Tuesday, Mar 02, 2021 - 02:42:59
94 results - (0.010 seconds)

study ’s authors:

    Over the course of the next decade humans will integrate more with technology to 'upgrade' our lives including brain chips and exoskeletons, a new report claims. Produced by dentsu, a Japanese advertising and PR firm, the report looks at ways the world could change over the next 10 years and the impact on global brands. 'As brands assess the impact of a seismic year and look to chart a new path to recovery, these trends provide them with a roadmap for the next decade,' the firm wrote in the executive summary to the report. One key area of change will be the continued rise of the 'synthetic society' as people increasingly incorporate the latest technology into their lives.  The study suggests people could even use brain chips to aid memory and exoskeletons to make us faster and stronger.  One key area of change will be the continued rise of...
    More that 4,300 SpaceX employees volunteered to be part of a COVID-19 antibody study co-authored by CEO Elon Musk in 2020. The study, which was recently published in the journal Nature Communications, shows evidence that infected people who exhibited milder symptoms developed less of an immunity to COVID-19 than those who got sicker from the disease. The group behind the study found some evidence that suggests there’s a particular threshold of antibodies that could provide immunity, though they wrote that “the precise levels […] associated with protection from re-infection remain unclear.” Vaccines also produce a much stronger immune response than cases with little to no symptoms, the authors note. They hope that this research, and other studies like it, could help policymakers figure out how to distribute limited vaccine supplies effectively. SpaceX employees were asked by email in April 2020 to be a part of the study — right...
    ATLANTA (AP) — A new study finds that teachers may be more important drivers of COVID-19 transmission in schools than students. The paper released Monday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention studies nine COVID-19 transmission clusters in elementary schools in the Atlanta suburb of Marietta in December and January, That included one cluster where 16 teachers, students and relatives of students at home were infected. In only one of the nine clusters was a student clearly the first documented case, while a teacher was the first documented case in four clusters. In another four, the first case was unclear. Of the nine clusters, eight involved probable teacher-to-student transmission. Two clusters saw teachers infect each other during in-person meetings or lunches, with a teacher then infecting other students. “Educators were central to in-school transmission networks,” the authors wrote. The findings line up with studies from the United...
    Originally Published by: Outdoor weddings rise in popularity COVID-19 testing wont be mandated before domestic flights for now UK opens quarantine hotels, pushes on with vaccine drive Zinc and Vitamin C fell short in a clinical trial after researchers found they made no significant difference in easing the duration of coronavirus symptoms. Findings from the Cleveland Clinic were published in JAMA Network on Friday, drawing on results from April 27 to Oct. 14, when 214 coronavirus patients in Ohio and Florida outpatient care sites were given either 50 milligrams of high-dose zinc to be taken at night, 8,000 milligrams of Vitamin C to be taken several times throughout the day with meals, a combination of the two or standard care over a 10-day period. These patients, averaging about 45 years old, were at home and answered virtual surveys about their symptoms, any adverse effects, hospitalizations and...
    Zoom and other video conference services may not be as much of an environmentally-friendly alternative to in-person meetings as many people assumed, according to a new study. But there’s a simple trick to make video conferencing even greener - turn off your camera. Despite a record drop in global carbon emissions in 2020, a pandemic-driven shift to remote work and more at-home entertainment still presents a “significant environmental impact” due to how internet data is stored and transferred around the world, according to a study by Purdue University, Yale University, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, released on Thursday, Jan. 14. One hour of videoconferencing emits about 150-1,000 grams of carbon dioxide into the environment, according to the study. The video also requires about 2-12 liters of water. For comparison, 1 gallon of gasoline burned from a car emits about 8,887 grams. However, by turning the camera off during a...
    Anna Moneymaker/CNP/Zuma Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.In a scathing new report, a team of medical experts at the Lancet determined that hundreds of thousands of people in the United States died unnecessarily as a result of former President Trump’s policies—even before the pandemic. The report considers Trump’s environmental protection rollbacks, attacks on the Affordable Care Act, and cuts to public health funding. The results are grim. By comparing premature death rates in the United States to those of other G7 nations, the paper’s authors determined that Trump’s presidency led to 461,000 unnecessary deaths in 2018. The paper also concludes that Trump’s politicization of the pandemic and failure to implement commonsense strategies to slow the spread of the virus accounted for 40 percent of preventable COVID deaths. To make matters worse,...
    Essential workers in kitchens and in agricultural settings are most at risk of death from the coronavirus, according to a study that adds a new urgency to the race to vaccinate those on the front lines of the pandemic. The study, conducted by researchers at the University of California-San Francisco, examined the occupations of those who have died in California since the beginning of 2016. In the past year, researchers found an especially high rate of excess mortality — the measure of how many people died over what might have been an ordinary period — among those who work in proximity to others. Line cooks experienced the most substantial number of excess death in 2020, the study found, followed by agriculture workers, bakers and construction laborers. Those who work in delivery occupations — shipping clerks, truck operators and delivery drivers — also experienced higher rates of death last year. The...
    Researchers in Brazil have reported cases of patients infected with two coronavirus variant strains at once, amid efforts to track the spread of emerging variants across the country. The findings were posted ahead of peer review this week in the preprint server medRxiv. The infections were found in two patients in their 30s, who both recovered without requiring hospitalization. One developed a cough and the other experienced a headache, cough and sore throat. "We were the first to identify two independent events of co-infection caused by the occurrence of B.1.1.28 (E484K) with either B.1.1.248 or B.1.91 lineages," study authors wrote. GETTING THE COVID-19 VACCINE? DON'T TAKE OVER-THE-COUNTER PAIN RELIEVERS BEFOREHAND, EXPERTS SAY The Brazil P.1 variant is a branch of the B.1.1.28 lineage, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), with the first U.S. case of the P.1 variant identified in Minnesota earlier this week.  The team of researchers warned that co-infections can...
    Young French-speaking Muslims in Europe’s capital Brussels are at least three times as likely to be antisemitic, homophobic and sexist compared to their atheist counterparts, according to a Belgian study. The study was highlighted by signatories to a letter published by newspaper L’Echo condemning a recent move to allow the wearing of the Islamic veil in Belgian schools by several secular and feminist activists this week. Published earlier this month, the 70-page study, which was authored by Professor at the Free University of Brussels (ULB) and the Institut d’Etudes Politiques de Paris Joël Kotek and Joël Tournemenne, examined religious attitudes in 38 schools in the Brussels region, compared to atheists. “Islam is even, according to all of our respondents, the religion with the most positive image; Judaism… the most negative,” the authors said in a summary of their findings. The authors add that Muslim women often appeared to be even more conservative than...
    The coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic that hit the world in 2020 has proved devastating. The Covid-19 human death toll hit the two million mark in January 2021. The deaths of other animals related to the pandemic are even higher. Denmark reportedly killed 15 million mink alone, which were farmed for fur, after the species proved susceptible to the virus. The pandemic has come with its fair share of lessons. It has, for example, offered us a stark reminder of a regularly ignored but elemental fact: humans, other animals, and the natural world as a whole are completely interconnected. This pierces through a mindset that has dominated certain cultures, namely western ones, for centuries. We often see ourselves as separate from nature rather than a part of it. But we are not, as the emergence of Covid-19 has made crystal clear. Coronavirus is believed to have transferred to humans from another...
    Zoom and other video conference calls may not be as much of an environmentally-friendly alternative to in-person meetings as many people assumed, according to a new study. But there’s a simple trick to make video conferencing even greener - turn off your camera. Despite a record drop in global carbon emissions in 2020, a pandemic-driven shift to remote work and more at-home entertainment still presents a “significant environmental impact” due to how internet data is stored and transferred around the world, according to a study by Purdue University, Yale University, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, released Jan. 14. One hour of videoconferencing emits about 150-1,000 grams of carbon dioxide into the environment, according to the study. The video also requires about 2-12 liters of water. For comparison, 1 gallon of gasoline burned from a car emits about 8,887 grams. However, by turning the camera off during a video call,...
    A research paper concluding that working with female mentors might hurt young women’s careers in the sciences has been retracted after fierce criticism from “group email threads” and on social media. The academic journal that published the paper apologized for “any unintended harm derived from the publication of this paper.” A study published in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Communications was retracted following backlash from people who were uncomfortable with the paper’s findings, according to a report by Inside Higher Ed. The research paper studied a variety of dynamics within three million mentor-mentee research pairings, including the “possibility that opposite-gender mentorship may actually increase the impact of women who pursue a scientific career,” reported Inside Higher Ed. The authors — which studied the disciplines of biology, chemistry, computer science, economics, engineering, geology, materials science, medicine, physics, and psychology — wrote that their study “suggests that female protégés who remain in academia reap more benefits...
    “You know you got it when you’re going insane.” Some of the lyrics from Ted Nugent’s 1977 song “Cat Scratch Fever” are not medically inaccurate, a new study suggests. In research published this month in the journal Pathogens, authors offer further evidence for the theory that Bartonella bacteria, which can be spread by insect bites and animal scratches — most famously, those of cats — is linked with psychiatric symptoms. In research published this month in the journal Pathogens, authors offer further evidence for the theory that Bartonella bacteria, which can be spread by insect bites and animal scratches — most famously, those of cats — is linked with psychiatric symptoms. (iStock) Scientists studied 33 participants, 29 of whom were found to be infected with Bartonella, with 24 reporting the development of stretch-mark-like skin lesions (considered a common sign of the disease) manifesting alongside mental symptoms. DOGS ABLE TO...
    A new study has defined the tendency for some individuals to see themselves as victims, including in seemingly harmless exchanges, often leading to a desire for revenge against those who wronged them and a sense of entitlement, numerous sources reported. The new construct, called the “Tendency for Interpersonal Victimhood” (TIV), was defined by researchers Rahav Gabay and Boaz Hameiri as an “enduring feeling that the self is a victim across different kinds of interpersonal relationships,” according to PsyPost. Psychologists have identified “how a person’s interpretation of social transgressions can inform feelings of victimhood and lead to revenge behaviors.” Congratulations on our diagnosis, 100% of Twitter users. https://t.co/yCEhc9kENt — Marty Beckerman (@martybeckerman) December 10, 2020 The authors point to small, interpersonal transgressions, like being interrupted while speaking, that many may view as inoffensive, but that someone with the TIV personality type would ruminate over and use to paint themselves as...
            by Jon Miltimore  On February 18, the Oxford Mail published an article headlined “Scientists working on a coronavirus vaccine in Oxford.” The article explained that Sarah Gilbert, a British vaccinologist and professor at the University of Oxford, was leading a team of scientists at Oxford’s Jenner Institute in rapid development of a vaccine. The article was short (less than 200 words), featured a quote from Gilbert, and was reported without any predictions on possible death tolls. For months, Gilbert’s research was not covered in the US. And when US media did cover it months later, the successful track record of the Oxford researchers was downplayed, as was the possibility of getting a vaccine developed quickly. “The earliest available (major outlet) U.S. story is from CNN on April 23rd and begins with a quote from England’s Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty saying that the probability of having a vaccine or...
    A study published in late October by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology linking a decrease in coronavirus hospitalizations to a face-mask mandate has been withdrawn following an increase in cases in the areas studied. “The authors have withdrawn this manuscript because there are increased rates of SARS-CoV-2 cases in the areas that we originally analyzed in this study,” the updated abstract of the study titled "Decrease in Hospitalizations for COVID-19 after Mask Mandates in 1083 U.S. Counties” now reads. “New analyses in the context of the third surge in the United States are therefore needed and will be undertaken directly in conjunction with the creators of the publicly-available databases on cases, hospitalizations, testing rates. Etc.” The update adds: “We will be performing this in conjunction with machine learning experts at UCSF. Therefore, the authors do not wish this work to be cited as reference for the project....
    A trader speaks on a phone outside the New York Stock Exchange, November 4, 2020.Andrew Kelly | Reuters Day traders have terrible track records.  Academics who study stock pickers have long observed that the vast majority of professional money managers – about 85% – underperform their benchmarks over a multi-year period. Now those professionals are turning their sights on retail day traders, warning that the same poor results apply to them as well.  "I don't confuse day traders with serious investors," Princeton professor Burton Malkiel, author of "A Random Walk Down Wall Street," wrote in a blog for Wealthfront, where he is chief investment officer.  "Serious investing involves broad diversification, rebalancing, active tax management, avoiding market timing, staying the course, and the use of investment instruments such as ETFs, with rock bottom fees.  Don't be misled with false claims of easy profits from day trading." Backing up Malkiel is a...
    Officials contemplating reopening plans (or lockdowns) amid coronavirus could look to cell phone mobility data to better inform decisions, a new study suggests. Researchers from Stanford University, among other institutions, studied anonymized data on 98 million people and their movement patterns hour-by-hour in the 10 largest metro areas in the U.S. An early version of the peer-reviewed findings was published on Tuesday in the journal Nature. “We found large variation in predicted reopening risks: on average across metro areas, full-service restaurants, gyms, hotels, cafes, religious organizations, and limited-service restaurants produced the largest predicted increases in infections when reopened,” study authors wrote. CORONAVIRUS-RELATED FACE MASKS PROTECT THE WEARER, TOO: CDC SAYS IN UPDATED GUIDANCE Cell phone mobility data can accurately predict virus cases, researchers argued. (iStock) Researchers argued that cell phone mobility data can predict virus cases with accuracy, and, based on the model, predicted that “a small minority...
    Early findings from a large study revealed that some coronavirus survivors may face a higher risk of being diagnosed with a mental illness up to three months later. “People have been worried that COVID-19 survivors will be at greater risk of mental health problems, and our findings ... show this to be likely,” Paul Harrison, a professor of psychiatry at Britain’s Oxford University, told Reuters. Researchers from the University of Oxford examined anonymised electronic health records of over 69 million U.S. patients, 62,354 of which were diagnosed with coronavirus from late January to August 1. Findings were published on Monday in The Lancet Psychiatry. "Adverse mental health consequences of COVID-19, including anxiety and depression, have been widely predicted but not yet accurately measured," study authors wrote, adding that "reliable estimation...requires large, well-controlled cohort studies." The team set out to find whether a coronavirus diagnosis was associated with higher rates of mental illness diagnoses thereafter....
    Scientists weren’t able to prove that this “love drug” is worth the hype. Researchers found that, despite its reputation, MDMA — often referred to as ecstasy — did not increase trust, cooperative behavior or empathy in study participants. These findings, published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, were determined by subjecting 25 people to two sessions where they were dosed with either a placebo or MDMA. Once dosed, participants completed a series of social assessment tasks, including playing a dictator game, an ultimatum game and a public project game. While “MDMA acutely increased self-reported ‘closeness to others’ and ‘euphoria,’ ” it did not have a significant impact on “task-based empathy, trust or cooperative behavior,” the authors found in the experiment. However, researchers acknowledge that this finding, at odds with the public perception of the so-called “party drug,” may be a result of the sterile site of their double-blind study. “Often...
    Scientists weren’t able to prove that this “love drug” is worth the hype. Researchers found that, despite its reputation, MDMA — often referred to as ecstasy — did not increase trust, cooperative behavior or empathy in study participants. These findings, published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, were determined by subjecting 25 people to two sessions where they were dosed with either a placebo or MDMA. Once dosed, participants completed a series of social assessment tasks, including playing a dictator game, an ultimatum game and a public project game. While “MDMA acutely increased self-reported ‘closeness to others’ and ‘euphoria,’ ” it did not have a significant impact on “task-based empathy, trust or cooperative behavior,” the authors found in the experiment. However, researchers acknowledge that this finding, at odds with the public perception of the so-called “party drug,” may be a result of the sterile site of their double-blind study. “Often ostensibly...
    Americans increasingly have suicidal tendencies. Dark new research has painted a bleak picture of recent suicide rates in the US. Published this month in “Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention,” the study reported that Americans have recently experienced an increase in suicidal thoughts, planning and attempts. Researchers looked at a sample of 7,654 adults using data collected between 2015 and 2018 from the National Survey Drug Use and Health Survey, and their findings are not pretty. “Results revealed that from 2015 to 2018, there was a 16% increase in suicide ideation, 18.6% increase in suicide planning, and 11.6% increase in suicide attempts,” the three study authors, all of whom are affiliated with the University of Cincinnati, wrote in the abstract. Drug users, youth, queer and African-American individuals were found to be among the most vulnerable to the disturbing trends. “Significant increases in each behavior were found...
    While early poverty in the household is already associated with impaired brain development among kids, a new study takes it further, linking impoverished neighborhoods to kids’ smaller brain volumes and worse cognitive functioning. Researchers from Washington University in Missouri analyzed data from over 11,800 kids aged 9-10 from 2018-2019 from sites said to reflect US demographics. The study found kids from poorer neighborhoods performed worse on reading skills, memory and attention, among other functions, per a release. Authors said many studies have focused on socioeconomic status at the household level and less so across neighborhoods. Data stemmed from the NIH-supported Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, which is said to be the largest long-term study of its kind in the US per a news release. Findings were published on Tuesday in JAMA Network Open. “Current models indexing poverty and early life adversity do not commonly include neighborhood-level measures,...
    A 71-year-old cancer patient who tested positive for the novel coronavirus but never showed symptoms remained infectious for 70 days, according to a case study. It started when she went to the emergency room for low back and lower extremity pain and underwent surgery, which then landed her at a rehabilitation facility, according to the study, which was published in the journal Cell. The woman, who was not identified in the report, has a 10-year history of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, acquired hypogammaglobulinemia, anemia and chronic leukocytosis. After arriving at the emergency room in February she underwent surgery for a spinal fracture and stenosis that was related to her cancer. She was transferred to a rehab center, but went back to the hospital for anemia. Once cleared, it was determined that she could not return to the rehab center due to an outbreak of COVID-19. “A chest CT performed on February...
    His body wanted a drink so bad, it cost him his ear. An article published in the International Journal of Bipolar Disorders on Monday puts forward the theory that Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh’s poor mental health and eventual suicide were likely caused not by syphilis or schizophrenia — previously proposed explanations — but alcohol withdrawal paired with malnutrition. To reach this conclusion, the study’s authors, based in the Netherlands, analyzed 902 letters from van Gogh’s correspondence — mostly with his brother Theo — about “what he was experiencing in his life, including his mental problems.” They also worked closely with three art historians who are experts on van Gogh. Based on their research, the study authors created a timeline of van Gogh’s declining health in his tortured but prolific final years, and explained how his delirium became so extreme. In the four years leading up to him fatally shooting himself...
    His body wanted a drink so bad it cost him his ear. An article published in the International Journal of Bipolar Disorders on Monday puts forward the theory that Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh’s poor mental health and eventual suicide were likely caused not by syphilis or schizophrenia — previously proposed explanations — but alcohol withdrawal paired with malnutrition. To reach this conclusion, the study’s authors, based in the Netherlands, analyzed 902 letters from van Gogh’s correspondence — mostly with his brother Theo — about “what he was experiencing in his life, including his mental problems.” They also worked closely with three art historians who are experts on van Gogh. Based on their research, the study authors created a timeline of van Gogh’s declining health in his tortured — but prolific — final years, and explained how his delirium became so extreme. In the four years leading up to him fatally...
    German researchers simulated an indoor pop concert and found little contribution of coronavirus spread, according to a study. Findings were posted on medRxiv ahead of peer review. “Overall, the expected additional effect of indoor [mass gathering events] MGEs on burden of infections is low if hygiene concepts are applied and adequate ventilation exists,” the study authors wrote. Some experts noted potential difficulty in reproducing the study's conditions in in real life, one outlet wrote.(iStock) INTENSE, INDOOR SPORTS RAISE CORONAVIRUS RISK, CDC WARNS, CITING 14 INFECTED AT ICE HOCKEY GAME The team from Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg tested three hygiene scenarios (no restrictions, moderate restrictions and strong restrictions) and used contact tracing devices to assess spectators’ close contacts. They also studied aerosol distribution and concert-goers’ resulting exposure. The concert was held on Aug. 22 in the Leipzig Arena with 1,212 participants, short of the researchers’ goal of 4,000. All attendees...
    While early poverty in the household is already associated with impaired brain development among kids, a new study takes it further, linking impoverished neighborhoods to kids' smaller brain volumes and worse cognitive functioning. Researchers from Washington University in Missouri analyzed data from over 11,800 kids aged 9-10 from 2018-2019 from sites said to reflect U.S. demographics. The study found kids from poorer neighborhoods performed worse on reading skills, memory and attention, among other functions, per a release. Authors said many studies have focused on socioeconomic status at the household level, and less so across neighborhoods. Data stemmed from the NIH-supported Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, which is said to be the largest long-term study of its kind in the U.S, per a news release. A new study linked impoverished neighborhoods to kids' smaller brain volumes and worse cognitive functioning. (iStock) Findings were published on Tuesday in JAMA Network Open. CLICK HERE TO SEE...
    Buttercup giving you the colt shoulder? Folklore would have humans believe that we have a special bond with horses, dating back some 6,000 years to the grasslands of Eurasia. Yet, while this consistent relationship has been largely positive from Homo sapiens’ standpoint — after all, horses work for us, compete for us and provide us with emotional support — a new study has revealed that these majestic ruminants are mare-ried to no one. Turns out, they’re just using us, too. Veterinary researchers from Sweden’s Linköping University set out to determine whether or not horses could “love” humans, in the sense that they form an attachment to a particular person and reciprocate affection. While observing 26 horses, their owners and several other human controls, researchers found that horses frequently exhibited higher heart rates while separated from any human, “irrespective of whether it was the owner or the stranger,” the authors...
    A COVID-19 infection can spread quickly and easily in a household, but there are some measures that will help stop the transmission of the bug, a new study says. “Persons who suspect that they might have COVID-19 should isolate, stay at home, and use a separate bedroom and bathroom if feasible,” according to the study which was supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The isolation should take place immediately even before getting tests results, the study says. “Delaying isolation until confirmation of infection could miss an opportunity to reduce transmission to others,” the authors wrote. The authors also recommend that everyone in the house wears masks when they are within the same space. The study found that 75% of secondary infections were identified within five days of the first patient getting sick. Transmission was “frequent” from both children and adults.
    While health care workers’ heightened risk of coronavirus has dominated the conversation, a new study found grocery store workers also have alarming rates of infection. Researchers from Harvard University found that 20% of 104 grocery workers tested positive at a store in Massachusetts, and most of them had no symptoms when tested. This infection rate was “significantly higher than the surrounding communities,” study authors wrote. A new study found grocery store workers have alarming rates of infection. (iStock) SINGLE-DAY CORONAVIRUS CASES IN US HIT RECORD HIGH Findings were published in Occupational & Environmental Medicine. Also, those who directly interacted with customers were five times more likely to test positive. CLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE The toll on these essential workers reaches further, however, sometimes harming their mental health. Researchers said workers who weren't able to consistently social distance while on the job had a higher risk for anxiety or depression.  Those who...
    (CNN)Americans now hate people in the opposite political party more than they love their own party, with disrupting implications about behavior, a new study finds."Compared to a few decades ago, Americans today are much more opposed to dating or marrying an opposing partisan; they are also wary of living near or working for one," according to the study published Thursday in the journal Science.Surviving 2020s election countdown with your sanity intact"They tend to discriminate, as when paying an opposing partisan less than a copartisan for identical job performance or recommending that an opposing partisan be denied a scholarship despite being the more qualified applicant," the study said.Leveraging data from 1975 through 2017 in nine Western democracies -- Australia, Britain, Canada, Germany, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland and the United States -- the researchers found that by 2017 what they call "out-party hate" was stronger in the United States than in...
    BOULDER, Colo. (CBS4) – NASA has taken one giant leap toward the future of space exploration. Twin studies posted to the Nature Astronomy journal on Monday point to water found at the molecular level on the moon, and potentially more crystallized in ice on the dark side. The announcement was made Monday by NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine. NEWS: We confirmed water on the sunlit surface of the Moon for the 1st time using @SOFIAtelescope. We don’t know yet if we can use it as a resource, but learning about water on the Moon is key for our #Artemis exploration plans. Join the media telecon at https://t.co/vOGoSHt74c pic.twitter.com/7p2QopMhod — Jim Bridenstine (@JimBridenstine) October 26, 2020 Researcher Paul Hayne, a faculty member at the University of Colorado, Boulder, co-authored the second of the twin studies. The first used SOFIA, or the NASA/DLR Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, which is a telescoped mounted...
    BOULDER, Colo. (CBS4) – NASA has taken one giant leap toward the future of space exploration. Twin studies posted to the Nature Astronomy journal on Monday point to water found at the molecular level on the moon, and potentially more crystallized in ice on the dark side. The announcement was made Monday by NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine. NEWS: We confirmed water on the sunlit surface of the Moon for the 1st time using @SOFIAtelescope. We don’t know yet if we can use it as a resource, but learning about water on the Moon is key for our #Artemis exploration plans. Join the media telecon at https://t.co/vOGoSHt74c pic.twitter.com/7p2QopMhod — Jim Bridenstine (@JimBridenstine) October 26, 2020 Researcher Paul Hayne, a faculty member at the University of Colorado, Boulder, co-authored the second of the twin studies. The first used SOFIA, or the NASA/DLR Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, which is a telescoped mounted...
    A recent report found that coronavirus caused two-thirds of the almost 300,000 higher-than-average U.S. deaths this year, per a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  These “excess deaths” include lives lost from any cause, and can give a better idea of the mortality associated with the pandemic, study authors wrote. Deaths counts directly owing to the pandemic are prone to underestimates due to inaccuracies in death certificates or testing shortages, among other limitations, the agency noted. CLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE The CDC compared weekly death data from its National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) from Jan. 26 to Oct. 3, 2020 to 2015-2019, and calculated the percentage change. During the timeframe under study, the CDC identified 299,028 excess deaths in the U.S, which peaked in mid-April and again in the week of Aug. 8. “The largest percentage increases were seen among adults aged 25–44 years (at 26.5%) and...
    When a rival fish father sprays a pile of eggs with its semen, this species of male fish will use their tail fin to swish away the seed. So says a new study by a group of Japanese scientists regarding the male dusky frillgoby fish. The dusky frillgoby is an “externally fertilizing species,” meaning that, to reproduce, the ladies lay piles of eggs which the men then ejaculate on top of, the authors explain in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. To reproduce, the bigger male frillgoby finds “spawning nests,” or underwater rock holes where they court and then mate with their dates. But “sneaker” males — which are physically smaller but equipped with larger testicles — will slink into nests after fish couples have had fish sex and “quickly ejaculate in the nest.” That prompts the original mating male to “aggressively chase sneaker males out”...
    A nationwide study in France estimated that less than 5% of the population had coronavirus antibodies by mid-May. The findings were posted ahead of peer review on Wednesday in medRxiv. Researchers from Public Health France, Department of Infectious Diseases, among others, said the study captures mild and asymptomatic cases that typically go unreported. A nationwide study in France estimated that less than 5% of the population had coronavirus antibodies by mid-May. (iStock) CLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE Study authors estimated that, throughout the first wave of the epidemic, nationwide prevalence of antibodies climbed from 0.41% in March to nearly 5% by May, which translates to 3,292,000 infections, according to the study. Also, about 70% of those with antibodies had detectable neutralizing antibodies, which varied across ages and regions, authors wrote. Blood samples were analyzed from 11,021 people and then extrapolated to the nationwide population. CORONAVIRUS ANTIBODIES PRESENT IN LESS THAN...
    A drug originally developed in the 1970s as a veterinary medicine to combat parasites in livestock was associated with lower death rates among people suffering from COVID-19, a study conducted in Florida and published in the medical journal Chest revealed. Patients who received ivermectin, which was called a "wonder drug" in a study a decade ago for the treatment of the parasitic diseases river blindness – or onchocerciasis – and lymphatic filariasis, had a mortality rate of 15% compared to 25% who did not receive the drug. The results were even more significant for COVID-19 patients with "severe pulmonary involvement." The mortality rate was only 38% for those patients who received ivermectin compared with 80.7% for the patients that did not receive it. Most patients in both groups also received hydroxychloroquine and/or azithromycin. "In this multihospital retrospective cohort study, we observed a significant association with ivermectin on improved survival for...
    A 25-year-old Nevada man has become the first confirmed case of a person being re-infected with the coronavirus in the US, researchers said Monday. The patient was infected with two different genetic strains of COVID-19 in less than two months, according to a case study published in the medical journal “The Lancet.” “The second infection was symptomatically more severe than the first,” the authors of the study wrote. The man, who had no underlying conditions, originally tested positive for the virus on April 18, and experienced symptoms including headache, coughing, nausea and diarrhea. He isolated, got better and then tested negative twice in May. But by the end of that month, the man went to an urgent care center with the same symptoms he’d felt before, plus fever and dizziness. He tested positive again on June 5. The patient was admitted to the hospital after suffering shortness of breath...
    A final report from a National Institutes of Health (NIH) study on the use of Remdesivir in coronavirus patients has confirmed the drug's success in speeding recovery.  Gilead’s experimental antiviral drug received an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the Food and Drug Administration on May 1 to treat severely ill hospitalized COVID-19 patients, which was later modified for expanded access in all hospitalized COVID-19 patients.  The NIH published preliminary results from a clinical trial in late May that showed the drug shortened patients’ path to recovery by about four days (11 days vs. 15 days in the placebo group).  A final report from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) study on Remdesivir in coronavirus patients further confirmed its use. (iStock) HERD IMMUNITY TO END CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC 'SIMPLY UNETHICAL,' WHO CHIEF WARNS Study authors said the final results were gathered after a complete follow-up and were in line with the preliminary findings. It involved 1,062 patients who...
    The coronavirus pandemic will cost the US an estimated $16 trillion - about 90 percent of the annual gross domestic product - in the next year, a new study suggests. Researchers say about half of the figure, $8.6 trillion, will be due to premature deaths and those who have long-term health implications from contracting COVID-19.  Additionally, costs will pile up due to new unemployment claims from those who lost their jobs and those seeking mental health treatment. The team, from Harvard University, says the findings suggest the costs of the crisis will far exceed those linked with The Great Recession and wars fought in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria.  Researchers predict the coronavirus pandemic will cost the US an estimated $16 trillion, or about 90% of the annual GDP. Pictured: Medical staff treat a patient on a ventilator in the COVID-19 ICU at the United Memorial Medical Center in Houston, Texas,...
    An HIV drug combination was found to be ineffective in treating hospitalized coronavirus patients, according to a new study. In a large, randomized trial in the U.K., researchers saw no significant difference in improval of 28-day mortality, among other measures, in patients receiving lopinavir-ritonavir versus those receiving usual standard care. Findings stemmed from the RECOVERY trial, which is testing a range of potential coronavirus treatments in 176 hospitals across the U.K. The results were published in The Lancet on Monday. The combination was suggested as an antiviral treatment against COVID-19 because the drugs inhibit the action of an enzyme called a protease that both HIV and coronavirus need to make an infectious virus. An HIV drug combination proved ineffective in treating hospitalized coronavirus patients, according to a new study. (iStock) THE CORONAVIRUS CAN SURVIVE ON SKIN FOR THIS MANY HOURS, STUDY SUGGESTS The lopinavir–ritonavir study randomly allocated 1,616 patients to the experimental...
    While respiratory issues are a well-documented symptom of coronavirus, researchers have found that over 80% of hospitalized COVID-19 patients experience some type of neurological manifestation as well. In examining 509 patients admitted to a Chicago hospital network, researchers found that 419 of them presented a neurological issue at some point during the course of their COVID-19 infection. “The most frequent neurologic manifestations were myalgias, headaches, encephalopathy, dizziness, dysgeusia [impaired sense of taste] and anosmia [loss of smell],” the authors wrote in their study, which was published Monday in the Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology. “Strokes, movement disorders, motor, and sensory deficits, ataxia and seizures were uncommon.” The patients involved in the study were admitted to the Northwestern Medicine Healthcare system between March 5 and April 6, and all had been diagnosed with COVID-19. The team noted neurologic symptoms based on a review of clinical notes, diagnostic studies, and physician-documented diagnoses taken during...
    As the 2020 presidential election approaches, social networks have promised to minimize false rumors about voter fraud or “rigged” mail-in ballots, a mostly imaginary threat that discourages voting and casts doubt on the democratic process. But new research has suggested that these rumors aren’t born in the dark corners of Facebook or Twitter — and that fighting them effectively might involve going after one of social media’s most powerful users. Last week, Harvard’s Berkman Klein Center put forward an illuminating analysis of voting misinformation. A working paper posits that social media isn’t driving most disinformation around mail-in voting. Instead, Twitter and Facebook amplify content from “political and media elites.” That includes traditional news outlets, particularly wire services like the Associated Press, but also Trump’s tweets — which the paper cites as a key disinformation source. Trump’s tweets, press conferences, and interviews were “by far” the most common misinformation driver The...
    Long-term, regular use of medications to treat acid reflux was linked to a 24% increased risk of type 2 diabetes, says a new study. The findings, by joint first authors Jinqiu Yuan and Qiangsheng He with The Seventh Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University in Shenzhen, China, were published Tuesday in the journal Gut. These commonly used medications called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) work by “inhibiting certain stomach cells from ‘pumping’ acid into the stomach,” reports Harvard Medical School. While PPIs are generally deemed safe for short-term use, prolonged use may introduce health concerns like bone fractures from calcium malabsorption and enteric (intestinal) infections, among other adverse effects. Long-term use of medications to treat acid reflux was linked to a 24% increased risk of type 2 diabetes, per a new study. (iStock) ARTIFICIAL PANCREAS MAINTAINED BLOOD SUGAR LEVELS IN CHILDREN WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES, STUDY SAYS PPIs were said to...
    While it has been claimed that up to 50% of coronavirus patients will remain asymptomatic for the duration of their infection, a new meta-analysis of several studies focusing on the experience of COVID-19 patients suggests that as many as four in five will go on to develop symptoms. The analysis, published in PLOS Medicine and conducted by researchers with the University of Bern in Switzerland, suggests that some patients described as asymptomatic at the time of the study period may later go on to develop symptoms but are unaccounted for in the data. “The proportion of people who will remain asymptomatic throughout the course of infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the cause of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is not known,” the authors wrote. “Studies that assess people at just one-time point will overestimate the proportion of true asymptomatic infection because those who go on to develop...
    Nick Diaz on Colby Covingtons list with a threat to retire him for good Hermès New Lipsticks Give Fall A Warm Welcome With Three New Shades Graduates from top universities tend to be less friendly and more prone to conflict — and they could derail your team project © Maja Hitij/Getty Maja Hitij/Getty Hiring an Ivy League graduate, or having one on your team, may hinder success, per a new report in the Harvard Business Review.  HBR reported on a September 2020 study in the European Journal of International Management which tracked 28,339 students from 294 universities for two months as they worked on virtual consulting projects.  The study found that graduates from high-ranking universities tend not to pay enough attention to developing interpersonal relationship with coworkers. These workers engage in fewer non-work-related conversations with team members, the authors find. The study finds these grads can sometimes be...
    About half of school employees are at risk for contracting coronavirus, according to a study. A group of researchers found that up to 51% of all school employees in the United States met criteria established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC) for having increased risk or a potential increased risk for contracting SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. “Between 42.0% and 51.4% of all school employees met the CDC definition for being at increased risk of severe COVID-19, depending on whether we used the main or broader CDC definition of increased risk," the authors of the preprinted study, which was released ahead of peer review by the journal Health Affairs this week, stated in their report. The CDC considers high-risk individuals to be those who are in an older age group, and individuals with underlying health conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease,...
    Months into the coronavirus pandemic, researchers are still investigating the actual event where the crossover of the novel coronavirus from animals to humans occurred. A team of scientists may have discovered the answer to the question many have been asking for months, according to a study published in Nature Microbiology. The group of scientists from the United States, China, and Europe compared mutation patterns of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, to other viruses, and created an evolutionary history of the related viruses. They discovered the lineage responsible for producing the virus that created the COVID-19 pandemic has been present in bats, according to the study. Scientists discovered the lineage responsible for producing the virus that created the COVID-19 pandemic has been present in bats, according to the study.  (iStock) “Collectively our analyses point to bats being the primary reservoir for the SARS-CoV-2 lineage. While it is possible that pangolins, or another hitherto undiscovered...
    The American Journal of Psychiatry (AJP) has released a correction to a 2019 Swedish study which drew as its primary conclusion that individuals who claim to be transgender experience mental health benefits following gender-affirming surgeries. An article at the Public Discourse by family physician Dr. Andre Van Mol of the American College of Pediatricians, endocrinologist Dr. Michael Laidlaw, and psychiatrists Dr. Miriam Grossman and Dr. Paul McHugh noted the authors of the original study retracted its conclusion after numerous requests for a reanalysis of the data led to the corrected findings. The American Journal of Psychiatry issued a major correction. Reanalysis demonstrates that neither “gender-affirming hormone treatment” nor “gender-affirming surgery” reduced the need for mental health services. Gender-anxious people deserve better. https://t.co/VcDY3cTtu2 — Public Discourse (@PublicDiscourse) September 14, 2020 After reanalysis, the Swedish study’s conclusion was that neither “gender-affirming hormone treatment” nor “gender-affirming surgery” decreased the need for mental health services of those claiming...
    Severe COVID-19 is more deadly than heart attacks among young adults, according to a new study. Data were analyzed at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston and the team’s findings were published on Wednesday in Jama Internal Medicine. Of nearly 781,000 coronavirus patients discharged between April 1 and June 30, 5 percent were among young adults aged 18 to 34. More than half of these patients were male and 57 percent were Black or Hispanic, which study authors said was “consistent with prior find ings of disproportionate illness severity in these demographic groups.” Researchers listed some common comorbidities; nearly one in four patients were morbidly obese, 16 percent had hypertension and 18 percent were battling diabetes. These health conditions were tied to worse outcomes. Further, young adults with multiple comorbidities faced risks on par with those seen among middle-aged adults without the underlying health conditions, study authors wrote. The...
    Severe COVID-19 is more deadly than heart attacks among young adults, according to a new study. Data were analyzed at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and the team’s findings were published on Wednesday in Jama Internal Medicine. Of nearly 781,000 coronavirus patients discharged between April 1 and June 30, 5% were among young adults aged 18 to 34. More than half of these patients were male and 57% were Black or Hispanic, which study authors said was “consistent with prior findings of disproportionate illness severity in these demographic groups.” US CORONAVIRUS DEATHS SURPASS 190,000 The coronavirus death rate for young adults with comorbidities doubled that of heart attacks in the same age group, per a new study. (iStock) Researchers listed some common comorbidities; nearly one in four patients were morbidly obese, 16% had hypertension and 18% were battling diabetes. These health conditions were tied to worse outcomes. Further, young...
    Results of coronavirus vaccine trials in Russia have showed an antibody response within three weeks in all participants tested, according to findings released Friday. “The vaccine is safe, well tolerated, and induces strong humoral and cellular immune responses in 100 percent of healthy participants," the researchers said of a vaccine, called Sputnik V, in a study published in the journal Lancet on Friday. MUTATED FORM OF CORONAVIRUS MAY BE MORE CONTAGIOUS, BUT LESS DEADLY, EXPERTS SAY According to the published report, two forms of the vaccine were analyzed, frozen for large-scale use, and lyophilized (freeze-dried) to be delivered in hard-to-reach areas of the world. The researchers from the Gamaleya National Research Center of Epidemiology and Microbiology said they used two different injections for the vaccine using adenoviruses, which are common viruses often associated with cold-like symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). “We designed a COVID-19 vaccine with two different adenoviral...
    Practicing effective physical distancing is much more complex than current rules make it out to be. In an analysis published Tuesday in health-care journal the BMJ, a group of British and American scientists make the argument that current social-distancing protocol is based on old research and far too basic. “Safe distancing rules are an oversimplification based on outdated science and experiences of past viruses,” study authors wrote. “Physical distancing is an important part of measures to control COVID-19, but exactly how far away and for how long contact is safe in different contexts is unclear.” While 6 feet has become the blanket distance people believe they need to maintain to not contract the coronavirus, the amount of space required to ensure safety is situational and dependent on the size of droplets humans are breathing out. Today’s distancing protocols originate in the 19th century. In 1897, German hygienist Carl Flügge...
    Children who are exposed to high levels of air pollution — specifically, the types of tiny particle pollution emitted by cars, trucks and other vehicles — are at increased risk of developing asthma and persistent wheezing, according to a Danish study published online this week in the journal BMJ. Although the study linked other factors — such as a family history of asthma, a mother who smoked during pregnancy and a low household income to the risk of having asthma during childhood, it identified air pollution as a separate and significant contributor to the disease. These findings “support emerging evidence that exposure to air pollution might influence the development of asthma,” the study’s authors conclude. Asthma is one of the most common diseases among children worldwide. It causes airways to become inflamed and narrow, making it difficult to breathe. In the United States, about 6 million children (one in 12...
    A new study from Federal Reserve Board economists argues that the rising market power concentration of American companies has contributed to a host of economic ills, including rising inequality and financial instability. The study published earlier this month by Isabel Cairo and Jae Sim, titled Market Power, Inequality, and Financial Instability, uses mathematical modeling to examine the impact of monopoly power. The authors identified a decline in competition, with large firms controlling more of their markets, as a common cause in a series of important shifts over the last four decades.  Those shifts include stagnating wage growth, a 'dramatic increase' in corporate profits, rising disparities in income and wealth, rising household debt and greater risk of large-scale financial instability.  A new study from Federal Reserve Board economists argues that the rising market power concentration of American companies has contributed to a host of economic ills (stock image) RELATED ARTICLES Previous...
    Rumors, myths and conspiracy theories circulating online amid the coronavirus pandemic may have resulted in hundreds of deaths, according to a new study. Rumors about "cures" included drinking bleach, eating garlic, keeping the throat moist, avoiding spicy foods, taking certain vitamins and drinking cow urine, according to the study that was published Monday in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. FLORIDA MAN, SONS SOLD TOXIC BLEACH AS CORONAVIRUS CURE, AUTHORITIES SAY With the world's attention focused on the new, emerging virus and global pandemic, an “infodemic” or “overabundance of information” may have made it difficult for people to find credible information, study authors said. “Misinformation fueled by rumors, stigma, and conspiracy theories can have potentially serious implications on the individual and community if prioritized over evidence-based guidelines,” study authors wrote. The study extracted information from a range of online platforms, including social media and websites of TV networks, from December 31,...
    Several biomarkers found in blood tests performed on coronavirus patients can allow doctors to detect the more critical cases and help them prevent those infected from getting worse, according to a new study. Researchers at George Washington University said in the study published in Future Medicine that five biomarkers were linked to greater chances of deterioration and possible death from the illness, Fox News reported. “This study has identified these five biomarkers as having an association with bad outcomes and not causation in a US cohort,” study authors Drs. Juan Reyes and Shant Ayanian told the news outlet in a statement. The authors said they decided to embark on the research after early findings in China showed biomarkers associated with poor outcomes in patients stricken by the deadly bug. The scientists studied the blood of 299 people who tested positive for COVID-19 and then analyzed five biomarkers present in their...
    Several biomarkers found in blood tests performed on coronavirus patients can allow doctors to detect the more critical cases and help them prevent those infected from getting worse, according to a new study. Researchers at George Washington University said in the study published in Future Medicine that five biomarkers were linked to greater chances of deterioration and possible death from the illness, Fox News reported. “This study has identified these five biomarkers as having an association with bad outcomes and not causation in a US cohort,” study authors Drs. Juan Reyes and Shant Ayanian told the news outlet in a statement. The authors said they decided to embark on the research after early findings in China showed biomarkers associated with poor outcomes in patients stricken by the deadly bug. The scientists studied the blood of 299 people who tested positive for COVID-19 and then analyzed five biomarkers present in their...
    The investigate, which was done in 2018, released this 7 days in Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. It uncovered that the Deinosuchus — a lineage of huge Late Cretacecous crocodylians from North The us — had been virtually as long as town buses, escalating up to 33 feet in length, according to the research authors. “Deinosuchus was a large that must have terrorized dinosaurs that came to the water’s edge to consume,” Dr. Cossette, co-author of the analyze, said in in a news launch saying the research’s conclusions. “Until eventually now, the complete animal was unfamiliar. These new specimens we’ve examined reveal a bizarre, monstrous predator with enamel the dimensions of bananas.” Deinosuchus’ name means “terror crocodiles,” but the study’s authors say that they far more carefully resembled alligators. However, the Deinosuchus snout was prolonged and wide, and it experienced two mysterious holes at the tip of its snout, which differentiated...
    (CNN)A new study has shed more light on gigantic "terror crocodiles," that once roamed the world and preyed on dinosaurs with teeth "the size of bananas."The research, which was conducted in 2018, published this week in Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. It found that the Deinosuchus -- a lineage of giant Late Cretacecous crocodylians from North America -- were nearly as long as city buses, growing up to 33 feet in length, according to the study authors. "Deinosuchus was a giant that must have terrorized dinosaurs that came to the water's edge to drink," Dr. Cossette, co-author of the study, said in in a news release announcing the research's findings. "Until now, the complete animal was unknown. These new specimens we've examined reveal a bizarre, monstrous predator with teeth the size of bananas."Deinosuchus' name means "terror crocodiles," but the study's authors say that they more closely resembled alligators. However, the Deinosuchus...
    How severe a case of coronavirus a person will develop may depend on five indicators found in the blood called biomarkers, according to researchers at George Washington University. The biomarkers were associated with higher chances of deterioration from COVID-19 and death, according to a news release from the university. The authors of the study, published in Future Medicine, said they decided on their research after initial findings in China showed biomarkers associated with poor outcomes in patients with the novel coronavirus. DOGS ABLE TO SNIFF CORONAVIRUS IN HUMAN SALIVA, GERMAN STUDY FINDS "This study has identified these five biomarkers as having an association with bad outcomes and not causation in a U.S. cohort,” study authors Dr. Juan Reyes and Dr. Shant Ayanian said in a combined statement to Fox News. The team of researchers from George Washington University studied the blood of 299 patients positive for COVID-19. They then analyzed five biomarkers present in...
    In trying to prevent the transmission of the novel coronavirus, more than a third of U.S. adults are putting their health at risk by using cleaning products incorrectly, according to a recent report. The report in JAMA stated a survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that 39% of adults in the U.S. reported using cleaning products and disinfectants in potentially dangerous ways while intending to limit exposure to the deadly virus. CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK ON MAINE BLUEBERRY FARMS SPARKS CONCERN FOR AGRICULTURAL COMMUNITY DURING HARVEST SEASON “Drinking or gargling diluted bleach solutions, soapy water, and other cleaning and disinfectant solutions" was one of the dangerous practices the authors of the survey reported. The survey also found that 19% of respondents applied bleach to food items, such as fruits and vegetables, while 18% used household cleaning and disinfectant products on their hands or skin. Some 10% reported misting their body with...
    The authors of a landmark 2019 study on the effects of transgender surgery on patients’ mental and emotional health walked back their much-cited conclusion over the weekend, stating nearly a year after publication that their initial claim that their data demonstrated that transgender surgeries resulted in improved mental health was “too strong” and not supported by the data. Richard Bränström, an associate professor at Sweden’s Karolinska Institute, and John Pachankis, an associate professor at the Yale School of Public Health, published their original study in The American Journal of Psychiatry in October 2019. The public health experts analyzed the records of roughly 9.7 million Swedes in the Swedish Total Population Register. According to the index, 2,679 Swedes were diagnosed between 2005 and 2015 with “gender incongruence,” meaning their biological gender does not match the gender with which they identify. Of the diagnosed, 1,018 received sex reassignment surgery. According to the...
    New York (CNN Business)Black-owned businesses have been hit substantially harder by the coronavirus pandemic than companies overall, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.The New York Fed on Wednesday unveiled a study on the virus' impact on business owners nationwide, and the results show disparities in how the business owners of various races have struggled.The report estimates that 41% of Black-owned businesses across the country shut down between February and April, echoing the findings of a similar University of California, Santa Cruz study released in June. About 32% of Latino businesses and 26% of Asian businesses shut down over the same time span. Only about 17% of white businesses shut down during the same period, the study authors found.The authors cite lack of financial savings, less access to capital, and funding gaps that existed prior to the pandemic as causes for the demographic disparities."Covid-19 has exacerbated these issues...
    Share Tweet Share Share E-mail That the Mediterranean diet is one of the best for health is something that was already known. However, now, a new study has established a link between following a Mediterranean diet and reducing cognitive decline. The research, published in the journal Alzheimer’s and Dementia, suggests that following a Mediterranean diet at the population level may reduce the risk of and delay cognitive decline. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, dementia is a general term that refers to significant cognitive decline, often in adulthood. Different diseases can cause dementia, although the most common is Alzheimer’s. Although a certain level of cognitive decline is common as people age, significant cognitive decline, as occurs in people with dementia, is not a normal part of aging. The authors of the new study wanted to explore the possible role of diet in the fight against dementia...
    A new study is looking at how coronavirus particles may spread in contained areas like elevators, classrooms, and supermarkets. Researchers at the University of Minnesota’s College of Science and Engineering tried to evaluate how the novel coronavirus is transmitted through aerosols, or particles released from a person while breathing and talking. “The SARS CoV-2 virus hitches a ride on those aerosols as they land on nearby surfaces or are inhaled by another person," according to the news release from the university, citing preliminary results of the study. HOMEMADE CORONAVIRUS FACE MASKS SHOULD BE TWO OR THREE LAYERS TO STOP SPREAD OF VIRUS, STUDY FINDS Airborne particles expelled by eight asymptomatic positive COVID-19 participants were recorded by researchers as the aerosols traveled through the air in an elevator, supermarket, and a classroom. The study authors then compared how different levels of ventilation and spacing between the room occupants affected the path of the virus particles. “In general, this is...
    A study in Germany found dogs were able to sniff novel coronavirus in the saliva of patients with COVID-19. Researchers at the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Germany, found the trained detection dogs in the study could determine the difference between saliva samples from COVID-19-infected patients and those who were negative for the disease. “During the presentation of 1012 randomized samples, the dogs achieved an overall average detection rate of 94 percent," the authors stated in the study. BLOOD TEST IDENTIFIES WHICH CORONAVIRUS PATIENTS MAY BE HELPED OR HARMED BY STEROID TREATMENT The randomized controlled double-blinded trial involved eight detection dogs who were trained over one week to detect saliva or respiratory secretions of SARS-CoV-2-infected patients. The sniffer dogs could differentiate between the samples of the saliva of infected and non-infected individuals with a fair degree of accuracy. “One hundred fifty-seven correct indications of positive, 792 correct rejections of negative, 33 incorrect indications of negative or incorrect rejections...
    By Harmeet Kaur | CNN Much of what we know about the horrors of slavery in the Americas comes from historical records. But new research shows that evidence of the slave trade’s atrocities can also be found in the DNA of African Americans. A study conducted by the consumer genetics company 23andMe, published Thursday in the American Journal of Human Genetics, offers some new insight into the consequences of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, from the scale at which enslaved Black women were raped by their White masters to the less-documented slave trade that occurred within the Americas. It’s one of the largest studies of its kind, thanks in part to the massive database of 23andMe customers that researchers were able to recruit consenting participants from. The authors compiled genetic data from more than 50,000 people from the Americas, Western Europe and Atlantic Africa, and compared it against the historical records...
    A recent study funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reaffirmed reports of an emerging, life-threatening inflammatory syndrome among some youth in the US, thought to be linked to the coronavirus. Despite children with COVID-19 being “relatively spared” from medical intervention, according to the study, reports have surfaced of a number of children experiencing a rare, potentially fatal hyperinflammatory response weeks after a COVID-19 infection. This condition, called multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, or MIS-C, has been likened to Kawasaki disease — which is an acute inflammatory syndrome and can cause coronary-artery aneurysms. In late April, clinicians in the UK reported eight children presenting with cardiovascular shock, fever and hyperinflammation, study authors noted. In the study, researchers surveilled pediatric health centers across the US from March 15 to May 20. Of 186 MIS-C patients in 26 states, researchers found that 73 percent had been previously healthy,...
    A recent study funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reaffirmed reports of an emerging, life-threatening inflammatory syndrome across some youth in the U.S., believed to be linked to the coronavirus. By Thursday, confirmed coronavirus cases in the U.S. topped 4 million, with at least 143,846 reported deaths, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. Despite the widespread disease, children with COVID-19 have been “relatively spared” from medical intervention, according to the study. Findings were published on Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine. CLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE Nevertheless, reports have surfaced of a number of children experiencing a potentially fatal hyperinflammatory response weeks after a COVID-19 infection. This condition, called multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, or MIS-C, has been likened to Kawasaki disease -- which is an acute inflammatory syndrome and can cause coronary-artery aneurysms. In late April, clinicians in the UK reported...
    Crystal Cox/Business Insider A new study found that the more a man watches porn, the more likely he is to experience erectile dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction mostly affects older men, but the study authors found that 23% of men under 35 had experienced the condition. They said the correlation between porn consumption and erectile dysfunction was "higher than expected." Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The more porn a man watches, the more likely he is to experience erectile dysfunction during sex — even if he's young and healthy, according to a recent study. The findings, presented June 16 at the European Association of Urology's virtual congress, are based on 3,267 men in Belgium, Denmark, and the UK, who completed an online questionnaire about masturbation habits, how often they watch porn, and their partnered sex experiences. They found men who reported watched 70 minutes or more of porn...
    A new study from the U.K. finds that immunity against COVID-19 fades within weeks, putting a "nail in the coffin" of the idea of herd immunity, according to the study's authors. What are the details? The research, carried out by scientists at King's College London, determined that a COVID-19 patient's level of antibodies peaked three weeks after symptoms appeared and then in some cases faded away altogether. Research notes that in some cases, a patient's level of antibodies was entirely "undetectable" after three months. The study, conducted on antibody response of 90 patients and health care workers at Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, found that 60 percent of those tested had "potent" levels of antibodies during their COVID-19 battles, but just 17 percent had the same level of antibodies three months later. The study also noted that it appears COVID-19 can reinfect people even...
    Miami-Dade police officers watch as demonstrators walk past during a protest against police brutality and the recent death of George Floyd on June 02, 2020 in Miami, Florida. Protests continue to be held in cities throughout the country over the death of George Floyd, who was killed while in police custody in Minneapolis on May 25th. Joe Raedle/Getty Images Two study authors have retracted their research after it was used in two opinion columns to dismiss systemic racism by police is a myth. The researchers said they were careless in their study's methodology, and the lack of complete data on nationwide police-civilian interactions led to flawed results. In response to the retraction, conservative news outlets said the authors were only doing so to appease people who complained. The authors said this was not the case. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Two researchers who wrote a study...
    By Elizabeth McGuigan Amazingly, a new “study” is making headlines, despite the fact that it relies on obviously faulty assumptions, irrational methodology and has not been peer-reviewed. The authors cite themselves as support for spurious statements like “Surges in firearm purchasing…have been well documented in association with mass shootings and significant political events and are followed by population-level increases in firearm violence.” Crime data for the most recent months isn’t available yet, but we know history proves otherwise. Sure, Americans tend to buy more of something they think will soon be scarce. Just as there was an increase in toilet paper buying during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, adults are more likely to legally purchase a certain firearm they have been thinking about when there is a political discussion of banning that firearm. Does that mean those purchases are, as the author argues, “excess” firearms? Any chef will tell...
    The authors of a study that has been frequently cited to prove the absence of racial bias in officer-involved shootings have asked for their study to be retracted in its entirety, claiming that their study has been repeatedly misused by the media and that some of the conclusions they drew were unwarranted. The study, which was published in 2019 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was titled, "Officer characteristics and racial disparities in fatal officer-involved shootings." The study gained national prominence when it became the subject of a widely-disseminated article by Heather MacDonald in the Wall Street Journal titled, "The Myth of Systemic Police Racism." MacDonald's article claimed that the study proved that endemic racism in policing does not exist. In explaining why they were asking for the article to be retracted, the authors of the study, Joseph Cesario and David Johnson, claimed that...
    A new paper examines property tax assessments in every state and concludes that Black homeowners pay, on average, a 10–13% higher tax burden “for the same bundle of public services.” Here’s the tax gap state by state: In Illinois, Black homeowners pay nearly a third more than white homeowners for otherwise similar houses. Among the states studied, only three—Vermont, Oregon, and Indiana—fail to show a pattern of over-assessing Black homeowners. The authors propose two mechanisms for the tax gap. First, property tax assessments do a good job of assessing value based on house characteristics—age, size, number of bedrooms, etc.—but do a poor job of assessing value based on neighborhood characteristics. Market prices generally do a good job of reflecting the kind of neighborhood a house is in, but property tax assessments tend to diverge from market prices—and they diverge more the greater the number of Black families are...
    BERLIN (AP) — The world’s mountain of discarded flat-screen TVs, cellphones and other electronic goods grew to a record high last year, according to an annual report released Thursday. The U.N.-backed study estimated the amount of e-waste that piled up globally in 2019 at 53.6 metric tonnes (59.1 tons) — almost 2 million metric tons more than the previous year. The authors of the study calculated the combined weight of all dumped devices with a battery or a plug last year was the equivalent of 350 cruise ships the size of the Queen Mary 2. Among all the discarded plastic and silicon were large amounts of copper, gold and other precious metals — used for example to conduct electricity on circuit boards. While about a sixth of it was recycled, the remainder of those valuable components — worth about $57 billion — weren’t reclaimed, the study found. Discarded electronic equipment...
    BERLIN (AP) — The world's mountain of discarded flat-screen TVs, cellphones and other electronic goods grew to a record high last year, according to an annual report released Thursday. The U.N.-backed study estimated the amount of e-waste that piled up globally in 2019 at 53.6 metric tonnes (59.1 tons) — almost 2 million metric tons more than the previous year. The authors of the study calculated the combined weight of all dumped devices with a battery or a plug last year was the equivalent of 350 cruise ships the size of the Queen Mary 2. Among all the discarded plastic and silicon were large amounts of copper, gold and other precious metals — used for example to conduct electricity on circuit boards. While about a sixth of it was recycled, the remainder of those valuable components — worth about $57 billion — weren't reclaimed, the study found. Discarded electronic equipment...
    BERLIN (AP) — The world’s mountain of discarded flat-screen TVs, cellphones and other electronic goods grew to a record high last year, according to an annual report released Thursday. The U.N.-backed study estimated the amount of e-waste that piled up globally in 2019 at 53.6 metric tonnes (59.1 tons) — almost 2 million metric tons more than the previous year. The authors of the study calculated the combined weight of all dumped devices with a battery or a plug last year was the equivalent of 350 cruise ships the size of the Queen Mary 2. Among all the discarded plastic and silicon were large amounts of copper, gold and other precious metals — used for example to conduct electricity on circuit boards. While about a sixth of it was recycled, the remainder of those valuable components — worth about $57 billion — weren’t reclaimed, the study found. Discarded electronic equipment...
    Matthew Rozsa June 23, 2020 5:10PM (UTC) A new study published this month in the academic journal Nature Communications argues that, despite all of the talk about using green technology to address man-made environmental problems, the only way for human consumption to become sustainable is if we rein in the affluent. "The key conclusion from our review is that we cannot rely on technology alone to solve existential environmental problems – like climate change, biodiversity loss and pollution – but that we also have to change our affluent lifestyles and reduce overconsumption, in combination with structural change," Professor Tommy Wiedmann from the University of New South Wales Engineering told that college's newspaper regarding the study. : The paper itself argued that "the affluent citizens of the world are responsible for most environmental impacts and are central to any future prospect of retreating to safer environmental conditions." The authors added that "existing...
    In a new study of convalescent plasma transfusions in 20,000 coronavirus patients, authors say the data offers “robust evidence” the treatment is safe and associated with improved survival. The idea behind the therapy is that plasma of recently infected recovered coronavirus patients has antiviral antibodies that can be used to treat other patients with the virus. “Convalescent plasma has a strong historical record of some efficacy during acute infectious pandemics,” study authors write. FLORIDA SETS NEW RECORD IN CORONAVIRUS SINGLE-DAY CASES The study, published on Wednesday in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, offered a larger analysis expanding on an initial report of 5,000 transfused patients. Patients were given the plasma through an expanded access program developed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Mayo Clinic. Study authors say the data offers “robust evidence” that plasma transfusions for COVID-19 patients are safe and associated with improved survival. (iStock) Between April 3 and...
    An influential study in the Lancet used to attack the president for recommending the use of hydroxychloroquine against coronavirus has been retracted after overwhelming criticism. The editors of the publication explained on Thursday that the authors of the study could not obtain the dataset in the study in order for third party reviewers to confirm the results. The original study was published in the Lancet on March 22. "Our independent peer reviewers informed us that Surgisphere would not transfer the full dataset, client contracts, and the full ISO audit report to their serves for analysis as such transfer would violate client agreements and confidentiality requirements," the authors said in the retraction. "As such, our reviewers were not able to conduct and independent and private peer review and therefore notified us of their withdrawal from the peer-review process," they added. ...
    The authors of two major medical studies on coronavirus patients— including one that raised global concerns about the use of the hydroxychloroquine — retracted their papers on Thursday. The journals that published the studies said the authors were unable to get full access to the database behind their work to verify the raw data. The Lancet retracted an influential paper published in May that claimed to analyze data from nearly 96,000 coronavirus patients in six continents. The study found those who took hydroxychloroquine showed increased heart rhythm problems and had a higher mortality rate than those who didn't take it. The New England Journal of Medicine then retracted a study from the same authors, also published in May, that said it analyzed 8,910 COVID-19 patients. That study suggested that widely-used blood pressure medicines did not raise the risk of death for COVID-19 patients.  The Lancet study influenced governments in several nations to ban...
    The authors of a study published in the medical journal The Lancet that said taking hydroxychloroquine to treat coronavirus could be fatal retracted their findings Thursday after multiple reports questioned its data. The database belonged to a small Illinois company called Surgisphere, which is owned by Dr. Sapan Desai, one of four co-authors of the study, and which has a science fiction writer and an adult content model on its small staff, who have little or no medical or science backgrounds. The other three co-authors, including Dr. Mandeep R. Mehra, a professor at Harvard Medical School, retracted the article after their attempt to verify the data’s accuracy and authenticity were thwarted by Desai, who did not return requests for comment from The Post. “We launched an independent third-party peer review of Surgisphere with the consent of Sapan Desai to evaluate the origination of the database elements, to confirm the completeness...
    Changes to levels of the hormone estrogen appear to make consuming alcohol more rewarding to female mice, according to a study. This may mean women are more likely to drink to excess at different phases of the menstrual cycle, one of the scientists involved told Newsweek. Higher levels of the hormone estrogen have previously been linked to women and rodents drinking more, said the authors of the research published in the journal JNeurosci. Estrogen is thought to change activity in the dopamine system, a collection of cells in the brain that play a part in how we process rewards. The authors set out to explore how estrogen affects the neurons of mice in a part of the dopamine system called the ventral tegmental area (VTA). They carried out two types of experiments. First, they took brain slices from female mice in either the high or low estrogen phases of their...
1