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    HAVERTOWN, Pa. (CBS) — The pandemic has impacted everyone, but especially children with special needs who do best when they follow a routine. Eyewitness News sat down with a Delaware County mom and her son to share at-home strategies every parent can use and to celebrate home-team heroes everywhere. “He was used to having the bus come every day. He was used to having a certain routine at school,” mother Christine Kobielnik said. READ MORE: Penn-Delco School District Approves Diversity Committee After Sparking Controversy With Board Member Kobielnik has seen the upheaval COVID has created for her 18-year-old son, Patrick, who is autistic and non-verbal. “He needed that structure,” Kobielnik said. Pre-pandemic, Patrick had a steady schedule that included school and social activities. All of that came to a sudden stop in mid-March of last year. “Being home and doing virtual and all of these different things was an enormous...
    This content was republished with permission from WTOP’s news partners at Maryland Matters. Sign up for Maryland Matters’ free email subscription today. Many students have experienced academic and social challenges while learning from home, but trying to replicate school for special-needs children has been an especially confounding undertaking that some Maryland lawmakers are trying to alleviate. Hundreds of students who requested an assessment for special education service eligibility were left hanging, Lori Scott, a parent, told the House Ways and Means Committee this week. Some started the school year in the fall not knowing whether they had special needs accommodations or not, she said. A federal law called the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act gives every child the right to services necessary to learn, and children with disabilities are given an Individualized Education Program (IEP), a written plan that details how a school would meet student’s unique needs. But before...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- In-person learning for students with special needs will not resume at Los Angeles Unified School District schools after the state Supreme Court rejected a lawsuit filed by two children's rights organizations.The suit sought to force the LAUSD to resume learning on campuses for those students.In its petition, Los Angeles non-profits Alliance for Children's Rights and Learning Rights Law Center claimed that the district violated a state law that requires schools to offer in-person instruction and provide "the appropriate resources to avoid learning loss, prevent behavioral regression, and protect students' mental health and well-being."But the state's highest court disagreed and didn't offer any comment on the decision.LAUSD Superintendent Austin Beutner last month suspended all in-person instruction and child-care programs in response to surging COVID-19 cases.EMBED More News Videos A planned suspension of all in-person instruction and child care in the Los Angeles Unified School District took effect...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Some Chicago Public Schools teachers returned to the classroom for the first time Monday as the district prepares to return to in-person learning for students later this month.With temperatures hovering below freezing, some teachers at Brentano Math & Science Academy bundled up and set up tables and computers outside so they could still teach virtually."It's chilly, but the parents are incredibly supportive," said Kirstin Roberts, a pre-K teacher at Brentano.The teachers reported to school, but refused to step inside- opting instead to teach from outside as many said they still did not feel that it was safe to enter the building.Teachers at Brentano Math & Science Academy dressed in layers and taught their students remotely outside their Logan Square school building in below freezing temperatures."I don't want to be forced to choose between my job and my health," Roberts said. "I don't want to catch this disease,...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — As New York City schools operate remotely, some parents say a city day care program is turning away students with special needs. Last week, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced children of essential workers were to be given priority. However, in a story only on CBS2, one mom told reporter Lisa Rozner on Sunday that’s not what happened to her. Criminal defense attorney and single mom Kristin Bruan still has to go to court, some days in person, others at home, but even remotely she cannot do her job as a public defender for the Legal Aid Society and watch after her 9-year-old daughter, Alice, at the same time. “A 9-year-old child should not be hearing about the things that I am talking about with my clients,” Bruan said. MORE: Sudden Switch To Remote Learning Means Particular Challenge For Students With Special Needs Because Alice has ADHD and...
    Parents of children with special needs fear the indefinite school shutdown will have devastating consequences for their kids, who rely on in-person learning for skills that can’t be taught on a screen. Parents described the heart-wrenching difficulty of trying to get children who receive special education services to sit in front of a computer for school and therapy. “For us it’s not inconvenient, it’s devastating,” said Julia DeBlasio Olsheski, a data analyst who has a 7-year-old third grader in a specialized autism program run by the Department of Education. “I’ve had to hold him like I am a human straitjacket just to keep him in front of the computer,” said Olsheski, who estimates her son has only received 18 of the normally 60 sessions of occupational, speech and physical therapies he usually receives by this time in the school year. Some of the occupational and physical therapies the city offers...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – The sudden switch to remote learning in New York City public schools is a major setback for students with special needs. City stats show more than half were enrolled for in-person learning, likely because they rely on support services that can’t be replicated through a screen. As CBS2’s Lisa Rozner reports, 16-year-old Jacob Sanchez is on the autism spectrum and adjusting, yet again, to remote learning. More: Mayor De Blasio Under Fire As New York City Public Schools Return To All-Remote Learning Via Zoom, Rozner asked how he and his mom felt. “How’d you feel about that?” his mom Carmen said. “I don’t know how I feel about that,” Jacob said. Showing how much more he thrives off in-person interaction, when the same question was posed in person, he elaborated. “Still not my thing, but I’d rather be in in-person class for this kind of stuff....
    Parents of children with special needs fear the indefinite school shutdown will have devastating consequences for their kids, who rely on in-person learning for skills that can’t be taught on a screen. Parents described the heart-wrenching difficulty of trying to get children who receive special education services to sit in front of a computer for school and therapy. “For us it’s not inconvenient, it’s devastating,” said Julia DeBlasio Olsheski, a data analyst who has a 7-year-old third grader in a specialized autism program run by the Department of Education. “I’ve had to hold him like I am a human straitjacket just to keep him in front of the computer,” said Olsheski, who estimates her son has only received 18 of the normally 60 types of occupational, speech and physical therapies he usually receives by this time in the school year. Some of the occupational and physical therapies the city offers...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- More than two-thirds of Los Angeles Unified School District parents say their children with special needs cannot learn and progress effectively through distance learning, according to a new survey.The survey was conducted over the last month by Speak UP, an organization that helps parents navigate special education. The goal of the survey was to learn how students with special needs have been impacted by distance learning amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.Additionally, 74% of those parents surveyed reported regressive behavior in their children."He actually started, you know, hurting himself... like self-injurious behaviors that he hadn't done in three years," said Carla Suarez-Capdet.Speak UP says that by not providing services required by IEP's, or individualized education programs, LAUSD is not complying with federal law. For example, providing behavior specialists."Even private agencies that are contracted by LAUSD who are saying, 'I have aides who are ready and willing to...
    BOSTON (CBS) – When Cristina and Michael Colanti got the news their daughters’ schools would switch back to fully remote learning after only three weeks of a hybrid model, they were in shock. “It’s shameful this is where we’re at right now,” Michael said. Cristina Colanti told WBZ she spent the whole day crying once she got the news. They have two daughters. Maia, age seven, has been learning remotely since March. Mae, age four, has Downs syndrome, and was allowed to return to school two days a week in the district-wide hybrid model as a “high needs” student. She was supposed to return to four days a week in person on Thursday, October 22. Maia and Mae (WBZ-TV) Wednesday morning, Mayor Marty Walsh announced that Boston schools would switch to all remote learning effective Thursday after the city saw a 5.7 percent COVID-19 positive rate. In the month of...
    CHICAGO (AP) — After seeing a significant drop in the number of pre-kindergarten and special education students enrolled in its online classes, the Chicago Public Schools on Friday announced that many of those children would return to the classroom by the end of December. “It is evident that online learning is not working for many of our students, and we must explore every possible opportunity to safely bring students back to school," CPS officials said in a letter to parents that was posted on its web site. CPS, which said all students would continue remote learning when the second quarter starts next month, did not indicate a specific date of when it would start phasing back to in-person instruction for their “most vulnerable” children. But it noted that administrators would make a decision in the next few weeks after consulting with public health officials. The district added that it hopes...
    DENVER (CBS4) – As Denver puts off, again, a return to in-person learning for upper grade levels, the cost of learning at home is being weighed for all students. Nowhere is it possibly more difficult than among “multi-intensive” classes and dealing with children with special needs. Deronn Turner knows it well. She and her husband have been trying to ensure their 10-year-old daughter Shepsira can learn. “For children with special needs — depending on what they have or what they’re dealing with — for her having Down Syndrome, the transition is very challenging for her. Because her being in the classroom gives her a consistent way of functioning all the time,” Turner said. There have been fits and starts learning at home. A computer is no substitute for human contact, no matter how well designed the program. “I love my daughter dearly, but she doesn’t have impulse control,” explained her...
    BOSTON (CBS) – Parents of Boston Public Schools’ students have whiplash over the back-and-forth plans of their kids’ education as the district navigates the uncharted waters of teaching 54,000 students in a pandemic. As the school year started, they were entirely remote. Then, a hybrid plan began on October 1, allowing the district’s most high-need students back into the buildings two days a week. Now, it’s unclear what’ll be next. “I think there’s a very real concern these kids might not even be in school this year,” Michael Colanti of West Roxbury told WBZ. His 7-year-old daughter Maia is learning remotely as a student at the Patrick Lyndon Elementary School. His four-year-old daughter Mae, who has Down syndrome, is learning in person two days a week at the William W. Henderson Inclusion School in Dorchester. Maia and Mae (WBZ-TV) “It gives her structure and routine, things that unfortunately we’re unable...
    (CNN)Virtual learning facilitator is a full-time job these days for Alicia Burgstahler.The Philadelphia woman, 39, is mother to two children, a 16-year-old son named Jaydon Scott and a 12-year-old daughter named Oliviah Scott. Both kids are sheltering in place due to the coronavirus pandemic. Both kids are in public school full time, online. Both kids have special needs that necessitate special accommodations for education — Jaydon is severely autistic and has Tourette syndrome, while Oliviah struggles with mild autism.In a typical year, Burgstahler's children would receive additional support at their respective schools — her nonverbal son in the form of an aide who is with him all day, her daughter with a counselor as needed. Before the pandemic, Jaydon Scott, who is severely autistic, would be assisted by a school aide. With online schooling from home in Philadelphia, his mother, Alicia Burgstahler, must fill that support role.But because this year...
    MANTECA (CBS13) — School can already be a bear for little ones, but add distance learning into the mix for preschoolers with special needs and there’s a whole new set of challenges. “They would just reject, reject the whole idea. They would have a meltdown. They’re very finicky in that point. They want the interaction,” said mom Cherie Brimhall. That’s why her boys, six-year-old Noah and four-year-old Jeremiah have new tools. Manteca Unified School officials expanded their focus, now making sure preschool students with special needs also have a device for distance learning. “Giving them the ability to have that one-on-one interaction with their teacher or speech therapist or occupational therapist is critical especially during this time. You know we can send packets home but that doesn’t really help when you can’t see what’s going on with a particular student,” said Special Education Director Jody Burriss. READ: Colusa Student Says Teacher...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Chicago Public School students are out of classrooms for now, and while we've heard of a lot of challenges with remote learning, not all of those challenges are the same.One family is now speaking out about how they are trying to navigate a return to learning for their child with special needs.Through an iPad, Antwuan Staton's teacher speaks to him in class. While the 13-year-old may look comfortable, learning from a screen has been extremely challenging for him and his parents.RELATED: CPS parents frustrated with remote learning 1 week into year, schools work to track down absent studentsEMBED More News Videos "I feel like I'm an overworked non-payed CPS employee at this point." Antwuan has cerebral palsy. He is non-verbal and has many physical limitations."Trying to keep a diverse learner still for those hours, we do get breaks, but this is almost impossible to keep his attention,"...
    As a fall semester of virtual learning has begun amid the coronavirus pandemic, many students and parents across the D.C. region have faced the same set of challenges. But parents of special education students in Virginia’s Loudoun County said distance learning has been especially hard for their children. The Loudoun County School Board held its regular meeting Tuesday night to cap the first day of the new school year. “Students and educators missed seeing each other in person and at the same time there clearly was significant enthusiasm regarding the start of the school year,” said Loudoun County School Superintendent Eric Williams. During the public comments period, some parents spoke out about the challenges of distance learning. Parents of special education students brought up some of the unique difficulties online learning poses for special needs students. “I am alone during the day and cannot provide the adequate help and assistance...
    BOSTON (CBS) – Outside the Boston Public Schools headquarters and under the rain Thursday afternoon, parents and teachers of Boston Public Schools students rallied to push for more in-person learning for students considered “high need.” The current plan for Boston Public Schools includes bringing students back to the classroom in a hybrid model, with students attending in person classes two days a week starting October 1. If space becomes available, that could eventually translate to four days a week. According to the district plan, it prioritizes students considered high need: those with special needs, learning disabilities, homeless students, and English language learners. Students who attend three exclusive special needs schools in the city will go to school four days a week starting October 12. Some parents and teachers say that two days a week of in person learning is not enough. “Special needs and high needs students in particular...
    DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – A whiteboard, composition notebook, markers, pencils and fidget widgets. These are the types of supplies Kylie Bennett says her students with special needs need for online learning. “Staring at a screen, having eye contact all of the time can be really difficult,” she said. “It helps for them to have something more concrete to work with.” Kylie Bennett – teacher (CBS 11) However, as a Teach for America teacher at KIPP Destiny Middle School in south Oak Cliff, sadly most started the year without. Knowing many of her families could not afford these supplies, she started a fundraiser online and in just a few weeks was able to raise $1,500, enough for 62 kits. She spent the holiday weekend hand-delivering them. “They’re excited about school again and just being able to bring that joy that we bring in the classroom virtually has been a really great opportunity,”...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – Many families are facing a big challenge adjusting to the new normal at schools this year. CBS2’s Kristine Johnson reports the changes can be even harder on students with special needs. “What I do know, is I’m terrified,” said Maria Lorenz, who has two sons with autism. Lorenz isn’t alone. For parents of children with special needs, back to school during the coronavirus pandemic brings an extra layer of anxiety when it comes to health and safety. “I don’t know that they will take the necessary precautions, as children. I don’t know that the adults will be as precautious as I’ve been with them,” said Lorenz. Her sons, Daniel, 10; and Robert, 12, will continue with remote learning, for now. COMPLETE COVERAGE: Schools: The New Normal Lorenz said both boys have shown signs of academic and social regression since being forced out of the classroom. “They...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — It’s a trying time for families with young children, but families of children with special needs feel especially hard hit with both remote learning and most health services online. Remote learning for 5-year-old Holton can be hard for his dad, Eric Weingrad, to watch. “The problem is, with my son and kids like Holton, is they are not aware of the world around them, so an iPad is just not sufficient,” Eric Weingrad said. Holton, who is blind and cannot walk or talk, started his first year at a Los Angele Unified School District school just last year. “He heard the kids,” Weingrad said. “He could feel the rumbling of the floor as they ran around. He could hear the teachers and feel their touch, and all that is gone.” Adriane Ransom’s 5-year-old son George has poor vision and physical and cognitive delays. He started kindergarten...
    By Kathleen Ronayne, Associated Press SACRAMENTO (AP) — More California children with specialized needs, such as students with disabilities or those who are homeless, will be allowed back in classrooms even as most schools remain shut for in-person learning under new state guidance released Tuesday.  Schools in most counties are closed for in-person learning because of the coronavirus. But the new guidance would allow the return to school for some children in grades K-12 in groups of up to 14 students. The limited return to school applies to students needing special care, such those with disabilities, English language learners, kids at risk of abuse or neglect or students who are homeless. It’s aimed at ensuring the students can access services like occupational therapy, speech and language services and individualized education programs. Statewide, counties can begin reopening schools for all children if they are off a state watch list that tracks...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — More California children with specialized needs, such as students with disabilities or those who are homeless, will be allowed back in classrooms even as most schools remain shut for in-person learning under new state guidance released Tuesday. Schools in most counties are closed for in-person learning because of the coronavirus. But the new guidance would allow the return to school for some children in grades K-12 in groups of up to 14 students. The limited return to school applies to students needing special care, such those with disabilities, English language learners, kids at risk of abuse or neglect or students who are homeless. It’s aimed at ensuring the students can access services like occupational therapy, speech and language services and individualized education programs. Statewide, counties can begin reopening schools for all children if they are off a state watch list that tracks virus cases, infection rates...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — As the upcoming school year approaches, a Baltimore area preschool program for children with special needs is gearing up to welcome students back into classrooms despite the coronavirus pandemic. PACT’s Pre-K Classroom is an affiliate organization of the Kennedy Krieger Institute, offering a full-day educational program in an inclusive setting. The program is designed to meet the individual needs of children who have medical conditions requiring daily nursing care and children with developmental disabilities who require multiple therapies. “Our whole system is set up to be play-based, to be engaging for children, to be a safe place for families to bring their children,” program director Sharon Holloway said. CORONAVIRUS RESOURCES:  Coronavirus Resources: How To Get Help In Maryland TIMELINE: Coronavirus In Maryland, Tracking The Spread Latest coronavirus stories from WJZ Latest CDC Guidelines The school also opens...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — Working full time and trying to make sure a special needs student is learning – it’s a tough task, and parents from Chicago to Northwest Indiana are worried their schools will not be able to provide the help they will need. CBS 2’s Tim McNicholas on Monday showed us how some facilities are handling it. For the Martin family of Munster, Indiana, the kitchen is also the classroom. And that’s not always easy. “I have two kids in special ed,” said Tracie Martin. Martin’s kids were part of the local school district – the School Town of Munster. This year, she instead enrolled them in an online charter school. “They have flexible online scheduling options,” Martin said. “We have great extended breaks in between session. I can watch a recorded lesson later.” Martin asked Munster for extended breaks and recorded lessons that she could go over with...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The third legislative session of the year has begun at the Capitol, and one topic Minnesota lawmakers discussed Wednesday morning was how students will safely start the school year. In a virtual hearing, Minnesota Department of Education officials laid out their plans to a committee of lawmakers. Education Commissioner Mary Cathryn Ricker said that all districts must have a plan for distance learning, in-person learning and hybrid learning. Several groups voiced concerns during the hearing. The National Alliance on Mental Illness said that children who are currently feeling isolated might need more mental health services. Also, parents of children with special needs said they could use more support. Questions were also raised on the possibility of updating school ventilation systems and how children experiencing hunger will get access to food. According to the Education Department’s plan, the priority will be to get young...
    FORT LAUDERDALE (CBSMiami) — Broward County Public Schools will restart the new school year on August 19, and it will be online only due to the coronavirus pandemic. But on Tuesday, during remarks to a special meeting of the county’s School Board on Tuesday, Superintendent Robert Runcie announced they are looking at the possibility of special needs students having some face-to-face learning, instead of 100 percent eLearning. “I have directed staff to look at a pilot program if we can find students and teachers who are willing. It would start August 31,” said Runcie in response to some parents of special needs students who have complained that distance learning doesn’t work for their children. “This pilot effort will allow us to better learn and understand the issues and challenges which may come up and how we can mitigate them from this effort, and hopefully with improved pandemic conditions, we will be...
    A Michigan teenager held in juvenile detention since mid-May for violating probation by failing to complete her online coursework was freed on Friday. The 15-year-old girl, identified only as Grace, was released to her mother at around 5 p.m. after the Michigan Court of Appeals overruled her initial sentence, ProPublica Illinois reported. She spent 78 days at a juvenile facility in Pontiac after an Oakland County family court judge revoked her probation on previous charges of assault and theft, ProPublica reported earlier this month. Judge Mary Ellen Brennan deemed her a “threat to the community” because she had failed to turn in assignments when her schools switched to remote learning amid the coronavirus pandemic. The case involving Grace, a black special-needs student who suffers from ADHD, drew national concerns over the juvenile court system and allegations of racial bias. More than 300,000 people signed an online petition calling for her...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — For a lot of families, distance learning is hardly ideal. Though it’s especially hard for those with students who need extra help. A number of parents reached out to CBS13 wondering how children with special needs will be able to handle another round of distance learning. “He was kind of left to do these assignments without any help,” said Ellen Skinner, whose son has autism and ADHD, among other things. For her son David, school is already a challenge. But now with miles between the classroom and David, it makes matter worse. Skinner said hearing from teachers last spring was stressful. “’David is missing 12 assignments – he’s not done any work and he’s now failing the class.’ I’d be like – what?” Skinner said. Other parents such as Heidi Kuehner said last spring she knew schools were in crisis mode, with no help for her non-verbal...
    Two California parents suing their Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom to reopen schools for in-person learning explained Friday that they’re concerned about their children. In an interview on “Fox & Friends,” Christine Ruiz told host Ainsley Earhardt that she has been listening to physicians and pediatricians across the country who say it is “essential” for kids to return to classrooms. “And especially for my two sons who have special needs, both are diagnosed with autism — one with severe, one with mild it — it is essential. It is imperative,” she said. “Regression is dangerous and profound for them. So, it’s definitely something that we thought we needed to fight for.” Jesse Petrilla, a father of two boys, noted the damage shuttered schools have caused for both parents like him and their children. “This [is] an issue that broadly affects all parents across the board. It doesn’t matter [what] political...
    Two California parents suing their Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom to reopen schools for in-person learning explained Friday that they’re concerned about their children. In an interview on “Fox & Friends,” Christine Ruiz told host Ainsley Earhardt that she has been listening to physicians and pediatricians across the country who say it is “essential” for kids to return to classrooms. “And especially for my two sons who have special needs, both are diagnosed with autism — one with severe, one with mild it — it is essential. It is imperative,” she said. “Regression is dangerous and profound for them. So, it’s definitely something that we thought we needed to fight for.” Jesse Petrilla, a father of two boys, noted the damage shuttered schools have caused for both parents like him and their children. “This [is] an issue that broadly affects all parents across the board. It doesn’t matter [what] political party...
    SAN JOSE, Calif. (KGO) -- Many uncertainties remain when it comes to what the upcoming school year might look like.It's known that counties on the state's coronavirus watch list are all preparing for a distance learning start. However, that approach is not fit for all students.ABC7 News introduced viewers to 6-year-old Jacob Tran. He was diagnosed with global development delay.Similar to many students, parents and teachers across the state, his class of six with severe special needs will be distance learning only in the fall.Now his mother, Christin Tran, is desperate to find in-person options.RELATED: 'It will take a village': New 'learning hub' program could help thousands of SF students with distance learning this fall"I think that even if it's just two days in person, it would really greatly be beneficial for Jacob, who can't focus in front of a Zoom meeting for more than two minutes before throwing a...
    Two California parents suing their Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom to reopen schools for in-person learning explained Friday that they're concerned about their children. In an interview on "Fox & Friends," Christine Ruiz told host Ainsley Earhardt that she has been listening to physicians and pediatricians across the country who say it is "essential" for kids to return to classrooms. CDC ROLLS OUT TOOLS FOR SCHOOLS TO REOPEN SAFELY DURING CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK: 'CRITICALLY IMPORTANT' "And especially for my two sons who have special needs, both are diagnosed with autism -- one with severe, one with mild it -- it is essential. It is imperative," she said. "Regression is dangerous and profound for them. So, it's definitely something that we thought we needed to fight for." Jesse Petrilla, a father of two boys, noted the damage shuttered schools have caused for both parents like him and their children. Video"This [is] an issue that broadly affects all parents across the board. It doesn't matter [what]...
    School districts across the country have abandoned special education kids amid the coronavirus crisis, according to a class action Manhattan federal lawsuit slated to be filed Friday. The case argues that districts ignored federal law by failing to provide legally mandated services to kids who suffer from mental and physical deficits after the closure of schools in March. “These school districts violated the rights of 6.7 million students across the country by altering their educational programs,” said parent and activist Patrick Donohue. “They put the burden on parents to do the job of these school districts.” The case names Mayor Bill de Blasio, Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza and districts across the country as defendants. Backers of the suit will release radio ads in New York to draw attention to the ongoing plight of special education parents. Two hundred families in 10 states have signed on as plaintiffs so far,...
    School districts across the country have abandoned special education kids amid the coronavirus crisis, according to a class action Manhattan federal lawsuit slated to be filed Friday. The case argues that districts ignored federal law by failing to provide legally mandated services to kids who suffer from mental and physical deficits after the closure of schools in March. “These school districts violated the rights of 6.7 million students across the country by altering their educational programs,” said parent and activist Patrick Donohue. “They put the burden on parents to do the job of these school districts.” The case names Mayor Bill de Blasio, Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza and districts across the country as defendants. Backers of the suit will release radio ads in New York to draw attention to the ongoing plight of special education parents. Twenty families in 10 states have signed on as plaintiffs so far, arguing that...
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