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    The Portsmouth Police Department announces the arrest of Brandon N. Barrett of 301 Dunlap road in Portsmouth. On March 1, 2021, at 0251 hours, Portsmouth dispatch center received a call from a female who lives in the 100 block of Dunlap Rd. The female advised that she was asleep inside her residence when she heard a noise. The victim went to investigate the sound and encountered the suspect, Brandon Barrett, inside her home. The victim ran back to her bedroom to retrieve a firearm. The suspect followed the victim into her bedroom. The victim fired one shot towards the suspect. The suspect and victim then fought over the handgun. The victim was able to free herself and ran outside to a neighbor’s home. Midnight shift patrol officers responded to the incident location and were able to recover a shell casing, bullet fragment, and video footage from neighbors. The incident report...
    S Club 7's Tina Barrett has opened up about her heartache over split from boyfriend Paul Cashmore. The 44-year-old - who is most well known for being part of 90s pop group - has tried to keep her personal life out of the spotlight since shooting to fame in 1998. 7Tina Barrett has revealed her heartache after going her separate ways with boyfriend Paul Cashmore two years agoCredit: Alamy Tina was on cloud nine after giving birth to baby Roman back in 2016. But when the tot was just three-years-old, the singer and her other half Paul - who is most well known for his role on Channel 4's Hunted - decided to go their separate ways after six years together. Tina has spoken out for the first time about their split and explained the pair just ended up drifting apart. She told OK! magazine: "I guess...
    Getty Von Miller could hit the free agent market if he is released. We can expect the Tampa Bay Buccaneers to be linked to a number of NFL stars throughout the offseason thanks to the perfect combination of Tom Brady and the team’s Super Bowl run. Former NFL quarterback and SiriusXM radio analyst Brady Quinn suggested the Buccaneers could add Broncos linebacker Von Miller if the team is not willing to pay Shaq Barrett’s asking price in free agency. “If you and I were going to bet right now on Von Miller at 32 this year having more production/more sacks if when healthy with Tampa, as compared to Shaq Barrett, if he leaves, I’d put my money on Von Miller,” Quinn explained, per JoeBucsFan.com. Miller is not a free agent but there is some speculation that the pass rusher could be a cap casualty for the...
    The Warriors shot 24 free throws. The Knicks shot 22 free throws. That didn’t stop the Knicks from voicing concern about the officials after the first Garden game this season with fans. Derrick Rose was the most vocal after he felt he got fouled on a few forays to the hoop. The Knicks shot 39 percent and faded in the second half — a recent trend. “I felt we were getting good shots,’’ Rose said. “To be honest, we weren’t getting the calls. It felt like guys were going into the lane and we weren’t getting the same calls. It makes it hard when it’s that lopsided.’’ The stats don’t show much lopsidedness, but coach Tom Thibodeau, too, was upset, and Julius Randle picked up two technical fouls to get ejected. Do the Warriors simply get more respect? “I really don’t know,’’ Rose said. “We’re pros. I don’t even want...
    Sergio Dionisio/Getty Images One actress who appeared on Star Trek says she slept with show creator Gene Roddenberry. However, she may not have been the only actress to be intimately connected to the show’s creator. In fact, a different actress who appeared on the series ultimately married Roddenberry. The original series of Star Trek aired from 1966 to 1969. It is also known that Gene Roddenberry reached a divorce settlement with his first wife, Eileen, in 1969, and married a former Trek actress shortly after that divorce was finalized. Here is what we know about the women Roddenberry was involved with over the years, and what life was like on set for Star Trek actresses of the time. Nichelle Nichols Said She Slept With Roddenberry in Her Memoir YouTubeNichelle Nichols as Uhura. Nichelle Nichols played Lt. Nyota Uhura on the original series of Star Trek,...
    RJ Barrett wasn’t in a scoring mode on Super Bowl Sunday, but when he made a defensive miscue, it was the last straw for Tom Thibodeau. Barrett was benched in the fourth quarter, finishing with three points, as the Heat escaped with a 109-103 Garden victory in a Sunday matinee. Julius Randle poured in 26 points and added 12 rebounds and seven assists. Reggie Bullock was on fire from 3-point range, knocking in seven 3s, for 21 points. But the Knicks (11-14) showed they can’t win unless Barrett is a major factor, and he was a no-show. Barrett played just 19 minutes and shot 1 of 6 as the Knicks had their two-game winning streak snapped. Barrett was scoreless in the first half. Sources said the Knicks were on the verge of acquiring Derrick Rose — with multiple reports saying the deal is done — partly to give them more...
    More On: new york knicks Knicks agree to trade to bring back former All-Star Tom Thibodeau limits vet’s minutes in Knicks’ win Ex-Knick, Tom Thibodeau favorite now on market Noticeable Knicks change is a sight to behold RJ Barrett wasn’t in a scoring mode on Super Bowl Sunday, but when he made a defensive miscue, it was the last straw for Tom Thibodeau. Barrett was benched in the fourth quarter, finishing with three points, as the Heat escaped with a 109-103 Garden victory in a Sunday matinee. Julius Randle poured in 26 points and added 12 rebounds and seven assists. Reggie Bullock was on fire from 3-point range, knocking in seven 3s, for 21 points. But the Knicks (11-14) showed they can’t win unless Barrett is a major factor, and he was a no-show. Barrett played just 19 minutes and shot 1 of 6 as the Knicks had their...
    An SAS marksman killed five Islamic State fighters (IS) with a single sniper shot from 3,000ft away, according to reports.  The highly-experienced special forces sniper is said to have used a Barrett .50 calibre rifle to shoot his jihadist target in the chest - exploding his suicide vest. The bomb blast killed the target and four other IS fighters. Among the five dead was a top jihadist commander, reports the Daily Star on Sunday. According to the paper, the shooting happened in Syria in November during a kill or capture mission against the terrorist group. An SAS marksmen killed five Islamic State fighters with a single sniper shot from 3,000ft away (stock image), according to reports. The highly-experienced special forces sniper is said to have used a Barrett .50 calibre rifle (pictured: Library image) to shoot his jihadist target in the chest - exploding his suicide vest The...
    Facebook Mary Barrett A Pennsylvania man has been charged with criminal homicide after he confessed to beating his wife to death with a fireplace poker following an argument about infidelity, authorities said. Daniel Barrett, 40, turned himself in to the Plymouth Township police station on Monday, January 11, and told officers he killed his wife, U.S. Air Force veteran Mary Barrett, two days earlier. WNEP reported the incident occurred after Barrett accused his wife of cheating on him during an argument, he told investigators, and his wife admitted that she had been “spending time” with someone else. He said he then punched her, knocking her down. The outlet reported that when officers went to Barrett’s home, they found a trail of blood down to the basement where Mary Barrett’s body was found. Barrett is being held at the Luzerne County Correctional Facility without bail on a charge of...
    A Pennsylvania man has been charged with criminal homicide after police say he confessed to stabbing and bludgeoning his wife to death with a fireplace poker, and then leaving her to die in the basement of their home for two days following an argument about infidelity.  Daniel Barrett, 40, was described in charging documents are being 'emotional and excited' when he walked into the Plymouth Police Department on Monday evening and admitted to brutally killing his wife, 43-year-old Mary Barrett, two days earlier for cheating on him.  Officers went to the couple's restored colonial home in the 100 block of Gaylord Avenue and followed a trail of blood through the house and down into the cellar, where they discovered the victim's lifeless body.  Daniel Barrett, 40 (left), has been charged with criminal homicide in connection with the bludgeoning and stabbing death of his wife, Mary Barrett, 43 (right)...
    A Pennsylvania man allegedly bludgeoned his wife to death with a fireplace poker because she was “spending time” with another man, authorities said. Daniel Barrett has been charged with criminal homicide for brutally murdering his wife Mary Susan Barrett in their Plymouth home on Saturday, the Citizen’s Voice newspaper reported. Barrett confessed to police on Monday. He said he got into a heated argument with his wife and accused her of cheating on him. Mary Barrett, an Air Force veteran, admitted she was “spending time” with another man, and her husband lost control, punching her in the face and knocking her to the ground, according to a criminal complaint obtained by the outlet. Barrett then repeatedly beat his wife with a fireplace poker and stabbed her in the lower back with a knife multiple times, court papers allege. Barrett claims he blacked out during the...
    More On: homicide Man found floating in East River was murdered, police sources say Two killed, three wounded in latest NYC shootings 53-year-old man fatally stabbed in Bronx, NYPD says 17-year-old fatally shot inside NYCHA complex: cops A Pennsylvania man allegedly bludgeoned his wife to death with a fireplace poker because she was “spending time” with another man, authorities said. Daniel Barrett has been charged with criminal homicide for brutally murdering his wife Mary Susan Barrett in their Plymouth home on Saturday, the Citizen’s Voice newspaper reported. Barrett confessed to police on Monday. He said he got into a heated argument with his wife and accused her of cheating on him. Mary Barrett, an Air Force veteran, admitted she was “spending time” with another man, and her husband lost control, punching her in the face and knocking her to the ground, according to a criminal complaint...
    A MAN bludgeoned his wife to death with a fireplace poker and stabbed her repeatedly with a knife before stashing the body in the basement for two days, according to police. Daniel Barrett, 40, has been charged with homicide over the alleged murder of his spouse Mary Susan Barrett at their home in Plymouth, Pennsylvania on Saturday. 3Daniel Barrett of Plymouth is now facing criminal homicide charges after he allegedly killed his wifeCredit: Plymouth Police 3Daniel Barrett, 40, has been charged with homicide over the alleged murder of his spouse Mary Susan BarrettCredit: Facebook An "emotional and excited" Barrett reportedly turned himself in to police and confessed to the crime on Monday night, police allege. When police arrived at the home on Gaylord Avenue, they found a blood trail through the house and into the basement, the criminal complaint states. Mary Barrett was reportedly found lying on the ground...
    Getty The Buccaneers want Shaquil Barrett back for 2021. Tom Brady may be garnering most of the national attention for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, but the team’s defense is a major reason why the franchise could make some noise in the postseason. Shaq Barrett has emerged as one of the top linebackers in the NFL but will be a free agent after the season. Buccaneers head coach Bruce Arians made a strong statement about Barrett’s future noting the team doesn’t “plan on Shaq going anywhere.” “It is a luxury and we don’t plan on Shaq going anywhere,” Arians said, per Tampa Bay Times. “I don’t think he wants to go anywhere because having JPP on the other side really helps him out and I think vice versa. Putting them over the guards this week, they did some different stuff and they’re a heck of a duo, man. When...
    After missing his first six shots of the preseason, RJ Barrett put up dynamic scoring numbers in Detroit — 15 in the opener Friday, 25 on Sunday. The 20-year-old is still not hitting his 3-pointer, but Barrett has begun his second season attacking, banging in mid-range jumpers and playing with pace. His rookie season was something of an inefficient mixed bag, though it was still shocking the third overall pick wasn’t selected to one of the league’s two all-rookie teams. “It’s a little slower, a little more comfortable, knowing what to expect a little more,’’ Barrett said after Sunday’s 99-91 loss. “You know how certain teams and coaches, what their schemes will be. I’m just getting more comfortable.’’ But not comfortable enough to eliminate turnovers. Barrett had four to go along with his 25-point night. He raised the subject on Zoom — a good sign. Barrett also had two...
    More On: new york knicks The skinny on every Knick in training camp Leon Rose’s grand Knicks roster plans went up in flames Tom Thibodeau hasn’t seen anything like this Knicks task Knicks’ draft steal similar to Kristaps Porzingis surprise Shooting guard RJ Barrett is considered the key young cornerstone in the Knicks’ rebuild. That cornerstone didn’t make it onto the two All-Rookie Teams. The snub was a surprise to a lot of people, including Barrett himself. More obscure players such as Terence Davis, Brandon Clarke and PJ Washington were chosen ahead of him. “It bothered me a lot,’’ Barrett said on a Zoom Call during Media Day. “Not going to lie, it bothered me a lot. I really don’t understand why I wasn’t on it. But it was motivation, motivation for next season. It was good to have an extra chip on my shoulder and just prove...
    Amy Coney Barrett Hours before Thanksgiving, we got an ugly look at what the fully Trumpified Supreme Court is going to bring us. The court of Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett brought us an unsigned order saying that New York’s public health guidelines don’t apply to religious organizations, because FREEDOM. The guidelines in question limit attendance at religious services in coronavirus hot spots. Currently, the harshest limits are in place nowhere in New York. Before Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death, Chief Justice John Roberts wrote, in a case similarly challenging restrictions on church attendance, that local officials “should not be subject to second-guessing by an unelected federal judiciary, which lacks the background, competence and expertise to assess public health and is not accountable to the people.” Wednesday night, that view was overruled by Gorsuch, Kavanaugh, Barrett, Samuel Alito, and Clarence Thomas. “The Constitution does not forbid States from responding...
    The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday night blocked New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo from reimposing strict attendance caps at worship services in areas hit hard by the novel coronavirus.  The court ruled 5-4 to bar Cuomo from enforcing his Oct. 6 “Cluster Initiative” against houses of worship that sued to challenge the restrictions.  The order was also the first in which Justice Amy Coney Barrett played a decisive role. Barrett, who was President Trump's third Supreme Court nominee, joined the court Oct. 27, after winning Senate confirmation following the Sept. 18 death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Then-Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett is seen Oct. 21, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Associated Press) Meanwhile, Chief Justice Roberts joined the court’s liberal wing in the dissenting opinion, which stated the court had acted rashly. Cuomo's initiative had created color-coded limits on mass gatherings and business operations, in an effort to stem the outbreak in New York...
    (CNN)In a 5-4 ruling, the Supreme Court sided with religious organizations in a dispute over Covid-19 restrictions put in place by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo that limited attendance at religious services.The case is the latest pitting religious groups against city and state officials seeking to stop the spread of Covid-19 and highlights the impact of Justice Amy Coney Barrett on the Court. It comes as Covid-19 related cases are spiking across the country. In the late-night ruling, Barrett sided with the conservatives in the dispute, while Chief Justice John Roberts joined the three liberal justices in dissent. The ruling underscores Barrett's impact on the bench, reflecting the Court's rightward shift. Last spring and summer, when Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was still alive, the court split 5-4 on similar cases, with Roberts and the liberals in the majority siding against houses of worship. Barrett was confirmed in October to take...
    In today’s Hoosier edition of One Step Forward, Ten Steps Back, Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill (R) seems to be asking the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that “marriage equality” means that some marriages are still more equal than others. Indiana’s position in Box v. Henderson is as petty as it is offensive – and yet, there’s every reason to believe it’ll get a friendly reception from the U.S. Supreme Court. The case over which parents have the right to be listed on state-issued birth certificates was initially brought by a group of eight married couples who conceived their children by using sperm donors. The problem – at least as far as Indiana is concerned – is that these couples are lesbians; the state’s position is that lesbian spouses  simply do not have the same rights that opposite-sex spouses do. Before discussing Indiana’s insidious actions toward these families, let’s dip briefly...
    When it comes to voting on abortion, Catholics' views tend to align with those of others in their party. Donald Trump spent the 2020 election courting Christian conservatives, hoping his anti-abortion stance would win over both evangelicals and conservative Catholics. For the latter group, that may have been a miscalculation. An election night analysis by Catholics for Choice showed that Catholic voters are not as single-minded about abortion as Trump assumes. Trump did everything he could to solidify his conservative Christian base, including rushing Amy Coney Barrett onto the Supreme Court. Nominating Barrett, an extremely conservative Catholic, was seen as a way for Trump to court the Catholic vote. This was based on the assumption that Catholics would vote on the basis of a candidate's views on abortion alone. 
    Donald Trump's chief of staff Mark Meadows has tested positive for COVID-19. Bloomberg reported on Friday night that Meadows, 61, was confirmed to be infected with the virus. On Friday 125,000 Americans tested positive - a new record, and the third consecutive day with more than 100,000 new cases every day.  It was unclear when he tested positive. He was last in the White House on Thursday, CNN reported.  His boss tested positive on October 1 and is thought unlikely to become infected again.  Meadows was with the president throughout his treatment at the Walter Reed medical center.  The White House has been battling a coronavirus outbreak since September 26, when a Rose Garden 'super spreader event' was held - the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett.  On Tuesday night an estimated 250 people gathered at the White House on watch the results filter in. Meadows has been one of the most...
    After newly minted Justice Amy Coney Barrett eased into her new job last week with a handful of low-profile cases, the Supreme Court on Wednesday heard its first oral arguments on a hot-button issue since Trump's third appointee joined the bench.  The justices on Wednesday considered Fulton v. City of Philadelphia, a case about whether Philadelphia can exclude a Catholic group from participating in its foster program because it refuses to certify same-sex couples to be foster parents. The dispute followed the city's decision to stop referring cases to the group, Catholic Social Services (CSS) and its later non-renewal of CSS' contract with the city.  Justice Samuel Alito took a highly suspicious view of the city's stance that it may refuse to let CSS participate in certifying foster families in what it said is a neutral application of its nondiscrimination policies. He accused the city of not being able to abide by the...
    U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Amy Coney Barrett, associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, stand on a balcony during a ceremony on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Oct. 26, 2020. The Senate voted 52-48 Monday to confirm Barrett to the Supreme Court, giving the court a 6-3 conservative majority that could determine the future of the Affordable Care Act and abortion rights. Photographer: Ken Cedeno/CNP/Bloomberg via Getty ImagesBloomberg | Bloomberg | Getty Images The Supreme Court is set to hear a case concerning the rights of gay and lesbian Americans on Wednesday morning in a dispute that advocates are warning could pierce holes in the nation's anti-discrimination laws. Arguments, which will take place just a day after the presidential election, will mark the first major fight to come before Justice Amy Coney Barrett, who was sworn in a week ago....
    Gabby Barrett is expecting her first child with husband Cade Foehner. The American Idol alums decided to dress up for a fun Halloween photo that put her baby bump front and center. On Saturday, October 31, Gabby posted the snapshot on her Instagram with her husband standing outside in what appears to be a field. The background is a little blurry, but a tree can be seen behind them and what looks like plenty of leaves on the ground. There was also glowing pumpkins around them as well. The pregnant singer looked adorable dressed up as a scarecrow. She had on a pair of dark blue jeans with a red plaid shirt that was left unbuttoned. Gabby wore a white top underneath that hugged her bulging belly nicely as she cradled it with one hand on top and the other one underneath. She also sported a tan wide-rimmed hat on...
    The Girl Scouts of America on Wednesday congratulated Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett on her appointment, but deleted the social media posts after sweeping criticism. The Scouts’ Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts featured an image of Barrett and the first four women justices to serve on the nation’s highest court. That includes Sandra Day O’Connor, Sonia Sotomayor, Elena Kagan and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, whose death last month paved the way for President Donald Trump to nominate Barrett. “Congratulations Amy Coney Barrett on becoming the 5th woman appointed to the Supreme Court since its inception in 1789,” the group tweeted around 1 p.m. ET, screenshots of the tweet show. The Scouts then clarified that the group is “a nonpolitical, nonpartisan organization.” “We are neither red nor blue, but Girl Scout GREEN. We are here to lift up girls and women. If you would like to debate partisan police–keep scrolling,” the...
    Trevor Noah joked about the Senate’s bad trade on Tuesday’s The Daily Show, comparing their move to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg with Amy Coney Barrett to trading LeBron James for Ben Carson.  Before the mockery began, the host gave credit where credit was due: “Say what you want about the G.O.P., man, but this shit — this was gangster. They swapped out a Supreme Court seat in four weeks.” “This whole process — this whole process — in four weeks,” he added. “It was like watching a chop shop strip down your car for parts. Like, yo, I’ll miss my Audi, but you’ve got to admire their technique.” Noah was not only impressed by the Senate’s speed but was also shocked — pointing out that they normally take months to accomplish anything. “I mean, they just hustled Amy Coney Barrett straight from the confirmation to a midnight ceremony,” he added. “Shit looked like the basic cable version...
            by Robert Romano  The U.S. Senate has confirmed Justice Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court by a vote of 52 to 48, creating a new 6 to 3 majority of Republican-appointed justices on the nation’s highest court—and the Democratic Party is in an absolute panic over the outcome. Almost as soon as Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed away, Democrats were already threatening to abolish the filibuster in order to amend the Judiciary Act of 1869 and pack the Supreme Court — increasing the threshold way beyond the current nine justices set by law. And the whole time, former Vice President Joe Biden has refused to tell the American people what he will do on packing the court if he wins the election. On Oct. 10, Ross DiMattei on KTNV told Biden that “packing the courts” is “the number one thing I’ve been asked about from viewers in the past couple days” and...
              Live from Music Row Tuesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed all-star panelist Clint Brewer to the studio to weigh in on the Senate vote for Amy Coney Barrett Monday night. Leahy: In studio now by our good friend, all-star panelist, recovering journalist, and public affairs specialist Clint Brewer. Thanks, Clint for being here. Brewer: Hey, man, good to be here you doing alright? Leahy: Four words that I’ve always wanted to hear and I will say them right now. Justice Amy Coney Barrett. Brewer: I thought you were going to say it is almost over. Leahy: (Chuckles) Those would be good ones to say as well. I don’t know when Clint we’ll be able to say it is almost over....
    Roger Sollenberger October 28, 2020 12:37AM (UTC) While Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation to the Supreme Court advanced to its all-but-certain conclusion last week, Pennsylvania Republicans pushed the high court to reconsider a case about voting by mail. Only days earlier, a split decision had dealt the attempt to restrict mail-in ballots with defeat.  If the court agrees to rehear the case, Barrett, who refused to answer questions during her confirmation hearings about whether laws enshrining voter intimidation were against the Constitution and whether the president had the authority to unilaterally delay the election, would see her voting views tested out of the gate.  : Combined with the controversial timing and speed of her confirmation, such a move would undoubtedly raise questions about whether Republicans rushed to stack the court with favorable justices ahead of the election. In fact, some have already answered in the affirmative. Earlier this month, Pennsylvania Republicans appealed a state court ruling declaring that mail-in ballots received within three days of Election Day should still be...
    Washington — Judge Amy Coney Barrett officially became Justice Amy Coney Barrett on Tuesday morning, with Chief Justice John Roberts administering the second of two oaths Supreme Court justices are required to take before beginning her work on the high court. But for Barrett, 48, there will be no slow transition from her seat on the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to the nation's highest court, as pending before the justices as she joins them are a slew of disputes involving politically charged — and time-sensitive — issues.  Barrett was confirmed by the Senate in a near party-line vote, 52-48, and took the constitutional oath of office, administered by Justice Clarence Thomas, at the White House on Monday night. On Tuesday morning, at a private ceremony at the Supreme Court, Roberts administered the judicial oath, with her six other new colleagues looking on from a safe distance and Justice...
    House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerTop Democrats introduce resolution calling for mask mandate, testing program in Senate Trump orders aides to halt talks on COVID-19 relief This week: Coronavirus complicates Senate's Supreme Court fight MORE (D-Md.) on Tuesday outlined a broad and ambitious legislative agenda for 2021, predicting Democrats will have unified power to move the party's priorities on issues as varied as health care, infrastructure, climate change and gun reform.  "I think we're going to deal with all of those — and more," he said on a call with reporters. First on tap, Hoyer said, would be another round of emergency coronavirus relief, which has stalled this month amid partisan differences over the size and scope of the next aid package.  Hoyer, echoing comments from President Trump just hours earlier, said he's hopeful the sides can unite in the post-election session to adopt another massive stimulus bill.  "It...
    Mayim Bialik commented on the appointment of Amy Coney Barrett to the United States Supreme Court by suggesting her “Big Bang Theory” character replace her. On Monday, the Senate voted to confirm Barrett as an associate justice on the nation’s highest court with a 52-48 vote, which many celebrities who lean left took issue with given how close to the election the vote took place. The former “Big Bang Theory” star took to Instagram shortly after the news was confirmed to joke that her character, Amy Farrah Fowler, should replace Barrett on the Supreme court.  “Can we swap out Amy Coney Barrett with Amy Farrah Fowler to the Supreme Court of the United States? Please??? #SupremeCourt #SCOTUS #TBBT,” she captioned an image of herself on the set of the hit CBS sitcom.  CELEBRITIES REACT TO TRUMP SELECTING JUDGE AMY CONEY BARRETT FOR THE SUPREME COURT Bialik herself has a...
    (CNN)With Amy Coney Barrett now seated on the Supreme Court, Republicans are pushing for reconsideration of a Pennsylvania case on mail-in voting -- the first potential test of how the new justice will handle election challenges.The case is one of several legal challenges across the country seeking an audience before the Supreme Court or being considered in state courts touching on voting and the pandemic, leaving rules for counting ballots in several key battleground states still in dispute just a week before Election Day.On Monday evening, shortly before Barrett's confirmation, the Supreme Court rejected a challenge from Democrats in Wisconsin, who were seeking to reverse a lower-court ruling that ballots could be counted only if they are received by Election Day.The legal fights could affect how ballots are counted -- in particular when it comes to mail-in voting, from when ballots must be received to count to how closely signatures...
    Matthew Chapman October 27, 2020 11:18AM (UTC) This article originally appeared on Raw Story On Monday evening, the House Judiciary Committee tweeted a gloating jab at Hillary Clinton following the confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. The juvenile behavior of the committee, whose ranking member is Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH), promptly earned criticism from commenters on social media. :   Matthew Chapman MORE FROM Matthew Chapman
    AMY Coney Barrett has been sworn in as Supreme Court justice to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. She was formally appointed after Republicans outvoted Democrats 52-48 in the US senate - here’s everything we know about the mother of seven. 3Amy Coney Barrett has been sworn in as Supreme Court justice to replace Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgCredit: Reuters Who is Amy Coney Barrett? Amy Coney Barrett, 48, was born in 1972 and raised in New Orleans. She is the eldest child of seven siblings. Her father worked as an attorney for Shell Oil Company. She earned her undergraduate degree in English literature in 1994 at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tenn. She then graduated from Notre Dame University Law School, and clerked for conservative icon Justice Antonin Scalia. She taught at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana for 15 years, before being appointed to her current role as a circuit...
    The Supreme Court could soon revisit a challenge to a Pennsylvania Supreme Court decision on extending the deadline for the receipt of absentee ballots — this time, with Justice Amy Coney Barrett on the Court, possibly casting a tie breaking vote. As Breitbart News reported last week: The U.S. Supreme Court rejected a Republican application to stay the decision of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court to grant the Democratic Party’s request to make several changes to mail-in voting that critics have decried as vulnerable to fraud. As Breitbart News reported last month, “The Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled … that ballots received three days after Election Day will still be counted — even if there is no evidence they were postmarked on time.” Republicans sought a stay. The Supreme Court, however, split 4-4 on the request, leaving the decision of the lower court in place. Chief Justice John Roberts sided with the...
    The U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee’s Republicans were among those celebrating the U.S. Senate’s confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court on Monday. The House Judiciary GOP Twitter account (@JudiciaryGOP) extended Secretary of State and former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton happy birthday wishes, positioning the rightward tilt of the nation’s highest court as her “present.” Hide Amy Coney Barrett, confirmed. Happy Birthday, @HillaryClinton!— House Judiciary GOP (@JudiciaryGOP) October 27, 2020 Hide The tweet came shortly after the 52-48 confirmation vote was finalized Monday evening. Though Clinton did not respond directly to the tweet, her thoughts on the process appeared on her Twitter account just six minutes after the “happy birthday” tweet posted. Hide Senate Republicans just pushed through a Supreme Court justice who will help them take away Americans health care in the middle of a pandemic. For them, this is victory. Vote them out.—...
    The U.S. Senate confirmed federal appellate Judge Amy Coney Barrett to a seat on the Supreme Court in a 52-48 vote late Monday. Republican Senator Susan Collins of Maine  joined the entire Democratic caucus voting against Barrett's confirmation. Collins said she would not vote for Barrett’s confirmation because of the proximity of the vote to next week’s presidential election.  According to the AP, no other Supreme Court justice has been confirmed on a recorded vote with no support from the minority party in at least 150 years. Barrett is the third justice on the nine-member court to be nominated by President Donald Trump and significantly tip its ideological balance toward a 6-3 conservative majority.   Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas is expected to swear Barrett in at a White House ceremony planned later Monday evening.  Democrats argued that the decision of picking a nominee for the seat should have been left...
    After Amy Coney Barrett's almost assured confirmation Monday evening, Justice Clarence Thomas is on the docket to swear in the 7th Circuit appellate judge to the Supreme Court at a White House ceremony. 'Justice Clarence Thomas will administer the official Constitutional Oath to Judge Amy Coney Barrett at the White House tonight,' a senior White House official told The New York Times. The vote on Barrett's nomination is set to take place some time after 7:00 p.m. Monday evening and the White House is prepared to hold a 'large' celebration in the Rose Garden honoring the momentous occasion just one week before Election Day. Although a source told Politico that the guest list for the South Lawn event is not small, Trump suggested it was smaller than it was being made out. White House chief of staff Mark Meadows also sought to assure reporters Monday that the White House ceremony...
    Loading the player... WASHINGTON (AP) — A divided Senate is set to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court, giving the country a ninth justice Monday as Republicans overpower Democratic opposition to secure President Donald Trump’s nominee the week before Election Day. Democratic leaders asked Vice President Mike Pence to stay away from presiding over her Senate confirmation due to potential health risks after his aides tested positive for COVID-19. But although Pence isn’t needed to break a tie, the vote would present a dramatic opportunity for him to preside over confirmation of Trump’s third Supreme Court justice. Read More: Senate Democrats hold all-night talk protest of Coney Barrett confirmation Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer and his leadership team wrote that not only would Pence’s presence violate Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, “it would also be a violation of common decency and courtesy.” But Senate Republicans control...
    The Senate is expected to confirm Amy Coney Barrett in a Monday evening vote as the White House has still not said whether or not Vice President Mike Pence will preside over the proceedings after being exposed to coronavirus by multiple aides. Democrats are pleading with Pence not to come to the Capitol to fulfil his largely ceremonial role, as is customary for vice presidents in landmark votes, claiming in a letter 'it's not a risk worth taking.' With little Democrats can do to stop the confirmation from going forward, the White House has already started planning a celebration – similar to the 'superspreader' event announcing Barrett's nomination at the end of September, which sparked a COVID-19 outbreak at the White House. This caused President Donald Trump, first lady Melania and their son Barron to contract the virus. The next event, which is not yet set in stone, would be...
            by Debra Heine  As Election Day draws near, Democrat business owners and politicians are increasingly flexing their muscles to push their politics into peoples’ faces and punish those who have opposing views. There have been multiple reports in the past year about Trump supporters being fired for expressing their support for the president. In the past couple of weeks, two more Trump supporters have been fired and a CEO of a major software company has sent a mass email to millions of customers telling them to vote for Joe Biden. A Republican music publicist in Nevada was recently fired by email after she posted pictures of herself at a Trump rally onto social media, the Federalist reported. When Danielle Reiss (pictured above) attended President Trump’s campaign rally in Henderson, Nevada, on Sep. 13, she had no idea it would cost her job. Reiss is a music publicist partnered with Pop Off, a Boston-based advertising agency...
    Judge Amy Coney Barrett, U.S. President Donald Trump's Nominee for Supreme Court, gestures during a photo before a meeting with Senator Roy Blunt (R-Mo) on Capitol Hill in Washington DC, U.S. October 21, 2020.Anna Moneymaker | Reuters Senate Republicans on Sunday advanced Judge Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court, clearing one of the final hurdles of the 48-year-old nominee's confirmation process. Barrett, a federal appeals court judge on the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, is expected to be confirmed by the Senate on Monday. Sunday's procedural vote divided 51-48 largely along party lines. Two Republicans, Sens. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine, sided with Democrats. There was little doubt that Barrett would sail through the vote, and there is less that she will ultimately be confirmed. Murkowski has said that while she opposed the hurried nomination process, she supports Barrett's nomination and will...
    Paul M. Collins, Jr. October 25, 2020 4:30PM (UTC) This article was originally published on The Conversation. Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court has highlighted the ways interest groups use the legal system to pursue their goals. Barrett is closely tied to the conservative Federalist Society, whose members have played a major role in President Donald Trump's judicial appointments. Organizations who support and oppose her confirmation are intensely lobbying senators and the public. Like other justices, if confirmed, Barrett will continually face pressure campaigns from groups trying to shape the direction of American law. : I have extensively studied how special interests use the court as a public policy battleground, including in my book, "Friends of the Supreme Court: Interest Groups and Judicial Decision Making." Here's what to expect from interest groups before a Supreme Court with a Justice Barrett. Friends of the court The main way...
    Reuters October 25, 2020 0 Comments The Republican-controlled U.S. Senate on Sunday plans to move closer toward a final confirmation vote on President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Amy Coney Barrett, on Monday, just over a week before Election Day. With Republicans controlling the chamber 53-47 and no indication of an internal revolt against the conservative appeals court judge replacing liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Barrett looks almost certain to take up a lifetime appointment on the bench over universal Democratic opposition. One of two Republican senators who had opposed the rushed confirmation process, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, said on Saturday that she would nevertheless vote to confirm Barrett. “I have no doubt about her capability to do the job and to do it well,” she said. Republicans are planning a preliminary vote on Sunday afternoon to end debate on the nomination, teeing up the final vote that is...
    By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Republican-controlled U.S. Senate on Sunday plans to move closer toward a final confirmation vote on President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Amy Coney Barrett, on Monday, just over a week before Election Day. With Republicans controlling the chamber 53-47 and no indication of an internal revolt against the conservative appeals court judge replacing liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Barrett looks almost certain to take up a lifetime appointment on the bench over universal Democratic opposition. One of two Republican senators who had opposed the rushed confirmation process, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, said on Saturday that she would nevertheless vote to confirm Barrett. "I have no doubt about her capability to do the job and to do it well," she said. Republicans are planning a preliminary vote on Sunday afternoon to end debate on the nomination, teeing up the final vote that is likely...
    A number of high-profile sexual assault survivors released a statement Friday accusing Judge Amy Coney Barrett of “siding with powerful abusers” and urging lawmakers to vote against her confirmation.  “Our society now demands we hold people who abuse their power accountable for sexual harassment and assault, no matter how important those people are,” actresses Michelle Hurd, Padma Lakshmi and Mira Sorvino wrote in a statement.  "Yet multiple times, Judge Barrett ruled against survivors of rape, instead siding with powerful abusers and the powerful institutions that enable them,” the statement continued.  “We know painfully well that the systems for survivors to pursue justice are broken. They cannot be repaired and must be rebuilt. But Judge Barrett’s record shows she’d reshape the law to make it even harder for survivors to be heard and for justice to be achieved.”  In 2019, Barrett led a three-woman panel of judges that ruled Purdue University...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Thursday told reporters that his health is fine after recent bruising that has appeared on his hands and lips.  In an off-camera conversation, Politico reporter John Bresnahan asked McConnell about his health and how he is feeling. McConnell,  the senior Republican senator from Kentucky, did not answer the question and in response to a follow up on if there is anything regarding his health that people should know, McConnell said, "Of course not." McConnell, at age 78, is just the latest high-profile politician to be the subject of health-related speculation. Notably, both President Trump, especially after being diagnosed with the coronavirus, and Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden have faced questions about their health. Biden is 77 and Trump is 74.  SENATE JUDICIARY REPUBLICANS ADVANCE BARRETT NOMINATION DESPITE DEMOCRATS' BOYCOTT, COMMITTEE RULES McConnell has held significant influence under the Trump administration as the Senate majority...
    Madison Summers October 22, 2020 0 Comments Senate Democrats are coming together to express their opposition to Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination to the Supreme Court as Republicans advanced her nomination to a full Senate vote. On Democrats boycotting the vote on Thursday in the Senate Judiciary Committee to advance the nomination, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) said, “Democrats will not lend a single ounce of legitimacy to this awful, awful hearing.” “We are voting with our feet,” he declared. “We are standing together, and we are standing against this unprecedented mad rush to jam through a Supreme Court nomination just days, days before an election.” If Barrett is confirmed it would be the closest nomination of a Supreme Court nominee to the presidential election. See Schumer’s remarks below: Sen. Chuck Schumer on boycott of Barrett vote: "Democrats will not lend a single ounce of legitimacy to...
    Democrats chose to be represented by pictures of people whose lives are endangered by Barrett on the court. Senate Democrats boycotted Thursday morning's Judiciary Committee vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination, but chairman Lindsey Graham plowed ahead anyway, putting a point on what a total sham the whole process has been. The Committee's rules expressly state that there have to be at least nine members, "including at least two Members of the minority," to "constitute a quorum for the purpose of transacting business." Further, "No bill, matter, or nomination shall be ordered reported from the Committee, however, unless a majority of the Committee is actually present at the time such action is taken and a majority of those present support the action taken." Rules are for everyone else, however, so the Committee moved ahead with all 12 Republicans passing her nomination. "Judge Barrett deserves a vote and she...
    AMY Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court is now set for a full Senate vote after a Democrat committee boycott failed to stall the proceedings. The Senate Judiciary Committee voted 12-0 on Thursday in favor of Barrett after Democrat lawmakers refused to attend the meeting. 1Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court is now set for a full Senate voteCredit: Getty - Pool Senator John Cornyn said that it was "surreal" that the Democrats were not present for the vote. Democrats boycotted the Amy Coney Barrett vote in a long-shot bid to block her Supreme Court appointment. In place of the Democrat's chairs were photographs of people who are benefiting from the Affordable Care Act. The photos included both young and old Americans, one of which is photographed in a wheelchair. Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer announced the planned boycott in a speech late Wednesday on the Senate...
    Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett is spending her Wednesday on Capitol Hill, meeting with GOP senators just one day before the Senate Judiciary Committee is set to vote on her nomination. Barrett has already met with Sens. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), John Barrasso (R-Wy.), Rob Portman (R-Ohio) and Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) and is scheduled to meet with Sens. Martha McSally (R-Ariz.), James Lankford (R-Okla.), Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.) and Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) before the end of the day. Barrett posed for photos with each of the senators, as is customary at the start of these types of meetings. During the photo ops, the senators were asked questions by members of the press. Speaking to reporters before the start of their meeting Wednesday morning, Alexander said, “I’m impressed with Judge Barrett. She brings scholarship and a good temperament and integrity to the court. Those are the things I look for in a...
    Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett served for nearly three years on the board of private Christian schools that effectively barred admission to children of same-sex parents and made it plain that openly gay and lesbian teachers weren’t welcome in the classroom. The policies that discriminated against LGBTQ people and their children were in place for years at Trinity Schools Inc., both before Barrett joined the board in 2015 and during the time she served. The three schools, in Indiana, Minnesota and Virginia, are affiliated with People of Praise, an insular community rooted in its own interpretation of the Bible, of which Barrett and her husband have been longtime members. At least three of the couple’s seven children have attended the Trinity School at Greenlawn, in South Bend, Indiana. The AP spoke with more than two dozen people who attended or worked at Trinity Schools, or former members of People...
    Loading the player... Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett served for nearly three years on the board of private Christian schools that effectively barred admission to children of same-sex parents and made it plain that openly gay and lesbian teachers weren’t welcome in the classroom. The policies that discriminated against LGBTQ people and their children were in place for years at Trinity Schools Inc., both before Barrett joined the board in 2015 and during the time she served. Read More: Senate will vote Monday on Amy Coney Barrett court confirmation The three schools, in Indiana, Minnesota and Virginia, are affiliated with People of Praise, an insular community rooted in its own interpretation of the Bible, of which Barrett and her husband have been longtime members. At least three of the couple’s seven children have attended the Trinity School at Greenlawn, in South Bend, Indiana. The AP spoke with more...
    Judge Amy Coney Barrett is meeting with senators Wednesday, a day before the Senate Judiciary Committee is set to vote on her nomination to the Supreme Court. Barrett met with Sens. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Roy Blunt, R-Mo., Wednesday morning, and is also scheduled to meet with John Barrasso, R-Wy., Rob Portman, R-Ohio, Martha McSally, R-Ariz., James Lankford, R-Okla., Jim Inhofe, R-Okla., and Marco Rubio, R-Fla. SCHUMER SAYS HE AND FEINSTEIN HAD A 'SERIOUS TALK' AFTER BARRETT HEARINGS: REPORT “I think the overwhelming majority of people who saw the hearing last week saw someone they were very impressed with,” Rubio told “Fox & Friends” Wednesday ahead of his meeting with Barrett. President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee was supported by 51% of participants in a recent Gallup poll, but opposition from the left has been fierce. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., was accosted in an airport this week by two...
    Fifty “senior intelligence” officials signed a letter recently saying that the Hunter Biden email story was probably Russian disinformation, Politico reported. They admitted that they had “no” new or enlightening “evidence” to introduce, which was noted high up in the piece. Former Director of National Intelligence Jim Clapper was the top signatory. He’s now a CNN contributor, but for some, he’ll always be a guy who lied to Congress. Also present pretty high up was noted anti-Trump Twitter personality John Brennan, an MSNBC analyst and former director of the CIA. Former President Barack Obama’s secretary of defense signed the letter too. You see where this is going. Moral inconsistencies and potential ulterior motives didn’t bother the rest of the media — responsible for accurately and comprehensively informing America — which picked up the letter and reported it credulously far and wide. And so went the latest example in one of...
    Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerTrump to lift Sudan terror sponsor designation Ocasio-Cortez, progressives call on Senate not to confirm lobbyists or executives to future administration posts The 2016 and 2020 Senate votes are about the same thing: constitutionalist judges MORE (D-N.Y.) said Tuesday that he had a "serious" conversation with Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Goldman Sachs - Tipping point week for Trump, Biden, Congress, voters This week: Clock ticks on chance for coronavirus deal Biden and Schumer face battles with left if Democrats win big MORE (D-Calif.) amid progressive backlash over her handling of last week's Supreme Court hearings, but declined to address her future role on the Judiciary Committee.  Schumer, speaking to reporters during a press conference, declined to say if he would make changes to the Judiciary Committee or to disclose how his conversation with Feinsten went.  "I had a long...
    Savannah Rychcik October 20, 2020 0 Comments Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) is making it a point to speak with Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) after receiving backlash for praising Republicans amid confirmation hearings for Judge Amy Coney Barrett. “I’ve had a long and serious talk with Senator Feinstein. That’s all I am going to say about it right now,” Schumer said. Senate Minority Leader Schumer (D-NY): "I’ve had a long and serious talk" with Sen. Feinstein (D-CA) following criticism from progressive groups for her handling of the Amy Coney Barrett hearings. pic.twitter.com/tpKKvL8qC2— The Recount (@therecount) October 20, 2020 The top Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee praised Republicans for how they conducted the hearings. “This has been one of the best set of hearings that I’ve participated in,” Feinstein said. She added, “It leaves one with a lot of hopes, a lot of questions and even some...
    Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer told reporters that he had a “long and serious talk” with Democratic California Sen. Dianne Feinstein after the Senate Judiciary Committee hearings to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. The 87-year-old Feinstein, the top Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, was cordial throughout last week’s hearings. She notably hugged Republican South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham when things wrapped up, telling the chairman it was the “best set of hearings that I’ve participated in.” WASHINGTON, DC – OCT. 15: Ranking Member Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) (R) and Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-SC) (L) hug as the confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett come to a close on Capitol Hill on Oct. 15, 2020 in Washington, DC. Barrett was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy left by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who passed away in September. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty...
    Amanda Marcotte October 20, 2020 5:00PM (UTC) Donald Trump's war on mail-in voting seems, like many of his schemes to steal the election, to be backfiring. As much as he may publicly deny it, Trump knows he's unpopular and cannot win a free and fair election. So he has determined that the best way to hang onto power is to keep as many Americans from voting as possible. Since nearly the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, Trump has been waging war against mail-in ballots, which many millions of Americans are using this year in order to avoid crowded and unsafe polling places. : Trump has repeatedly and falsely declared, with the help of Attorney General Bill Barr and White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, that such ballots are dangerous and fraudulent. He has threatened to use mail-in ballots as an excuse to reject the results of any election he loses. His postmaster general, Louis...
    Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on October 14, 2020.Jonathan Ernst-Pool/Getty Images For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.On Monday evening, a deadlocked Supreme Court delivered a victory for Pennsylvania voters—along with a hint that we might be facing a Bush v. Gore redux that could invalidate people’s votes and swing a close election. The court declined to overturn a Pennsylvania Supreme Court decision to count ballots received by the Friday after the election, as long as they are sent by Election Day. State Republicans had pushed for any ballots received after Election Day to be thrown out, regardless of when they were mailed. But the decision also contained a bad omen for voting rights. While Chief Justice John Roberts sided with the three liberal justices, four conservative justices—Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, and...
    (CNN)As another high-stakes confrontation between Democrats and Republicans went down to the wire, Chief Justice John Roberts again crept left and sided with the liberals.Roberts' vote on Monday night, in a ballot dispute in the battleground state of Pennsylvania critical to President Donald Trump's reelection bid, led to a 4-4 Supreme Court deadlock. That left in place a Pennsylvania court decision allowing mailed ballots to be counted up to three days after Election Day, despite familiar yet unfounded claims from Republicans regarding "the taint of" illegal ballots.It was not the first time Roberts, a 2005 appointee of Republican George W. Bush, has moved left in a highly charged partisan case to cinch the outcome, but it may be one of the last.The Supreme Court is on the cusp of a transformation, less one week before it likely sees the addition of a conservative jurist, Amy Coney Barrett, and two weeks...
    Joe Biden's lead among Catholics in swing states is within the margin of error after President Trump nominated Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. Biden, a Catholic, has consistently led Trump with fellow members of his faith throughout the campaign. But the Democratic presidential nominee now only boasts a slim advantage over the president in the Rust Belt states of Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Wisconsin, as well as Arizona, Florida, and North Carolina, according to a poll conducted by RealClear Opinion Research. That narrowing coincided with Trump's nomination of Barrett to the Supreme Court, a move met widely with approval from Catholics. Barrett, who is all but certain to fill the seat left vacant after the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, found favor with a plurality of Catholics. About 46% approved of her nomination, while only 28% opposed it. A majority of Catholics, regardless of whether they...
    The Supreme Court on Monday left intact an extended mail ballot due date in Pennsylvania, handing a major defeat to Republicans. The court's four more conservative justices — Clarence ThomasClarence ThomasLeading progressive group to launch pro-Biden ads in Arizona, Pennsylvania Government efforts to 'fix' social media bias overlooks the destruction of our discourse Democrats aim to paint Barrett as 'extreme' MORE, Samuel AlitoSamuel AlitoThe politics of originalism Democrats aim to paint Barrett as 'extreme' Senate kicks off fight over Trump's Supreme Court pick MORE, Neil GorsuchNeil GorsuchJudge Barrett's hearing: Democratic senators left holding an empty sack The politics of originalism Barrett refuses to say if she would recuse herself from election-related cases MORE and Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughMajor abortion rights group calls for Democrats to replace Feinstein on Judiciary Committee Trump rebukes Collins amid difficult reelection fight Supreme Court battle turns into 2020 proxy war MORE — said they would have granted...
    Women's March protestors flooded the streets in Washington, D.C., on Saturday to demonstrate against the Trump administration and its decision to appoint Judge Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettRepublicans increasingly seek distance from Trump Overnight Health Care: Pfizer could apply for vaccine authorization by late November | State health officials say they need .4B for vaccination effort | CDC: Blacks, Hispanics dying of COVID-19 at disproportionately high rates Major abortion rights group calls for Democrats to replace Feinstein on Judiciary Committee MORE to the Supreme Court.  Saturday's march is a separate series of localized protests organized by the Women's March, which gathered this year in January. The annual demonstration began in Washington and around the country following Trump's inauguration in 2017.  Around 11 a.m. local time Saturday, several hundred people assembled at Freedom Plaza before a noon rally. Rallygoers in Washington, D.C., were required to wear a mask or face covering and practice social...
    Dueling demonstrations are taking place in the nation’s capital Saturday as Women’s March activists clash with supporters of both President Trump and his Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett. The anti-Trump Women’s March is taking place in Washington, DC, as well as several cities across the nation. According to the official Women’s March website, the day of action is about sending an “unmistakable message about the fierce opposition to Trump and his agenda, including his attempt to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat.” Breitbart News is live on the scene, as feminists involved with the Women’s March square off with supporters of both Trump and Barrett. Footage shows feminists arguing — particularly over abortion — and hurling expletives at the pro-Trump demonstrators.
    On Friday’s broadcast of HBO’s “Real Time,” host Bill Maher stated that Democrats should make Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s religion an issue, and instead of the court being “packed, with Catholics” there should be a “healthier balance” of religious beliefs on the court. Maher said, “Democrats have to stop talking about packing the Supreme Court. Because it’s already packed, with Catholics…and once Mitch McConnell and company are done Fed-Exing Amy Coney Barrett to the bench, seven of the nine justices will be Catholic. And look, I have nothing against Catholics, except my entire upbringing. But they are only 20% of the population. If seven out of nine justices were Jews or Muslims or Buddhists would that be okay? And if faith is this super important element of life, as Barrett and her Republican supporters say it is, shouldn’t we have a healthier balance on our highest court?”...
    Republican Utah Sen. Mitt Romney said Thursday that he plans to vote for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett. Romney, the only Republican to vote to convict President Donald Trump during the president’s impeachment hearings, announced his intention to vote for the Supreme Court nominee after meeting with her Thursday, the last day of Barrett’s confirmation hearings. (RELATED: Hot Mic Reportedly Catches Dianne Feinstein Comment About Amy Coney Barrett’s Religion) “After meeting with Judge Barrett and carefully reviewing her record and her testimony, I intend to vote in favor of her confirmation to the Supreme Court,” Romney said in a Thursday statement, according to Fox News. “She is impressive, and her distinguished legal and academic credentials make it clear that she is exceptionally well qualified to serve as our next Supreme Court justice.” “I am confident that she will faithfully apply the law and our Constitution, impartially and regardless of...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — It was the hug that may define — or doom — a long Senate career. Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California embraced Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham at the close of confirmation hearings Thursday for President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett, publicly thanking the chairman for a job well done. “This has been one of the best set of hearings that I’ve participated in,” Feinstein said at the Senate Judiciary Committee. Calls for her ouster from Democratic leadership were swift, unequivocal and relentless. “It’s time for Sen. Feinstein to step down from her leadership position on the Senate Judiciary Committee,” said Brian Fallon, the executive director of Demand Justice, which opposes conservative nominees to the courts. “If she won’t, her colleagues need to intervene.” Eli Zupnick, the spokesman for Fix Our Senate, said: “Senator Feinstein is absolutely wrong about what is happening in the Senate...
    By LISA MASCARO, AP Congressional Correspondent WASHINGTON (AP) — It was the hug that may define — or doom — a long Senate career. Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California embraced Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham at the close of confirmation hearings Thursday for President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett, publicly thanking the chairman for a job well done. “This has been one of the best set of hearings that I’ve participated in,” Feinstein said at the Senate Judiciary Committee. Calls for her ouster from Democratic leadership were swift, unequivocal and relentless. “It’s time for Sen. Feinstein to step down from her leadership position on the Senate Judiciary Committee,” said Brian Fallon, the executive director of Demand Justice, which opposes conservative nominees to the courts. “If she won’t, her colleagues need to intervene.” Eli Zupnick, the spokesman for Fix Our Senate, said: “Senator Feinstein is absolutely wrong about...
    Sen. Dianne Feinstein was allegedly recorded discussing Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett’s stance on abortion and her Catholic faith. “She’s been pro-life for a long time. So I suspect with her, it is deeply personal and comes with her religion,” a woman is heard saying Thursday during the fourth day of Barrett’s confirmation hearings. “Sen. Feinstein hot mic talking about Judge Amy Coney Barrett,” Faith Wire editor Tre Goins-Phillips tweeted, accompanied by footage of the exchange. ????️ Sen. Feinstein hot mic talking about Judge Amy Coney Barrett: “She’s been pro-life for a long time. So I suspect with her, it is deeply personal and comes with her religion.” pic.twitter.com/5dUBhHLQsn— Tré Goins-Phillips (@tregp) October 15, 2020 Barrett’s Catholic faith and membership of the Christian group People of Praise has been in the spotlight since headlines spread across the country, speculating on who President Trump would nominate to...
    Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), the ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, was overheard on a hot mic speaking about someone’s pro-life position — presumably that of Judge Amy Coney Barrett — stating she suspects the view is “deeply personal” and “comes with her religion.” A clip, which surfaced Thursday, featured one side of a conversation featuring Feinstein, who could be heard speaking about an unnamed individual’s “long time” pro-life views. “She’s been pro-life for a long time. So I suspect with her, it is deeply personal and comes with her religion,” Feinstein said: ????️ Sen. Feinstein hot mic talking about Judge Amy Coney Barrett: “She’s been pro-life for a long time. So I suspect with her, it is deeply personal and comes with her religion.” pic.twitter.com/5dUBhHLQsn — Tré Goins-Phillips (@tregp) October 15, 2020 Notably, C-SPAN picked up some of the statement before cutting to Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) in...
    Team Biden is seeking to draw another contrast with President TrumpDonald John TrumpTwitter CEO calls blocking New York Post article without explanation 'unacceptable' Michael Cohen writing second book on Trump administration's Justice Department As Trump downplayed the virus publicly, memo based on private briefings sparked stock sell-offs: NYT MORE on COVID-19 by highlighting how they’re handling two campaign coronavirus cases disclosed Thursday. After top aides to Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenTwitter CEO calls blocking New York Post article without explanation 'unacceptable' Cheers erupt as Trump puts on MAGA hat, takes off tie at Iowa rally Hillicon Valley: Twitter lacked adequate cybersecurity protection ahead of July hacks, regulator says | Twitter, Facebook clamp down on New York Post article about Hunter Biden | YouTube bans COVID-19 vaccine misinformation MORE were notified late Wednesday about positive tests for two members of Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisKamala Harris confirms she noticed fly on Pence's...
    Alex Thomas October 15, 2020 0 Comments President Donald Trump is back on the campaign trail after missing a few days during which he was battling the coronavirus. In a North Carolina rally, Trump celebrated the Supreme Court nomination process of Judge Amy Coney Barrett and said that the Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee were “evil people.” Speaking to supporters on Friday, Trump said, “We got it done, it looks like it’s going to be done very soon. They have a one-week period where they sit but they’re getting out of committee and it’s very exciting.”Referencing Judge Barrett, Trump said, “She’s been flawless, she hasn’t made a mistake. She’s toying with those Democrat, evil people.”He added, “The way that they treated Justice [Brett] Kavanaugh was one of the greatest disgraces, I’ve never seen anything like it and I’ve watched a lot of unfair things. I get treated that...
    The blank pad Barrett's holding up is what she'd like us to believe constitutes the entirety of her opinions on everything the Supreme Court might rule on. Night Owls, a themed open thread, appears at Daily Kos seven days a week Dana Drugmand at DeSmog writes—Amy Coney Barrett’s Remarks on Climate Change Raise Alarm That a Climate Denier Is About to Join the Supreme Court: During her Senate confirmation hearing on Tuesday, October 13, Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett trotted out a tired and dismissive refrain from climate deniers, saying, “I’m certainly not a scientist” when Senator John Kennedy (R-LA) asked specifically about her views on climate change. After Barrett said she doesn’t have “firm views” on the subject, Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) pressed her on those views during the hearing Wednesday, where she continued to dodge the question. “I don’t think that my views on global warming or climate change are...
    Democrat vice presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) implied during her questioning of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett that the mother of two adopted black children does not understand race issues. “My question is do you agree with Justice Roberts who said, ‘Voting discrimination still exists,’” Harris said. “‘No one doubts that.’ Do you agree with that statement?” “Senator Harris I will not comment on what any justice said in an opinion,” Barrett said. “Whether an opinion is right or wrong. or endorse that proposition.” “Do you call it a proposition or a fact?” Harris said. “Are you saying you don’t agree with a fact?” “Senator, I’m not going to make a comment,” Barrett said. “I’m not going to say that I endorse either majority or the dissent in the case of Shelby County.” Harris and Barrett were discussing a voting rights case out of Texas. “Are you saying...
    Sky Palma October 14, 2020 11:55PM (UTC) This article originally appeared on Raw Story During Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation hearing this Tuesday, Senator Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., question the SCOTUS nominee on how she defines "precedent" — or in regards to Roe v. Wade, "super-precedent." "How would you define super-precedent," Barrett asked Klobuchar, who lobbed the question back to Barrett, saying, "I'm asking you." : "Okay — well, people use 'super-precedent' differently," Barrett said. "The way that it's used in the scholarship and the way I was using it in the article that you're reading from was to define cases that are so well-settled that no political actors and no people seriously push for their overruling, and I'm answering a lot of questions about Roe, which I think indicates Roe doesn't fall in that category, and scholars across the spectrum say that doesn't mean that Roe should be overruled, but descriptively...
    Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett may have put on a tough show while facing a barrage of intense questions during the first two days of her confirmation hearing, but it appears as though she felt the need for some extra 'protection' before heading into day three.  The 48-year-old made a move away from feminine fashion in favor of a 'more serious and professional' ensemble on Wednesday - an indication that she wanted to suit up in her own kind of 'armor' to go before the Senate, a leading fashion expert told DailyMail.com.  According to stylist Gayle Perry, Barrett - who impressed with her elegant style choices on Monday and Tuesday - had one main sartorial focus when she dressed for today's hearing: exuding confidence, strength and professionalism.   Ready for anything: Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett dressed in stylish 'armor' for the third day of her confirmation hearing, a...
    Yuri Gripas/AP For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.This week, the Senate Judiciary Committee is holding confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett, President Donald Trump’s pick to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who died last month. Judge Barrett is being presented to the American public for a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court as the pinnacle of white womanhood. A woman with seven kids, two of whom are Black, and still manages to hold down a job is being exalted for her superhuman accomplishments. For Trump and the Republican Party, who are never too far away from being legitimately accused of racism or sexism, a white working mother with Black children is a godsend, a status that protects her from criticism like a force field. But despite the endless stream of praise and adulation from conservatives,...
    (CNN)Amy Coney Barrett's appointment to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court goes to the heart of the question of what feminism actually is. Is supporting the promotion of women inherently feminist? One of Ginsburg's best-known quotes came from an interview in 2015 when she asserted, "People ask me sometimes, when—when do you think it will it be enough? When will there be enough women on the (Supreme) Court? And my answer is when there are nine." Laura BeersPresident Donald Trump's immediate public commitment to appoint a woman to replace Ginsburg on the Supreme Court, and his subsequent nomination of Barrett were intended, one presumes, to demonstrate that he too supports increasing female representation and that, therefore, women who consider themselves feminists can support Donald Trump. Trump himself directed a spotlight on how open his play for the support of White women is during a Pennsylvania rally on...
    Senate Judiciary Committee Chair Lindsey Graham referred to segregation as the 'good ol' days' during Wednesday's confirmation for Judge Amy Coney Barrett.  'Do you think Brown v. Board of Education is a super-precedent? As in, you're not aware of any effort to go back to the good ol' days of segregation by a legislative body, is that correct?' Graham had asked President Donald Trump's Supreme Court pick.   He quickly got pummeled by his Democratic opponent for the quip.  'Lindsey Graham just called segregation "the good old days." The good old days for who, Senator? It’s 2020, not 1920. Act like it,' tweeted Jaime Harrison, South Carolina's Democratic Senate candidate, who is Black.   Graham bristled that his remark - 'made with dripping sarcasm' - had become controversial when he talked to reporters in Capitol Hill's corridors afterward.  Senate Judiciary Committee Chair Lindsey Graham got pummeled by his Democratic opponent Jaime Harrison after...
    Democratic California Sen. Dianne Feinstein said she was “really impressed” with Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s definition of “severability” during a discussion about the Affordable Care Act (ACA) at Wednesday’s Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearings. Feinstein asked Barrett to explain her views as compared to that of the late Justice Antonin Scalia, who in dissent argued that the entire ACA should be unconstitutional. WATCH: Barrett likened the concept to a Jenga game where the question becomes, “if you pull one out, can you pull it out while it all stands?” She went on to explain that, while Scalia believed pulling both the Medicaid provision and the individual mandate out would make the law fall, the upcoming case only deals with the individual mandate. Asked by Feinstein what she thought of severability in general, Barrett said it “serves a valuable function of trying not to undo your work when you wouldn’t...
    The Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Judge Amy Coney Barrett heated up Wednesday afternoon with more tense exchanges over the Affordable Care Act (ACA), specifically with Sen. Amy Klobuchar, appearing to suggest that Barrett was publicly lobbying for a judicial job from Trump by writing a law review article that expressed suspicion of a past ACA ruling.  Klobuchar, D-Minn., picked up on a point hammered by Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., Tuesday that Barrett published a 2017 law review article in which she criticized the reasoning of the majority opinion in NFIB v. Sebelius, the original Supreme Court ruling that upheld the ACA's constitutionality by reading the fine associated with the individual mandate to purchase health insurance as a tax. Klobuchar implied the article was some sort of signal to Trump that he should select her for a judgeship.  "The position of the Trump administration is to throw the whole thing out," Klobuchar said...
    Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett quickly corrected a suggestion by Democratic Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar Wednesday that Barrett had cut an implicit deal with President Donald Trump on Obamacare. Klobuchar focused a line of questioning around the Affordable Care Act Wednesday afternoon, like Democratic California Sen Kamala Harris did Tuesday evening, pressing Barrett on whether Barrett knew when she was nominated that one of Trump’s campaign promises was to repeal Obamacare. “As I said before, I’m aware that the president opposes the Affordable Care Act,” Barrett responded. (RELATED: ‘A Reinforced Concrete Barrier’: Lindsey Graham Explains Why A Barrett Confirmation Is Groundbreaking For Conservative Women) “Well, I know you are aware now,” Klobuchar said. “But were you aware back then? When you were nominated?” “Senator Klobuchar, I think that the Republicans have kind of made that clear, it’s just been part of the book, public discourse,” the Supreme Court...
    Webster’s Dictionary quickly edited the definition of the word “preference” after it was declared by some as an “offensive” term to use when discussing sex. The dictionary previously added in a definition for “preference” to include “orientation” and “sexual preference,” Steve Krakauer, the executive producer of Megyn Kelly’s podcast, tweeted. After Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett used the term “sexual preference” Tuesday during confirmation hearings, some, including Democratic Hawaii Sen. Mazie Hirono, claimed that the term is offensive – despite it being used widely. Barrett later apologized, saying she “honestly did not mean any offense or to make any statement by that.” Shortly after, Webster’s Dictionary sprinted to edit the definition of “preference” in regards to the term “sexual preference,” this time declaring that it is “offensive,” archives of the website suggest. As recently as last month, Webster’s Dictionary included a definition of “preference” as “orientation” or “sexual preference.”...
    Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett said she didn’t mean to offend the LGBTQ community with the term “sexual preference” during her second day of confirmation hearings on Tuesday. Barrett apologized saying she didn’t mean to “cause any offense in the LGBTQ community” with her remarks in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee. The nominee used the term when Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinFive takeaways from Barrett's Supreme Court grilling Barrett declines to say if Trump can unilaterally delay election Barrett sidesteps Democratic questions amid high-stakes grilling MORE (D-Calif.), the committee’s ranking member, asked whether the Constitution protects gay people’s right to marry.  The Supreme Court nominee didn’t directly answer the senator’s question, but said she has "never discriminated on the basis of sexual preference and would not ever discriminate on the basis of sexual preference."  Later Tuesday, Sen. Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoBiden: Faith shouldn't be a subject in Barrett...
    Sen. Diane Feinstein (D-CA), the ranking member on the Senate Judiciary Committee, pronounced herself “really impressed” with Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s explanation of the doctrine of severability during her confirmation hearing on Wednesday. The issue is crucial to a current challenge to Obamacare that Barrett would hear if confirmed to the Supreme Court. In an exchange between the leading Democrat and the nominee, Barrett used a “Jenga” analogy to explain the idea: Feinstein: Yesterday, you spoke of California v. Texas, the current case seeking to strike down the Affordable Care Act. You said, I think, that the issue before the Court is “severability.” Meaning whether the Court could still uphold the Affordable Care Act if it rules that the individual mandate is unconstitutional. And you said yesterday this question was not before the Court. As I understand this, Chief Justice [John] Roberts and the majority did involve the issue of...
    Tuesday, during an appearance on CNN’s “Cuomo Prime Time,” former South Bend, IN Mayor Pete Buttigieg, formerly a candidate for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, warned Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation to the Supreme Court could threaten marriage equality. Buttigieg pointed out that the 2015 Obergefell v. Hodges effectively legalizing same-sex marriage was narrowly decided and that one vote going the other way could void out some marriages. “Well, my main concern is that they seem to be wanting to put marriage equality back on the table. This was a move that America made, a move forward we made five years ago, in the belief that it was no going back. Yet we saw two justices on the conservative majority that’s already seated on the court just last week write in ways that made it sound like they’re ready to go back on that. And...
    While Amy Coney Barrett prepares for a second full-day of grilling from senators on the Judiciary Committee, a new poll released Wednesday morning shows the Supreme Court nominee is gaining popularity. Nearly half of registered voters believe Barrett should be confirmed, despite a controversial nomination especially in terms of timing. The Politico/Morning Consult survey shows 48 per cent of American voters want Barrett's confirmation to get through in contrast to a previous poll that showed only 37 per cent felt President Donald Trump should choose the next Supreme Court Justice. And this survey also shows support from Democrats for her confirmation jumped by 13 points. Barrett, 48, walked into the first day of the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Monday with less support for her confirmation than she now holds. But the poised judge would not be rattled, even as she faced a harsh line of questioning from Democrats Tuesday on...
    President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett said during her Senate confirmation hearing Tuesday that she 'wept' with her children over the death of George Floyd.  Barrett claimed that the death of Floyd, a black man who died in police custody in Minneapolis in May, was 'very, very personal' as she has two adopted black children from Haiti, Vivian and John Peter.  She added that she believes racism is a problem in America but would not say whether she thinks it is systemic or not, claiming that was a decision for Congress and not her role as a judge.  Scroll down for video President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett gave an emotional response when she was questioned about the death of George Floyd on Tuesday The Supreme Court nominee has two black children she adopted from Haiti. Her children are pictured here  as they...
    Fox News scored a massive daytime rating win on Monday thanks to its coverage of the Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court nomination hearings. And the network also swamped CNN and MSNBC in primetime. According to Nielsen Media Research, Fox News’ daytime ratings on Monday peaked during the 2:00 p.m. hour as Judge Barrett gave her opening statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee. In that afternoon time slot, Fox gathered an impressive 637,000 viewers in the coveted 25 – 54 age demographic (3.84 million overall). That ranked in the top five in all of cable news on Monday in the demo (5th) and in total viewers (4th), only being beat out by Fox News’ primetime lineup and The Five. In addition, the network handily beat CNN and MSNBC from the end of of its Fox & Friends morning show through 2:20 p.m as all the cable networks turned to the high-visibility Supreme Court...
    (CNN)Endangered Senate Republicans have a new running mate in the battle to keep their narrow majority: Amy Coney Barrett.As President Donald Trump's standing has deteriorated, they are aligning themselves closely with his Supreme Court nominee, hoping their aggressive push to confirm her to the bench before Election Day will be enough to energize their base, fill their campaign coffers and overcome the drag at the top of the ticket.At Tuesday's confirmation hearing, Republicans in tight races in North Carolina, Iowa, Texas and South Carolina were quick to rally to Barrett's defense and are signaling they'll vote to confirm her to the court just days before the November election.Republicans are calculating that getting Barrett on the bench will overcome backlash from voters, given that polls show clear majorities believe that the winner of the November 3 elections should make the lifetime appointment -- and the fact the Republican senators all took...
    Labor Secretary Eugene Scalia’s wife has tested positive for COVID-19—becoming at least the 13th person who attended a largely mask-free White House Rose Garden event to contract the coronavirus. Trish Scalia was seated next to Kellyanne Conway at the ceremony to announce President Donald Trump’s nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court, and right behind Melania Trump. Conway and the first lady also got infected with COVID-19, along with the president, former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, press secretary Kayleigh McEnany and two of her underlings, and Sens, Mike Lee and Thom Tillis, along with several others. In addition, other members of Trump’s inner circle, like adviser Hope Hicks, who were not at the event also tested positive in the White House outbreak, which put the president in the hospital. The Labor Department said Secretary Scalia—whose father, the late Justice Antonin Scalia, was a mentor to Barrett—tested...
    Amy Coney Barrett withstood hours of questioning Tuesday with poise, civility, and at times, moments of humanity – countering the portrait of a right-wing extremist that Democrats have attempted to paint of President Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court, experts argued. Jeffrey McCall, professor of communication at DePauw University, said Barrett's professional responses and pleasant demeanor have undercut the narrative pushed by Democrats that she is threatening or radical. "Judge Barrett has had a most impressive day," McCall told Fox News. "It is clear she is bright and sincere. Her poise and pleasant personality make her a natural for the television cameras, which will also make it increasingly difficult for her opponents on the committee to trash her without themselves coming off as uncivil." Barrett, 48, responded to scholarly legal questions with ease and did so without hesitation. She didn’t bring any files to the hearing and at one point held up a blank pad...
    Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President TrumpDonald John TrumpTwo ethics groups call on House to begin impeachment inquiry against Barr Trump relishes return to large rallies following COVID-19 diagnosis McGrath: McConnell 'can't get it done' on COVID-19 relief MORE’s Supreme Court nominee, told lawmakers on Tuesday that she “wept” with her family following the death of George Floyd earlier this year. Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinDemocrats warn of ObamaCare threat from Barrett, Trump Democrats steer clear of Barrett's religion during Supreme Court hearing Gloves come off in Barrett confirmation hearing MORE (D-Ill.) asked Barrett what “impact” viral footage of a former Minneapolis police officer kneeling on Floyd’s neck had on her, as Democrats grilled the high court pick during a marathon hearing. Floyd's death sparked fresh scrutiny of police tactics and renewed nationwide Black Lives Matter protests. “As you might imagine, given that I have two Black children, that was very, very personal...
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