying the 2020 presidential election. Seven Senate Republicans voted to convict Trump of inciting an insurrection, including Sens. Bill Cassidy (R-LA), Richard Burr (R-NC), Susan Collins (R-ME), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Mitt Romney (R-UT), Pat Toomey (R-PA), Ben Sasse (R-NE). Biden, who was at the Camp David presidential retreat when the decision came down, pointed to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConell (R-Ky.) who did not vote to convict Trump, as part of his statement in response. “While the final vote did...
    President BidenJoe BidenGraham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Overnight Defense: Pentagon, Congress appoint panel members to rename Confederate bases | Military approves 20 more coronavirus vaccination teams Lawmakers give standing ovation for Officer Eugene Goodman MORE on late Saturday night issued a statement on the acquittal of former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE, in which he said that he was thinking about those who protected the Capitol on Jan. 6, adding that though Republican senators largely did not vote against Trump, the “substance of the charge” was not in dispute. The Senate voted 57-43 on Saturday to acquit Trump of the charge of incitement of the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol building. At...
    President Joe Biden issued a statement late Saturday, hours after the U.S. Senate voted to acquit former President Donald Trump on an article of impeachment for "inciting an insurrection." "While the final vote did not lead to a conviction, the substance of the charge is not in dispute," Biden wrote. "Even those opposed to the conviction, like Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, believe Donald Trump was guilty of a 'disgraceful dereliction of duty' and "practically and morally responsible for provoking' the violence unleashed on the Capitol." This is a developing story. Check back for updates.Dom Calicchio is a Senior Editor at FoxNews.com. Reach him at dom.calicchio@foxnews.com.
    Miami : Without conviction, the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump ended. The billionaire was acquitted of the charge of “incitement to insurrection”, raised on January 13 by the House of Representatives of the United States Congress. The indictment, made a week after a mob of pro-Trump protesters stormed the Capitol building, was dismissed this Saturday by members of the Senate. That instance voted to determine the guilt or innocence of the magnate, who was said to have promoted the attack against the Legislative headquarters. The session ended with 57 yeses, 10 votes short of those needed to convict the New Yorker.. As it was expected, Democrats spoke out en bloc in favor of “impeachment.” Apart from them, seven Republican senators supported the initiative. Dissident lawmakers include Mitt Romney, who also distanced himself from partisan discipline last year, during the first vote of no confidence against Donald Trump. The...
    Savannah Rychcik February 13, 2021 0 Comments The Senate voted to acquit Former President Donald Trump on the charge of inciting an insurrection on Saturday after falling short of the 67 votes needed to convict him. The majority of senators voted to declare Trump guilty of the charge in a 57-43 vote, including seven Republicans. Sens. Richard Burr (R-NC), Bill Cassidy (R-La.), Susan Collins (R-Maine), Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), Mitt Romney (R-Utah), Ben Sasse (R-Neb.), and Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) all sided with Democrats. The Senate acquitted Donald Trump at his second impeachment trial. Vote is 57-43 aye. Needed 67.These Republicans joined all Democrats:Richard Burr (R-NC)Bill Cassidy (R-LA)Susan Collins (R-ME)Lisa Murkowski (R-AK)Mitt Romney (R-UT)Ben Sasse (R-NE)Pat Toomey (R-PA) pic.twitter.com/8VHZzfRc0a— The Recount (@therecount) February 13, 2021 The failure to convict Trump makes him the only president to be impeached and acquitted twice in the history of the United States. Trump released a statement following the...
    Former President Trump was acquitted in an unprecedented second impeachment trial on the charge of inciting an insurrection for the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, making him the first and only president to impeached and acquitted twice in history. A majority of senators found Trump guilty on Saturday in a 57-43 vote, but the number fell short of the supermajority needed to convict the president. Had Trump been convicted, the Senate would have moved to bar the 45th president from holding federal office ever again. The seven GOP senators who joined with all Democrats in finding Trump guilty were: Sens. Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania. The acquittal means that as of now Trump can leave the door open to another White House bid in 2024, though senators have hinted they may...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Enough senators have cast ‘not guilty’ votes to acquit Donald Trump of impeachment charge, incitement of insurrection. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    WASHINGTON - Following two blistering days of arguments by the House Democratic managers that former President Donald Trump instigated a violent insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 and continues to pose a clear and present danger to democracy, the Trump defense team on Friday questioned the legitimacy of the impeachment trial, slamming it as “an act of political vengeance” driven by the Democrats’ anti-Trump animus. “It’s about Democrats trying to disqualify their political opposition,” Trump lawyer Michael van der Veen told senators. “It is constitutional cancel culture.” The question of whether the Senate can try to convict a former president has been debated ever since the House of Representatives impeached Trump last month, making him the first U.S. president to be impeached twice. Under the Constitution, conviction results in removal and disqualification from holding federal office in the future. On the opening day of the trial Tuesday,...
    House impeachment managers “accidentally” added a blue check verification to a pro-Trump tweet used in the Senate trial of the former president, but aides condemned the charge by defense lawyers that they manipulated video evidence. Senior House Democratic aides for the managers acknowledged a graphic they displayed during the trial showing a pro-Trump tweet, “accidentally had a blue verification checkmark,” but said the content of the tweet was “entirely accurate.” “If anything, it is further evidence of President Trump’s attention to and knowledge of what was being openly planned on January 6 by his followers, even those without Twitter verifications," a senior Democratic aide said. The tweeter, Jennifer Lynn Lawrence, this week said her Twitter account does not have the blue check mark that the social media giant uses to indicate a “verified” account. The impeachment managers used two of her tweets in the trial. One of them,...
    In an incitement case, the issue is what the accused says, not how the mob hears it. Indeed, that is always the First Amendment analysis. If what a person says is constitutionally protected expression, we protect the speech and we don’t give the heckler – or the rioter – a veto. Rep. Madeleine Dean, D-Pa., one of the House impeachment managers, noted on Wednesday afternoon that, 15 minutes into his Jan. 6 Ellipse speech, then-President Trump asserted that he knew the crowd was about to march peacefully on the Capitol. She grudgingly conceded that this was "one of his defenses" to the incitement charge. In point of fact, it would be a complete defense to an incitement charge if a prosecutor brought one in a real court, which would be inexplicable on the evidence the House managers are presenting. VideoObviously aware of this inconvenient problem, Congresswoman Dean instantly pivoted from...
    The Senate voted Tuesday to move ahead with the unprecedented impeachment trial of former President Trump after listening to nearly four hours of arguments on whether it is constitutional to try a president who is already out of office.  A handful of GOP senators crossed party lines on Tuesday by voting to affirm the constitutionality of the trial.FAST FACTS Trump will stand trial on a single count of incitement of insurrection following the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol.   If convicted on the charge, Trump could be barred from running for office again in the future.  If convicted on the charge, Trump could be barred from running for office again in the future. The six Republicans who joined with the Democrats on voting to continue the trial were Sens. Susan Collins of Maine, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska, and Pat Toomey of...
    Washington — As former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial kicks off in the Senate on Tuesday afternoon, congressional Democrats are working to ensure the legislative focus remains on President Biden's sweeping coronavirus relief package. The impeachment proceedings against Mr. Trump will take priority in the upper chamber, with other legislative activity and nominations put on the back burner for the duration of the trial. But on the other side of the Capitol, the Democratic-led House committees are crafting their parts of Mr. Biden's $1.9 trillion aid package, as outlined in budget reconciliation instructions approved by both chambers in a budget resolution last week. Those portions will then be combined to form the reconciliation bill. "We have to do everything we can to end this crisis. And even though the impeachment trial is an important and august responsibility, we are doing both," Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said during a press...
    Reuters February 8, 2021 0 Comments Former President Trump faced a deadline to submit a pretrial brief on Monday, a day before the Senate is due to begin his second impeachment trial on a charge of inciting insurrection arising from the deadly Jan. 6 rampage at the U.S. Capitol. The nine Democratic House of Representatives lawmakers who will serve as prosecutors hope to persuade members of the 100-seat Senate to convict Trump and ultimately bar him from holding public office again. Trump ended his four-year term in office on Jan. 20, having lost the Nov. 3 election to Democrat Joe Biden. Monday’s deadline for the filing by Trump’s legal team comes as the defense prepares to emphasize its argument – laid out in an earlier filing – that the Senate lacks the constitutional authority to conduct the trial now that he has left office and is a private citizen....
    (CNN)Democrats won the Senate, but they're not yet in charge until the chamber's party leaders strike a power-sharing agreement. The stalemate has prevented Democrats from taking control of key committees since the chamber is operating under the rules of the last Congress, when the GOP was in charge.Meanwhile, President Joe Biden is working to push his agenda through Congress and confirm his Cabinet nominees, and the Senate impeachment trial against former President Donald Trump is set to start on February 9. Democrats hold the majority in the chamber since Vice President Kamala Harris has the power to break tie votes, so once an agreement is reached, Democrats will hold the chairmanships of the committees, giving them power to set the agenda.The organizing resolution was held up for more than a week over a disagreement about whether or not Democrats had to promise in writing that they wouldn't blow up the...
    Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) said Tuesday on Fox News Channel’s “Your World” that he opposed an impeachment trial in the U.S. Senate as a remedy for former President Donald Trump because he was a private citizen and could be prosecuted by the criminal justice system. Cavuto asked, “Do you think he provoked that crowd when he said, ‘These are the things and events that happen when a sacred landslide election victory is so unceremoniously & viciously stripped away from great patriots.’ Do you think he should be punished for those remarks?” Rubio said, “Yeah, so if someone makes those remarks, he’s a private citizen. So he’s now — the reason why we have impeachment is the following; you can’t charge a president. So you have to remove them from office and then subject to criminal penalty. That’s why Ford Pardoned Nixon because after he resigned, he could have still been prosecuted. If he did something that rises to...
    House Democrats presented an article of impeachment against Donald Trump to the Senate on Monday night, kicking off proceedings for an unprecedented second trial of a president that could have major consequences for the former president's future political prospects to proceed. Rep. Jamie Raskin of Maryland, one of nine House Democrats named as prosecutors in the upcoming trial, read the article of impeachment on the Senate floor. In his address, Raskin quoted from Section 3 of the 14th Amendment, which he said "prohibits any person who has "engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the United States from holding any office under the United States." "President Trump gravely endangered the security of the United States and its institutions of government," the article of impeachment says. "He threatened the integrity of the democratic system, interfered with the peaceful transfer of power, and imperiled a coequal branch of government. "He thereby betrayed his trust as president to...
    House impeachment managers Monday night delivered to the Senate an article impeaching now-former President Trump of inciting an insurrection ahead of the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. It’s the second time in little more than a year that Democrats crossed the Capitol to deliver an impeachment charge against Trump, who left office on Jan. 20 and is now living at his Mar a Lago resort in Palm Beach, Florida. The Senate trial will begin on Feb. 8 but it won’t be like the proceedings against Trump last year, when he went on trial for two impeachment articles relating to his effort to convince the Ukraine president to investigate now-President Joe Biden. This time, Chief Justice John Roberts won’t be presiding. Instead, Democrats have appointed Sen. Patrick Leahy, a Vermont Democrat and the Senate’s president pro tempore, to adjudicate the trial. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, a New York Democrat,...
    Reuters January 25, 2021 0 Comments The U.S. House of Representatives on Monday will formally charge ex-President Donald Trump with inciting insurrection in a fiery speech to his followers before this month’s deadly attack on the Capitol, signaling the start of his second impeachment trial. Nine House Democrats who will serve as prosecutors will proceed through the building where hundreds of Trump supporters fought with police, leaving five dead, at about 7 p.m. on Monday (0000 GMT), carrying the article of impeachment to the Senate where Trump will face trial. A similar ceremony was carried out for Trump’s first impeachment trial last January, when the House clerk and sergeant at arms led a small procession of lawmakers through a hushed Capitol. It will mark two historic firsts – Trump is the only U.S. president to have been impeached by the House twice and will be the first to face...
    DONALD Trump's impeachment date has been set for February 8 as the ex-President faces an "incitement of insurrection" charge over the US Capitol riot. Speaking on the Senate Floor on Friday, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said: "Both the House managers and the defense will have a period of time to draft their legal briefs just as they did in previous trials. 2Donald Trump's impeachment date has been set for February 8Credit: AP:Associated Press 2Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer revealed the news on the Senate floor on FridayCredit: EPA "Once the briefs are drafted, the presentation by the parties will commence the week of February 8." Opening arguments in the Senate impeachment trial for Donald Trump on the charge of incitement of insurrection for the Capitol riot will begin the week of Feb. 8. The announcement was made late Friday after agreement was reached with Republicans. The impeachment article against...
    U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Monday will send an article of impeachment against Donald Trump to the Senate, Democratic Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said Friday, beginning a trial at which the former president could be convicted of inciting an insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. "There will be a trial,” Schumer said on the Senate floor. "It will be a full trial. It will be a fair trial.” Democrats rejected Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell's request to delay Trump’s impeachment trial until next month on the ground that Trump’s legal team needs more time to develop a defense strategy. Trump is the first U.S. president to be impeached twice and the first to go on trial after leaving office. Schumer did not say when Trump’s second impeachment trial would begin, but if he is convicted of the single charge of incitement of insurrection, he could be barred from holding...
    New York : Former President Donald Trump is seen on his arrival in West Palm Beach, this Friday, the same day as the inauguration of his successor Joe Biden. Photo: Giorgio Viera / EFE WASHINGTON – Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, announced this Friday that the president of the House of Representatives, also a Democrat Nancy pelosi, will send the article of impeachment to the former president to the Upper House on Monday Donald trump, with which the process will formally begin. Trump, the first president in US history to be subjected to two political trials, will be on this occasion under the charge of “inciting insurrection” for the violent assault on the Capitol on January 6 of a mob of his followers, and that left five dead. This means that Trump’s second impeachment trial could begin next Tuesday, the day after the delivery of...
    WASHINGTON, Jan 22 (Reuters) – The Democratic-controlled House of Representatives will deliver an impeachment charge against former President Donald Trump to the Senate on Monday, rejecting Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell’s request for a delay. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, who displaced McConnell as the chamber’s leader after Democrats won two Georgia runoff elections this month, announced the move on the Senate floor but did not say when Trump’s second impeachment trial would begin. “The House will deliver the article of impeachment to the Senate. The Senate will conduct a trial of the impeachment of Donald Trump. It will be a full trial. It will be a fair trial,” Schumer said on the Senate floor on Friday. That came the morning after McConnell asked the House to delay sending the charges until next Thursday, and to agree not to start the trial until mid-February to give Trump more time...
    Reuters January 21, 2021 0 Comments  The U.S. House of Representatives could as early as Friday send an impeachment charge accusing former President Donald Trump of inciting insurrection to the Senate, which must decide his fate and whether to block him from seeking office again. A source familiar with the planning told Reuters the House could transmit the article of impeachment it approved last week as early as Friday and No. 2 Senate Democrat Dick Durbin said he expected it “in a day or two.” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi declined to answer reporters’ questions about when she would submit the charge, a necessary prelude to starting what would be the first Senate impeachment trial of a president after leaving office. With new President Joe Biden pushing for quick Senate confirmation of Cabinet nominees and congressional approval of a coronavirus aid bill, Durbin told MSNBC on Thursday that Democrats will...
    Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski said Thursday she is undecided on whether to convict President Trump on an impeachment count, despite asserting that that House lawmakers acted "appropriately" by approving the resolution In a statement, Murkowski, of Alaska, said she will consider all the evidence before making a decision on how to vote. "Our nation’s founders gave the Senate the sole power to try all impeachments, and exercising that power is a weighty and important responsibility," Murkowski said. "When the Article of Impeachment comes to the Senate, I will follow the oath I made when sworn as a U.S. Senator. I will listen carefully and consider the arguments of both sides, and will then announce how I will vote." A total of 10 Republicans joined with Democrats in a 232-197 vote to impeach Trump on a single charge of "incitement of insurrection." A Senate impeachment trial is not expected to begin until after President-elect Joe Biden is inaugurated...
    In this image from video, the final vote total of 232-197 to impeachment President Donald Trump over the violent siege of the Capitol, after voting on the House floor Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2021, on Capitol Hill in Washington. House Television via AP WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 13: Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) signs an article of impeachment against President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol on January 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. The House of Representatives voted to impeach Trump for incitement of insurrection, following Vice President Mike Pence's refusal to use the 25th amendment to remove him from office for his role in the breach of the U.S. Capitol last week. Photo by Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images A television monitor in the White House Press Briefing Room displays a recorded address by U.S. President Donald Trump after the U.S. House of Representatives voted to impeach...
    WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump was impeached by the U.S. House for a historic second time, charged with "incitement of insurrection" over the deadly mob siege of the U.S. Capitol in a swift and stunning collapse of his final days in office.With the Capitol secured by armed National Guard troops inside and out, the House voted 232-197 on Wednesday to impeach Trump. The proceedings moved at lightning speed, with lawmakers voting just one week after violent pro-Trump loyalists stormed the Capitol, egged on by the president's calls for them to "fight like hell" against the election results.Ten Republicans fled Trump, joining Democrats who said he needed to be held accountable and warned ominously of a "clear and present danger" if Congress should leave him unchecked before Democrat Joe Biden's inauguration Jan. 20.Trump is the only U.S. president to be twice impeached. It was the most bipartisan presidential impeachment in modern...
    By LISA MASCARO, MARY CLARE JALONICK, JONATHAN LEMIRE and ALAN FRAM WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump was impeached by the U.S. House for a historic second time Wednesday, charged with “incitement of insurrection” over the deadly mob siege of the Capitol in a swift and stunning collapse of his final days in office. With the Capitol secured by armed National Guard troops inside and out, the House voted 232-197 to impeach Trump. The proceedings moved at lightning speed, with lawmakers voting just one week after violent pro-Trump loyalists stormed the U.S. Capitol, egged on by the president’s calls for them to “fight like hell” against the election results. Ten Republicans fled Trump, joining Democrats who said he needed to be held accountable and warned ominously of a “clear and present danger” if Congress should leave him unchecked before Democrat Joe Biden’s inauguration Jan. 20. Trump is the only U.S....
    Jim Lo Scalzo/Getty Images In the final hours leading up to a vote in the United States House on whether to impeach President Donald Trump, five House Republicans were on record saying they would vote in favor of the move. If all 222 House Democrats and 207 remaining House Republicans vote along party lines, impeachment will pass the chamber Wednesday afternoon by a vote of 227-207 before proceeding to the Senate. Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney, the No. 3 House Republican Cheney, the daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, said Tuesday she supported impeachment, saying the president had “summoned” a “mob” to the Capitol. The vote could have lasting implications for Cheney, who just won a vote by her colleagues to become her party’s conference chair. Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) said Wednesday Republicans “ought to have a second vote” on Cheney’s position in light of the development. Washington Rep. Jaime...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is signaling support for the House Democratic impeachment effort that includes an article charging the president with 'incitement of insurrection.' Word of the powerful Republican's posture came Tuesday as the House prepared prepared to take up an impeachment article Wednesday – with signs that several Republicans will back it.  McConnell worked successfully to scuttle the  impeachment effort during a trial last year on different charges, and follows reports that McConnell never wants to speak to Trump again after the Capitol riots that had Trump supporters invading the Capitol, trashing leadership offices, and endangering the lives of lawmakers. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell denounced Trump's election challenge in a speech last week after a mob egged on by Trump invaded the U.S. Capitol McConnell backs the effort because it will make it easier to purge Trump from the party, the New York Times reports. One...
    January 12, 2021 12:30 PM | With information from EFE 15 minutes. The outgoing president of the United States (USA), Donald Trump, considered “absolutely ridiculous” that he is going to open another impeachment or impeachment in Congress for the assault on the Capitol last Wednesday. In addition, he noted that it is causing “tremendous anger.” The president made these statements to reporters at the White House shortly before leaving for Texas. There visit the border wall construction work, amid the political tension that the country is experiencing after last week’s chaotic days. According to Trump, impeachment What the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Democrat Nancy Pelosi, announced is “absolutely ridiculous.” Is about “a continuation of the greatest witch hunt in the history of politics“, something that is causing” tremendous anger “. Democrats said they will charge the president with the charge of “inciting insurrection.” When asked if he plans...
    WASHINGTON (CBS News) — House Democrats on Monday unveiled an impeachment resolution accusing President Trump of “incitement of an insurrection” over the January 6 attack on the Capitol, moving closer to impeaching the president for the second time less than two weeks before he leaves office. The impeachment resolution was spearheaded by Democratic Representatives David Cicilline, Jamie Raskin and Ted Lieu, has the backing of at least 210 Democrats. The bill says the president “engaged in high Crimes and Misdemeanors by inciting violence against the Government of the United States.” The resolution cites Mr. Trump’s speech to supporters on January 6 near the White House, before the crowd moved to the Capitol. Read more on CBSNews.com >>  
    Loading the player... Impeachment pressure mounting, the House worked swiftly Monday to try to oust President Donald Trump from office, pushing the vice president and Cabinet to act first in an extraordinary effort to remove Trump in the final days of his presidency. Trump faces a single charge — “incitement of insurrection” – in an impeachment resolution that could go to a vote by mid-week. First, Democrats called on Vice President Mike Pence to invoke constitutional authority under the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office before Jan. 20, when Democrat Joe Biden is to be inaugurated. Read More: Trump Senate impeachment trial may come after Biden’s first 100 days, Rep. Jim Clyburn says It all adds up to stunning final moments for Trump’s presidency as Democrats and a growing number of Republicans declare that he is unfit for office and could do more damage after inciting a mob that ransacked...
    By LISA MASCARO, DARLENE SUPERVILLE and MARY CLARE JALONICK WASHINGTON (AP) — Impeachment pressure mounting, the House worked swiftly Monday to try to oust President Donald Trump from office, pushing the vice president and Cabinet to act first in an extraordinary effort to remove Trump in the final days of his presidency. Trump faces a single charge — “incitement of insurrection” – in an impeachment resolution that could go to a vote by mid-week. First, Democrats called on Vice President Mike Pence to invoke constitutional authority under the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office before Jan. 20, when Democrat Joe Biden is to be inaugurated. In all, these are stunning final moments for Trump’s presidency as Democrats and a growing number of Republicans declare that he is unfit for office and could do more damage after inciting a mob that ransacked the U.S. Capitol in a deadly siege on...
    WASHINGTON -- As the House prepares for impeachment, President Donald Trump faces a single charge - "incitement of insurrection" - over the deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol, according to a draft of the articles obtained by The Associated Press.Lawmakers are set to introduce the legislation Monday, with voting mid-week. Pelosi's leadership team also will seek a quick vote on a resolution calling on Vice President Mike Pence and Cabinet officials to invoke the 25th Amendment.The four-page impeachment bill draws from Trump's own false statements about his election defeat to Democrat Joe Biden; his pressure on state officials in Georgia to "find" him more votes; and his White House rally ahead of the Capitol siege, in which he encouraged thousands of supporters to "fight like hell" before they stormed the building on Wednesday.A violent and largely white mob of Trump supporters overpowered police, broke through security lines and windows and...
    By Tim Ahmann | Reuters WASHINGTON – A draft of the article of impeachment against President Donald Trump drawn up by Democratic members of the House of Representatives after the storming of the U.S. Capitol accuses him of engaging in high crimes and misdemeanors by inciting insurrection, MSNBC reported on Friday. The draft says the Republican president willfully made statements that encouraged imminent lawless action at the Capitol, MSNBC said, adding that House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi had yet to endorse the language of the draft. This is a breaking story, please check back for updates.
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