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Health Council:

              Unlike their government employee peers, Metro Nashville City Council members receive special treatment when it comes to health benefits. If they serve the two-term limit in full, they are eligible to receive lifetime health benefits on the taxpayer’s dime. All other Metro Nashville employees must work 20 years before earning similar lifetime benefits. These lifetime benefits reportedly cost taxpayers over $800,000 annually, which is projected to reach over $1.2 million by 2024. Council member Tonya Hancock proposed BL2020-387 to change that rule in August. Hancock argued the bill was a step toward balancing the city budget and, in turn, lower property taxes. The measure would cut back on the 75 percent government-subsidized lifetime insurance for Metro council members. Hancock noted that a 2014 study discovered that no other peer cities offer retiree medical coverage for their council members. She bolstered her argument for...
    How can you live with the virus? Several ideas are currently being studied by the executive reports The world, so that the French can find a semblance of “normal” life. Among them, the vaccination passport. This measure is currently the subject of an online citizen consultation, launched by the Economic, Social and Environmental Council (CESE). Elsewhere, such as Sweden or Denmark, the idea materializes. In France, it is the airline company Air France which launches hostilities by opening an experiment from March 11 by requiring passengers bound for the Antilles, the results of a PCR test of less than 72 hours, for a validity of a month. At a time when some are beginning to consider the idea of ​​learning to live with the virus, the scenario is attractive, as much as it worries. Nevertheless, what could be its legal framework in France? Could such a tool actually see the...
    The request of the Generalitat to the town councils of València and Castelló so that the days that were originally going to be Fallas and Magdalena remain as lectures it has signs of disrupting the school calendar again. In the case of Valencia, the City Council has extraordinary summoned the Municipal School Council to review its decision of early February, when it voted to maintain the days March 16, 17 and 18 as non-teaching (19 is a regional holiday). Sources from the Department of Education of the Valencia City Council indicated that last Friday they were waiting to hold a conversation with those responsible for the Department of Health to set the date for an extraordinary meeting of the Municipal School Council and discuss the issue. This body has already approved by majority, in a session held on February 2, maintain the three school holidays planned in March despite...
    After tech issues have challenged D.C. residents attempting to make COVID-19 vaccine appointments, a council member is calling for a review of what happened as the city gears up for the next group of available appointments. The D.C. Department of Health made 3,500 appointments available Saturday, but for the third consecutive day, tech issues made registering difficult for some and impossible for others. “If individuals cannot schedule an appointment, and this is one of the main ways that we’re able to do that, that’s a problem,” said at-large council member Christina Henderson. She has requested that the Committee on Health and the Committee on Government Operations hold emergency oversight hearings with D.C. Health and the Office of the Chief Technology Officer for a thorough review of what happened. “We cannot afford for that website to fail two weeks in a row,” Henderson said. “It’s important for us to get this...
    ANTIOCH, Calif. (KGO) -- The Antioch City Council voted to move forward on a series of police reform measures on Friday in a special session that went late into the night.The measures were brought forward by Mayor Lamar Thorpe who called them a "blueprint" for reform.As such, the council was not yet voting to officially implement the reforms. Rather, they were voting to direct city staff to investigate and create policy drafts that would be brought for a decision at a later meeting.The first item was whether the city wanted to create a mental health crisis response team.The council heard a presentation from a program called CAHOOTS which operates in Eugene, Oregon.They also heard more than two hours of public comment, including written messages that were all read out loud.The item was underscored by the death of Angelo Quinto, who died on Dec. 26 while in Antioch Police custody.RELATED: Bay...
    Alleging the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health has failed its residents and harmed its businesses during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the West Covina City Council in a split decision this week voted to begin the process of forming its own health department. The move would eventually free the 16-square-mile city of about 110,000 residents from health mandates handed down by the county’s health department — such as bar and restaurant closures related to COVID-19 — but not until it creates a department of its own that meets state health requirements. It would not free the city from state health mandates. The move comes at a time when various small cities in the area have expressed interest in going it alone on health matters, as differences of opinion over pandemic-related shutdowns have caused tensions and disagreements at the municipal level. West Covina could be a test case for...
    BURBANK (CBSLA) — The Burbank City Council Tuesday unanimously voted to take legal action against Tinhorn Flats in an effort to close the restaurant. “The city is acting as expeditiously as possible within the confines of the court system,” the city said in a statement. READ MORE: Youth Sports Get Green Light To Resume In Los Angeles, Orange Counties The latest escalation follows the business’ refusal to close after the city revoked its operating license for violating both Los Angeles County health orders and the Burbank Municipal Code. Tinhorn Flats responded to that vote early Tuesday morning on Instagram by writing, “WILL NOT COMPLY. OPEN 12 NOON TOMORROW.” READ MORE: Road Closures Begin Near Beverly Hilton Ahead Of This Weekends Golden Globe Awards The popular sports bar, located at 2623 W. Magnolia Blvd., had its health permit suspended by the L.A. County Department of Public Health in December for violating...
    LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — The Lincoln City Council has approved a measure banning the discredited practice of conversion therapy for LGBTQ children — making Lincoln the first city in the state to do so. The City Council voted 5-1 Monday to ban the practice, the Lincoln Journal Star reported. It bars counselors, psychiatrists and therapists from seeking to change the sexual orientation or gender identity of a minor. Professional associations have condemned the therapy over concerns it damages the mental health of children and can lead to high incidences of suicide. Opponents argued at a recent public hearing on the ban that it would unconstitutionally restrict speech in Lincoln and could be struck down by federal courts as unconstitutional. Councilman Roy Christensen cast the lone vote against the measure, saying he questions whether the city should interfere with a profession that is governed by state licensing boards. Lincoln Mayor Leirion...
    Mental health will be the focal point for police reform, along with increased police transparency and community involvement, in a proposal Antioch Mayor Lamar Thorpe unveiled on Monday. Thorpe, who campaigned on police reform, outlined his proposed measures, which also included the establishment of an independent oversight commission to review police complaints, adding police body and dashboard cameras, and improving training and hiring practices and more, during the morning news conference at City Hall. “This is a conversation that started post George Floyd, and frankly since the murder of George Floyd, there is a national and global awakening that has made the streets of our nation the epicenter of expression, frustration and hope, including right here in Antioch,” the mayor said. Thorpe blamed “political rhetoric” that has divided the city in the past year, which included misinformation continually promulgated on social media, for keeping reform from moving forward. “Quite frankly, if...
    By The Associated Press UNITED NATIONS — Britain has circulated a draft resolution to the U.N. Security Council demanding that all warring parties immediately institute a “sustained humanitarian pause” to enable people in conflict areas to be vaccinated against COVID-19. The proposed resolution reiterates the council’s demand last July 1 for “a general and immediate cessation of hostilities” in major conflicts from Syria and Yemen to Central African Republic, Mali and Sudan and Somalia, an appeal first made by U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres on March 23, 2020, to tackle the coronavirus pandemic. The draft, obtained Friday by The Associated Press, “emphasizes the need for solidarity, equity, and efficacy and invites donation of vaccine doses from developed economies to low- and middle-income countries and other countries in need, including through the COVAX Facility,” an ambitious World Health Organization project to buy and deliver coronavirus vaccines for the world’s poorest people. The...
    OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — A pilot program in Oakland to dispatch counselors and paramedics to mental health crises, instead of armed law enforcement officers, that was scheduled to start in January is having trouble getting off the ground. The Oakland City Council in June voted to set aside $1.85 million to fund the program amid protests against police brutality that followed the killing of George Floyd. But eight months later, the Mobile Assistance Community Responders of Oakland program is in disarray after two community-based organizations that were vying for the contract bowed out this week, the San Francisco Chronicle reported Friday. Earlier this month, a battle flared up over which nonprofit would receive taxpayer funds to handle duties that have long fallen on sworn police officers. The city’s Department of Violence Prevention spent months picking a contractor. A panel of city staff and community members with expertise in behavioral health...
    Still no confinement, but “vigilance” which “remains in place”: the status quo continues in France in the face of the Covid-19 epidemic, with contaminations for the moment stabilized despite the progression of variants. “The situation remains so fragile that nothing can tip it” and we could “pay dearly for any form of relaxation”, assured government spokesman Gabriel Attal, Wednesday after the health defense council and then the council of ministers. However, and as expected, he did not announce any new restrictions. He praised “the very great responsibility of the French”, who “have been able to thwart the prognosis”, in particular those of many scientists who expected a worsening of the situation because of the appearance of variants of the virus. Read also: COVID-19 in 24 hours: Johnson & Johnson vaccine, partial unemployment, illegal curfew … “We must not take exceptional measures because we can clearly see today that the...
    (Reuters) - European Council President Charles Michel said late on Monday that he welcomed the support of UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson to work together on a pandemic treaty. "I welcome the support of Boris Johnson to work together on a pandemic treaty in order to improve global preparedness, resilience and recovery", Michel said in a tweet. Johnson said earlier he would be keen to agree a global treaty on pandemics where countries agreed to share data, amid British and U.S. concern over access given to a World Health Organization (WHO) mission to China. (Reporting by Kanishka Singh in Bengaluru, Editing by William Maclean) Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters. Tags: diseases, infectious diseases, vaccines, public health, coronavirus, European Union, United Kingdom, Europe, World Health Organization
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — New York City Council legislation aims to tackle racial and gender equity in health care. From patient care to employees’ experiences, councilmembers want to hold hospitals accountable, CBS2’s Aundrea Cline-Thomas reported Thursday. “I trained at Harvard and at Montifiore and always wanted to do HIV primary care and, basically, just serve my community,” said Dr. Stella Safo, one of eight plaintiffs in a discrimination lawsuit against Mount Sinai Health System. Safo says she was called derogatory names and retaliated against for speaking up. “What I experienced at Mount Sinai made me question if I was going to stay in medicine at all,” Safo said. Similar stories of hostile work environments at hospitals across the city prompted the creation of new city council legislation. One would require the Department of Health to create an advisory board to study racial and gender discrimination in hospitals and its impact...
    A Fresno City Council Member is calling for a lawsuit against the city’s school district, arguing that its refusal to reopen schools is damaging children’s mental health and goes against scientific evidence that in-person learning does not pose a serious health risk of spreading COVID-19. Council Member Garry Bredefeld said he felt compelled to propose the lawsuit at next week’s city council meeting after hearing the pleas of parents whose children have been struggling to cope with the lockdowns. "They call my office every day and they are pleading, crying (and) distraught, because their kids have been out of school now for almost a year," Bredefeld told Fox News. Bredefeld said over the summer his office called on the Fresno Unified School District (FUSD) to reopen schools. He cited research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Academy of Pediatrics that said...
    When Spain has reached three million infections And with death figures at highs, the Government and communities again address this Wednesday in the Interterritorial Health Council the vaccination protocol and possible de-escalation measures. The Community of Madrid, for example, has already shown willing to relax the curfew so that the hotel business can give dinners “as soon as the Sanida department gives the green light”. The Council will also debate the proposal that groups such as police, firefighters and teachers of kindergarten, primary and secondary be the next to be vaccinated with doses of Astrazeneca. Health notified this Tuesday 766 deaths, the highest number since the first wave. In addition, 16,402 new infections were registered. Meanwhile, Castilla-La Mancha is considering reopening the hotel industry and in the Basque Country, the judges have been the ones who have ordered that bars and restaurants can reopen. Placeholder mam module Latest...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — A Baltimore City Council committee met with health officials Tuesday to investigate the problems plaguing the City’s COVID-19 vaccine distribution plan. “I have lost sleep over this rollout. I am sick to my stomach knowing,” Baltimore City Councilman Yitzy Schleifer said. RELATED: Maryland Vaccination Frustration: Anxiety Over Second-Dose Supplies, People ‘Jumping The Line,’ and Whether To Sign Up On Multiple Wait Lists The two sides discussed the hundreds of canceled appointments last week at Baltimore City Community College. CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE: TIMELINE: Coronavirus In Maryland, Tracking The Spread Latest coronavirus stories from WJZ Latest CDC Guidelines “Right now, there is no bigger failure in this rollout than the potential loss of life,” Schleifer said. “These vulnerable people that have been chalked up to technology issues. Please, please do the right thing and reschedule appointments for those who were canceled.” Baltimore City Health Commissioner Dr. Letitia Dzirasa said...
    Politico-rugby week while awaiting the fortunately confirmed start of the Six Nations tournament. After the Prime Minister intervened to deny against all expectations the imminence of yet another confinement, despite the certainties of the media sure of themselves, informed “desourcesûre” by a “close to the file” or by the close of a ” adviser to an adviser ”, President Macron appeared by surprise in the game in the middle of a newscast, bypassing his teammates and in a magnificent framing worthy of the legendary Boniface brothers pushes the yet compact pack of the supporters of the restriction , media scholars and affirmative mandarins, and deceives the rear lines of ministers anchored to the precautionary principle. Superb essay in the corner of the Élysée. The transformation may be more difficult. At half-time, John Castex, the government coach, comes to comment on the non-event, condemned to say nothing, amazed that we...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — For hours Friday, Philadelphia elected officials discussed what led to the botched rollout of the city’s COVID-19 vaccine efforts. Coming under heavy scrutiny by City Council,  Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas Farley addressed whether or not he should resign. Multiple officials took questions from City Council during Friday’s hearing, but it was Philadelphia’s health commissioner on the hot seat. “One week ago, Mayor [Jim] Kenney sent me a letter to rectify that mistake,” Farley said. Farley went on the defensive during a hearing Friday, where City Council fired questions as to why the group Philly Fighting COVID was selected to set up the city’s mass COVID vaccine clinic. “I know you said earlier that the CDC basically made the selection. Are you saying that the administration had no involvement at all in the selection of this organization?” Councilmember Cindy Bass asked. “No, not at all,” Farley responded. “It...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA)  — A medical center expected to shut down next month is being urged by the Los Angeles City Council to reconsider closing as I.C.U. capacity continues to be low in the county. Two L.A. City Council members Wednesday urged the operators of Olympia Medical Center to delay its planned closure on March 31 by at least six months due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The resolution, which was introduced by Councilwoman Nithya Raman and Councilman Mark Ridley-Thomas, urges Alecto Healthcare, which is selling the hospital to U.C.L.A. Health, to work with U.C.L.A. to ensure medical care at the hospital, located at 5900 W. Olympic Blvd in the Mid-Wilshire area, remains available during the pandemic. “There are only a few dozen I.C.U. beds currently available in Los Angeles County, and hospitals near Olympia Medical Center to which patients are being referred are already severely understaffed,” the resolution stated. Alecto Healthcare...
    BOSTON (CBS) – The Boston City Council will vote Wednesday on a petition to waive a special election to replace Mayor Marty Walsh, who is set to have a confirmation hearing to become President Joe Biden’s labor secretary. The city’s charter calls for a special election if Walsh leaves office before March 5. That could mean holding as many as four elections this year. Last month, councilor Ricardo Arroyo filed a home rule petition to get permission from the state to skip the special election because of health concerns amid the pandemic. “On top of it being incredibly unsafe from a health standpoint it’s also incredibly confusing for voters and it tends to make it that they don’t participate or they participate in less numbers,” said Arroyo. The petition needs approval from the city council, the state legislature and Gov. Charlie Baker, who has indicated he is in support of...
    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The Indianapolis City-County Council has passed a resolution supporting a ban on conversion therapy, the practice of trying to turn gays and bisexuals toward heterosexuality. The council’s special resolution, which does not carry any actual authority, on Monday passed the majority-Democrat council, The Indianapolis Star reported. “I know that I am so very blessed to have been born into a loving family that supports me just as I am, but not every LGBTQ Hoosier is able to share that same feeling of support,” said council member Keith Potts, one of four LGBTQ council members. “Too often, they feel quite the opposite.” At the state level. Sen. J.D. Ford, D-Indianapolis, has introduced a bill to ban conversion therapy after a failed attempt by Democrats last year. Ford, Indiana’s first openly gay lawmaker, said conversion therapy "leads to anxiety, depression and/or suicide. That’s why this bill is so important.”...
    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo "needs to think about stepping aside" as a pair of controversies over his handling of the coronavirus pandemic threaten to overwhelm his administration, Republican New York City Councilman Joe Borelli told "America Reports" Monday.  On Monday, The New York Times reported that nine senior officials at the New York State Department of Health have resigned, retired or left the department in recent months. The report cited decreased morale and senior health officials being "sidelined and treated disrespectfully" by Cuomo and members of his administration. Borelli, one of three Republicans on the New York City Council, told Fox News that the report, along with revelations last week about the true numbers of COVID-related deaths in state nursing homes, should serve as "the siren song for my fellow New Yorkers." JOE BORELLI: Look at the totality. We had this nursing home order exposé last week by the [state] attorney...
    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — City officials in Philadelphia promised Monday to improve the vetting of groups hired to administer COVID-19 vaccinations after it closed a convention center site run by a 22-year-old graduate student. At least two investigations are under way into how the city health department gave the no-contract work to Andrei Doroshin, a Drexel University student with almost no public health experience. City Council plans a hearing Friday. Council President Darrell Clarke wants to require the city to sign written contracts with vaccine partners given what he called the embarrassment and mistrust that ensued. The city's Office of Inspector General is meanwhile examining whether Dr. Caroline Johnson, an acting deputy in the health department, unfairly gave Doroshin's group and another potential applicant budget information that was not made public. Johnson, an infectious disease specialist, resigned over the weekend. Mayor Jim Kenney on Monday praised her prior work for the...
    WALNUT CREEK — Police don’t have the tools or training to de-escalate crisis situations involving people struggling with mental health, according to the consensus view of residents, city employees and law enforcement officers surveyed in a new report. Through anonymous “listening sessions,” the report finds that trust between law enforcement and the community was eroded by the 2019 police killing of Miles Hall, a Black man who had suffered a mental break. The listening sessions were led by Jason Seals, chairman of ethnic studies at Merritt Community College in Oakland, who also runs an independent consulting firm that creates “healing spaces” for community members, with a focus on those of African ancestry. As part of a “collective healing” process, the report recommends that the city hire more mental health clinicians and train police officers to respond more peacefully to situations involving mental health crises. In addition, it urges Walnut Creek...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Some Philadelphia City Council members are demanding answers about why the city put a critical public health project in the hands of Philly Fighting COVID. “I have no idea how these people got here. I have no idea where they came from,” Philadelphia City Councilwoman Cindy Bass said. Bass is introducing a resolution Thursday to order hearings into the city’s health department dealings with Philly Fighting COVID, after a volunteer posted in Twitter she witnessed the CEO of the clinic take home a ziplock bag full of vaccines and offered other volunteers the chance to use excess vaccinations to inoculate friends and family. “How was this allowed to happen, and what were the city’s protocols demanding to know how many shots were given ou?. And also, what’s our record-keeping on this? There’s just so many questions,” Bass said. Among them: how did they become the city’s largest...
    A partial Medicaid expansion could cost North Carolina more than a full expansion, a state policy adviser estimated Friday. States have the option to raise the income eligibility requirement for Medicaid to open the taxpayer-funded program to more participants. Gov. Roy Cooper and other Democrats have pushed for raising the eligibility threshold from 42% of the federal poverty level to 138%, the maximum allowed under federal law. Republican lawmakers have rejected the proposal, offering a broader program with work requirements and premiums, among other alternatives. Twelve percent of the state’s population remains uninsured, and many of them live below the poverty level, a rate that could be rising in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Julia Lerche, the chief actuary and policy adviser for North Carolina's Medicaid program, said a full expansion could cost the state $400 million less than a partial expansion. “It would...
    More On: indonesia Indonesia plans to give working adults COVID-19 vaccine before elderly Nurse suspended after stripping off PPE to have sex with COVID-19 patient Smuggled Sumatran orangutans flown home to Indonesia from Thailand Volcano eruption forces thousands to flee in Indonesia JAKARTA – Indonesia’s highest Muslim clerical council hopes to issue a ruling on whether a COVID-19 vaccine is halal, or permissible under Islam before the country is due to start a mass inoculation program using a Chinese vaccine next week. The world’s largest Muslim-majority country plans to launch vaccinations on Jan. 13 after obtaining 3 million doses from China’s Sinovac Biotech. Controversy over whether vaccines adhere to Islamic principles has stymied public health responses before, including in 2018, when the Indonesian Ulema Council (MUI) issued a fatwa declaring that a measles vaccine was forbidden under Islam. “Hopefully the edict can be declared before the government starts its...
    WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. (AP) — Officials on the Navajo Nation are reporting 287 new cases of the coronavirus and 23 more deaths. Thursday's figures come on top of 225 new cases the tribal government reported Wednesday along with two additional deaths. The new reports bring the total number of cases on the reservation that extends into Arizona, New Mexico and Utah to 23,090. More than half of those people have recovered, the Navajo Department of Health said. The death toll is 806. Navajo President Jonathan Nez said the high number of cases reported over the two days is likely due to reporting delays over the Christmas holiday. “However, we understand that we are still in a dire situation just like the rest of this country,” Nez said in a statement. "We all have to remember that the resilience of our ancestors is still within each of us to this day....
    The Children’s Services Council of Broward County (CSC) reminds residents who are experiencing emotional distress to call 2-1-1 for help or access 211Broward.org for a list of providers and professionals serving children and adults with behavioral health issues. People contact the INFOLine for many different issues, such as: feeling anxious or sad disruptive behaviors eating disorders alcohol or drug use feelings of depression or suicide The 24-hour Behavioral Health INFOLine provides free, confidential emotional support, crisis intervention, and information and referrals to mental health services, substance abuse prevention and treatment programs, and other behavioral health services. Coalition, and Castle Group, are among those who sponsored the effort. About the Children’s Services Council of Broward County  The Children’s Services Council of Broward County is an independent taxing authority established by a public referendum on September 5, 2000, and reauthorized on November 4, 2014, which, through Public Act, Chapter 2000-461 of the laws of Florida, authorizes the Council...
    A Seattle politician and 'defund the police' supporter called 911 after having a rock thrown through the window of her living room - a crime which critics say could be 'effectively legalized' under her plans for a so-called 'poverty defense'.  Lisa Herbold called the cops after hearing a 'loud noise that sounded like a gunshot' which proved to be a rock, according to a police report seen by My Northwest.  Herbold is said to have 'dived into the kitchen for cover' and did not see the attacker, described by a neighbor as a white man who was 'unathletic and a bad runner'.    The council member is behind a proposal which could see suspects found not guilty if they are 'meeting an immediate basic need' or showing 'symptoms of a behavioral health disorder' which includes alcohol or drug addiction.  Donald Trump-supporting radio host Jason Rantz accused Herbold of 'hypocrisy' after calling...
    Seattle City Council is considering a new criminal code regulation that would see it become the first municipality in the US to excuse misdemeanor crimes if they can be linked to poverty, addiction, or mental health disorders. The concept, known as the poverty defense, was discussed Tuesday by the Seattle City Council's Public Safety Committee after it was introduced by Councilmember Lisa Herbold and Anita Khandelwal, the King County’s director of the Department of Public Defense. Under the defense, an accused suspect could possibly be absolved of a crime – such as theft, assault, or trespassing – if they committed the offense to meet a basic need to survive. ‘In a situation where you took that sandwich because you were hungry and you were trying to meet your basic need of satisfying your hunger; we as the community will know that we should not punish that. That conduct is excused,’...
    SAN ANTONIO – Two city council members who represent San Antonio’s South Side want officials to focus on the most vulnerable communities of the city when distributing COVID-19 vaccinations. The first doses of the vaccine will be reserved for front-line health care workers. But as more doses become available, District 3 Councilwoman Rebecca Viagran and District 4 Councilwoman Adriana Rocha Garcia said the city needs to keep in mind underinsured residents on the South Side, who have been harder hit by COVID-19 due to underlying health conditions. Your questions answered: COVID-19 vaccine in Texas “As future distribution phases begin to take shape, we need to ensure we utilize an equitable approach as more rounds of COVID-19 vaccines are made available, by including our smaller hospitals and clinics located in our hard-hit communities and serve our constituents in low-income areas like the Southside,” Rocha Garcia said. The city’s COVID-19 dashboard shows...
    The Minneapolis City Council has passed a budget that reduces the city’s police department budget by $8 million. "The City Council adopted a 2021 budget!!" Minneapolis City Council President Lisa Bender tweeted Thursday. "All the #SafetyForAllBudget proposals passed for 2021. Mental health, violence prevention, oversight and more." The City Council adopted a 2021 budget!!All the #SafetyForAllBudget proposals passed for 2021. Mental health, violence prevention, oversight and more.The budget makes important investments in affordable housing, health and economic recovery.Thanks to all who got involved!— Lisa Bender (@lisabendermpls) December 10, 2020 Through the “Safety for All” plan, $7.7 million will be taken from the Minneapolis Police Department's budget and will be redirected to alternative policing measures, such as mental health teams. The plan will not affect Mayor Jacob Frey's targeted staffing levels for the force. Police Officers Federation of Minneapolis President Bob Kroll slammed the passage, saying violence in the...
    PARKER, Colo., (CBS4) – The Parker Town Council rebuked state-implemented restrictions on indoor dining Monday by unanimously passing a resolution demanding the state move Douglas County back to level orange from red on the COVID-19 dial. (credit: CBS) While the action by council is largely symbolic, Mayor Mike Waid tells CBS4 it was a culmination of the “frustration of our businesses, our restaurants, our churches, and our elected body.” By passing the resolution, council intended to show support for local restaurants, Waid said. “It just doesn’t seem to be equitable and make sense to shut down an industry basically,” Waid added. “That’s what this is doing, is shutting down an industry, when it’s not equitable across all of the industries.” In downtown Parker there are plenty of outdoor dining options, but at Mainstreet staple Idochine Cuisine, limited seating means largely relying on takeout. The restaurant currently has limited outdoor dining...
    By STEVE KARNOWSKI, Associated Press MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Minneapolis City Council members who tried unsuccessfully to dismantle the police department in response to George Floyd's death are voting Wednesday on whether to shrink it, a move that could imperil the entire city budget because the mayor is threatening to use his veto to protect public safety amid soaring crime rates. The plan, which supporters call “Safety for All,” is the latest version of the “defund the police” movement that Minneapolis and other cities have considered since Floyd’s May 25 death ignited mass demonstrations against police brutality and a nationwide reckoning with racism. Eleven of the 13 council members have already cast committee votes in favor of the largest parts of the plan, signaling that passage is likely. It would cut nearly $8 million from Mayor Jacob Frey’s $179 million policing budget and redirect it to mental health teams, violence prevention...
    FOLSOM (CBS13) — After outrage from the community, the Sacramento County supervisors pulled a proposed ordinance that would have fined businesses up to $10,000 for not complying with health orders. In Folsom, both the city council and business balked at the proposed fines. At Tuesday’s meeting, the board decided on delaying making a decision on the new fines until next week. Jackie Sellitti owns Monroe Salon Suites in Folsom. She choked back tears over the thought of fines for businesses who violate health and safety guidelines to protect against COVID-19. “These people are just trying to survive and they just do not need any other fines or being held down,” said Sellitti. “The numbers don’t justify the lockdowns.” She lost stylists after the pandemic hit and now half of those left are working part-time from home because their clients left. She was glad she added studio suites for social distancing, but...
    About half of New York City residents aren’t sold yet on getting the COVID-19 vaccine — complicating efforts to finally tame the killer bug, according to a survey disclosed Friday. New York City Health Commissioner Dr. David Chokshi revealed details of the online poll during a City Council hearing on vaccine distribution — and acknowledged persuading Big Apple residents to get the COVID-19 shots poses a big challenge. The unpublished Health Department survey, conducted from Oct. 3 through Oct. 14, found that only slightly more than half — 52.6 percent of city respondents — would get the vaccine. Twenty percent of Gotham residents said they would not take the vaccine and 27 percent were not sure. More White New Yorkers said they would get vaccinated compared to black, Hispanic and Asian New Yorkers, the survey found. The Health Department did not provide a racial or ethnic breakdown of the...
    More On: Coronavirus in NY Ex-union boss caught maskless despite claims he’s scared of COVID-19 Battle brewing over COVID-19 testing requirements in NYC schools COVID-19 outbreak at NYC Board of Elections offices could affect Bronx race Yankees boss: NY should legalize mobile sports betting to address fiscal crisis About half of New York City residents aren’t sold yet on getting the COVID-19 vaccine — complicating efforts to finally tame the killer bug, according to a survey disclosed Friday. New York City Health Commissioner Dr. David Chokshi revealed details of the online poll during a City Council hearing on vaccine distribution — and acknowledged persuading Big Apple residents to get the COVID-19 shots poses a big challenge. The unpublished Health Department survey, conducted from Oct. 3 through Oct. 14, found that only slightly more than half — 52.6 percent of city respondents — would get the vaccine. Twenty percent of...
    By GARY D. ROBERTSON, Associated Press RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper was blocked from expanding Medicaid in his first term by Republicans in the legislature, and any repeated push could again face more stalemates with the GOP after the status quo election results of November. Now shifting to his second term, Cooper is unveiling a high-powered bipartisan blue ribbon commission he hopes will plow aside acrimony with the still Republican-controlled General Assembly and improve health care access through consensus legislation in 2021. The extended COVID-19 pandemic also has made coverage gaps more acute with job losses and illness. “I think that there are core principles that we can agree to, like the fact that more people in North Carolina deserve health insurance,” Cooper said in an interview this week with The Associated Press. “This is not just purely a Medicaid expansion issue." The North Carolina...
    By The Associated Press Recent editorials of statewide and national interest from Ohio newspapers: Pass Collin’s Law to help stop hazing The Columbus Dispatch Dec. 1 Few parents ever want to see lawmakers pass a bill named for their child, because when that happens, it typically comes after there has been a tragic end to a short life. Once a mother and father have experienced the horrific death of a son or daughter, they surely want to think their child didn’t die in vain. It won’t ease their pain — not in the least — but knowing that something has changed to try to prevent another senseless death can provide a ray of hope. This is why the Ohio General Assembly must finish its work on House Bill 310 and send Collin’s Law: The Ohio Anti-Bullying and Hazing Act to Gov. Mike DeWine. It will close a chapter in the...
    In the latest rejection of government shutdowns of businesses to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, the Beverly Hills City Council on Tuesday voted to oppose a Los Angeles County Department of Public Health order to ban outdoor dining. The Los Angeles NBC affiliate reported on the unanimous vote: The resolution demanded a motion be placed on the Dec. 8 agenda of the LA County Board of Supervisors to repeal the current health order, according to a statement released by the city of Beverly Hills. In addition, the resolution demanded that the county’s public health order be based on data related to “a particular industry, sector, or area and not be applied unilaterally to every jurisdiction in LA County.” Further, the resolution called on the city attorney to explore legal action against the county, according to the statement. The LA County order banning all indoor and outdoor dining is set...
    BEVERLY HILLS (CBSLA) — The Beverly Hills City Council Tuesday unanimously approved a resolution opposing the Los Angeles County public health order prohibiting outdoor dining. Citing a detrimental impact to local businesses and an alleged lack of scientific evidence used by the county, the resolution demands that the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors repeal the order. RELATED: LA County Sees Record-High COVID-19 Daily Cases, Hospitalizations Again The council also requested that the county “focus on implementing restrictions based on data and localized to the area of the outbreak,” and base those decisions on “actual data related to a particular industry, sector or area and not be applied unilaterally to every jurisdiction.” In addition to the resolution, the council also directed city staff to explore the potential for the creation of a local city health department rather than remain under the jurisdiction of the L.A. County Department of Public Health....
    BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (KABC) -- The Beverly Hills City Council on Tuesday approved a resolution opposing Los Angeles County's outdoor dining ban.The resolution was unanimously approved and calls on the L.A. County Board of Supervisors to vote on repealing the current health order.Citing "a detrimental impact on local businesses and lack of scientific evidence used by the County," the resolution calls for a motion to be placed on the board's agenda on Dec. 8 to repeal it.Beverly Hills is also calling for future public health orders to be "based on actual data related to a particular industry, sector, or area and not be applied unilaterally to every jurisdiction in Los Angeles County."During the meeting, the council asked staff to explore the possibility of creating a local city health department and not remain under the jurisdiction of L.A. County. West Covina and Whittier are also looking at possibly breaking away from...
    WEST COVINA (CBSLA) — Several cities Tuesday were considering breaking away from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health and establishing their own after the latest round of coronavirus restrictions went into effect. West Covina is one of those cities. Mayor Tony Wu said he was worried that his city’s 4,000 small businesses would not survive the latest COVID-19 pandemic safety regulations. “Tell me, how many businesses can do this,” he said. “They have been jerked around, back and forth. As their mayor, I cannot take it. We have to do something.” At Tuesday night’s council meeting, he plans to introduce a request to discuss creating a health department for the city, or working with other nearby cities to create a regional health department, believing that the L.A. County department was too big to know the needs of smaller cities like his. “Their policy is one policy fits all,”...
    WHITTIER (CBSLA) – The Whittier City Council passed a resolution Wednesday opposing the controversial dining ban implemented by Los Angeles County public health officials this week. A waiter takes an order at The Butchers Daughter restaurant along Abbot Kinney Boulevard in Venice, Calif., on Nov. 23, 2020. (Genaro Molina/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images) The Whittier City Council’s resolution formally opposes the resolution, which was upheld Tuesday by the L.A. County Board of Supervisors in a narrow 3-2 vote. The ban, which took effect late Wednesday night and will last for a period of at least three weeks, limits all restaurants in L.A. County to only offering take-out, drive-thru and delivery services. Eateries are no longer allowed to serve patrons outdoors, as they have been for the past several months. Only the city of Pasadena, which has its own health department, is exempt from the ban. RELATED: LA Restaurants In Peril As...
    PORTSMOUTH — Portsmouth City Council passed multiple pieces of legislation during it Monday evening meeting, including two on third reading and three others where the reading-rule was waived. Starting with the third reading, council authorized City auditor Trent Williams to close the 2020 fiscal year books and ratified the Fraternal Order of Police/Ohio Labor Council Dispatchers Unit collective bargaining agreement. The latter was originally of some debate on Council, which passed first reading 3-2 during Council’s Oct. 26 session, but has over the past two meetings become one of more consensus. Complaints from the public and those on council revolved around what was explained to be rudeness by Portsmouth Police Department dispatchers, which moved Mayor Kevin Johnson and former 4th Ward councilperson Andrew McManus against ratifying a contract which would increase pay for the city’s eight dispatchers. Johnson shifted sides following an evening spent at their office Nov. 6, experiencing...
    LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — A petition drive in Lincoln seeks to recall the mayor and most of the city council, an effort spurred by the city leaders' actions during the coronavirus pandemic. The Lincoln Journal Star reports that LNK Recall organizers on Monday took the petitions to the County-City Building as the council held a meeting. Several dozen people waited near the entrance to sign the petitions. Meanwhile, a counter protester stood nearby chanting, “My daughter's a nurse. Don't make it worse. Wear a mask.” The recall effort accuses Mayor Leirion Gaylor Baird of seeking authoritarian control and attacking the liberty of Lincoln residents. Petition organizers want to remove several council members for voting to appoint Pat Lopez as health director in August. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Associated Press, infectious diseases, health, Nebraska, coronavirus, lung disease
    THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — An advisory panel said Thursday that the Dutch government should prioritize coronavirus vaccinations for people over age 60, those with underlying health problems and frontline health care workers when the first shots become available. The advice from the Health Council of the Netherlands tackles the question of who should get first access to the vaccines — a potentially thorny issue that governments around the world are starting to confront with vaccines against the virus likely becoming available in the coming months. Dutch Health Minister Hugo de Jonge tweeted that the council’s recommendation was clear: “Give priority in vaccinations to the elderly, the ill and health care workers.” He added that the government would “quickly take an initial decision about the vaccination strategy.” The health council said its proposed strategy was aimed at reducing serious illness and deaths. The confirmed Dutch death toll in the pandemic...
    Follow live the last hour on the Covid coronavirus: the numbers of infected and deceased, the different confinements and restrictive schedules in the autonomous communities, the economic proposals to reactivate the economy, the most outstanding information in the international arena and other news of interest . The pandemic already leaves more than 53 million cases worldwide The new coronavirus pandemic accumulates 53.3 million cases and more than 1.3 million deaths worldwide after registering about 580,000 positives in 24 hours, according to the balance updated this Saturday by Johns Hopkins University. Specifically, around the world 587,426 new positives have been registered in the last day for a total of 53,385,255 cases, while the global death toll stands at 1,302,841. More than 34.4 million people have managed to overcome the disease worldwide. Health sees signs of stabilization of the second wave The second wave of the covid-19 pandemic...
    After eight and a half months of closure due to Covid-19 restrictions, the Trace of Madrid It will reopen on November 22. It will do so under strict security measures, and there will only be 500 positions, half of the total. Regarding the capacity, the maximum allowed will be 2,700 people. This Friday, sources from the Madrid City Council confirmed that they have reached an agreement with the Municipal Board of the Central District and the Rastro de Madrid to reopen the market, as long as the evolution of the pandemic in the capital is favorable and the sanitary circumstances allow it. Since the negotiations began, the Consistory has launched a total of five proposals, and it has been the latter that has received the approval of the parties involved. The Rastro will be divided into six sectors and will have a total of 500 stalls...
    The D.C. Council Committee on Health held a public roundtable on legislation that would declare racism a public health crisis in D.C. Ward 7 Council member Vincent Gray — the chairman of the committee and a former mayor — hosted the virtual discussion Thursday. The aim is to push the D.C. Council to recognize legislation that would allow racism to be declared a public health crisis. Council member Kenyan McDuffie introduced the legislation. Vicki Girard, director of Georgetown University’s Health Justice Alliance, supported the resolution, saying, “District families and children face barriers to good health every day.” Girard said most of the obstacles that African American residents in D.C. face are connected to legal rights. “When these issues go unrecognized, they “perpetuate poor health outcomes that disproportionately harm Black D.C. residents,” she said. The Health Justice Alliance is a partnership between the law and medical centers focused on training future...
    Submit your letter to the editor via this form. Read more Letters to the Editor. No time to sow seeds of doubt in vaccine I was distressed to read the FDA debated the use of the “emergency use authorization” for a COVID-19 vaccine (“FDA debates use of “emergency” vaccine,” Oct. 24). Vaccines, one of the greatest public health achievements, have come to be questioned and feared. Now is not the time to be planting seeds of doubt into the public. Instead, efforts should focus on establishing credibility and trust, when people are still forming their perception and opinions of a coronavirus vaccine. If we allow doubt to be sowed, no matter how effective the vaccine may be, it will be useless if there are not enough people willing to take it. Nathalie Lopez Berkeley Assange case pivotal for press freedom Even though election coverage seems nonstop, not enough attention has...
    Submit your letter to the editor via this form. Read more Letters to the Editor. Biden has courage, plan to fight climate change Re: “Biden’s oil remark tests voter resolve on climate change,” Oct. 23: Joe Biden did not promise to “destroy the oil industry” or “kill paychecks earned by hardworking families in Texas.” He did say that oil production and usage are huge contributors to global warming, as climate change scientific experts have been warning for many, many years. What he did promise is a phased-in plan. Yes, the transition from coal and gas will be expensive, but can we really afford to do otherwise? President Trump prefers to deny the impacts of climate change — claiming it will “get cooler” or people should just “plant more trees.” Texas, Oklahoma and Pennsylvania — I hope you did hear Biden describe a “three-decade plan” for phasing out fossil-fuel use. I...
    By The Associated Press The (Fort Wayne) Journal Gazette. October 25, 2020 Voters left uneducated on coming school change State officials love to point out more than half of the state’s budget is dedicated to education. It’s the go-to response when confronted with data on lagging teacher salaries or growing inequity among Indiana school districts. But while many like to talk about how much schools cost, they are much less forthcoming when it comes to disclosing views on how those dollars are spent or who benefits. For Gov. Eric Holcomb, a key player in removing the state’s top education post from voter ballots, that extends to revealing whom he would appoint to the new cabinet-level position replacing it. Having lost the right to elect a state superintendent of public instruction, voters deserve to know whom the governor will choose. If Democratic challenger Dr. Woody Myers is elected, voters know exactly...
    (CBS DETROIT) – Detroit City Council has approved Amazon’s plan to create a fulfillment center at the former state fairgrounds. 138 acres will go toward the facility for $16 million. Amazon says the project will create 1,200 jobs. Altogether $400 million will go toward the redevelopment of the state grounds. Construction is set to begin in a few weeks. MORE FROM CBS DETROIT: Michigan Health Dept.: New Coronavirus Outbreaks In 27 Michigan Schools MORE FROM CBS DETROIT: U-M Students Ordered To Stay-In-Place By Washtenaw County Health Department To Stop Covid-19 Spread MORE FROM CBS DETROIT: Sheriff: Woman Found Dead In Rochester Hills Pool © 2020 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Related
    The D.C. Council has approved a bill giving children 11 and older the option to get government-recommended vaccines without their parents’ approval. The “Minor Consent for Vaccinations Amendment Act” passed with a 12 to 1 vote, with 8th Ward Councilmember Trayon White the sole dissenter. The bill, which Ward 3 Councilmember Mary Cheh introduced, includes various measures to help ensure confidentiality. It directs health care providers to seek reimbursement directly from insurers, and it requires doctors to submit an immunization record directly to the young patient’s school instead of a parent. The bill was introduced in March 2019, back when a vaccine debate usually centered on something like a measles shot — and way before the phrase “COVID-19” had entered the nation’s vocabulary. “A child needs to be protected against the dangers of things like measles, other diseases that cause death, and the community needs to be protected so that...
    The Donald J. Trump administration unveiled on Monday a national strategy to address rampant homelessness in cities across America, including shifting from the Obama-era failed policy of “housing first as a one-size-fits-all approach” to an emphasis on self-reliance and addressing racial disparities and mental health. The plan, titled “Expanding the Toolbox: The Whole-of-Government Response to Homelessness,” was produced by the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness. “Policies that do not address the real root causes of homelessness combined with high housing costs in over-regulated markets have exacerbated the homelessness condition in America,” the executive summary of the report stated. “As many community leaders are coming to realize, the status quo is simply not working,” the executive summary stated. “Reforms and changes are needed to reverse the growing homelessness crisis in America.” “Our aspirational goals should move beyond primarily providing subsidized housing assistance,” the executive summary stated. “As Congress has suggested, we...
    BERKELEY — A total of 12 candidates have thrown their hats into the ring for four seats in this year’s Berkeley City Council election. In Districts 2 and 3, discussions of climate change and police reform are on the forefront of candidates’ minds, which have seven candidates total. In District 2, current incumbent Cheryl Davila’s district, the challengers are business owner Timothy Carter, solar energy scientist Alex Sharenko and Berkeley transportation commission vice chair Terry Taplin. In District 3, incumbent Ben Bartlett is being challenged by construction manager Orlando Martinez and real estate broker Deborah Matthews. Davila, in an interview, addressed homelessness as one of her top priorities, saying she’s a supporter of tiny homes, safe parking for RV dwellers, sanctioned encampments (with regular trash pickup and good neighbor policies). She said during her tenure on council she’s helped bring change — such as taking mobile showers to the city’s homeless...
    BERKELEY — Both incumbents of Berkeley City Council’s Districts 5 and 6 face challengers who are questioning their leadership roles, including on fire safety and past voting on police-related issues. In District 5, incumbent Sophie Hahn’s district, her challengers are realtor Todd Andrews and community center organizer Paul Darwin Picklesimer. In District 6, incumbent Susan Wengraf has just one challenger, social justice attorney Richard Illgen. Hahn, first elected in 2016, said she wanted to run for re-election because of her dedication to her hometown and strong Berkeley values of education, equity, the local economy and the environment. She has served on the zoning board, and is “deeply enmeshed” in Berkeley — she went to high school here and then UC Berkeley. She wants to focus on health and safety, homeless and affordable housing, and climate and the environment if re-elected. Picklesimer said in an interview that he decided to run...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — The New York City Council will hold a virtual hearing Friday on health and safety at schools. Among the topics is a new report on racial disparities when it comes to remote learning. Data from last spring shows student attendance and engagement were nearly eight times more likely to be lower at schools where at least half the student population were Black and Hispanic. Low student engagement was nearly four times more likely at schools where Black students accounted for 25% of the student population. Schools: The New Normal Parents Work To Keep Kids Focused While Virtually Learning Cyber Security Concerns Grow As Many Classes Go Online The Rush Is On To Bridge The Digital Divide In Tri-State Area Cities How To Help Children Deal With Anxiety As They Return To School Distance Learning Tools And Links For Parents Teaching At Home Complete Back-To-School Coverage...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The 2020 Holidazzle will be taking place virtually this holiday season due to the COVID-19 pandemic. On Thursday, the mpls downtown council announced the event is moving online, with a full schedule set to be released in early November. Organizers say it was a “difficult decision, but the right decision” to move the event, normally held in Minneapolis’ Loring Park, to a virtual space. “Our community’s health and well-being are most important as we head into the holiday season,” Leah Wong, vice president of external relations for the mpls downtown council, said. “We are excited for the virtual experience Holidazzle will provide as you and yours celebrate with us wherever you are.” Organizers say the virtual version of the event will offer holiday fun for all ages and abilities, offering holiday-themed activities and interactive engagement. In addition to the Holidazzle going virtual, the...
    LAKEVIEW — Howard Brown Health’s plans to move its Lakeview center to a new, five-story building along the Northalsted strip are moving forward after they received critical city approval Tuesday. The city’s Committee on Zoning, Landmarks and Building Standards approved a rezoning request that would allow the LGBTQ-affirming health provider to redevelop the lot at 3501–3519 N. Halsted St. into a full-service medical clinic. The facility would double the capacity of Howard Brown’s existing Lakeview clinic at 3245 N. Halsted St., which is at capacity with about 6,000 patients, CEO David Ernesto Munar said during a September community meeting. It would also allow patients to access all of Howard Brown’s services from a central location. “It’s very crucial that a person can get their entire care here because people are much more likely to get the full health care they need when everything can be met in one facility,” Ald....
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff HARRISBURG (KDKA) – Gov. Tom Wolf announced a health reform package Friday, saying he wants to make health care more affordable, hold corporations accountable and address inequities “resulting from systemic racism.” “True reform means focusing on every aspect of a person that contributes to their health. Even before the pandemic, there were warning signs that Pennsylvania’s health care system wasn’t working for everyone,” Gov. Tom Wolf said. “Many Pennsylvanians found it hard to pay their medical bills due to rising health care costs, including families who have health care coverage and often have to pay higher premiums and more out-of-pocket costs every year.” He says an estimated 1.5 million Pennsylvanians are expected to become uninsured as a result of the pandemic. The three main components of the governor’s plan include an interagency health reform council, five regional accountable health councils across the state...
    TULSA, Okla. (AP) — The Tulsa City Council has voted to expand and extend a requirement that masks be worn in public when social distancing is not possible in an effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus. The council voted Wednesday to lower the age of those who must wear a mask from 18 to those 10 and older and extend the mandate that was to expire Nov. 30 until Jan. 31. Oklahoma City has a similar mask mandate for any aged 11 or older that is to expire Oct. 20. Both cities allow exceptions such as bar and restaurant patrons who are eating or drinking and those taking part in athletic events. The state health department on Wednesday reported 87,199 total virus cases statewide and 1,031 deaths due to COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus. The actual number of cases in Oklahoma is likely higher because many...
    Parents in Berkeley, California, may soon be spared having their kids at eyeball level with candy and other sugar-laden temptations waiting in the checkout lines of the city's larger retail stores. That's if an ordinance clears the Berkeley City Council a second time next month. Council members unanimously approved a measure this week that would prohibit grocery stores bigger than 2,500 square feet from displaying junk food and other unhealthy items in checkout aisles. It would apply to 25 retailers in Berkeley, including CVS, Safeway, Trader Joe's and Whole Foods. Any affected retailer could continue selling chips, candy bars, soda and other food viewed as empty calories elsewhere in their stores. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox "It's not a ban, it's a nudge," said Kate Harrison, a council member who co-authored the ordinance, according to local media reports. The new policy drew applause from the Center for...
    Submit your letter to the editor via this form. Read more Letters to the Editor. The internet is a lifeline during COVID isolation The internet has had a big part in improving life during quarantine. Watching shows on streaming platforms such as Netflix has been a great source of entertainment, and has made staying at home less boring. Also, social media such as Instagram or Snapchat have provided some sense of normalcy by letting you stay connected with friends. Having such entertainment helps take your mind off the stressful aspects of quarantine. The internet has even helped with school. Many schools across the country are doing online school through apps such as Zoom or Google Meet. Without the internet, this would not have been possible. Aaryen Reddy Danville Wilk a proven leader for Walnut Creek Please join me in re-electing Kevin Wilk to Walnut Creek City Council. Kevin has proven...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — New York City Council Speaker Corey Johnson says he is no longer considering a run for mayor. “Just as I was open about the fact that I was considering a run for mayor, I now want to be open about the fact that I have made the difficult decision not to run,” Johnson said in a statement Thursday. “This challenging time has led me to rethink how I can best be of service to this city, and I have come to the conclusion that this is not the right path for me.” In the statement, Johnson cited personal challenges and opened up about his depression. “Too often mental health issues are shrouded in secrecy and stigmas, which causes people struggling with these issues to feel alone,” he said. “I encourage anyone who is experiencing a mental health condition to seek help. I did and I am...
    The D.C. Council on Tuesday extended Mayor Muriel Bowser’s health emergency authority until the end of the year, more than six months after she first declared the emergency to deal with the coronavirus pandemic. The council’s declaration, which passed unanimously, extends the mayor’s authority until Dec. 31. Council Member Robert White, who voted in favor of the extension, raised concerns about the challenges D.C. has faced in obtaining supplies. “Procurement has proven to be a challenge during these times — for the entire nation, with federal, state and local governments scrambling to obtain the supplies and equipment we need to care for our communities,” White said. He specifically cited people “seeking to profit from the chaos” and warned of price-gouging as well as people who sell low-quality goods. “I intend to examine the emergency procurement reporting requirements that we created in March to ensure the council is receiving the correct...
    STAFF members of a local council in London have been banned from smoking at their desk – even while they are working from their own home. Hammersmith and Fulham council told staff who work from home any part of their house they use for working will "be required to be smoke-free". 3Hammersmith and Fulham council has banned workers from smoking at their desks - even at home The move has been heavily criticised by campaigners who believe it is a “moral crusade” which “wages a war on choice and personal freedom”. The directive was issued as part of a bi-borough health and safety guidance with Royal Kensington and Chelsea borough. In February this year, however, Kensington and Chelsea nullified the ban on staff working from home when it dropped the directive. The council’s rule on smoking is criticised in a report named “Smokefree Ideology – How local authorities are...
    The City Council of Philadelphia approved a resolution on Thursday pushing for Mayor Jim Kenney to declare gun violence a citywide emergency, after the measure was introduced last month. The resolution was originally proposed by Councilmember Jamie Gauthier and has since picked up 14 co-sponsors, according to Fox 29. Councilmembers reportedly asked for community outreach programs, educational institutions, and healthcare organizations in addition to the emergency request. Lawmakers also cited a deadly quadruple shooting as one of the reasons they've devoted increased time and attention to the issue. PHILADELPHIA GUN SHOP OWNER 'JUSTIFIED' IN SHOOTING BURGLARS, KILLING ONE, DA SAYS VideoLocal police said two young men, Khallid Henderson, 21, and Jayden Lucas, 18, were both killed in the shooting that occurred at the park where the opening credits to the show "Fresh Prince of Bel-Air" were filmed, ABC 6 reported. Deputy Commissioner of the Philadelphia Police Melvin Singleton said, "We have video that shows three males...
    SAN ANTONIO – City Council is expected to vote on the $2.9 billion FY 2021 budget during a meeting Thursday morning. The meeting is slated to begin at 9 a.m., but delays are possible. A livestream of the meeting will be placed in this article; if there is not a livestream available, check back at a later time. The FY 2021 budget would make small adjustments to areas like housing, health, and small business programs, but the “defunding” of the San Antonio Police Department is not included.Read more:Proposed city budget tweaks add money for housing, health, and small businesses, but avoid large changes to SAPD Copyright 2020 by KSAT - All rights reserved.
    For the Star Tribune, Joe Carlson says, “Hundreds of thousands of patients and donors to Children’s Minnesota and Allina Health hospitals are getting letters saying some of their personal data may have been exposed in the second-largest health care data breach in state history. The growing list of those affected includes more than 160,000 patients and donors at Children’s Minnesota, and more than 200,000 patients and donors from Allina Health hospitals and clinics.” The AP reports, “A Minnesota man who is accused of joining the Islamic State group in Syria has been returned to the United States to face terrorism charges. Abdelhamid Al-Madioum made his first court appearance in U.S. District Court in Minnesota on Wednesday. Authorities say he was vacationing with his family in Morocco in 2015 when he secretly booked a flight to Istanbul, Turkey, and then traveled to Syria. He’s charged with providing material support to a...
    SAN ANTONIO – On the eve of the city council’s vote on the FY 2021 budget, proposed amendments to the $2.9 billion document would make small adjustments to areas like housing, health, and small businesses programs. However, the large-scale “de-funding” of the San Antonio Police Department activists have been calling for remains off the table. City staff presented $4 million worth of proposed amendments to the city’s operating budget and $2.4 million worth of additional capital spending on Wednesday, following dozens of council member requests. However, none of those requests pertained to the San Antonio Police Department, which has a general fund budget that’s set to increase next year, largely because of a scheduled pay increase for officers. District 6 Councilwoman Melissa Cabello Havrda, the chairwoman of the council’s Public Safety Committee, briefly said during the online meeting that she felt the council was not doing enough to look at...
    Berkeley could become the latest Bay Area city to issue fines for violations of the COVID-19 public health orders that mandate masks and bar large gatherings. The city council is expected to vote Tuesday evening on the decision to install civil penalties starting at $100 per day, per violation and escalating up to $500 for both residents and businesses. The order is designed to provide a mechanism to enforce the orders from the city’s health officer, which would otherwise come with a hefty misdemeanor penalty. The civil route allows for lighter fines and to avoid the lengthy court process, the city manager’s office wrote in its recommendation to the council, calling the measures currently in place “generally impracticable” and saying they “risk leading to the unnecessary criminalization of conduct that is more appropriately addressed through a civil remedy.” Related Articles California Fitness Alliance sues state over coronavirus closures...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — Aldermen on Friday backed an ordinance to ban the sale of flavored vaping products in Chicago, after an earlier effort to prohibit all flavored tobacco of any kind stalled in the face of opposition from retailers who feared losing customers to the suburbs and northwest Indiana. The City Council Health Committee voted to approve a measure that would ban all flavored vaping products, except those that taste or smell like tobacco. Ald. Matt O’Shea (19th), the chief sponsor, originally wanted to ban any kind of flavored tobacco, including cigarettes, cigars, and chewing tobacco, but couldn’t get enough support from fellow aldermen, many of whom sided with retail groups who argued smokers would simply go outside city limits to buy those products, and increase the black market for so-called “loosies” – unregulated cigarettes. Health Committee Chair Ald. Roderick Sawyer (6th) said the goal of banning flavored vaping products...
    PLEASANTON — Pleasanton is the latest city to take a hard look at the role of police in the community and schools — and how to respond to mental health calls. But there are no plans to defund the police, at least for now. The city agreed to revise its police use of force policies and possibly removing school resource officers and ending the police-led DARE anti-drug program. “I think this is really the time to reevaluate the program,” Vice Mayor Kathy Narum said about DARE at last week’s City Council meeting. Narum pointed out that in a recent survey of Pleasanton residents, they did not list the DARE program as very important. Several young people spoke to the council, urging that police be removed from campuses. One student said the only time she saw school resource officers in action was when they wrestled a teen having a breakdown to...
    Council Speaker Corey Johnson on Wednesday called the summer’s sharp increase in New York City gun violence a “public health emergency.” “This increase is stark and really scary for communities across New York City when you see a 1-year-old in Brooklyn getting shot and dying and a mother getting shot and dying,” Johnson said on WNYC radio, referring to the shooting death in July of little Davell Garnder during a cookout. “This is a public health emergency,” Johnson said. As The Post reported, as of Monday there were 955 shootings with 1,174 victims so far this year compared to 510 shootings and 602 victims last year. The uptick in gunplay has continued for 12 consecutive weeks in New York City — with police data showing 352 more shootings, 464 more victims and 69 more murders compared to the same time last year. Johnson stopped short of saying that a police...
    SAN ANTONIO – Numerous people had a hand in developing the resolution San Antonio’s City Council passed on Thursday, declaring racism as a public health crisis. While the Office of Equity was the main city department involved, the lesser-known Office of Health Equity also played a role and helped provide some of the data on health outcomes here in Bexar County. We took a closer look at what specifically it is they do for the city. The full story can be watched above in the video player. RELATED: City Council passes resolution that declares racism as a public health crisis Copyright 2020 by KSAT - All rights reserved.
    LAS VEGAS (AP) — The Las Vegas City Council denied a motion to halt an enforcement program that sends people to make sure businesses are complying with measures to contain the coronavirus. The motion by Councilwoman Michele Fiore was defeated Wednesday on a 5-3 vote. “We have sent out 65 snitches into businesses, to then call code enforcement on them to harass them,” Fiore said. City officials say program workers have visited more than 8,300 businesses to ensure they are following public health guidelines. The effort has led to 580 violations in its one month of existence, nearly all of which were corrected once the workers taught owners about the guidelines, the Las Vegas Sun reported. Mayor Pro-Tempore Stavros Anthony and Councilwoman Victoria Seaman also supported the motion. Officials did agree to reduce the number of employees dedicated to the program from 65 to 12, which they say is the...
    SAN ANTONIO – The San Antonio City Council declared racism a public health crisis on Thursday, passing a resolution that, among other promises, “commits to advocating for racial justice as a core element of all policies, programs, and procedures.” The resolution was passed by all council members, except District 8 Councilman Manny Pelaez, who was absent, and District 10 Councilman Clayton Perry, who abstained from voting. The resolution does not make any immediate changes. However, it includes various commitments to pursue racial equity, like reviewing policies and procedures to eliminate racial bias and working with historically marginalized communities to find solutions for health equity issues. Residents and council members alike noted that actual action would still need to follow.  "We are here for systemic change and not just for check-the-box exercises," said the city's Chief Equity Officer Zan Gibbs, who presented the resolution to council members.  The resolution resulted from...
    SAN ANTONIO – San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg and City Council will meet on Thursday to discuss a resolution that declares racism as a public health crisis. The meeting is slated to begin at 9 a.m. via videoconference. It will be livestreamed in this article, but delays are possible. If there is not a livestream available, check back at a later time. The resolution would establish “stronger efforts to promote racial equity in San Antonio,” the city says. It comes amid a summer of protests due to racial inequality and police brutality following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. 6 charts show some of the racial disparities in U.S., San Antonio Protestors in San Antonio marched for justice in the days following his death, urging city leaders to take up deep discussions on racial inequality. A draft of the resolution recognizes “the San Antonio community has experienced a history...
    RUSSIA’S top respiratory doctor has quit over “gross violations” against ethics linked to Putin's new coronavirus vaccine. Alexander Chuchalin left the Russian health ministry’s ethics council after criticising the new Sputnik V drug ahead of the body approving its registration. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 3Alexander Chuchalin left the Russian health ministry’s ethics council over 'gross violations' linked to the vaccineCredit: Nikolay Malakhin 3Dr Chuchalin blocked registration of the vaccine on 'safety' groundsCredit: Ministry of Defence Chuchalin sought and failed to block the registration of the vaccine on “safety” grounds before quitting the ethics council. Dr Chuchalin named and attacked Prof Alexander Gintsburg, director of the Gamaleya Research Centre for Epidemiology and Microbiology, and Prof Sergey Borisevich, a medical colonel and Russian army’s top virologist, who were the leading scientists behind the new vaccine. The top doctor specifically accused the two leading medics...
    ADVERTISING/PUBLIC RELATIONS The Minnesota chapter of the Public Relations Society of America celebrated its 42nd Annual PRSA Classics Awards. Among the winners: Weber Shandwick for its campaign of Insight to Action: Driving Pork Demand with Actionable Insights, taking five awards; 2019 Best of Show Award: Padilla for Student’s Stories Shed Light on Health Inequities; Donald G. Padilla Distinguished Practitioner Award: Medtronic’s Greg Zimprich; Rising Star Award: Katie Volney, of broadhead; Dr. Willard Thompson Scholarship: Gaokia Mindy Lee, Metropolitan State University, University of Minnesota Chapter, $2,000 scholarship; Laura Kerwin, University of Minnesota Chapter, $1,000 scholarship. APPAREL Storm Creek, an Eagan-based supplier of eco-made outdoor-inspired apparel, announced it has hired Phil Andersen as controller. CONSTRUCTION Kraus-Anderson has named Troy Stutz as senior project manager in the company’s Minneapolis office. FINANCIAL SERVICES UBS announced that two financial advisers in the Wayzata office, Becky Falk and Kelli Puhl of the Falk, Puhl &...
              Metro Nashville At-Large Council Member Sharon Hurt said Wednesday during a virtual meeting of the Joint Pubic Safety and Health Committee that there should be stronger legislation for those not wearing masks and suggested they be charged with murder or attempted murder. Hurt said that she works for an organization that, “If they pass the virus, then they are tried for murder or attempted murder.” Hurt thinks the same standard should apply to the general public. “This person who may very well pass this virus that’s out in the air because they’re not wearing a mask is basically doing the same thing to someone who contracts it and dies from it,” she said. “Maybe there needs to be stronger legislation to say that if you do not wear a mask, and you subject exposure of this virus to someone else then there will...
    (CBS DETROIT) – On Wednesday, Governor Whitmer announced a series of new initiatives to prevent racial inequity and discrimination in Michigan. One initiative declares racism as a public health crisis in the state. “This pandemic has confirmed and highlighted the deadly nature of these pre-existing inequities caused by systemic racism,” said Whitmer. The governor says COVID-19 is more than 4-times as likely to take the life of a black Michigander than a white one. “Though black people make up 14 percent of the population of the state of Michigan, but thus far we have made up 40 percent of the people who have died of Covid-19,” said Lt. Governor Garlin Gilchirst. The executive order states people of color in Michigan are more likely to live in areas that lacks healthy food choices and essential resources. there are also higher risks to pandemics such as Covid-19. “If you’re a...
              Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer created the Black Leadership Advisory Council on Wednesday, declaring racism a “public health issue.” The council — the first of its kind in Michigan — will give advice to the governor and help recommend policies to combat systemic racism. This includes identifying state laws that create or perpetuate inequities, promoting legislation that seeks to correct racial inequality within Michigan, helping community groups serve Black communities and promoting the cultural arts within Black communities, according to the governor’s office. The council will consist of 16 voting members and is housed within the Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity. “We must confront systemic racism head on so we can create a more equitable and just Michigan,” Whitmer said in a statement. “This is not about one party or person. I hope we can continue to work towards building a more...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) – City Councilman David Ryu wants to increase penalties for property owners who hold large house parties in violation of public health orders. In a motion introduced Wednesday, Ryu said property owners who skirt building and safety rules or city laws, such as the Los Angeles party house ordinance are in violation of COVID-19 public health orders and the city’s party house ordinance, which became law in 2018. Under the proposal, penalties for large gatherings could include water and power shutoff, permit prohibitions or having a certificate of occupancy held or revoked for any “large, close-contact, largely maskless gatherings, in direct violation of City Emergency Orders and County Health Orders”. “Despite a pandemic that has killed thousands in Los Angeles, some homeowners are choosing to put everyone at risk by renting out their homes to massive house parties,” Ryu said. “This is irresponsible bordering on deadly, and...
    LANSING, Mich. (CBS DETROIT) — Governor Gretchen Whitmer signed an executive order Wednesday creating the Black Leadership Advisory Council. The governor also signed an executive directive declaring racism as a public health crisis in Michigan. Under the executive directive, the governor asked MDHHS to make health equity a major goal, as well as required implicit bias training for all state employees. “Since I was sworn in as governor, I have made it a top priority to include more people of color, more women, and more members of the LGBTQ+ community at the table. We’ve been able to build a more inclusive state government, but there is more work to do. That’s why today, I am proud to create the Black Leadership Advisory Council of Michigan,” said Whitmer. “We must confront systemic racism head on so we can create a more equitable and just Michigan. This is not about one party...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A change in the Minneapolis Charter would take the input of everyone in the city to ensure public safety for all. WCCO’s Reg Chapman spoke with the lead council person about what a Department of Community Safety and Violence Prevention would look like. Ward 4 City Council person Phillipe Cunningham says he is pushing for a public health approach to public safety. “Building a comprehensive approach to public safety where law enforcement plays a role, but is right sized,” Cunningham said. Cunningham says right now officers answer calls that are related to mental and chemical health challenges. He would like to allow police to focus on policing and create other systems to handle the needs of the community. “It does not defund the police it does not abolish the police what it does do it creates a system a a department that mirrors that of the state...
    FORT WORTH (CBSDFW.COM) – The Fort Worth Police Department sent CBS 11 News an update on policy reform efforts it has collaborated on with a panel of experts since December of 2019. The panel shared observations and recommendations with the department as they identified them. And from that partnership, the department said is has already adopted several of the identified recommendations and is currently working on several others. Some of the changes that have were already implemented, or are underway include: Additions to its Use of Force Policy and General Orders to enhance accountability and further clarify de-escalation and duty to intervene expectations, recognizing that these are serious policy violations when not followed. Changes pertaining to investigating and classifying civilian complaints. Effective since the start of June 2020, all citizen complaints are assigned a complaint number by Internal Affairs for accurate tracking. Final phase of the implementation of an...
    EASTON, Md. (WJZ) — Anyone who refuses to wear a face mask in Talbot County, Maryland could be fined up to $1,000 for failing to do so. The Talbot County Council voted 4 to 1 Tuesday to reinforce Gov. Larry Hogan’s expansion of the statewide coronavirus mask mandate, adding a hefty fine to the mix. This fine also applies to businesses that violate the governor’s directives. “These measures take effect immediately,” says Council President Corey Pack. “We are working to keep everyone as safe as possible and are continuing to closely follow the governor’s Maryland Strong Roadmap to Recovery.” The council also considered other legislative measures that could address the county’s escalation number of COVID-19 cases. CORONAVIRUS RESOURCES:  People ‘Trying To Find Loopholes’ To Avoid Wearing Masks, Face Coverings, Baltimore Officials Say Coronavirus Resources: How To Get Help In Maryland TIMELINE: Coronavirus In Maryland, Tracking The...
    REUTERS/Eric MillerA woman carrying her child walking on Chicago Avenue painted with the names of people killed by police near the site of the murder of George Floyd.The Minneapolis City Council, led by Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins and Council Member Phillipe Cunningham, is following other cities and counties in declaring racism a public health emergency. Approving this resolution [PDF] was a first step in acknowledging pervasive structural racism within Minneapolis institutions as a driving force in the lack of safety, premature loss of life, and health inequities experienced by Black and brown communities. Minneapolis City Council Vice President Andrea JenkinsA deep body of research links experiences of racism and the associated stress and trauma to changes in the body and brain that profoundly impact the well-being of Black people in particular. Racism contributes to health disparities in Minnesota between Blacks and whites, including early death, doubled infant mortality rates,...
    By ROXANA HEGEMAN, Associated Press BELLE PLAINE, Kan. (AP) — The Kansas State Finance Council has allocated more than $254 million of federal coronavirus relief funds mostly toward efforts to slow the spread of COVID-19 and boost the state's economy. The group's unanimous approval on Wednesday slated the federal funds for public health, education and economic development proposals as recommended by the executive committee of the Strengthening People and Revitalizing Kansas task force. “I want to thank the State Finance Council for approving these funds that will provide aid to Kansans who need it the most, help mitigate the spread of COVID-19 and accelerate our economic recovery,” Gov. Laura Kelly said Thursday in a news release. “Both rural and urban areas of our state will benefit from these dollars.” More than $100.9 million is going toward public health. Economic development proposals will get $78.6 million, education will receive about $74.9...
    (CNN)Greg Fischer, the mayor of Louisville, Kentucky, recommended that the city's Metro Council pass a resolution declaring racism a public health crisis on Wednesday.In a release provided to CNN, Fischer expressed his desire to partner with the Council to jointly condemn racism beyond an executive order or ordinance that he could otherwise enact on his own."Identifying and working to eliminate structural racism has been a priority for me and my team for over a decade, but there's much more to be done," Fischer said. "Now, as we see people in our streets and in streets across the nation demanding fundamental change, we must have a new sense of urgency to make this declaration and do the hard work of dismantling racism and creating real transformation. I look forward to partnering with Council on this work." A key miscalculation by officers contributed to the tragic death of Breonna TaylorTwo members of...
    The Montgomery County, Maryland, Council held a marathon legislative day Tuesday with action on more than 19 items, including a plan to pump funding into a health initiative aimed at tackling the spread of COVID-19 and calling for a vote-by-mail election in November. The council approved $72 million in cuts to the fiscal year 2021 budget, part of the impact of the financial fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic. During discussions, council members referred to the move as a “savings plan” designed to blunt the effects of a possible shortfall of $600 million in tax revenue. More than $43 million was slashed from the operating budget, while another $28 million was cut from the capital improvements budget. More Coronavirus News Sign up for WTOP alerts Latest coronavirus test results in DC, Maryland and Virginia Northam orders new COVID-19 limits for Hampton Roads area Delaware beach towns ‘disappointed’ to see state...
    (CNN)Local politicians in Vancouver, Canada, are pushing to change its policing strategies, after its City Council passed a motion that would limit police response to mental health, substance abuse and other nonviolent issues -- working instead to fund a community-led initiative.The council's Standing Committee on Policy and Strategic Priorities approved the motion, titled "Decriminalizing Poverty and Supporting Community-led Safety Initiatives," on Monday, after being introduced by Councillor Jean Swanson earlier this month. "The City of Vancouver is committed to using an equity lens on social issues which include issues relating to police services," the motion reads, also noting that current policing practices disproportionately criminalize Black and Indigenous communities. The motion asks the police board to itemize the work they do relating to mental health, homelessness, drug use and sex work, with the associated costs. The plan then is to create "community-based harm reduction and safety services," with input from organizations...
    ARGYLE, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – Argyle Mayor Donald Moser has announced his resignation due to health issues. Mayor Moser has been battling cancer since 2017, shortly after being elected mayor, the city said in a news release. “I have worked my hardest to fulfill the expectations of my office,” Moser said in his resignation letter. “I am now facing more intense treatment and do not feel that I will be able to fulfill these obligations to the high expectations the citizens and town staff deserve”. Argyle Mayor Donald Moser (credit: Town of Argyle) Mayor Pro Tem Cynthia Hermann said the Argyle Town Council is grateful to Moser for his years of service to the town. “During his time serving Argyle, Don has led us through a number of challenges,” Hermann said. “He embodies strong leadership and has been a wonderful mentor to me during our time working together, despite battling ongoing...
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