Tuesday, Mar 02, 2021 - 03:38:28
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    EAST LONGMEADOW (CBS) – A team of nine students from Birchland Park Middle School in East Longmeadow won a regional Future City competition for their creation that is out of this world. The group of creative young minds presented their design for a city on the surface of the moon. It’s made up of all recycled materials. The students went up against three other New England schools during a virtual competition last weekend and won. READ MORE: Heres Whats Not Reopening In March When Massachusetts Begins Phase 4 “We really all put our heads together, and it was a really big group effort that we all agreed on all the ideas. It was never like, one person said like, ‘Let’s do this,’ and then other people were like, ‘No,’ and then we did it anyway,” one of the students said. READ MORE: Boston Will Wait Until After St. Patricks Day...
    DENVER (CBS4) – The deadline to opt-out of CMAS testing for Denver Public Schools is this Friday, and it has many still divided over what to do. “I personally opted my 3rd and 4th grader out this year, I probably will not do that next year,” Amy Bergner said. READ MORE: Colorado Lawmakers Discuss Creation Of ‘Health Service Reserve Corps’ Modeled After National Guard (credit: CBS) By now some have already made up their mind, and that means a percentage of kids will not be taking the test, Bergner also happens to be a DPS elementary teacher. “It’s the whole assumption that we’re not doing any testing, and of course we are, we have unit tests, we have term test, we have all of that data,” she said. READ MORE: Big Crash! Bam! Boom!: Trash Truck Backs Into Denver House, Causing Partial Collapse In 2020 the test was canceled because of...
    DENVER (CBS4) – The deadline to opt-out of CMAS testing for Denver Public Schools is this Friday, and it has many still divided over what to do. “I personally opted my 3rd and 4th grader out this year, I probably will not do that next year,” Amy Bergner said. READ MORE: Emergency Declared For SkyWest Flight Landing At Aspen-Pitkin County Airport After Possible Smoke Reported In Cabin (credit: CBS) By now some have already made up their mind, and that means a percentage of kids will not be taking the test,  Bergner also happens to be a DPS elementary teacher. “It’s the whole assumption that we’re not doing any testing, and of course we are, we have unit tests, we have term test, we have all of that data,” she said. READ MORE: Fort Collins Teacher Lucky To Be Alive After Ex-Boyfriend Hides In Crawl Space & Attacks Her In...
    The latest episode of Fox Nation's "Crime Stories with Nancy Grace" examines allegations of abuse at the Provo Canyon School for troubled teens in Utah made by Paris Hilton and others. Former student Jeremy Whiteley tells host Nancy Grace that students couldn't speak out about the alleged abuse and if they did, they "got in a lot of trouble for it." Whiteley recalls that he was sent to Provo Canyon at the age of 15. "I wasn't getting along with my parents, they sent me to a therapist and a therapist suggested I go to this boarding school ...," he explains. "It looked like tons of fun and I could do all this fun stuff in Utah, all the outdoor recreation, and so I wanted to go. I asked my parents to send me there." PARIS HILTON DETAILS ALLEGED ABUSE AT UTAH BOARDING SCHOOL FOR THE FIRST TIME: 'CONTINUOUS TORTURE' When Whiteley arrived at the school,...
    (CNN)Two years after Calvin Tyler first enrolled at Morgan State College, he had to drop out because he couldn't afford it.He took a job as a UPS driver, one of the first 10 in Baltimore. Now -- almost 40 years later -- Tyler has made the largest-ever private donation from an alumnus to the historically Black school, now Morgan State University, it announced Tuesday. Tyler and his wife, Tina, committed $20 million, with the money going to an already-established endowed scholarship fund in their name. The Calvin and Tina Tyler Endowed Scholarship Fund, established in 2002, initially gave full tuition need-based scholarships to students in Baltimore, Tyler's hometown, and has since been expanded to benefit students from anywhere. College in America could be changed foreverWith millions unemployed because of the pandemic, it's gotten harder for many families to pay for college. And schools are struggling, too, with loss of income...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — While they may be coming at a strange time of year, the first day of school jitters are very real in several local school districts returning to their classrooms for the first time this year. Sure, parents may find themselves feeling a bit relieved, but for the kids it can be a time of high anxiety. READ MORE: Tree Of Life Congregation Donates Supplies To The Wilkinsburg School District Dr. Allison Bashe is a Psychologist and the Clinical Director for New Horizons Counseling Services. She says those concerns could have roots in several places. “The most important thing you can do when someone shares a concern is to validate how the person is feeling, meet them where there are.” In other words don’t dismiss your child fears with a quick ‘Oh, you’ll be okay.’ Dr. Bashe says, “Sometimes we rush too quickly to say it’s going to...
    Across Minnesota today, students are returning to school after months of distance learning. As they do, a growing number of educational leaders and commentators across the country are arguing that schools should focus first on addressing the “learning loss” that students likely suffered since schools closed last spring due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The policies being proposed include: extended summer school, year-round learning, grade retention, intensive online and in-person tutoring, and boot camps during which students concentrate on making up for lost ground in mastering basic skills. While learning loss is an issue that we must understand and address, young people’s path out of the pandemic should not begin with boot camps. Starting with that strategy would only exacerbate the inequities that the COVID-19 pandemic has already laid bare. But if focusing on learning loss is not the right way to help students return to school, what is? A wide...
    Students at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst have been banned from walking around campus or hanging out in each other's dorm rooms as cases of COVID-19 surge on campus. Campus officials have ordered students to self-sequester 'at the encouragement of state public health officials,' according to the school's website.  Students who leave campus for any reason may not be able to return, and students planning to leave campus have been directed to email the school for 'guidance and instruction concerning your final move-out.' 'It may further spread the virus through your travel and would also require additional isolation/quarantine time and resources,' according to the website. Students who remain on campus are expected to stay in their rooms 'at all times.' According to the school, there were 51 new cases reported on February 10. The school has a total of 500 active cases with a 7-day cumulative positivity rate of...
    TV and streaming picks for Thursday, Feb. 11 WATCH THIS: “Walker” (8 p.m., The CW): Micki is uncomfortable with the spotlight Captain James puts on her during a current investigation. Walker talks to Liam about their parents and learns there was trouble while he was away. Trey applies for a new job in town while Stella starts community service and August  stumbles upon some secrets from his father’s time away undercover. “Hell’s Kitchen” (8 p.m., Fox): The Red Team gets to choose which member of the Blue Team they would like to go head-to-head with in a challenge to reinterpret classic Italian dishes. Later, the chefs get a surprise when Hell’s Kitchen hosts diners who will later be part of the audience at the Pen & Teller magic show. “Call Me Kat” (9 p.m., Fox): When Randi’s cousin comes to town, Kat and Phil convince Randi to let them...
    A Utah charter school that sparked national controversy when it decided to allow parents to opt their students out of the Black History Month curriculum has now changed course. As The Hill reported, the Maria Montessori Academy faces sharp criticism when it posted a notice saying that children did not have to take part in the curriculum honoring the contributions of Black Americans. The message was originally posted on the school’s private Facebook page, but quickly found its way into national news. School director Micah Hirokawa said that he came to the decision reluctantly after a few families had asked not to participate, but has now gone back on the decision. In a letter shared with The Hill, Hirokawa said that celebrating Black History Month is a school tradition and that the school regrets initially sending parents a letter saying they could choose not to have their students participate. “We...
    Empty Classroom In Elementary School. Education Images/Universal Images Group/Getty Images A Utah school faces backlash over letting parents opt kids out of Black History Month lessons. The choice was announced in a Facebook post by the school's director first reported by the Standard-Examiner. Out of 322 students at the academy, only three — less than 1% — identify as Black, the AP reported. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Maria Montessori Academy in North Ogden, Utah, is facing backlash after allowing parents the option to opt their child out of lessons relating to Black History Month. The decision was announced in a private Facebook post by the school's director, Micah Hirokawa, according to local news outlet the Standard-Examiner.  "A few families" decided not to participate in the teachings related to Black History Month, Hirokawa wrote in the post, though he did not tell the Standard-Examiner exactly how...
    The parents made, in the first week of the pre-registration process for the school year 2021-2022, the registration of 70 thousand minors in the online and face-to-face modalities in the Educational Development Coordinations (Cordes), for preschool, primary and secondary levels. According to information from the Secretary of Public Education, the pre-registration process for more than 10 thousand public education schools in Puebla, this year, could exceed the pre-registration figures of 2020, the year in which 188 thousand 200 new students were registered. Parents, as well as tutors, who carry out the online pre-registration process, do so through the page www.sep.puebla.gob.mx, which will be open until February 28 of this year. At the same time, the tutors and parents carry out the pre-registration process in person at one of the 19 Educational Development Coordinations (Cordes), a process that will be open until March 26. The SEP stressed that, in the...
    A Utah charter school that incorporates Black History Month into its lesson plans is now facing backlash from some after the school announced it was allowing parents to opt students out of the curriculum.  Maria Montessori Academy Director Micah Hirokawa announced the decision in a Friday post on the school’s private Facebook page, according to local news outlet the Standard-Examiner.  Hirokawa wrote that he “reluctantly” sent a letter to families stating that administrators were allowing them “to exercise their civil rights to not participate in Black History Month at the school.”  Hirokawa said in the post that “a few families” had asked not to participate in the curriculum, though he declined to tell the Standard-Examiner the exact number of parents who had contacted the school or the reasons they gave for making the request.  The public charter school director, though, added that the demand from parents “deeply saddens and disappoints...
    NORTH OGDEN, Utah (AP) — A charter school in northern Utah that is allowing parents to opt students out of its Black History Month curriculum has sparked a debate over if parents should have the option. Maria Montessori Academy Director Micah Hirokawa said on the school's Facebook page on Friday that he “reluctantly” sent out a letter explaining families are allowed “to exercise their civil rights to not participate in Black History Month at the school,” the Standard-Examiner reported. Hirokawa said “few families” asked not to participate in instruction related to Black History Month. But he declined to say how many parents or their reasons for making the decision. “We should not shield our children from the history of our Nation, the mistreatment of its African American citizens, and the bravery of civil rights leaders, but should educate them about it,” Hirokawa said, adding that the parents' request saddens and...
    A pharmacy graduate student is suing the University of Tennessee for violating her freedom of speech and 'spying' on her after they tried to expel her for allegedly 'vulgar' posts on social media.  Kimberly Diei, 27, was expelled in September by the college's Health and Science Center (UTHSC) after anonymous students twice complained about her photos on Instagram and Twitter, including wear low-cut tops, sticking her tongue out and writing reportedly raunchy rap lyrics inspired by Cardi-B.   Although the college later reversed the decision to avoid court, the doctoral candidate, who is studying for a PhD in nuclear medicine, is fighting back with the help of a pro-bono lawyer and filed a federal lawsuit on Wednesday. The University of Chicago graduate, who now studies at the Tennessee public school's Memphis campus, posts under the pseudonym kimmykasi and called her messages to her 19,500 Instagram followers and 2,000 Twitter followers 'sex...
    Chicago Public Schools (CPS) has backed down on its threat to lock K-8 teachers out of their remote learning tools if they failed to show up at its facilities this week to prepare for the return of in-person classes.  The withdrawal was announced in a joint statement issued Monday night by Mayor Lori Lightfoot and CPS CEO Janice Jackson -- and, for now, appears to avert a potential strike from the Chicago Teachers Union (CTU). Both sides are in a dispute over how to reopen schools safely during the coronavirus pandemic. The union previously threatened that its members would picket if they were denied access to programs they have been using to instruct students remotely.  "We have reached another important milestone today in our efforts to provide in-person learning for our students in the Chicago Public Schools system. We have secured agreement on one other open issue and made substantial progress on a framework that we hope will address the remaining issues," the statement said. "We are calling for a 48-hour cooling off period that will hopefully lead to...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Some students in Philadelphia got the whole day off, while others a half-day to enjoy what was their first real snow day in several years on Monday. “We came here last time when the snow fell and we had a blast!” said Robin Miller about West Philadelphia’s Clark Park. Miller and her two sons joined dozens of other families who flocked to the popular sledding spot as the snow fell. “It’s nice to see. It’s certainly sad when we get lots of years without snow and this is the biggest snow she’s had so far,” said Camden Segal of daughter Lyra. Parents and kids alike agreed — a snow like this was as long overdue. “Our first time in two years, I think,” said Solomon Bellin, who was sledding with his dad, Eric. It wasn’t all play for children who attend Philadelphia public schools. They had to...
    New York City public schools that lost students after families moved or pulled out because of the Covid-19 pandemic now must prepare to return to the city some funding due to enrollment drops. This academic year, the number of students enrolled in the country’s largest school system from grades 3K to 12 is approximately 960,000, down about 43,000, or 4%, from the previous year, according to preliminary city enrollment data. Schools that lost students will have to return a portion of the funding received for each student who left. CHICAGO MAYOR ORDERS TEACHERS TO RETURN TO CLASSROOM AS TUG-OF-WAR WITH UNION INTENSIFIES Jessica Flores remembers seeing the problems brewing in July that will end up costing her school a lot of funding. Within months of the start of the pandemic, droves of families started withdrawing their children from her son’s elementary school — Public School 9 Sarah Smith Garnet — with many moving...
    By Geoff Mulvhill, Adrian Sainz and Michael Kunzelman | Associated Press President Joe Biden says he wants most schools serving kindergarten through eighth grade to reopen by late April, but even if that happens, it is likely to leave out millions of students, many of them minorities in urban areas. “We’re going to see kids fall further and further behind, particularly low-income students of color,” said Shavar Jeffries, president of Democrats for Education Reform. “There’s potentially a generational level of harm that students have suffered from being out of school for so long.” Like some other officials and education advocates, Jeffries said powerful teachers unions are standing in the way of bringing back students. The unions insist they are acting to protect teachers and students and their families. In a call Thursday evening with teachers unions, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the federal government’s top infectious disease expert, said the reopening of...
    While teachers' unions push for remote schooling amid the coronavirus pandemic, the lack of in-person learning is having an impact on students, former Education Secretary Margaret Spellings said on Thursday. "Americans know, we all know there is no recovery without our students back in school. Parents must have those options. Not only is it the right thing for a recovery but gosh, our kids are suffering every day. Their mental health, their learning and these unions are overplaying their hand at this moment. We have to put students ahead of adults," Spellings told "America's Newsroom." CHICAGO PARENTS TOLD NOT TO BRING KIDS TO SCHOOL AS IMPASSE BETWEEN TEACHER'S UNION, DISTRICT CONTINUES Meanwhile, the parents of Chicago public school students were told not to send their children to school Thursday as the stalemate between the school district and teachers union continues over reopening conditions.  Teachers in the nation's third-largest school district decided not to report to schools this...
    DENVER (CBS4) – After a new online poll found nearly 1-in-6 of Denver parents admitted to moving their child out of Denver Public Schools, a coalition of parent groups is urging action. The coalition includes groups Transform Education Now (TEN), African Leadership Group, Stand for Children, and FaithBridge. Two separate studies found students are learning less online, and parents worry kids have fallen behind academically. (credit: iStock/Getty Images) “Parents are frustrated, lost and are in need of a plan,” Transform Education Now stated on its website, prefacing the data. The first study was a scientific poll via an online survey by Keating Research. It was conducted between Jan. 4-10 among 647 parents of a K-12th grade school age child in the city of Denver. Key findings of the Keating poll show: A majority of parents are satisfied with the learning options that DPS is offering Two-thirds of parents feel...
    DENVER (CBS4) – After a new online poll found nearly 1-in-6 of Denver parents admitted to moving their child out of Denver Public Schools, a coalition of parent groups is urging action. The coalition includes groups Transform Education Now (TEN), African Leadership Group, Stand for Children, and FaithBridge. Two separate studies found students are learning less online, and parents worry kids have fallen behind academically. (credit: iStock/Getty Images) “Parents are frustrated, lost and are in need of a plan,” Transform Education Now stated on its website, prefacing the data. The first study was a scientific poll via an online survey by Keating Research. It was conducted between Jan. 4-10 among 647 parents of a K-12th grade school age child in the city of Denver. Key findings of the Keating poll show: A majority of parents are satisfied with the learning options that DPS is offering Two-thirds of parents feel...
    SANGER, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – Traditional school stores might offer snacks and knickknacks, school gear and notebooks – but the one at Linda Tutt High School in Sanger, has a very different inventory and clientele. At Linda Tutt you can get everything from produce, milk and eggs to pasta, peanut butter and canned goods to dishwasher soap and laundry detergent. Students and staff can shop there, but on Tuesdays the store is open to the community. And it’s all free. “I like seeing their smiles, seeing how appreciative they are, and knowing that they are thankful that we’re doing something like this,” said Hunter Weertman, a 16-year-old junior who stocks shelves and takes inventory at the store housed in an unused art room. It has been open since November. The idea is to provide students with job skills, and at the same time help students, staff and local residents who are in...
    Christy Hudson, a Fairfax County, Va. mother of three, told "America’s Newsroom" on Monday that the county’s postponement of in-person learning amid the coronavirus pandemic is "heartbreaking" and "devastating." "We are watching our kids suffer tremendous academic regressions as well as social, emotional and behavioral problems," Hudson said, acknowledging that her two children who are in the public school system and who have not returned to the classroom in more than ten months are "struggling." Her daughter attends private school and has been able to learn in the classroom, she explained. A Washington Examiner editorial published last week titled, "The vaccine has exposed teachers unions' true priorities," argued that Fairfax County is "dragging its feet, even though its vaccination process is in full swing and even though students in the area have had to put up with distance learning since the pandemic broke out in March of last year."...
    DENVER (CBS4) – Multiple children were rushed to the hospital after a hit-and-run crash caused their school bus to topple over on Wednesday. Middle and high school students from HOPE Online Learning Academy were on their bus ride home when the collision took place. (credit: CBS) As Central Park residents near 28th and Havana rushed in to help students get out of the bus, two others started chasing suspects who were running from the scene. Witnesses told CBS4’s Dillon Thomas two vehicles were driving fast through the neighborhood, one chasing the other following a hit-and-run. When they approached the intersection of 28th and Havana, one vehicle hit the bus. The people inside that vehicle ran away. “It was a tremendous collision. He T-boned the van. Knocked it over. The van slid across the street,” one man said. “It was a horrific scene with kids out on the curb crying.” “It...
    Sometimes it’s karaoke. Sometimes it’s multiplayer games like skribbl or Among Us. Whatever it is, middle-school student Tiggerina Virgen never skips her after-school program — even though it means more time on Zoom. During one meeting, Alejandrina Arizmendi-Ruiz, a recent college graduate who runs the sessions, found out that Tiggerina had an F in science. She quickly mobilized support for Tiggerina, making sure she submitted missing work and stayed on track. Tiggerina’s grade rose to a D. Then a C. “I was, like, I’m so proud of you!’” Arizmendi-Ruiz said. “I asked her: ‘So, what helped you change that grade? What are you planning to do next?’” Arizmendi-Ruiz’s intervention at John Liechty Middle School typifies the work of 225 young adults who are embedded in 26 schools throughout Los Angeles County, including Boyle Heights, Inglewood, Pico Union and Watts. They’re part of City Year, a nonprofit tied to AmeriCorps....
    The attorney representing a white college student has accused the University of Tennessee of 'caving in to hysteria' after she was kicked out over a video shared by her black high school classmate showing her using a racial slur when she was 15.  Speaking to Fox News on Monday, Mimi Groves' lawyer Shan Wu said that the school made a 'rush to judgement' after the video of Groves looking into the camera saying ‘I can drive, n*****s’ as she was sitting in traffic went viral. Groves was 15 years old and a high school freshman at the time of making the video in 2016, but it resurfaced this year when her black high school classmate Jimmy Galligan, of Leesburg - who had received the video at the time - posted it publicly.  Groves, a championship-winning cheerleader, was planning to attend the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, whose cheer team were reigning national champions....
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Two of the largest school districts in Minnesota — Anoka-Hennpin and St. Paul — have unveiled their plans to families for the return to full-time, five-days-a-week in-person learning. Officials with Minneapolis Public Schools announced Sunday that they will make an announcement on their re-opening plans sometime during the week of Jan. 4. The Anoka-Hennepin Schools District, the largest in the state, will restart classes for kindergarten through second grade on Tuesday, Jan. 19. Grades three through five will restart on Monday, Feb. 1. Middle school and high school students will continue with distance learning, but can return to in-person learning as conditions allow. Special education students in settings three and four are also expected to return in January on a date that has yet to be set. St. Paul Public Schools Superintendent Joe Gothard sent out a letter Thursday announcing pre-K, kindergarten, first-grade and second-grade student will...
    Parents are pulling their children out of the public school system across the country, sending a message to districts that prolonging remote learning is costing them students.  In Washington, D.C., northern Virginia and Maryland, thousands of children are leaving public schools, the Washington Post reported. Potentially $42 million is at stake in Montgomery County and $35 million in Prince George’s County, since funding is tied to student enrollment. In Wisconsin, a study showed that 34 districts that started the school year with virtual learning saw a 3% decrease in enrollment, while the state’s school enrollment declined 2.67%. Private school choice programs grew by more than 2,700 students as public schools saw declines of 36,000. Corey DeAngelis, an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute’s Center for Educational Freedom and the Director of School Choice at the Reason Foundation, says these trends are appearing across the country as parents seek out alternatives...
    A beloved North Texas nurse who came out of retirement to help teach aspiring frontline workers in the midst of the pandemic has died from the coronavirus.  In September, Iris Meda began teaching Nursing Skills for Collin College at Anna High School and Allen High School. She had retired from the North Texas Job Corps in January after more than 30 years. The 70-year-old nurse contracted COVID-19 while teaching in a class, tested positive for the virus on October 14 and was hospitalized just three days later.  In September, Iris Meda began teaching Nursing Skills for Collin College at Anna High School and Allen High School The 70-year-old nurse contracted COVID-19 while teaching in a class, testing positive for the virus on October 14 She died on November 14, her family shared in a GoFundMe for the nurse's medical bills and funeral expenses.  Her family takes comfort in knowing...
    Dissatisfaction with the NYC public schools in the midst of COVID-19 is driving tens of thousands of families to switch their children to private or parochial schools, homeschool their kids or move out of the city, sources say. City schools have lost 31,000 students, about 3.4 percent of the roughly 1 million enrolled last year, according to preliminary data obtained by the education news site Chalkbeat.org. The DOE’s enrollment has slipped to just over 901,000, Chalkbeat reports. But that number does not include about 130,000 students in charter schools, which are publicly funded, or 50,000 kids in early-childhood programs. Far more NYC students from low-income families than wealthy ones have left or dropped out, although the percentage of exiting kids was higher in the rich schools. At schools where 80 percent of kids come from low-income families, enrollment dropped by 19,000 students, or 4 percent. At the most affluent NYC...
    Amid stalled negotiations between teachers and D.C. Public Schools about how to return students to in-person learning, the local teachers’ union urged educators to call out sick Monday and take a mental health day. It wasn’t clear how many teachers participated, though some principals reportedly had to cancel classes because of teacher shortages. The protest came just as the school system announced it would not reopen elementary school classrooms for most students next week as planned, citing the need to readjust staffing. In a statement Monday, schools Chancellor Lewis Ferebee said, “We have heard feedback from many in our community about” the school system’s reopening plan, “and we will use this moment to adjust our timeline and staffing plans for reopening.” The plan, announced last month, allowed for up to 75% of elementary school students eventually returning to classrooms starting Nov. 9. Washington Teachers’ Union President Elizabeth Davis told WTOP...
    EMMANUEL Macron has vowed that "Islamists will never take our future" after he stood beside the coffin of a teacher slain by a jihadi. Samuel Paty, 47, was beheaded last Friday by a brainwashed fanatic, 18, after he showed his students cartoons featuring the Prophet Muhammad. 10President Macron stands near Samuel Paty's coffin at a memorial service for the teacher who was murdered by a jihadiCredit: AFP 10Macron vowed that terrorists would not 'take out future' in a defiant speechCredit: Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. 10Teacher Samuel Paty was murdered after he showed his students cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad Chechnya-born Abdullakh Anzorov posted a picture of the teacher's severed head online before he was shot dead by police in Paris. Speaking at a memorial event at Sorbonne University, in front of Paty's coffin, President Macron said the teacher was killed by "cowards" for standing for France's...
    A parent is freaking out over a photo showing Omaha, Nebraska, public school students painted red, white, and blue, with the words "world war" spelled out on their chests — and one of them holding a flag supporting President Donald Trump, WOWT-TV reported. What are the details?"I think it was intimidating. I think it was threatening. I think it was racist," parent Erik Christensen told the station regarding the online photo of students who attended an Elkhorn South High School football game recently. "I felt like it was kind of soaked in white supremacy." Image source: WOWT-TV video screenshot Christensen added to WOWT that he was angry and concerned for his stepdaughter. "I literally had to get up this morning, and I had to wonder if she was going to be OK when she went to school because this was the kind of environment that she was...
    An upstate New York dad says his children’s school district is giving them the boot for taking virtual classes from out of state. Jeffrey Emmette, of Auburn, took his three children on vacation to Missouri, but then decided to stay at a relative’s and rent out his home on Airbnb when possible while his two school-age sons do their remote learning on Zoom, Syracuse.com reported. But the single father then received an email from the school district informing him that his sons, Aiden and Tyler, are no longer “entitled” to be enrolled after Oct. 23 since they have no firm date for returning to the state. “Are you kidding me? I never thought there was any problem,” Emmette told the outlet of the district’s decision. “I pay my taxes and my mortgage, and my home is not for sale. I didn’t move. And my kids do all their work...
    An upstate New York dad says his children’s school district is giving them the boot for taking virtual classes from out of state. Jeffrey Emmette, of Auburn, took his three children on vacation to Missouri, but then decided to stay at a relative’s and rent out his home on Airbnb when possible while his two school-age sons do their remote learning on Zoom, Syracuse.com reported. But the single father then received an email from the school district informing him that his sons, Aiden and Tyler, are no longer “entitled” to be enrolled after Oct. 23 since they have no firm date for returning to the state. “Are you kidding me? I never thought there was any problem,” Emmette told the outlet of the district’s decision. “I pay my taxes and my mortgage, and my home is not for sale. I didn’t move. And my kids do all their work on...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Having the right tools is the key to success for students. And now, students in the Mon Valley will have a stash of supplies after a recent supply drive held in part by the Allegheny County Sheriff’s Office. The office partnered with the North Versailles Walmart to donate nearly $5,000 worth of notebooks, pens and other items. The office says the goal is to get deserving families through this pandemic. “[We’re doing this] to help kids out, help students out with supplies,” said Chief Deputy Kevin Kraus of the Allegheny County Sheriff’s Office. “Especially during COVID and these times of need, it’s a pleasure to be able to get together and work collaboratively to help the kids out.” Deputies later delivered the supplies to the McKeesport School District.
    It was yet another week in which Bill de Blasio proved himself New York’s worst mayor ever — on multiple fronts. Most obvious was his berating one of the city’s top cops, Chief of Patrol Fausto Pichardo, into quitting — amid soaring crime and sinking NYPD morale. Pichardo by all accounts has been working his butt off, but he missed a phone call from the mayor — who wanted to engage in some of his patented micromanagement. When the chief did get back to him, de Blasio complained about cops’ handling of a raucous Hasidic rally where a journalist and another man were assaulted. And never mind that the mayor has been demanding unprecedented NYPD restraint on all fronts. Then there’s the lunatic Blas-ordered purchase of the Reliant school-bus company to bail out its owner, a Blas donor — decades after the city got out of the bus...
    A New Jersey high school student says two teachers wanted him to take down a Trump campaign banner that was posted to the wall behind him in his own home - and one booted him from class when he refused. Anthony Ribeiro, 17, said his chemistry teacher asked him to leave a virtual class October 8 after refusing to remove the sign, which read 'Trump 2020 - Keep America Great.'  The teacher, Andrew Gilman, told him to either take down the Trump banner or leave. Ribeiro, a student at Toms River High School North in Toms River, N.J., said he waved goodbye.  The next day, the honor roll student said his English teacher, Leslie Maryon-Larose, requested he take down the banner, saying it could 'offend' other students. That time he complied - but he's uneasy about it.  Toms River High School North student Anthony Ribeiro, 17, said two teachers...
    A Brooklyn College professor threatened to kick students out of class for "intentional misgendering" other students — but once the administration found out, the school was having none of it, Campus Reform reported. What are the details?Campus Reform said it obtained the complete original syllabus of the course taught by Brandon Aultman, which includes a warning regarding "intentional misgendering." The outlet said the syllabus reads, in part: Pronouns, Gender Identity, and Racial Insensitivity: My name is B. Call me B. I am nonbinary, transfeminine. For my information concerning the use of these terms please consult http://transstudent.org. I use gender-neutral pronouns (they/them). I adhere to a strict policy of respect for the gender, sexual, and racial identities of my students. Intentional misgendering, as with any attempt to slur another student's personal integrity on the basis of race, ethnicity, or religion, will result in immediate dismissal from class for that session....
    Students of color at T.C. Williams High School in Alexandria, Virginia, are sharing stories of their school experiences, with some reluctant to show themselves on camera during remote learning and others hesitant to enroll in school programs. Several spoke Wednesday night at the first of what will be three virtual student forums this month. The forums are part of a listening process as the Alexandria City School Board considers removing the name of former superintendent Thomas Chambliss Williams — a segregationist — from the school. As the only Black student in an Advanced Placement class, Fina Owusu said she didn’t want to show her face on Zoom at the virtual start of the school year. “I told my teacher, ‘I have some stuff going on at home so I don’t want to show my face’, but in reality, it was because I knew I was the only Black student, and...
    Associated Press MIAMI (AP) — As Florida's largest school district prepares for a first wave of students to return to physical classrooms on Monday, several teachers and parents say schools are struggling to be ready. Parents and teachers told the Miami Herald that the ventilation and air quality at some schools are concerning because of the way the schools are designed. A teacher told the newspaper that staff hadn't received face masks, wipes or hand sanitizer at one school. Teachers were spacing out desks without a measuring stick, according to that teacher. A district spokeswoman said the school had given out cloth masks and the teacher was asking for a different type of mask. Superintendent Alberto Carvalho on Saturday posted photos on social media showing schools with signage promoting social distancing and hygiene, air filters, socially distant desks and buses with hand sanitizer. “Spent the day conducting school visits and...
    SAN ANTONIO – Editor’s note: This story is part of a series reporting on the latest Bexar Facts poll. Find more coverage on our Bexar Facts page. Roughly three out of four Bexar County parents say distance learning has improved since the first attempt last spring, according to a new Bexar Facts-KSAT-San Antonio Report poll released this week. According to the Bexar Facts poll, 72% of respondents think school districts are doing either a “much better” or “somewhat better” job during this round of virtual learning. Students and teachers were forced out of the classroom at the end of the last school year due to the coronavirus pandemic and many students have continued remote-learning when school started again this fall. Some of the changes by school districts this year included requiring teachers to deliver live virtual lessons to kids sitting at home and using a combination of prerecorded videos, self-guided...
    Another day in Zoom school, another meltdown and another reminder of what parents already know: Online school is especially challenging for younger students. There’s a reason children from kindergarten through third grade spent much of their pre-pandemic school days moving around and learning through play, not sitting still and staring at at a screen. Many school districts are prioritizing younger elementary school students for reopenings, as studies show that younger children may be less vulnerable to the coronavirus. But what if you’re in a school district that’s not reopening anytime soon? What if your child is immunocompromised? Or what if you are reluctant to return to in-person learning in the middle of a pandemic when there are so many “what ifs”? Then you have to make the most of distance learning. Many tips for how to best manage distance learning — including creating a designated space for school,...
    A California high school teacher threatened to kick a student out of a virtual class for displaying a Trump 2020 flag on his wall, Good Day Sacramento reports. The 16-year-old was working from his bedroom, where the flag is pinned to his wall, when his Colusa High School chemistry teacher told him he had 15 seconds to take it down. He left the class instead. "Since school has begun, my son has had this Trump flag hanging in his background," Tiffany, the students parent, told the news outlet. A Colusa High School employee referred ABC10 to the code of conduct when asked about the incident. "The Governing Board believes that free inquiry and exchange of ideas are essential parts of a democratic education," the Colusa Unified School District student handbook writes regarding free speech. "The Board respects students rights to express ideas and opinions, take stands on issues, and support...
    The average American parent’s science and math knowledge taps out around the sixth-grade level, according to new research. When asked to estimate the grade they’d be placed into for both math and science if they took a test today, the average respondent said sixth grade for each. The survey of 2,000 American parents of school-aged children also found 42 percent of parents said they would be “lost” trying to teach their child the math curriculum for their grade. SWNS And 35 percent said the same about the science curriculum. Commissioned by Mongoose on behalf of the USA BMX Foundation, the survey tested parents’ STEM knowledge, as well as their plans for helping their children stay up-to-date with their STEM curricula in the event of a remote or hybrid school year. More than half of parents (55 percent) found math difficult in school and nearly four in 10 struggled with science....
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City Less than a week before in-person classes are scheduled to start, the number of families choosing to keep their children out of school buildings continues to rise.  According to Department of Education data released this week, 42% of New York City’s over 1 million public school students will not be returning to school buildings this year and are instead opting for fully remote learning. Out of those students requesting to opt-out of the city’s blended learning model, where students take classes online and in the classroom, 25 % identify as Asian, 21% as Black, 38% as Hispanic, 11% as white and 3% as other.  Here is a breakdown of remote learning requests by district and economic need:  District % Remote Learning Requested  Economic Need...
    Parents and children protest the opening of schools, following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the Brooklyn borough of New York City, U.S., September 14, 2020.Brendan McDermid | Reuters The disruption to schools caused by the coronavirus pandemic constitutes a "global education emergency" that threatens to derail the education of at least 24 million students projected to drop out of school as a result, said Henrietta Fore, executive director of the United Nations Children's Fund.  "At the height of Covid-19," 192 countries shuttered schools, leaving 1.6 billion students without in-person learning, Fore said on a press call hosted by the World Health Organization and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. She added that now, more than 870 million students, "or half the world's student population in 51 countries," are still unable to return to school.  "The longer children remain out of school, the less likely they are to...
    SOUTH SHORE — Two area high schools saw first-day attendance rates above 98 percent, according to Chicago Public Schools data, and school officials hope to encourage continued attendance this fall by keeping students engaged. At King College Preparatory High School in Kenwood, 99.8 percent of the 466 enrolled students attended their first day of virtual classes. At South Shore International College Preparatory High School, 98.3 percent of 578 enrolled students were present. King students have so far maintained high attendance rates, finishing out the first week with a 96.3 percent attendance rate, according to principal Brian Kelly. RELATED: For Some Chicago High School Students, Remote Learning Brings A New School Struggle: Motivation Faculty members weren’t surprised at the success, given high attendance in past years and good turnout at a Sept. 4 “welcome day” where students received personal protective equipment, t-shirts and technology, Kelly said. To continue their strong start,...
              Illinois high school student athletes and their parents who are tired of COVID-19 delays in sports are taking matters into their own hands — some are protesting, while others are moving out of state to play elsewhere. Student athletes, coaches and students’ parents rallied in the dozens in McCook on Sunday to demand fall sports to resume, ABC 7 reported. Only golf, cross country, girls’ tennis and girls’ swimming and diving are playing for now. Meanwhile, ABC 7 reported that some student athletes and families are moving out of state to play.   The station interviewed Gage Perri, who moved to Colorado from Barrington High School in Illinois to continue playing hockey. NPR’s David Greene of NPR in August interviewed senior Brett Kuczynski and his mother Denise in a story available here. They moved to their vacation home in Florida so Brett...
    MCCOOK, Ill. (WLS) -- Dozens of Illinois high school student athletes, coaches and parents held a rally Sunday demanding the expanded return of fall sports for Illinois schools.At the McCook rally, Wheaton Warrenville South Student Jaylen Brown said he's worried about his senior football and basketball seasons."This decision will determine if I get a scholarship or not," high school athlete Jaylen Brown said.High school sports advocate and rally organizer Joe Trost says these issues can weigh particularly heavy on some CPS students."Imagine being a 17-year-old kid, last year you went through the CTU strike and you lost the end of your season which for a lot of these kids is a huge exposure opportunity, and then again here your senior year, realizing you could lose it again," Trost said. "Right now, everybody wants health and safety, and if the health and safety data shows that the outdoor activities can go,...
    GREELEY, Colo. (CBS4) – Hundreds of students in Greeley are resorting to remote learning amid concerns of coronavirus spreading within the school. A spokesperson for Greeley-Evans School District confirmed students at Billie Martinez and Madison Elementary Schools were sent home for at least two weeks after dozens of students called in sick on the same day. (credit: CBS) A total of 20% of students at Billie Martinez, and 30% at Madison, called out sick in one day. The district requires all students to stay home if at least 20% of students call out in one day. “Sometimes we are quarantining without a positive test because parents are refusing to have their students tested,” said Theresa Myers, Chief of Communications for the district. “Ironically we don’t have any positive tests at that school. But, we had a large amount of students out with symptoms that could be COVID.” Myers said those...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — With less than three weeks left until New York City students return to school in-person, parents are still waiting to get key information, including details about how kids will get to school. When buses roll out of the depots at the start of the school year, there will be some new protocols in place: Each one will be at 25% capacity. Face masks are required. Students will be seated next to the window in every other row. Only siblings will be allowed to sit together. Buses will be disinfected every day. “You’re not going to have as many kids on the buses, but at the same time, you’re not going to have as many kids going to school on each given day,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said Tuesday. As CBS2’s Aundrea Cline-Thomas reports, parents are waiting for more details from the district, but in...
    Wisconsin farmer plants sunflower fields to provide a respite during this rough year 9 retailers that are avoiding the industrys shakeout and opening stores Unemployment diary: Im a 21-year-old Disney World intern in Idaho whos been out of work since April © Provided by Business Insider Stephanie Becerra. Courtesy of Stephanie Becerra; Shayanne Gal/Business Insider The Unemployed States of America takes readers deep inside the decimated American workforce. Stephanie Becerra is a 21-year-old Disney World intern based in Boise, Idaho. Becerra moved to Florida back in January to pursue a dream internship at Disney World, but was soon sent back as the pandemic shuttered businesses across the nation. She moved in with her parents and has been relying entirely on savings and the pandemic unemployment assistance.  As an incoming sophomore at Boise State University this fall, Becerra's having difficulty finding the right role that fit her preferences and schedule...
    SAN ANTONIO – Some students will be heading back to school this week but others will still be at home taking part in distance learning. Despite it being a new concept for public schools this year due to the coronavirus pandemic, many students have been successfully learning online for years. A 2017 report by the Digital Learning Compass Organization found that more than six million high school education students were taking at least one online course. “Online schooling can work,” Julie Taylor head of the Bridge School said. The Bridge School is one of the largest accredited online K-12 schools in the nation. For years the school has made breakthroughs in catering to students online. Taylor now wants to pass on some of what they have learned to parents whose kids may be struggling right now. The first tip is to set a schedule for both student and parent. “It...
    A teacher at a private elementary school in Michigan claims he was fired after repeatedly voicing his concerns about a lack of masks being worn in the school despite the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Nathan Smith told Michigan Public Radio that he made repeated warnings to Oakdale Academy headmaster David Stanton that the school’s plans to make mask wearing voluntary created an unsafe environment for students. Stanton reportedly ignored Smith’s warnings, eventually asking him to resign, and later firing Smith. Although the state requires that all students wear masks while in school, the state has not made it clear whether this policy will be enforced by local authorities. In video messages addressing the school community on YouTube, which were seen by MPR but are now private, Stanton proclaims that “no one in this school will be judged for wearing a mask, and no one in the school will be judged for...
    ONEONTA, New York (WABC) -- SUNY Oneonta is sending all students home for the rest of the fall semester after hundreds of coronavirus cases have been reported so far this school year.All in-person classes and activities for the rest of the semester are canceled after 389 students have tested positive for COVID since the semester started on Aug. 24.The school announced last weekend it would stop all on-campus learning for two weeks after more than 100 students tested positive for coronavirus.As of Sunday morning, there were 105 positive cases on campus -- which makes up for 3% of students and faculty on campus this year. But that number continued to rise all week."However, with the increase in confirmed cases within our campus community - 389 since the start of the semester on Aug. 24 - the college now needs to take this new action to contain the virus and prevent...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Pittsburgh Public Schools has too few devices and too many students without them. While other school districts are moving forward with classes both in-person and online, Pittsburgh Public Schools has delayed online-only classes for at least a week, and maybe even longer. The district is still waiting for thousands of computer devices on order to be delivered — 11,000 have not yet arrived, including those for 6,000 students who still don’t have a device in their homes. Board president Sylvia Wilson says the district is not alone in this nationwide backlog. “We just want people to be patient. We want students to have things in their hands to be able to start. It’s not a fault of the school district. At best, it’s because everybody needs the equipment and everybody is looking for it,” she said. But board member Sala Udin says the district was slow to...
    Jamie Ewing, an elementary school science teacher at P.S. 277 in the Bronx, is a proud educator and considers himself a role model to his students. This year, if New York City public schools reopen for in-person classes as planned, he’ll take on an unofficial third job title that’s arguably a lot less fun: mask-wearing enforcer.   Face-coverings will be mandatory inside of New York City school buildings for both students and staff under city Department of Education (DOE) rules. (Exceptions will be made for students who cannot wear masks for health reasons.) While Ewing, 55, isn’t thrilled about having to police students’ mask-wearing, he expects most students will follow the rules. To live through March and April in New York City, when it was the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic, he believes, is to understand the importance of wearing a face mask. “With the younger kids, we’re going to have...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Pittsburgh Public Schools will not be welcoming students back to class on Monday morning. Thanks to a shortage of devices needed for remote learning, nearly 24,000 students will begin school a week later than planned — beginning on September 8. KDKA’s Chris Hoffman reported from Carrick High School on Saturday where administrators were distributing laptops to families when they started running into problems. Parents started lining up hours before the distribution and for some it was their second or third try to get the laptops. Administrators say they have ordered enough but supply chain issues are causing a delay in getting them. Related stories: Pittsburgh Public Schools Delays Start Of School Year High Demand For Computer Devices Quickly Exhausts Pittsburgh Public Schools’ Supply Hours Into Distribution Comcast Launches Program To Help Nearly 2,000 Pittsburgh Public Schools Students Connect To Internet For Free Pittsburgh Public Schools...
    The students will face all the elements while wearing masks and social distancing. @thirdgradersatdbs/Instagram Nicolette Raney is a teacher at Dothan Brook School in Hartford, Vermont. She previously hosted class outside once a week, but this year, she's moving all five days outdoors. Raney will teach her 15 third-graders in Vermont's wilderness, where each student will have his or her own hammock to read, write, and relax in.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. For the past three years, Nicolette Raney's third-grade classroom eagerly waited for Wednesday in the woods or Tuesday in the trees. This year, her students won't have to wait. Raney plans to teach all five days of the academic week in the school's neighboring woods.  Raney, 34, is a teacher at Dothan Brook School in Hartford, Vermont. Her school administration decided to allow elementary students back into the classroom this year; however, a...
    Some University of Connecticut students have been removed from campus after being busted during a late-night dorm party, violating COVID-19 rules. The school announced that an undisclosed amount of students have been removed from housing due to an "unapproved gathering in a residence hall room.” "According to the report we reviewed (Tuesday, Aug. 18), students were not wearing masks, closely assembled, and endangering not only their own health and well-being, but that of others at a time when UConn is working to protect our community and resume classes in the context of a deadly global pandemic," a statement from school officials said. The party happened on Monday, Aug. 17 at a residence hall on UConn’s Storrs campus. "These actions do not represent or speak for the 5,000 residents currently composing our residential community," the statement continued. "Our residential community has demonstrated an admirable commitment to follow universal precautions and keep...
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill declared Monday that it was changing to all virtual courses right after reporting 135 new COVID-19 conditions and 4 clusters within just a 7 days of beginning in-individual courses for the drop semester — an outcome several critics feared when the university resolved to reopen. “After consultation with condition and regional health and fitness officials, #UNC’s infectious ailment gurus and the UNC process, Carolina is producing two variations to de-densify campus,” the college introduced on Twitter Monday afternoon. “On Wednesday, Aug. 19, all undergraduate instruction will shift to distant finding out.” UNC-Chapel Hill has grow to be the first faculty to send out pupils dwelling following reopening. The shift was introduced inside of an hour of the current situation counts being added on the school’s CV-19 dashboard, which tracks metrics like exams executed, optimistic scenarios, and isolation and quarantine capability. The...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — With many universities across the country starting the semester completely remote, students who signed leases to rent off-campus apartments are now struggling to get out of them — and the law is not on their side. Before the pandemic, Aaron Brown of Inglewood was an honor student at Clark Atlanta University and a cornerback on the football team. In June, he signed a lease at an off-campus apartment complex, thinking he would be going back to school. “The school said that everybody will be able to come on campus,” he said. But a month later, the university decided to go remote for the fall semester, and Brown lost his athletic scholarship. He called the apartment complex. “Hey, the school sent us an email that no one can come on campus at all, and I am out of state student and I want to see if I...
    WYLIE, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – Thursday was the first day of school for Wylie ISD, and this year parents had the option of sending their kids to back school or signing them up for remote learning due to the coronavirus pandemic. Approximately 50% of students were back in the classroom the school district said. Leading up to the start of school, three Wylie ISD staff members working at various schools tested positive for COVID-19, but the district said there is no current threat to anyone at school. For Bridget Krumbholz, the decision to send her kids back to school was easy. “My kids have always liked structure so just getting up at a certain time, getting ready for school, being there in class, having that structured day in school,” she said. “I think they were just excited and ready for school.” “I really missed my teachers so I was happy to...
    PROSPER, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – Wednesday was the first day of school for Prosper ISD and the district reports 61% of elementary and 67% of secondary students participated in in-person learning. “They’re ready to see their teachers, they’re ready to see friends, they’re ready to just get back into a normal routine,” parent Kelley Moore said. Her 3rd and 5th graders headed back to Johnson Elementary School for the first time since March. “It kind of feels weird because we’ve been in quarantine for five months, it feels different but I like it,” student Abby Moore said. “It was nice to be back at school and actually learning stuff not just from a computer,” student Haidyn Moore said. At school this year there’s several new coronavirus prevention-related protocols. First day of school in Prosper ISD 2020 (credit: Prosper ISD) “They’ve put a lot of thought into this to make it the...
    “A quarter of NYC students opt out of school buildings this fall, while 736,000 are set to return — for now” was originally published by Chalkbeat, a nonprofit news organization covering public education. Sign up for their newsletters here. More than a quarter of New York City families who attend traditional public schools plan to start the 2020-2021 school year fully remote, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Monday. That means roughly 264,000 students are opting to stay out of school buildings while another 736,000 children are set to participate in a hybrid schedule that combines in-person instruction one to three days a week, while learning at home the rest of the time.
    BACK OF THE YARDS — Back of the Yards College Prep narrowly voted to remove police officers from its campus, becoming the fifth Chicago high school to do so. Local school council members voted 6-5 in favor of eliminating school resource officers from the South Side school Monday morning. Following the unrest stemming from the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, protesters have demanded Chicago Public Schools cut ties with the Chicago Police Department — as has happened in Minneapolis — and remove officers from schools as part of a larger movement against police violence. City and district leaders have resisted taking widespread action, instead urging local school councils to make their own decisions. Most schools already have opted to retain school police while other councils must vote by the end of the week. Northside College Prep in North Park, Benito Juarez Community Academy in Pilsen and Roberto Clemente Community Academy in Humboldt Park and Hancock High School...
    As we head toward the start of the academic year, schools around the country are grappling with how to educate their students while keeping everybody safe. Some districts will have kids back in class full-time, while others will only teach them via a screen. But an estimated 20 to 30 percent of the nation’s school districts—including New York City, which alone serves more than one million students—are planning to implement a “hybrid” model, where groups of kids attend in person on alternating, part-time schedules. U.S. Governors, school chancellors, and state epidemiologists have touted this approach as the Goldilocks solution: the number of children in classrooms is kept low enough for proper social distancing, while students still receive some amount of essential in-person learning. It appears to be the perfect compromise. But this widely held assumption may be grossly incorrect.SUBSCRIBESubscribe to WIRED and stay smart with more of your favorite Ideas...
    Roger Sollenberger August 6, 2020 9:00AM (UTC) The president of the University of Texas at Austin (UT) sent an email Wednesday announcing that the school anticipates that it may need to provide "several hundred tests" each day for community members who show signs of COVID-19. The university, one of the largest and highest-ranked research institutions in the country, has studied coronavirus in a joint research program with the Wuhan Institute of Virology and publishes one of the premier epidemiological models in the United States. UT's endowment of $31 billion was second only to Harvard's in 2019. : The school will put those resources behind providing tests for 5,000 members of the 74,000-person UT community each week, regardless of symptoms, according to the email. Three rapid-response machines, currently on order, will yield approximately 100 tests per day, with a 15-minute turnaround time. University spokesperson J.B. Bird told Salon in a phone interview that the school will provide an additional 100 to...
    MESQUITE, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – North Texas school districts are in the process of finalizing back to school plans. And in Mesquite, that means making sure students are prepared as well. An iPad or a Chromebook as well as a hotspot will go home to every Mesquite ISD student who needs it. While some parents are apprehensive about the start of school, they’re also eager to get started. Stephanie Cooke, a mother of a rising Senior with special needs told CBS 11 New reporter, Nicole Jacobs, “My son actually is in the TLC program he has autism. So for us it’s hard because he needs that structured setting.” Cooke was one of dozens of parents who picked up a Chromebook for their child. When school begins in exactly 2 weeks, her son and all Mesquite ISD students will learn virtually until September 14. That’s the earliest they will have an option for...
    Social distancing measures implemented on school buses due to COVID-19 could leave many students home this upcoming school year as it reduces capacity, reports CNN. More than 25 million children nationwide use the school bus system. The maximum seating capacity of a standard school bus is 72 passengers. With a six-foot social distancing measure implemented, that number will drop significantly. "Because physical distancing drastically reduces bus capacity, only special education, homeless, and priority students will be transported for in-person classroom instruction initially," Houstons interim superintendent Grenita Lathan told the news outlet Tuesday. CNN reported buses in Sioux City, Iowa, will not be filled to capacity but will not be empty enough to enforce social distancing. Atlanta will limit the amount of bus riders to 60%, Philadelphia will only allow 11-15 students on board and Austin, Texas, 12 students. "The logistics of being able to transport students with those kinds of...
    Marine Park, Brooklyn (WABC) -- Back in 1989, Brian Robbins was a TV sitcom heartthrob, starring on ABC's hit show "Head of the Class," about a class of gifted students attending a fictional Manhattan high school.But on this day, the Eyewitness News camera was following Robbins around Marine Park Junior High School, his old school in Brooklyn, where he encouraged the starstruck kids to get serious about their own education."I see just how important it is and I really hope everyone in this room .. if you have some kind of learning or area that you are falling behind in, that you get help," Robbins said.Robbins was promoting an educational program called "Smart Steps" which helped get parents, teachers, and students to work together to overcome learning disabilities.At the time, according to this file report, 13% of the 17-year-old students in the United States were functionally illiterate and over 700,000...
    There’s a magical place in New York City. When I’m there, it’s hard to remember that I’m still within the city limits. The weather is often different there than it is anywhere else in the city. There are rarely any taxis. There are a couple of subway stops, but they’re run with the kind of dreamy inefficiency better suited to a sleepy Italian village than the NYC MTA. The people there sound like they’re from Brooklyn or Queens (or both) but dress like they’re going surfing, because they often are—the beach is never more than five minutes away. This Brigadoon-ish place is a spit of land that launches itself off Queens into the Atlantic Ocean, where it curves around Brook­lyn. If you’ve ever flown out of JFK, you’ve probably seen it from the air. It’s beach and boardwalk, skyscrapers and marinas, the cold swell of the November ocean, and the...
    Students not returning to school in the fall are at risk, but it has nothing to do with a lack of a coronavirus vaccine. Research firm Children at Risk say that even with socially distanced learning, more children are checking in less with their teachers in their virtual classrooms. “I suspect that this is going to be a travesty for many, many students, but most importantly for low-income kids. It's close to disastrous,” Dr. Bob Sandborn, president and CEO of Children at Risk, told Fox News. At-risk kids aren't limited to those from lower-income families, it also encompasses students who have one parent at home, a child that hasn’t tested well or someone who is frequently absent from school. Sandborn’s firm, which researches students K-12 in the state of Texas, has found that attendance is one of the most important things for a child’s success. “For middle and high school...
    ARCADIA, Calif. (KABC) -- An investigation into sexual exploitation of minors is expanding as the Arcadia Police Department launches into how police personnel handled a report last year.A former member of the Arcadia High student council, Dylan Chan was arrested after detectives searched his home last week. The 18-year old faces charge of sexual exploitation of a child, using a minor for sex acts and distribution of child pornography.A former classmate who is using the name "Judy" to protect her privacy says that she was 17 when Chan had sex with her, recorded it without her consent, then posted it on social media."At I first found out, I just couldn't believe that he would do something like that to me," says Judy.Because of an earlier experience, she says didn't feel Arcadia High administrators would take her seriously if she reported it to them. She says classmates urged her to keep...
    "Knowing what I know, and seeing how the university has been run and even now continues to operate, it is clear that Jerry doesn't even begin to comprehend what it means to be truly apologetic," one resigned staffer, former director of diversity retention LeeQuan McLaurin, said. While pushback against Falwell has simmered since his 2016 endorsement of Donald Trump, his detractors have been an outspoken but undersized presence in Lynchburg, where Liberty has a formidable economic footprint. Indeed, McLaurin and other disheartened Black alumni have limited power to force change. Falwell was endorsed after his apology by the school's board of trustees in a June 8 release that touted the school as a home for "students and staff of all races!" But interviews with more than a dozen current and former students and employees point to significant doubt that the school's culture is as welcoming as it claims. Keyvon Scott,...
    (CNN)Soon after George Floyd died at the hands of police in Minneapolis, the city's public school district voted to push police out of its schools. The move has inspired many other districts across the US to make a similar decision -- or at least consider it. School officials in Denver, Milwaukee and Portland, Oregon, have all announced they are severing ties with police.And in California, the state's Department of Education is pushing for a reevaluation of police on school campuses, specifically as it relates to racial justice, Superintendent Tony Thurmond said last week. Hours later, the school board in Oakland, California, unanimously voted to disband the school district's police department as part of what they called the George Floyd Resolution.School resource officers have been a common fixture in American public schools for decades. They are meant to keep campuses safe, and even mentor students. But activists say these officers have...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Calls to cut the NYPD‘s budget includes pressure to remove officers from schools. Protesters are calling for school safety to be handled solely by the Department of Education, CBS2’s Aundrea Cline-Thomas reported. MORE: Protesters Occupy Area Outside City Hall Demanding $1 Billion Cut From NYPD Budget Past and current students were joined by City Council members Thursday to demand all officers be removed from New York City Public Schools. “The only time I felt unsafe going to school is like when I see myself, or my friends, or someone I went to class with being harassed by school safety agents,” one person said. GEORGE FLOYD PROTESTS CBS2’s Maurice DuBois, Documentary Filmmaker Marshall Curry Discuss Where The Conversation About Race Goes From Here Public Advocate Jumaane Williams On What’s Next With Race In America Having The Difficult But Important Conversation About Race How To Be A Part...
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