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    They invent a cart that follows you in the supermarket and can even pay for the purchase
    Unemployment remains high, Republicans allowed expanded unemployment benefits to expire, and retail companies are using that desperation to get vulnerable people to risk their health or their lives for low, low wages. Early on in the pandemic, many retail chains paid their workers some amount of hazard pay. It was usually an inadequate amount and often wasn’t backed up by a commitment to safety, but it was something. Well, no more. Most of the companies that offered hazard pay back in the spring have phased it out, often replacing it with bonuses, so workers aren’t tempted to think of it as part of their hourly pay and fight to keep it. And, The New York Times reports, many of those same companies have spent far more buying back stock to benefit their shareholders even as they strategize carefully to avoid paying their workers a penny more than they have to. All while...
    TRENTON, N.J. (CBS/AP) — New Jersey is upping its efforts to force chemical companies to pay for decades of contamination of waterways by so-called “forever chemicals” used to stain-proof clothing and produce non-stick cookware that have become ubiquitous in everyday life. The state Attorney General’s Office and the Department of Environmental Protection sued three companies on Tuesday, alleging they have failed to clean up, and in some instances continue to release, chemicals that have polluted public drinking water at opposite ends of the state. The substances are sometimes called “forever chemicals” because they do not break down, and tend to accumulate in the air, water, soil and even fish. They can harm fetuses and newborns, and have been associated with kidney and testicular cancer and other illnesses. They have been used for more than 60 years and have become staples of modern life for consumers who want to protect their...
    When asked about Google, Bryan Clayton voices a familiar lament among small-business owners. "You keep getting squeezed further and further down the search results page," said Clayton, CEO of GreenPal, a company that operates an app to help homeowners find lawn care. "As a startup, you don't have a million-dollar advertising budget." The Justice Department sued Google for anticompetitive behavior on October 20, saying the company's dominance in online search and advertising harms rivals and consumers. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox But owners such as Clayton have a different beef. What's unfair about Google, they say, is the way it gives the greatest prominence in search results to companies that spend the most on advertising. Companies covet the top spots in Google search results — the first page of rankings, and the top of subsequent pages. But if too many companies vie for one of these...
    A mother and her new partner have bought a house with her ex and all their kids - after years of previous domestic bliss all living under one roof.  When Lindsay Taylor, 35, from Putnam, Connecticut, and her ex-husband Chris Kelley, 38, split up, they remained good friends, co-parenting their two children. She went on to marry new hubby Mike Taylor, 52, but they all remained close - so moved into one five-bed home to raise their collective kids. The massive family said the set up has worked so well, that when it was time to look for a bigger home, they did it together, and are preparing to move again as a team. Lindsay Taylor, 35, from Putnam, Connecticut, and her new partner Mike Taylor, 52, have bought a house with her ex-husband Chris Kelley, 38, and all their kids. Pictured: Ex-husband Chris, Lindsay and new husband Mike ...
    Purdue Pharma's wealthy Sackler family are set to keep their billions under a settlement with the Trump administration, according to reports.  The company entered bankruptcy protection last year in an effort to settle thousands of lawsuits accusing it of helping spark an opioid addiction and overdose epidemic that has contributed to more than 400,000 deaths in the U.S.    The lawsuits said the company, and in some cases the Sacklers, used deceptive marketing and took other improper steps to flood communities with prescription opioids. Oxycodone is the main ingredient in OxyContin, made by Purdue Pharma.  Now The New Yorker reports the Sacklers, who own Purdue Pharma, are prepared to pay out $3 billion to opioid crisis victims - but only if they face no criminal liability. In court papers the family say they will make the payout if released from 'all potential federal liability arising from or related to opioid-related activities.' Bankruptcy judge Robert Drain...
    Love the idea of working with animals, but don’t have the resources or desire to go through vet school? You can still put your love of pets or wildlife to work in your career. Here are 12 jobs working with animals that can pay the bills for any animal lover. (Salaries are from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and Salary.com.)1. Groomer Groomers help pets look their best by cleaning them, trimming fur and providing other services. Pay depends on skills, certifications, experience and which state you work in. The highest pay in each region typically going to specialists who provide boutique grooming services. Here are the job details: Median Salary: $34,702 Salary Range: $22,666 to $51,323 Minimum Qualifications: high school diploma or equivalent How to become one: Typically, animal caretakers must have at least a high school diploma or GED. Most training takes place on...
    Florida Attorney General Ashley Moody (R) has called for state and federal law enforcement to investigate the legality of an effort backed by billionaire Democrat Michael Bloomberg that has raised millions to pay off the debts of felons in the state so that they can vote ahead of the November 3 election. What are the details? Bloomberg — who has pledged to spend $100 million to help Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden win the White House — announced Tuesday that he helped raise more than $16 million toward a fund launched by the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition that has thus far paid off the court fines of over 31,000 former prisoners in order to restore the felons' voting rights. Following the news of Bloomberg's initiative, Florida Rep. Matt Gaetz (R) tweeted, " I just spoke to @AGAshleyMoody, she is all over the @MikeBloomberg-connected activities in Florida."...
    Billionaire and former Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg has raised more than $16 million toward paying off the court fines of Florida felons in order to make them eligible to vote, and so far the ongoing effort has settled obligations in full for more than 31,000 former prisoners ahead of Election Day. What are the details?Bloomberg aides told The Daily Mail that the former mayor of New York City — who has pledged to spend $100 million to help Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden win on Nov. 3 — rallied other donors and added nearly $17 million to the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition's $5 million raised toward pay off fines owed by felons so that they can vote. The outlet reported that according to the Florida Right Restoration Coalition, "other donors include John Legend, LeBron James, Michael Jordan, MTV, Comedy Central, VH1, Ben & Jerry's, Levi Strauss & Co,...
    NBA star LeBron James has reportedly been reaching out to convicted felons to help them pay any lingering fines that are preventing them from being able to vote. James has partnered with the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition to send text messages to notify anyone who may qualify for the assistance, according to OutKick. "We're teaming up with LeBron James to break down barriers to voting for people w/ felony convictions. Do you know anyone that needs their fines & fees paid off so they can vote?" one of the text messages reads. Outkick obtained this screenshot Monday:(Link: https://t.co/jAjupyI2uA.) pic.twitter.com/DgGMPqPKLE— OutKick (@Outkick) September 22, 2020 James has been urging people to vote as part of his larger effort to raise awareness about racial injustice and police brutality. James said black people "are terrified" to live in the United States following the shooting of Jacob Blake, a black man...
    Former Mayor Michael Bloomberg has helped pay off the outstanding fines and fees of 32,000 convicted felons in Florida so they could regain their right to vote ahead of the November election, according to a report. The billionaire and former presidential candidate raised over $16 million for, and donated $5 million to, the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition, according to Axios. Bloomberg’s push would benefit ex-cons as part of a 2018 state constitutional amendment allowing felons who had served their time to regain their right to vote. Before they could regain those rights, however, they would need to pay back any fines, fees or restitution. In a statement to the news outlet, a representative for Bloomberg said, “The right to vote is fundamental to our democracy and no American should be denied that right. Working together with the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition, we are determined to end disenfranchisement and the discrimination...
    Alex Henderson September 22, 2020 6:19PM (UTC) This article originally appeared on AlterNet. Earlier this year, Vice President Joe Biden and former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg were rivals in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary; now, Bloomberg is one of Biden's most generous donors and is fighting to help him win Florida in the general election — and that includes paying the fines of almost 32,000 Black and Latinx voters who have felony convictions. Michael Scherer, in the Washington Post, explains that "Bloomberg and his team" have raised $16 million for "a program organized by the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition to pay the fines, fees and restitution costs for former prisoners who are already registered to vote in Florida but barred by law from participating in the election because of those outstanding debts." : In Florida, many Democrats have argued that prohibiting people from voting because of those fines or fees...
    Earlier this year, Vice President Joe Biden and former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg were rivals in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary; now, Bloomberg is one of Biden’s most generous donors and is fighting to help him win Florida in the general election — and that includes paying the fines of almost 32,000 African-American and Latino voters who have felony convictions. Michael Scherer, in the Washington Post, explains that “Bloomberg and his team” have raised $16 million for “a program organized by the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition to pay the fines, fees and restitution costs for former prisoners who are already registered to vote in Florida but barred by law from participating in the election because of those outstanding debts.” In Florida, many Democrats have argued that prohibiting people from voting because of those fines or fees is a form of voter suppression. But many Florida Republicans have disagreed...
    PHOTO VIA MIKE BLOOMBERG/FACEBOOKJust days after after Gov. Ron DeSantis won a court victory to keep felons from voting until they’ve paid off fines, restitution and court fees, Democratic billionaire and former presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg has stepped in to help them pay off the debts. Bloomberg is part of an effort that raised more than $20 million dollars to help felons who have completed their prison sentences vote in the presidential election. That’s in addition to the $100 million he has pledged to help Joe Biden win Florida, a crucial state with 29 electoral college votes that President Donald Trump’s hopes will keep him in the White House. A federal appellate court ruled on Sept. 11 that in addition to serving their sentences, Florida felons must pay all fines, restitution and legal fees before they can regain their right to vote. The case could have broad implications for the November elections. Under Amendment 4,...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami/AP) – In a case that could have broad implications for the November elections, a federal appellate court ruled Friday that Florida felons must pay all fines, restitution, and legal fees before they can regain their right to vote. Reversing a lower court judge’s decision that gave Florida felons the right to vote regardless of outstanding legal obligations, the order from the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals was a disappointment to voting rights activists and upheld the position of Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis and the GOP-led state Legislature. Under Amendment 4, which Florida voter passed overwhelmingly in 2018, felons who have completed their sentences would have voting rights restored. But the legal dispute arose after lawmakers the next year moved to define what it means to complete a sentence. In addition to prison time served, lawmakers stipulated that all legal financial obligations, including unpaid fines and restitution, would...
    Florida felons must pay all fines, restitution and legal fees before they can regain their right to vote, a federal appellate court ruled Friday in a case that could have broad implications for the November elections. Reversing a lower court judge's decision that gave Florida felons the right to vote regardless of outstanding legal obligations, the order from the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals was a disappointment to voting rights activists and upheld the position of Republican Governor Ron DeSantis and the GOP-led state Legislature. Under Amendment 4, which Florida voters passed overwhelmingly in 2018, felons who have completed their sentences would have voting rights restored. But the legal dispute arose after lawmakers the next year moved to define what it means to complete a sentence. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox In addition to prison time served, lawmakers stipulated that all legal financial obligations, including unpaid...
    Florida felons must finish paying any fines and fees they owe before they are eligible to vote, The Hill reports. A federal appeals court ruled Friday to uphold a Florida law that requires felons to pay any restitution they owe before the state will deem them eligible to vote. The 10-judge panel of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals issued a 6-4 ruling to reverse a lower court judge’s decision that awarded Florida felons the right to vote regardless of unpaid legal obligations. It is estimated that the decision will impact up to 1 million felons in the state. The case began after an amendment to Floridas constitution passed in 2018 that restored voting rights to those with felony convictions who had completed “all terms” of their sentences. The state legislature and Supreme Court ruled that “all terms” meant that fines and fees had to be paid. Florida is a...
    ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — Florida felons must pay all fines, restitution and legal fees before they can regain their right to vote, a federal appellate court ruled Friday in a case that could have broad implications for the November elections. Reversing a lower court judge’s decision that gave Florida felons the right to vote regardless of outstanding legal obligations, the order from the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals was a disappointment to voting rights activists and upheld the position of Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis and the GOP-led state Legislature. Under Amendment 4, which Florida voter passed overwhelmingly in 2018, felons who have completed their sentences would have voting rights restored. But the legal dispute arose after lawmakers the next year moved to define what it means to complete a sentence. In addition to prison time served, lawmakers stipulated that all legal financial obligations, including unpaid fines and restitution,...
    ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – Florida felons must pay all fines, restitution and legal fees before they can regain their right to vote, a federal appellate court ruled Friday in a case that could have broad implications for the November elections. Reversing a lower court judge's decision that gave Florida felons the right to vote regardless of outstanding legal obligations, the order from the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals was a disappointment to voting rights activists and upheld the position of Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis and the GOP-led state Legislature. Under Amendment 4, which Florida voter passed overwhelmingly in 2018, felons who have completed their sentences would have voting rights restored. But the legal dispute arose after lawmakers the next year moved to define what it means to complete a sentence. In addition to prison time served, lawmakers stipulated that all legal financial obligations, including unpaid fines and restitution, would...
    By CURT ANDERSON, AP Legal Affairs Writer ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — Florida felons must pay all fines, restitution and legal fees before they can regain their right to vote, a federal appellate court ruled Friday. Reversing a lower court judge's decision that gave Florida felons the right to vote regardless of outstanding legal obligations, the order from the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals was a disappointment to voting rights activists and could have national implications in November’s presidential election. Under Amendment 4, felons who have completed their sentences would have voting rights restored. But the legal dispute arose after the Republican-controlled state Legislature in 2019 moved to define what it means to complete a sentence. In addition to time served, lawmakers stipulated that all legal financial obligations, including unpaid fines and restitution, would also have to be settled before a felon could be eligible to vote. Amendment 4...
    A federal appeals court ruled Friday to uphold a Florida law requiring up to 1 million felons in the state to finish paying fines and fees before they are eligible to vote. The 10-judge panel of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals decided in a 6-4 ruling to reverse a lower court judge’s decision that gave Florida felons the right to vote regardless of outstanding legal obligations. In July, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to revisit the federal appeals court ruling before the primary voter registration deadline. The case stems from an amendment to Florida's constitution passed in 2018 that restored voting rights to those with felony convictions who had completed “all terms” of their sentences. The state legislature and Supreme Court decided that “all terms” also requires fines and fees. The ruling, which came as a disappointment to voting rights activists, comes less than two months before the November election. Florida is...
    Washington (CNN)Florida can bar ex-felons from voting if they owe court fines or fees associated with their convictions, even if they are unable to pay, a federal appeals court ruled Friday.The 6-4 ruling by the full 11th US Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a lower court's ruling blocking the law.The law, Chief Judge William Pryor wrote in the majority opinion, doesn't constitute a poll tax. Instead, it's meant to promote "full rehabilitation." Visit CNN's Election Center for full coverage of the 2020 raceEarlier this year, the US Supreme Court said Florida can enforce the law while the legal case over its constitutionality plays out, meaning the rule would likely be in place for the November elections.Read MoreFriday's ruling overturns a decision from US District Court Robert Hinkle, who had said the Florida law, in respect to those people who are unable to pay, violates the Constitution. Hinkle called the state's...
    CASH-STRAPPED Valencia have been forced to give their stars IOU notes because they can't afford to pay their players, according to reports. The struggling LaLiga side have seen their finances devasted by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. 1Valencia's players have not been paid, according to reportsCredit: EPA They have already been forced to sell star players Francis Coquelin and Dani Parejo for bargain fees - causing widespread anger among supporters. TRANSFER NEWS LIVE: Breaking news, juicy gossip and the biggest deals Both players joined league rivals Villarreal for a combined fee in the region of £12million to ensure they are off the wage bill. But the problems appear a lot more serious than first feared following Marca's latest revelation. They write how the players were forced to forgo their latest pay packets and were left angered when they were instead given IOU's with an expiry date of September 2021....
    Under President Donald Trump’s plan to extend unemployment benefits, states are on the hook to cover 25% of the cost. But many governors say they can’t afford to pitch in money as they are already facing budget deficits imposed by the coronavirus pandemic, according to NBC News. "The concept of saying to states, you pay 25% of the unemployment insurance is just laughable," New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Sunday. "The whole issue here was getting states funding, state and local funding. You cant now say to states who have no funding, and you have to pay 25% of the unemployment insurance cost." Maine Gov. Janet Mills said Trump’s plan is not the budget relief that states need. "Asking states now to take on additional expenses is unresponsive to these needs and threatens important programs and services," she said. Under Trump’s executive order, the jobless would receive $400 per week....
    The voting rights organization founded by NBA star LeBron James is contributing $100,000 toward paying fines for convicted felons in Florida so they can vote, Politico reported. James and other athletes and entertainers founded More Than a Vote after the death of George Floyd as a group focused on increasing voter turnout among minority communities. In Florida, convicted felons were granted the right to vote, but they are still prohibited from doing so if they owe court debts."Your right to vote shouldn't depend upon whether or not you can pay to exercise it," Miami Heat forward and More than a Vote member Udonis Haslem said in a written statement.The partnership will help ensure that "formerly incarcerated American citizens — many of them Black and brown — are able to pay their outstanding fines and fees and register to vote in the 2020 election and beyond."The coalition already has raised...
    LeBron James wants to help Florida felons get the right to vote, and the NBA star is putting his money where his mouth is to get it done. James founded a voting rights group that is raising funds to pay the outstanding court debts for people convicted of felonies in the state. This group had previously been barred from casting their ballots, but a 2018 ballot initiative reversed that and ended Florida’s lifetime voting ban on felons. LeBron teamed up with a number of other Black athletes to start the group More Than A Vote, which has partnered with the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition (FRRC) to launch the campaign. As The Huffington Post reported, close to 1.4 million Florida residents had been unable to vote due to convictions, including one in every five Black residents of the state. After the ballot initiative ended the lifetime voting bans, state Republicans passed...
    By Marin Wolf and Leslie Patton, Bloomberg Parents, fearing their kids won’t see the inside of a classroom this fall, are ginning up an alternative familiar to the Home Depot crowd: Do-it-yourself. Amid the pandemic, enterprising families, especially those with means, are hiring tutors on their own or in groups or joining the already growing movement of homeschooling. Their efforts include preschoolers, as well as elementary and beyond. For five Los Angeles families, that has meant spending $22,500 in the last three months to create what they’re calling a “micro-school” for their pre-school aged kids. They hired an interior designer to build a makeshift classroom with an art pavilion at one of their homes and contracted the services of a local teacher to come three days a week. She creates bespoke lesson plans about age-appropriate topics, like the alphabet and human emotions. “This is healthier for the both of us,”...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Months into the pandemic, the ABC 7 I-Team continues to get calls and emails from viewers who say they are still unable to get approval for their much-needed unemployment benefits, despite improvements to Illinois Department of Employment Security's the website and call center."I haven't received a dime. It's been extremely hard on me to be able to stay on top of all my bills and all my, you know, all my loans that I've had to take out for student debt, everything, um, once I got back to work in June, you know, I had to right away pay my landlords for April, May, and June," said Blancaestela Zermeno.Zermeno is now back to work as an aesthetician, but she was out of work from March 20 until June due to the stay at home order.Zermeno said she has been waiting on unemployment backpay form IDES and says...
    Tesla has told its workers they are allowed to take Juneteenth off as an “excused absence” after some had already showed up for work on the holiday that recognizes the end of slavery in the United States, according to internal emails first reported by BuzzFeed and CNBC. The company also told employees that they would not be paid if they don’t show up. Just after this story published, CEO Elon Musk tweeted that Juneteenth will be “henceforth considered a US holiday at Tesla & SpaceX,” though he did not immediately clarify if workers will be paid on those days moving forward. Other Silicon Valley companies like Spotify, Uber, and Twitter had previously announced ahead of time that they were making Juneteenth a paid company holiday. Automakers like Ford and General Motors have merely asked their workers to observe a moment of silence. Both emails came from the head...
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