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    Boiled, fried, scrambled or in an omelette, whole eggs pose a threat to health and eating more of them increases your risk of death, a study warns.  Researchers found eating just half a whole egg — which includes the yolk and the white — increases the likelihood of dying by seven per cent. Risk of death increases by a further seven per cent for every half an egg on top of this, so a person eating one egg a day has at 14 per cent greater chance of death than someone who avoids the food.  Chinese researchers who led the study believe high fat and cholesterol levels in eggs are to blame.  They warned that people should use only the whites or switch to healthier egg substitutes, which lower the risk of dying.  Substituting an equivalent amount of nuts or legumes for half a whole egg reduced death rates by...
    A new drug could help improve age-related hearing loss. Preliminary studies have shown that it may also ease tinnitus and Meniere’s disease, a neurological condition that causes hearing loss and dizziness. And the drug is now being tested in the U.S. as a potential treatment for patients with Covid-19. The new drug, known as SPI-1005, boosts levels of a natural compound that protects delicate hair cells in the inner ear. The role of these hair cells is to convert sound vibrations into electrical signals, which are then relayed along the auditory nerve to the brain. The number of auditory hair cells — there are normally around 15,000 in each ear — declines over time due to age, disease and exposure to loud noise. A new drug could help improve age-related hearing loss. Preliminary studies have shown that it may also ease tinnitus and Meniere’s disease, a neurological condition RELATED...
    There are still many wounds to heal and the capital of Hubei is still far from the same as before | 01/23/2021 | ionicons-v5-c10: 00 | . | Wuhan.- Wuhan, the great city China that overnight found herself isolated and confined by surprise, after being the first to suffer the virus that still hangs over the world, is still trying to recover his life with great caution today, amid wounds that will take time to overcome. At ten o’clock in the morning on January 23, 2020, this city of 11 million inhabitants woke up totally closed, with its entrances closed, the streets deserted and the people stuck in their houses, in the midst of the fear of a disease from which little was known. In the first moments of the unprecedented isolation, some were still able to go out to buy food in the few stores that remained open,...
    The coronavirus has now infected all 3,006 counties across the United States, according to a new report. The last county to record a positive case was the nation’s smallest: Kalawao County, a remote island enclave in Hawaii established in the 1860s for people with leprosy, the Wall Street Journal reported. Kalawao's first case was recorded on December 10 after one resident received a positive COVID result after returning back to the county from a trip to Honolulu.  Five leprosy patients, who are all elderly and considered high risk, still live in Kalawao.  However, the county has so far managed to avoid further spread, with the person who tested positive immediately alerting authorities and quarantining themselves. The discovery in Kalawao came just under 11 months after the first case of COVID-19 was recorded in Snohomish County, Washington, on January 20, 2020. Since then, the virus has continued to ravage its way across...
    How swiftly a person's immune system responds following infection with the coronavirus plays a crucial role in determining disease severity, a study shows. Cambridge researchers studied 207 people who tested positive for Covid-19 over a three-month period and found those with no symptoms or mild cases mounted a robust immune response soon after getting infected. But the people with severe cases who required hospitalisation had an impaired immune response, which led to a delayed and weakened attempt to fight the virus.  This undercooked response to the infection is characterised by inflammation of several organs, which occurs immediately after a person catches the coronavirus.   Scientists say abnormalities in immune cells may be behind the slack response to viral infection as well as the body's inflammatory response, and may contribute to severe disease and also 'long Covid'. Scroll down for video   How swiftly a person's immune system responds following infection with the...
    This year, Business with workers registered in the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS) could see increased premiums that they must cover before the Institute. This when considering the Covid-19 disease an occupational hazard, as established by the IMSS Technical Council, in a resolution that was published on January 8 of this year in the Official Journal of the Federation. This opinion establishes that the Covid-19 is recognized as a work hazard, although within it it is not indicated what the worker’s activities will be. That is, it would not only apply to personnel working in hospitals or similar tasks, but it is left open in a general way for companies in the country. For some specialists, the implications fall on the fact that the Mexican Institute of Social Security can increase its income through the collection of work risk premiums, at the expense of companies registered as of this...
    Scientists have identified the brain cells that are most vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease for the first time, in what's being referred to as the 'holy grail' of dementia studies.  The brain cells lie in a region known as the entorhinal cortex, which controls memory, navigation and time perception, and are the first to be killed off by the disease. The researchers hope the findings could be used to develop a new and much more targeted approach to developing therapies to slow or prevent the spread of Alzheimer's disease.   The brain cells lie in a region known as the entorhinal cortex, which controls memory, navigation and time perception, and are the first to be killed off by the disease HOW MANY PEOPLE HAVE DEMENTIA? The charity Alzheimer's Research UK has described dementia as the greatest health challenge of our time. Somebody is diagnosed with it every three seconds. It is the...
    Children who get diagnosed with depression between the ages of five and 19 are six times more likely to die by the time they're 31, according to a study. Researchers in Sweden followed 1.4million people to test whether there was a link between childhood or teenage depression and worse health in adulthood. While they found a 14-fold increase in the risk of death by self-harm, which may be expected to link with depression, they also saw that people who suffered with mental health disorder in their youth were more likely to be diagnosed with dozens of serious illnessses. These included type 2 diabetes, obesity, heart diseases, epilepsy, sleep disorders, liver disease and kidney disease.  Depression is one of the most common mental health problems and is found increasingly often among children and teenagers, studies have found.  The study, led by Stockholm's Karolinska Institutet, said that around 2.8 per cent of eight to...
    Trench fever - the disease that plagued First World War soldiers - has started cropping up amongst the urban, homeless population in Canada, according to a new study.  The Canadian Medical Association Journal study, which was published Monday, revealed four people living in Manitoba, who had experienced homelessness, were eventually diagnosed with trench fever, which killed millions of soldiers during the First World War.   The disease, caused by the bacteria Bartonella quintana is transmitted from person-toperso through body lice. Symptoms include relapsing fevers, muscle aches, headaches, rashes, and pain in the shins, CTV News reported.  Trench fever, first identified in 1915 amongst British soldiers, was found in four homeless men living in Winnipeg, Manitoba. First World War British soldiers are pictured near German lines RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Nurse in Pfizer vaccine trial who worried she had COVID-19... Hundreds of black vultures invade...
    Evie Junior has been living with the pain and limitations of sickle cell disease for almost all of his 27 years. He’s been hospitalized too many times to count with infections, exhaustion and excruciating pain, spawned by the incurable illness embedded in his genes. “You try and adjust to the demands of the disease, but it’s never clear when the attacks are going to occur,” Junior explained. “You start to make progress on something, then you get sick and it takes you out, and you have to start over at square one. “It’s one step forward and three steps back all the time.” But the Anaheim man has good reason to feel thankful this holiday season: An experimental gene therapy being tested on him shows promise in disarming the debilitating disease. Junior’s doctors at the UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center say the genetically modified stem cell infusion that he...
    Bill Gates has criticized White House coronavirus adviser Dr. Scott Atlas as a 'pseudo-expert' and labeled him 'off-the-rails'. The Microsoft billionaire's remarks about Atlas joined an increasing chorus from public health experts that sounded in recent weeks.  'We now have a pseudo-expert advising the president,' Gates said during Yahoo Finance's All Market Summit: Road to Recovery on Monday.  The outlet said that after the initial interview on October 15, Gates confirmed he was speaking about Atlas and added that the Stanford professor is 'off-the-rails.'  While speaking during Yahoo Finance's All Market Summit: Road to Recovery, Bill Gates (pictured) called Dr. Scott Atlas a 'pseudo-expert' News reports have indicated that Scott Atlas, a neuroradiologist who has gained favor with the President, has promoted the controversial herd theory in the White House.  The notion has been blasted by several other experts, including Dr. Anthony Fauci, who was previously the face of the...
    Diet drinks are just as bad for your heart as the full-sugar versions, a study has found. French researchers tracked more than 104,000 people over ten years, looking at how many sugary or sugar-free soft drinks they consumed. They found the consumers of both sugary and artificially sweetened drinks are up to  20 per cent more likely to suffer heart disease, stroke or heart attacks than those who avoid soft drinks.  Scroll down video   Researchers found the consumers of both sugary and artificially sweetened drinks are up to 20 per cent more likely to suffer heart disease, stroke or heart attacks than those who avoid soft drinks The scientists, at Sorbonne University in Paris, split people into three groups based on their consumption of sweetened beverages.  These categories were labelled as non-consumers, low consumers and high consumers and drinks split into either artificially sweetened or sugary.  A sugar content equalling...
    (CNN)President Donald Trump's election endgame argument, far from bristling with new solutions to a pandemic that has killed 220,000 Americans, on Monday devolved into a campaign of insults against Dr. Anthony Fauci -- for telling the truth about the disease.Trump ridiculed Fauci as a "disaster" and an "idiot" who has been around for "500 years" -- trashing one of the nation's best hopes of easing the pandemic along with his recommendations to quell an alarming Covid-19 surge.His personal warfare against Fauci on a frenzied day on the campaign trail, while indecent and questionable from a strategic political perspective, revealed how the US government effort to beat the pandemic has been suppressed in the service of Trump's reelection."Tony Fauci has been the most clear, consistent proponent of the measures the United States needs to protect itself from a deadly disease," William Haseltine, a renowned public health expert and former professor at...
    Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officials approved the first treatment for Ebola on Wednesday.  Regulators greenlit a trio of antibody drugs developed by Regeneron to treat the hemorrhagic fever virus that has killed tens of thousands of people in West Africa, and is up to 90 percent fatal.  Regeneron is making another antibody to treat the newest viral threat to humanity, COVID-19, but the two treatments are entirely unrelated.  Ebola patients treated with Regeneron's antibody 'cocktail' in trials were one third less likely to die than were people who did not get the drug.   Although a vaccine against Ebola was approved in December of last year and was declared officially 'over' in June, has been little doctors could do to improve survival odds for someone who does catch the devastating virus.  'It's still pretty terrifying' said former Food and Drug Administration (FDA) associate commissioner Peter Pitts of Ebola.  'If there...
    ALEX EDELMAN/AFP via Getty Images Coronavirus has killed over 1 million people globally. Many died alone, due to strict COVID-19 hospital rules. The president casually drove by his supporters while infected with the very disease that killed more than 210,000 Americans across the country. Insider spoke with a man who lost his father in April to coronavirus who couldn't be there with him for his final moments. He said it's "It's painful to watch" the president downplay the disease. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.   John Pijanowski's dad is not going to be at Thanksgiving dinner this year. In April, 51-year-old Pjanowski lost his 87-year-old father Don to a sudden, fatal case of coronavirus that "literally hit him like a lightning bolt." The grief is hardly over for Pijanowski. Just a few days ago, President Donald Trump casually drove by his supporters while infected with the...
    (CNN) — The novel coronavirus may have infected about one in 10 people globally, meaning the majority of the world remains vulnerable to Covid-19, a World Health Organization official has said. “Our current best estimates tell us that about 10% of the global population may have been infected by this virus,” Dr. Mike Ryan, director of the WHO’s Health Emergencies Programme, said at a WHO executive board meeting Monday. “This varies depending on country, it varies from urban to rural, it varies between different groups. But what it does mean is that the vast majority of the world remains at risk,” Ryan added. There are more than 35.5 million confirmed Covid-19 cases globally, according to the widely-used Johns Hopkins University dashboard, but WHO and other experts say that is almost certainly an enormous undercount. Over the summer, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said cases in the US...
    (CNN)The novel coronavirus may have infected about one in 10 people globally, meaning the majority of the world remains vulnerable to Covid-19, a World Health Organization official has said. "Our current best estimates tell us that about 10% of the global population may have been infected by this virus," Dr. Mike Ryan, director of the WHO's Health Emergencies Programme, said at a WHO executive board meeting Monday."This varies depending on country, it varies from urban to rural, it varies between different groups. But what it does mean is that the vast majority of the world remains at risk," Ryan added. Months into a pandemic, Fauci says the US is still lagging in Covid-19 testingThere are more than 35.5 million confirmed Covid-19 cases globally, according to the widely-used Johns Hopkins University dashboard, but WHO and other experts say that is almost certainly an enormous undercount. Over the summer, the US Centers...
    Love him or loathe him, President Donald Trump is arguably the most famous person on the planet right now — which makes him, by default, the biggest celebrity to test positive for COVID-19 to date. Wife Melania Trump has a confirmed case of the novel coronavirus, too, and so the First Couple has now officially joined over 34 million people worldwide to receive such a diagnosis thus far, including more than one million who died as a result of the virus. The overall total includes in excess of 71,000 Coloradans who've had COVID-19 during the pandemic's first six months plus; because of medical privacy laws, most of them have never been publicly identified. Some have, though; here's a look at some of the most notable individuals from our state to have contracted the disease:The Athletes Related Stories Jared Polis's Mom on Trump Racism and New Hate Groups Film COVID-19: Greek House Sh*t...
    The coronavirus saps men's testosterone and leaves them more susceptible to falling seriously ill as well as robbing them of their sex drive, a study suggests.  Researchers in Turkey analysed levels of the sex hormone in 200 men who were in hospital after they tested positive for Covid-19. More than half (51 per cent) had developed a condition called hypogonadism, in which their bodies did not produce enough testosterone. On average, participants' levels were drained by 30 per cent post-infection to borderline unhealthy levels. Academics claimed there was a direct correlation between severe illness and lower testosterone levels.  But, even among men who showed no symptoms of the virus at all, two thirds reported having a lowered sex drive – a tell-tale sign of low testosterone.  As well as being key in the development of sex organs and muscle growth, testosterone also helps regulate the immune responses, including fighting viral infections. Low...
    A hero of the 9/11 New York terror attacks has died from coronavirus just 12 days before his brother also died from the disease. The double tragedy saw Ralph and Nicholas Gismondi, originally from Queens, New York, die of the illness. The pair were 'big family men,' according to CNN which added that they were so beloved that neighbours posted banners praising them when they died. Ralph Gismondi, 68, had helped to rescue victims of the Al-Qaeda attacks on the World Trade Center. Ralph Gismondi, 65, who died of coronavirus just 12 days before his brother Nicholas did He held the rank of captain in the FDNY and he was one of the first from the department to respond to the 2001 terror attacks. Upon retiring he worked as a flight attendant on JetBlue airlines, based at JFK Airport. He began to suffer from a cough, fever and shortness...
    As the sun slid from the evening sky over Minsk, clusters of people thronged the imposing entrance of the Bolshoi Theatre of Belarus clutching their tickets for the ballet. Many had dressed up to attend one of the city’s landmark buildings, a legacy of the Stalin era that was inspired by Roman amphitheatres. ‘We don’t want our theatres closed,’ said Darya, an elegant 25-year-old heading in to enjoy the performance of The Creation Of The World with friends Igor and Nadia.  ‘You need art to live a full life, despite anything else that is happening in the world.’ Minutes later, I watched in the imposing auditorium as the large orchestra struck up, five dancers appeared and 800 people sat back to enjoy the show. Darya is right about the ability of art and culture to lift spirits in dark times. Yet in Britain, as in other parts of the world, theatre...
    Children who have previously caught the common cold have coronavirus antibodies that prevent them from developing the hyper-inflammatory condition called MIS-C, new research suggests.   The rare disease is caused by infection with the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, the same pathogen responsible for the current COVID-19 pandemic.  Research has found the condition, known as multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), is different to both COVID-19 and Kawasaki disease.  However, little is known about why some children, roughly a month after being infected with the coronavirus, develop MIS-C symptoms.  Indicators of the disease include a rash, fever and abdominal pain as well as conjunctivitis, a cough and a headache.  Experts at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden compared healthy children with youngsters suffering from MIS-C and Kawasaki disease.   Blood tests of 13 MIS-C-patients, 28 Kawasaki disease patients and uninfected children revealed the MIS-C cohort lack antibodies against the common cold.  Researchers say it is possible antibodies...
    Trump doubles down on urging his supporters to vote twice Shapovalov wins in 5 at Open vs. Fritz, who says: Choked Ciera Payton to Play Wendy Williams in Lifetime Biopic Executive Produced by the TV Host The Oval star Ciera Payton has been tapped to play Wendy Williams in the upcoming biopic about her life set to premiere on Lifetime. © Provided by People GETTY IMAGES (2) Ciera Payton, Wendy Williams P-Valley's Morocco Omari will star as Williams' ex-husband Kevin hunter, Deadline reported. A rep for Lifetime did not immediately respond to PEOPLE's request for comment. The biopic, which will premiere next year, will be executive produced by Williams, 56, as well as Will Packer and Sheila Ducksworth. Production will start in September, according to Deadline. The project will give fans a intimate look at Williams' rise to fame, exploring the challenges she faced from her early days as...
    A much-loved nurse has died of coronavirus after working in a hospital's intensive care unit for three decades - just a week before her 92-year-old mother also died of the illness. Patricia Edwards, known as Nurse Pat, died at Bon Secours St. Francis in Greenville, South Carolina - surrounded by her colleagues - on August 19. She had worked the night shift between 7pm and 7am at the hospital's ICU for the past 14 years and was loved by everyone, according to her eldest daughter, Sherie Gamble, 45. 'My mom was everything to everybody,' Ms Gamble told NBC News. 'We knew how much she was loved, but we didn't know to this magnitude. Nobody was a nurse like Mama.' Patricia Edwards, known as Nurse Pat, died at Bon Secours St. Francis in Greenville, South Carolina - surrounded by her colleagues - on August 19. Her mother, Rosa Lee Finch...
    Women don't seem to get Covid-19 as bad as men and it could be down to oestrogen, according to a new study that set out to explain the gender disparity.  A number of studies show that men face a much greater chance of getting a severe case of Covid-19, and could be as much as twice as likely to die from the virus.  In an effort to understand why this occurs, scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine conducted a review of data on hormone activity, especially oestrogen.   They found that the enzyme ACE2 that coronavirus attaches to in order to enter the heart, is reduced as a result of higher levels of oestrogen in women. The enzyme is more prevalent in men due to the lack of oestrogen keeping numbers down -  which could account for why symptoms are worse in men, the team said. In an effort...
    Neurologists are to start treating Alzheimer's patients by sending electrical currents deep into their brain. A team at Imperial College London and the UK Dementia Research Institute have been given a $1.5million (£1.14million) grant by US philanthropists, including Bill Gates, to trial the technology. Researchers have selected 24 patients with early-stage Alzheimer's to undergo the therapy, which will involve two weeks of daily hour-long sessions. After dozens of failed trials for dementia drugs, experts have high hopes for this new method. The technology – called temporal interference brain stimulation – involves applying electrodes to the scalp.   The electrodes then send two harmless high-frequency beams into the brain. These beams are of slightly different frequencies – 2,000 Hz and 2,005 Hz – and when they cross they create a third current, a low-frequency wave of 5 Hz. And it is this new wave which researchers hope will make all...
    Being overweight can raise the risk of severe Covid-19 by 40 per cent, while obese people are 70 per cent more likely to be hospitalised with the disease, according to a study. Researchers analysed data from more than 300,000 people, 640 of whom ended up in hospital with the coronavirus at the peak of the pandemic. They found extra weight is linked with 'higher odds' of admission to hospital, increasing in line with body mass index (BMI) - a height-to-weight ratio.  Being too thin also raised the risk compared to someone who was a healthy weight, but by a smaller margin of six per cent.  The team, led by University College London, sought to build on previous smaller-scale studies which first shone a light on the link between weight and Covid-19. Concerns led to an investigation by Public Health England, which last month said it found overweight people are more than three...
    Hydroxychloroquine could prevent tens of thousands of people from dying from coronavirus but the drug has been too politicised, scientists have warned  Hydroxychloroquine could prevent tens of thousands of people from dying from coronavirus but the controversial malaria drug is being discarded prematurely, top scientists have warned. While studies have proven it cannot treat patients who have already caught the virus, experts say it may still be able to stop people from getting infected in the first place. Donald Trump has repeatedly touted the medicine as a 'game changer' without scientific evidence to back up his claims and has even admitted to taking it himself to prevent Covid-19.   British researchers behind the only large global trial testing hydroxychloroquine as a prophylaxis say their work is in jeopardy because it has become too politicised. They have warned dropping the drug will block science from finding out if the medicine can really...
    Being vaccinated against pneumonia could significantly reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests. In a study being presented at the annual Alzheimer's Association International Conference on Monday - held virtually this year - Duke University scientists looked at the medical records of people aged 65 and older. They found that receiving the pneumonia immunization before age 75 lowered the risk of the age-related brain disease by about one-third. What's more, for those who didn't have any genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's or dementia, the jab decreased the risk by up to 40 percent.  A new study from Duke University found that receiving the pneumonia vaccine reduces the risk of developing Alzheimer's by 25% to 30% and up to 40% in those without genetic risk factors (file image) 'With the COVID-19 pandemic, vaccines are at the forefront of public health discussions,' Dr Maria Carrillo, chief science officer...
    A SINGLE flu jab can cut the risk of developing Alzheimer’s by almost a fifth in the over-60s, a study says. Those given the shot for several years were almost a third less likely to have the disease, experts found. 2A US study found that a single flu vaccine can slash the risk of Alzheimer's by almost a fifthCredit: Getty It comes just days after the government announced plans for its biggest flu vaccination programme this winter. The US team, who analysed 9,066 over 60s, said one jab led to a 17 per cent fall on average. Injections over several years could add a further 13 per cent protection, the benefits greatest in those injected the youngest. Albert Amran, of the University of Texas, said: “Our study suggests that regular use of a very accessible and relatively cheap intervention — the flu shot — may significantly reduce risk of Alzheimer’s...
    The driver of Despierta América and Cristina Bernal excitedly thanked all those who have supported them in their fight against the coronavirus A couple of weeks ago, Alan Tacher and his wife publicly shared the news that they had tested positive for COVID-19 like many other colleagues in the program he leads, Wake up America. Through those days, the couple has been very present on social networks to inform their devoted followers about the evolution they have had while struggling to overcome the disease. Now in your personal account Instagram, the driver has shared a short video where He thanks his wife for all the signs of affection they have received during this tough process. Among other things, the famous and his wife highlighted the incredible naturist remedies, among them the teas that friends and followers who have gone through the disease have recommended and that they have helped...
    In-depth Analysis and Data-driven Insights on the Impact of COVID-19 Included in this Global Infectious Disease Diagnostics Market Report NEW YORK, July 23, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05934705/?utm_source=PRN The infectious disease diagnostics market by revenue is expected to grow at a CAGR of over 7% during the period 2019–2025. The global infectious disease diagnostics market, which is one of the major segments in the global in-vitro diagnostics market, is likely to grow at a steady rate during the forecast period. The growth can be attributed to the growing prevalence/incidence of several infectious diseases. Malaria continues to be a major cause of death in the Middle East and Africa. The market is witnessing growth due to the increase in the usage of diagnostic tests for several purposes, including routine health checkups, infectious diseases, seasonal flu. Improvements in technology such as the introduction of automated analyzers, advanced...
    Pharmaceutical companies are experimenting with other ways of applying the drugs Inhaling medications is a widely used method of fighting respiratory diseaseIt is a way that the medical community is experimenting to find a treatment against infection with the new coronavirus. British scientists have tested an inhaled drug that reduces the risk of COVID-19 tax by 79 percent, according to its developers. Called for now as SNG001, it is a drug that “greatly reduced the number of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 who progressed from ‘requiring oxygen’ to ‘requiring ventilation’,” he said. Synairgen, the company that produces it. In the words of Richard Marsden, CEO of biopharmaceutical, SNG001 showed that patients who received it were “at least twice as likely to recover to the point that their daily activities were not compromised by being infected with SARS-CoV-2 ″. After testing this new development on 101 coronavirus patients in nine UK...
    (CNN)Each day new information comes out about the deadly novel coronavirus and Covid-19, the disease it causes, making it difficult to keep up with all that science has learned. Here's a wrap-up of what has changed since the pandemic began and what you need to know now to keep you and your family safe.What are the symptoms of Covid-19?Fever, cough and shortness of breath: The big three are still the most common symptoms, but the list has grown over the months. We now know many common cold and flu symptoms can also play a role, such as a sore throat, headache, body and muscle aches, chills and shivers, a snotty or congested nose, intense fatigue (which can last longer than the illness), diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. New, bizarre symptoms: Skin rashes and "Covid-toes," where the toes become red and swollen from tiny blood clots, are some of the newer symptoms...
    In the late 18th century, one in five Londoners contracted syphilis by their mid-30s, according to a fascinating (if you enjoy reading about the history of medicine, as I do) paper published online this week in the journal Economic History Review. Using data painstakingly collected from the archived admission records of London’s hospitals and workhouse infirmaries, the paper’s authors — historians Simon Szreter of Cambridge University in the U.K. and Kevin Seina of Trent University in Canada — estimate that 2,807 Londoners were being treated annually for syphilis in the “foul” (venereal disease) wards of those facilities in the 1770s. That’s twice as many people as were being treated for syphilis in the much smaller English city of Chester during that period and about 25 times more than as were being treated in rural areas of England and Wales. Based on those 2,807 cases, Szreter and Seina estimate (conservatively) that 20...
    Being obese in your fifties could significantly raise the risk of developing dementia, a study has found. Obesity increased the chances of developing the disease by almost a third compared to those of a healthy weight. The risk was even higher for women with bulging waistlines, according to researchers from University College London. Experts have warned the UK is facing a dementia timebomb unless we do more to tackle obesity.  Britain’s spiralling obesity crisis means two in three adults and one in three children are now overweight or obese (file photo) RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Having a genetic mutation linked to dementia may DOUBLE the... Revealed, the reason why obese people may be more at risk of... Women are living longer but men are catching up as females'... Intermittent fasting could make you live longer and help... Share...
    SULEIMAN KHEL, Pakistan (AP) - When Tariq Nawaz’s daughter was born a year ago, he borrowed money to pay for his wife’s cesarean delivery. Seven months later, they learned their baby had polio and sold the little bit of jewelry his wife had received for her wedding to pay mounting medical bills. Then the new coronavirus pandemic struck Pakistan, prompting a countrywide lockdown. Still in debt, Nawaz lost his job, his monthly paycheck of $95 and the means to provide treatment for the baby’s polio. “It’s all I can think of. I feel like my head is going crazy,” he said. TOP STORIES Abraham Lincoln monument torched in Chicago: An absolute disgraceful act Coronavirus hype biggest political hoax in history Defund police movement divides Democrats, disrupts Biden VP derby For millions of people like Nawaz who live in poor and troubled regions of the world, the novel coronavirus is...
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