Sunday, Feb 28, 2021 - 04:56:31
33 results - (0.001 seconds)

a San Francisco based:

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Home-sharing site Airbnb posted a $3.9 billion loss in the fourth quarter of 2020 as it suffered from the pandemic downturn in travel and recorded one-time costs for becoming a public company. In results released Thursday — Airbnb’s first as a publicly traded entity — the company took a charge of $2.8 billion for stock compensation related to the IPO. A year earlier, Airbnb lost $352 million. READ MORE: California Allocates $1.4 Million To Track And Stop Attacks Against Asian Americans Revenue fell 22% to $859 million in the quarter that ended Dec. 31. Nights booked fell 39% from a year earlier. Airbnb declined to offer a forecast for 2021 profit and revenue. Company executives said they are upbeat about a recovery, but they said the unknown pace of vaccinations make it difficult to know how quickly people will be willing to travel. The company did...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The COVID-19 pandemic is having a major impact across the world and also in cities across Northern California. The latest number of confirmed cases in the U.S. can be found at the CDC's 2019 Novel Coronavirus in the U.S. page. (The CDC updates the webpage on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.)Join anchor Kristen Sze for ABC7's daily interactive newscast about the novel coronavirus outbreak in the Bay Area and other hot topics. You can check here to stream the show Monday-Friday at 3 p.m. GET HELP: Resources and information about COVID-19 CA REOPENING TIERS: Map shows which counties can, can't reopen under Newsom's new 4-tier system LATEST LOCAL CASES: Updated number of COVID-19 cases, deaths in San Francisco Bay Area Here are the latest developments on the respiratory illness in the U.S.: Feb. 24, 20219:30 p.m.SF-based One Medical allegedly let ineligible people get vaccine, report...
            by Eric Lendrum  The San Francisco Board of Education voted on Tuesday to replace its long-standing merit-based admission system with a random lottery, accusing the former of being racist, as reported by the Washington Free Beacon. Included in the board’s jurisdiction is Lowell High School, which is widely considered one of the most prestigious public high schools in the nation. The resolution passed by the board claims, without evidence, that merit-based admission “perpetuates the culture of White supremacy and racial abuse towards black and Latinx students.” This is despite the fact that currently over 75 percent of Lowell’s students are already non-White students. The resolution also demands that the district hold an audit of “racist incidents” and implement “antiracist” training programs for students. The move was widely criticized by parents and students within the district, some of whom spoke out during the board meeting’s public comment...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The San Francisco Unified School District's Board of Education has recently been criticized for several decisions, including possibly renaming 44 schools and voting to do away with the merit-based admissions system at Lowell High School.The board made its latest controversial decision on Tuesday night, when it rejected a parent volunteer who was supposed to be appointed to the Parent Advisory Council.The reason: his race. Seth Brenzel is a white, gay man.The Parent Advisory Council (PAC) tried to defend its selection of Brenzel as a possible new member during Tuesday's school board meeting.The PAC advises the board on issues that affect students and parents.Here's the current ethnic makeup of the PAC: Three Latinas Three white women Two African Americans One Asian American One Pacific Islander All current members of the PAC are women. Brenzel would have been the only man, and he happens to be...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — San Francisco’s school board voted to change the admissions policy at the city’s prestigious Lowell High School, Tuesday night. The seven-member San Francisco Board of Education voted 5-2 to change the school’s current merit-based policy to a lottery system. Lowell ranks as one of the highest performing high schools in California, but board members cited the magnet school’s lack of diversity and “pervasive systemic racism” as the reason to change the current admissions policy. The high school has previously selected students based on grade point average for decades, leading to ongoing conversations about equity and racial segregation, as well as several policy changes to bring on more students of color from underserved neighborhoods. But increasing racism being reported by students, particularly those within Lowell’s Black Student Union, over the last several years further heightened discussions, resulting in a proposal to remove the grade-based admissions process...
    San Francisco education officials voted to end merit-based admissions at one of the nation’s most prestigious public schools and will be switching to a lottery-based system in a purported effort to address racism, numerous sources reported. The San Francisco Board of Education voted 5-2 late Tuesday evening to switch to a lottery-based system to assign students to Lowell High School, ending more than a century of merit-based admissions, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. The school will no longer require test scores and grades for admissions after board members cited “pervasive systemic racism” at the school that the current merit-based system enables by excluding students of color. Other district high schools abide by a lottery-based system. Of Lowell’s 2,871 students, 50.6% are Asian, 18.1% are white, 11.5% are Hispanic, and 1.8% are black, according to California education data. About a third of the school’s students are from low-income families, compared to...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — San Francisco’s school board voted to change the admissions policy at the city’s prestigious Lowell High School, Tuesday night. The seven-member San Francisco Board of Education voted 5-2 to change the school’s current merit-based policy to a lottery system. Lowell ranks as one of the highest performing high schools in California, but Board members cite the magnet school’s lack of diversity and “pervasive systemic racism” as the reason to change the current admissions policy.
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — San Francisco’s school board voted to change the admissions policy at the city’s prestigious Lowell High School, Tuesday night. The seven-member San Francisco Board of Education voted 5-2 to change the school’s current merit-based policy to a lottery system. Lowell ranks as one of the highest performing high schools in California, but Board members cite the magnet school’s lack of diversity and “pervasive systemic racism” as the reason to change the current admissions policy.
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The San Francisco Board of Education has voted to end merit-based admission at Lowell High School and permanently move the high school to the lottery system immediately.The results of the vote became official at 10 p.m. Tuesday. #BREAKINGSan Francisco Board of Education votes to END merit based admission at Lowell and permanently move the high school to the lottery system immediately.— Kate Larsen (@KateABC7) February 10, 2021This is a breaking news update. Previous story as follows:The San Francisco School Board will introduce a resolution Tuesday to end the selective admission process at Lowell High School. Lowell has been ranked among the top high schools in the country.If the resolution eventually passes, Lowell will be part of the district's random lottery system just like any other school. The issue is a divisive one.RELATED: Lowell High School may move to lottery admissions, SF school district announcesLowell High School...
    San Francisco’s school board may drop merit-based admissions to Lowell High School because of concerns that the tests reinforce “systemic racism” at the majority-Asian institution. The San Francisco Chronicle reported Sunday that Lowell, “San Francisco’s elite academic public high school,” will “no longer admit students based on top grades and test scores, and instead use a random lottery system for admission” if a new resolution, introduced Tuesday, passes. Local ABC news affiliate KGO reported: Lowell High School is the oldest public high school west of the Mississippi. It’s quite often referred to as one of the nation’s academic gems. There are two factors needed to get into Lowell. A high grade point average and students must excel in their admissions test. No other high school in San Francisco other than the Ruth Asawa School of the Arts has admission requirements. However, the Chronicle noted Tuesday: “Critics argue that not only is Lowell exclusionary,...
    The San Francisco Board of Education voted to rename 44 of the city’s schools, claiming that prominent figures from American history, such as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Paul Revere, were tied to racist incidents. The committee based their decisions on Wikipedia and other wildly inaccurate information to source its claims. Committee chairman Jeremiah Jeffries, along with his fellow committee members, used Wikipedia to support their claims that prominent U.S. historical figures had ties to racist incidents, and therefore warranted the renaming of scores of San Francisco schools, according to a report by Mission Local. A Google Doc showcasing the committee’s notes attempting to justify their reasons for voting to rename the schools revealed some of the bizarre details behind their decision-making process. The committee, for example, voted to rename Lowell High School — named after American poet James Russell Lowell according to Mission Local — despite the fact that Lowell was...
    By Josh Eidelson | Bloomberg Instacart Inc. plans to terminate about 1,900 employees’ jobs, including the only unionized positions in the U.S., representing a fulsome embrace of the gig economy. The grocery delivery company already classifies most of its workers as independent contractors, whose ranks have ballooned to more than 500,000 during the coronavirus pandemic. But starting in 2015, the company hired a small subset of workers as employees, who under U.S. law are entitled to protections like minimum wage and can be subject to more direction and training by their boss. “What we found is that our shoppers require training and supervision, which is how you improve the quality of the picking,” Instacart Chief Executive Officer Apoorva Mehta said at the time. “You can’t do that when they are independent contractors.” Now, Instacart is moving in the other direction, eliminating 1,877 employees’ positions, including those of 10 workers in...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF/AP) — San Francisco-based home-sharing giant Airbnb has announced it will be blocking and cancelling all reservations in the Washington, D.C. area during the week of the presidential inauguration. The decision, announced Wednesday, came a day after Airbnb said it was reviewing reservations to make sure any of its guests were associated with hate groups or violent activity. Various local, state and federal officials have been asking people not to travel to Washington, D.C. Airbnb said that guests whose reservations were cancelled will be refunded in full. It will reimburse hosts — at Airbnb’s expense — the money they would have earned from those cancelled reservations. It also said that reservations at HotelTonight, a service owned by Airbnb that handles last-minute deals at top-rated hotels, will also be cancelled. Airbnb declined to say how many reservations were cancelled. But over Presidents’ Day weekend, the site lists...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF/AP) — Airbnb says it’s reviewing reservations in the Washington, D.C., area ahead of next week’s presidential inauguration and will bar any guests associated with hate groups or violent activity. The move by the San Francisco-based company comes as some city officials ask Airbnb, VRBO and other rental hosts to take down their listings until the Jan. 20 inauguration is over. “There’s no way to guarantee that your guests are not coming to incite violence,” Janeese Lewis George, a Washington city council member, said in a post on Twitter. “Please protect your neighbors and the District from more attacks.” Airbnb has had a policy of removing guests who are confirmed to be members of hate groups since 2017, when it blocked guests who were headed to a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. The company will warn all guests in the Washington region that it may bring...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF/CNN) — As COVID cases continue to soar at an alarming rate across California, San Francisco-based Yelp has added the ability for its users to post complaints after observing coronavirus violations at businesses and restaurants. The San Francisco Bay Area and other regions of the state remain under strict restrictions as new COVID cases overwhelm local health care providers and hospitals. California’s coronavirus catastrophe reached a staggering new level on Monday as Johns Hopkins University data showed the nation’s most populous state has recorded more than 30,000 deaths since the pandemic started nearly a year ago. Deaths have exploded since a COVID-19 surge began in October. It took California six months to record its first 10,000 deaths. But in barely a month, the total rose from 20,000 to 30,000. Officials with the crowd-sourced review platform said they were expanding their COVID-19 section on profile pages to...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF/KPIX) — Pinterest has agreed to pay more than $22 million to settle a gender discrimination lawsuit brought by the company’s former Chief Operating Officer Francoise Brougher. San Francisco-based Pinterest did not admit to any liability. Under the deal, Pinterest will also pay $2.5 million to charities that support women and underrepresented minorities in technology. In the lawsuit filed in San Francisco Superior Court, Brougher, a top executive at the online ‘pinning’ company, accused Pinterest of leaving her out high-level meetings, paying her less than her male colleagues and other sexist treatment. Hundreds of employees staged a virtual walkout in support of her claims. “I’m glad Pinterest took this very seriously,” Brougher told the New York Times. “I’m hoping it’s a first step in creating a better work environment there.” In a statement the company said: Pinterest recognizes the importance of fostering a workplace environment...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- Say the pandemic has put you out of work, but you have a great skill to teach kids remotely.Outschool may be your answer to some cash."It's a great option for a lot of people who are looking for a way to earn flexibly and safely from home at this time," Amir Nathoo, Outschool CEO and co-founder, said.Outschool launched in 2017 and is a marketplace of live online classes for kids 3 to 18. The San Francisco-based platform is growing by the day. It currently offers more than 100,000 classes with over 500,000 learners attending.RELATED: Job Hunting with Jobina: UPS is hiring for the holidays"Typically three to 8 students and a teacher are joining from all over the country or all over the world," Nathoo replied. "We've seen an incredible surge in demand and that's why we're looking for more teachers, or more professionals."On average, teachers earn...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- As more people become attuned to issues of social justice, interest in historic and current films and documentaries has grown.A streaming service aimed at libraries and universities has curated a collection that has assembled some of the best. Race and social justice are pillars of Building A Better Bay Area.The streaming service Kanopy is available widely at public libraries and universities. The collection has hundreds of titles that are timely and provocative.A clip from the film "I Am Not Your Negro, courtesy of Kino Lober, Inc.: "The story of the Negro in America is the story of America. It is not a pretty story."RELATED: Understanding commonly used terms, ideas related to racism, injustice EMBED More News Videos Learn more about seven terms commonly used when discussing racism and racial injustice like systemic racism, white privilege, institutional racism, microaggression and white fragility. Kanopy has been working with...
    A new investigation by USA Today has examined how systemic racism and the coronavirus pandemic are linked. The outlet did research into Asian Americans in the Bay Area and how high death rates were impacting the community. Asian Americans spoke about the fear of getting tested because of expenses and fear of discrimination. Mandy Rong told USA Today, “If you test positive, everyone would be scared of you. Everyone would think you are the devil.” Rong’s daughter got sick with a fever and coronavirus symptoms but Rong was too nervous to get her tested. The San Francisco Department of Public Health shared that 38% of 123 coronavirus deaths are Asian Americans, the highest of any ethnicity. Positivity rates among Asian Americans in San Francisco are 12%, but experts worry it’s much higher in reality. Because of a lack of federal data, nationwide information on Asian Americans and the coronavirus...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- How well are you managing your time working from home? Do you find yourself taking breaks to raid the refrigerator? Or killing time between meetings?A calendar analyzer that uses artificial intelligence has the ability to make us more productive. It's part of the changing workplace as we Build A Better Bay Area.Juggling meetings and finding private time to focus on projects have never been tougher. Co-workers are working from home. Some are even working from other states and countries. Now there's help -- a platform called Clockwise.RELATED: Coronavirus impact: Lessons learned from working at home during COVID-19 pandemic"What Clockwise will do is actually automatically look for the best time for that event on your calendar and the calendars of the attendees by a series of algorithms and artificial intelligence" explained Alexandra Moser, head of business operations at Clockwise.The San Francisco-based company is trying to address this...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- How well are you managing your time working from home? Do you find yourself taking breaks to raid the refrigerator? Or killing time between meetings?A calendar analyzer that uses artificial intelligence has the ability to make us more productive. It's part of the changing workplace as we Build A Better Bay Area.Juggling meetings and finding private time to focus on projects have never been tougher. Co-workers are working from home. Some are even working from other states and countries. Now there's help -- a platform called Clockwise.RELATED: Coronavirus impact: Lessons learned from working at home during COVID-19 pandemic"What Clockwise will do is actually automatically look for the best time for that event on your calendar and the calendars of the attendees by a series of algorithms and artificial intelligence" explained Alexandra Moser, head of business operations at Clockwise.The San Francisco-based company is trying to address this...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- Airbnb will prohibit one-night rentals over Halloween weekend as part of its ongoing effort to crack down on party houses.The ban will impact one-night rentals of entire homes in the U.S. and Canada on Oct. 30 or Oct. 31.The action comes nearly a year after a deadly shooting at a home in Orinda, where five people were killed during a Halloween party.RELATED: No charges to be filed against 5 suspects in deadly Orinda shootingAirbnb says previously booked rentals will be cancelled and refunds will be offered.The move doesn't impact two and three night reservations, but the company says that could change, as it will take a closer look at these reservations as well.A guest may be denied, for example, if they try to book a whole home close to their own home during that period and they don't have a history of positive reviews on Airbnb.Last...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — A lawsuit against United Airlines claims flight attendants selected for professional football and baseball charter flights are uniformly white, blonde and young. “It is blatant discrimination,” said Kim Guillory, who is African-American and has worked at United for 28 years. “It’s dehumanizing, demoralizing,” said Sharon Tesler who is Jewish and has been with United for 34 years. In a discrimination lawsuit filed by both women in San Mateo County, they claim they were repeatedly denied plum assignments on NFL and Major League baseball charter flights. The women say they were told by supervisors they were not on the so-called ‘preferred’ list. So they did a little digging and found the list. “Every time a new flight attendant was added to the crew that they all look like sisters, they were all white female and blondes, and I thought, well that’s strange,” Guillory told...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- A Bay Area company is launching a new testing kit that can track whether COVID-19 is present on surfaces.San Francisco-based biotechnology company Phylagen started producing surface testing kits to help people identify if the virus is present in their home or business."It is not a human diagnostic test," said Dr. Jessica Green, the company's CEO. "It just indicates whether or not you have people that are carrying the virus."The kits include between 10 to 25 swabs that can be brushed on any surface and sent back to the lab to be processed.Phylagen guarantees a 48-hour test turnaround time.RELATED: Coronavirus cases reported at 4 Costco stores in Santa Clara County, health officer says"We process every sample and assess whether the virus that causes COVID-19 is present in the sample," Green said. "Then you can have a comprehensive view of where in your building the virus was present."It's...
    If a San Francisco lawmaker has his way, making racially motivated 911 calls will be against the law in that city. San Francisco Supervisor Shamann Walton has introduced an ordinance called the Caution Against Racially Exploitative Non-Emergencies Act. Yes, it's the CAREN Act. And it answers the problem of who calls the cops because they see a person with melanin in their vicinity and can't deal with it. "Racist 911 calls are unacceptable that's why I'm introducing the CAREN Act at today's SF Board of Supervisors meeting," Walton tweeted Tuesday. "This is the CAREN we need." He said that his ordinance is "part of a larger nationwide movement to address racial biases and implement consequences for weaponizing emergency resources with racist intentions." In a supervisors meeting, Walton said "911 calls and emergency reports are not customer service lines for racist behavior, and using these for fraudulent reports based on the...
    San Francisco supervisor Shamann Walton joined "The Story" Wednesday to discuss the CAREN Act, Walton's proposed legislation that would punish so-called "false racially biased emergency reports." "If you look at what's been happening across the country, you see people making these frivolous and these arbitrary 911 calls," Walton told host Trace Gallagher. "And so what happens? You put people of color in contact with law enforcement. And in some cases, there's some very dire consequences that can lead to harm to human beings. "But in some cases, they've also led to death," Walton went on. "So no one should be calling 911 to weaponize 911 against people of color, black people or any other protected class." 'CENTRAL PARK KAREN': AMY COOPER SHOULD BE INVESTIGATED FOR FALSE CLAIM, DE BLASIO SAYS The CAREN Act stands for Caution Against Racially Exploitative Non-Emergencies. The name is a play on "Karen," a pejorative term that has come to prominence to...
    NEW YORK -- Levi's said Tuesday that it will cut 700 office jobs, or about 15% of its worldwide corporate workforce, as it deals with a sharp drop in sales due to the coronavirus pandemic.The San Francisco-based jeans maker said the layoffs will save it about $100 million a year and won't affect workers at its stores or factories.RELATED: US adds 4.8 million jobs as unemployment falls to 11.1% amid pandemicLike other clothing companies, Levi's had to temporarily close its stores due to the virus. Many of the department stores that sell its jeans were also shut.Levi Strauss & Co. said its second-quarter revenue sank 62% to $497.5 million. It reported a loss of $363.5 million, after reporting a profit a year ago. Adjusted losses came to 48 cents per share, beating Wall Street expectations, according to Zacks Investment Research.RELATED: Macy's announces it will layoff 3,900 workersThe company said most...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- San Francisco-based Juul has been heavily criticized and sued in several states for its harmful, targeted advertising towards teens before, but a new report says the company may have even got a step further.RELATED: Juul considers selling building in SOMA District: ReportJuul has now been accused of trying to use company funding to recruit public health researchers to legitimize the vaping industry, according to an investigation by KSTP-TV, the ABC affiliate in Minneapolis, M.N.At least one researcher from the University of Minnesota told KSTP-TV he had just finished giving a study on youth and smoking last year in San Francisco when he received an e-mail about potential "research" opportunities with Juul.RELATED: Teens start using disposable vapes as loophole to flavored e-cig banIn a statement, Juul said it has dropped the practice of soliciting research after a "broad review" of the company's policies, according to KSTP-TV.Dozens of...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF/AP) — Two San Francisco-based food delivery services companies are merging as Uber announced Monday it was acquiring Postmates in a $2.65 billion all-stock deal. Uber and its Uber Eats food-delivery division will gain ground against DoorDash, which controls about 37% of the U.S. food delivery market. That’s compared with Uber Eats’ 20% share before the Postmates deal. Grubhub holds around 30% of the U.S. food delivery market, according to Second Measure, a data analysis company. Last month, Uber lost out in a bid for Grubhub, which would have made it the dominant U.S. food-delivery service. But Amsterdam-based Just Eat Takeaway.com ended up nabbing Chicago’s Grubhub in a $7.3 billion deal. Uber was reportedly seeking to team Grubhub with its Uber Eats business. The food delivery sector is undergoing a major consolidation this year and more is expected. The number of people using food delivery services is...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- Amazon is buying Foster City based self-driving company Zoox for $1.2 billion."Zoox is working to imagine, invent, and design a world-class autonomous ride-hailing experience," said Amazon's CEO of Worldwide Consumer Jeff Wilke, in the company's blog post Friday."Like Amazon, Zoox is passionate about innovation and about its customers, and we're excited to help the talented Zoox team to bring their vision to reality in the years ahead."Zoox has been testing out vehicles regularly on the streets of San Francisco.RELATED: Unlocking the mystery of sensor-covered, unmarked SUVs cruising San Francisco streetsThe retailer could use the autonomous vehicles to deliver packages but it could pave the way for a rideshare service too.Zoox has primarily focused on providing rides for passengers or what some refer to as a "robotaxi."Zoox's CEO and co-founder are expected to remain in their positions when the deal closes.
1