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    The Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus (CAPAC) is branching out to welcome House Republicans into a new bipartisan group, a shakeup that reflects the historic diversity of the newly elected GOP class.  Rep. Judy Chu, D-Calif., chairs the group of Asian-American House members, which is currently made up exclusively of Democrats. But the election in November of California Republicans Michelle Steel and Young Kim prompted Chu to find a new way to work across the aisle. "We are going to be starting a bipartisan API (Asian Pacific Islander) caucus," Chu said Friday. FILE: Rep. Judy Chu, D-Calif., speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. At a House Armed Services hearing on military suicides Friday, Sept. 9, 2011, Chu testified, and in a dramatic moment described the death of her nephew, Marine Lance Cpl. Harry Lew, 21, who put a gun to his head and killed himself while...
    A bipartisan group of dozens of former federal judges called Friday for the Senate to confirm Merrick Garland to lead the Department of Justice as attorney general. In a letter to Sens. Chuck Schumer, Mitch McConnell, Senate Judiciary Chair Richard Durbin and ranking member Chuck Grassley, the judges urged the upper chamber to carry out the confirmation process "as swiftly as possible." The judges cited Garland’s record of service as a judge and prosecutor, including his oversight of the federal investigation into the Oklahoma City bombing. "We believe, based upon Judge Garland’s character, his impeccable judicial service, and his distinguished service to the United States as a federal prosecutor and senior Justice Department official, that he will be an outstanding attorney general," the judges said in the letter. VideoGarland is slated to appear for a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday. From there, Garland’s nomination is subject to a...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – A bipartisan group of elected officials are calling for a review of the current U.S. policy and relations with Cuba in a push for freedom on the island. Among those taking part was Republican Congressman Carlos Gimenez. “A good number of elected officials from Miami, from this area, while we may disagree on certain things, and God knows that I’ve disagreed with some of the gentlemen here, but we agree on this: That we need and we want, we need and we demand a free Cuba,” he said. The meeting comes on the heels of the White House announcement that the Biden administration would review the existing Cuba policy.
    A bipartisan group of lawmakers wants to allocate $300 million to fund emergency grants and loans for New Jersey's small businesses and nonprofit organizations. The money, which would be funneled through the New Jersey Economic Development Authority (EDA), ostensibly aims to help organizations impacted by COVID-19. “With State revenues almost certain to beat expectations this year and the likelihood New Jersey will receive billions more in the next federal relief package, there’s no legitimate argument that we can’t afford this legislation,” state Senate Republican Budget Officer Steven Oroho, R-Franklin, said in a news release. In a statement, state Senate President Steve Sweeney, D-Gloucester/Salem/Cumberland, said the funding “will speed up our economic recovery from the pandemic, prevent more businesses and nonprofits from closing, and create jobs for workers who have been on the unemployment rolls for almost a year.” The bill, proponents say, would help small businesses...
    WASHINGTON (WJZ) — Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan was among the members of a bipartisan group of lawmakers to meet with President Joe Biden at the White House Friday to talk about the Biden administration’s plan to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. The lawmakers met to go over the American Rescue Plan, which the White House billed last month as “an aggressive, two-step plan for rescue, from the depths of this crisis, and recovery, by investing in America, creating millions of additional good-paying jobs, combatting the climate crisis, advancing racial equity, and building back better than before.” RELATED: Ed Smith Stadium To Allow Fans For Orioles Spring Training Games; Attendance Capped At 25% Capacity Larry Hogan, governor of Maryland, from right, Michelle Lujan Grisham, governor of New Mexico, U.S. President Joe Biden and U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris wear protective masks during a meeting with governors and mayors in the Oval...
    President BidenJoe BidenPostal Service posts profits after surge in holiday deliveries Overnight Defense: Pentagon pushes to root out extremism in ranks | Top admiral condemns extremism after noose, hate speech discovered GOP senators send clear signal: Trump's getting acquitted MORE will meet with a bipartisan group of mayors and governors at the White House on Friday as he advocates for his $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief proposal. White House press secretary Jen PsakiJen PsakiBiden opposes effort to recall California's Newsom: White House Huawei wants appeals court to overturn FCC's national security ban White House says Biden won't opine on trial MORE announced plans for the meeting at a briefing Wednesday, saying the group would “discuss the vital need to get more support to their communities and to those on the frontlines of this fight.” The participants were not immediately disclosed. While no congressional Republicans have backed Biden's coronavirus relief proposal, Republican governors...
    A bipartisan group of lawmakers came out in support of new domestic terror laws this week, despite earlier opposition from over 150 civil rights groups that were concerned about the implications for minority communities. Experts said domestic terrorist groups could pose a continuing threat after the Capitol riot on Jan. 6, leading to a bipartisan majority of the House Homeland Security Committee to agree on considering new laws to address potentially harmful groups, The Washington Post reported Thursday. But 156 civil rights groups, including the NAACP, the Human Rights Campaign and the Council on American-Islamic Relations, had sent a letter to Congress on Jan. 19 describing concern about expanding legal authority related to terrorism. “We must meet the challenge of addressing white nationalist and far-right militia violence without causing further harm to communities already disproportionately impacted by the criminal-legal system,” the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights wrote. The...
    A bipartisan group of lawmakers is calling on Congress to immediately approve federal funds to ramp up distribution and administration of vaccines, without waiting for negotiations on a broader coronavirus relief package to finish.  On Thursday, the 56-member Problem Solvers Caucus — which is split evenly between Democrats and Republicans — endorsed the $160 billion package, which would devote an immediate additional $50 billion to testing and $20 billion to a national vaccine program in partnership with states, tribes and territories.  The plan would also provide another $30 billion for disaster relief, $5 billion in additional personal protective equipment for first responders, doctors and dentists and $15 billion to restock the strategic national stockpile.  An additional $5 billion would go toward the Defense Production Act, which gives the president the authority to speed up domestic production of critical resources, and $35 billion would be used for aid to health providers,...
    A bipartisan group of senators is signaling that they want the next round of coronavirus relief checks to Americans to be more targeted. The group is offering an amendment to the budget resolution part of the Senate's hours-long vote-a-rama on Thursday. Though it's non-binding, the fact that it has support of 16 senators from both parties signals that the structure of the checks is an area of likely negotiation as Democrats craft the coronavirus relief package. The amendment was offered by Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Senate committee advances Granholm nomination to lead Energy | EPA nominee Regan pledges 'urgency' on climate change at confirmation hearing | Omar calls on Biden to block pipeline being built in Minnesota Senate passes organizing resolution after Schumer-McConnell deal Poll: 64 percent support increasing the federal minimum wage to by 2025 MORE (D-W.Va.). And it has the support of Democratic Sens. Kyrsten Sinema...
    A bipartisan group of U.S. senators and congressmen nominated the pro-democracy movement in Hong Kong for the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize amid a power grab and protest crackdown by the Chinese Communist Party in the formerly semi-autonomous city. The nomination was sent to the Nobel Peace Prize Committee on Sunday, the deadline for submissions, and the lawmakers publicized their letter on Wednesday in a move that is sure to upset Beijing at a time when President Biden is less than a month into his tenure at the White House. The letter was signed by Republican Sens. Marco Rubio of Florida, Steve Daines of Montana, and Todd Young of Indiana. Democratic Sens. Jeffrey Merkley of Oregon and Gary Peters of Michigan, along with Republican Rep. Vicky Hartzler of Missouri and Democratic Reps. James McGovern of Massachusetts, Thomas Suozzi of New York, and Tom Malinowski of New Jersey, also signed...
    A bipartisan group of lawmakers introduced a bill to ease a major financial burden on the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) by eliminating a requirement that it fund retirement benefits decades ahead of time. The USPS Fairness Act would do away with a 2006 law that mandated the USPS to form a $72 billion fund to pay for retirement health benefits for over 50 years, a requirement that is not imposed on any other federal agency.  The legislation was introduced in the House by Reps. Peter DeFazioPeter Anthony DeFazioLawmakers offer competing priorities for infrastructure plans The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Which path will Democrats take on COVID-19 bill? On The Money: Economy shrank 3.5 percent in 2020 | Lawmakers rip Robinhood's decision on GameStop | Budget rules, politics threaten per hour minimum wage MORE (D-Ore.), Tom ReedTom ReedGOP senators praise Biden's inauguration speech The Hill's 12:30 Report:...
    Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., accused President Biden of abandoning true unity for a "patina of unity" and said the president failed to reach out to his group of bipartisan centrist senators before releasing his $1.9 trillion coronavirus stimulus proposal earlier in January. Cassidy is among ten Republican senators who proposed an alternative $600 billion coronavirus relief package on Sunday. BIDEN PROPOSES SPENDING $1.9 TRILLION AS HE UNVEILS ‘RESCUE PLAN’ FOR AMERICA "We're targeted to the needs of the American people, treating our tax dollars as if they're our tax dollars not just money to spend," Cassidy told "Fox News Sunday." "If you say you want bipartisanship ... and then you have a budget reconciliation which is chock-full of payouts to Democratic constituency groups ... you don't want bipartisanship, you want the patina of bipartisanship." Cassidy claimed that Biden did not even try to work with his bipartisan group of senators. "The President's team...
    A bipartisan group of House and Senate lawmakers is waiting on the sidelines for a chance to play a key role in negotiating a coronavirus aid package. President Biden’s $1.9 trillion coronavirus aid proposal can’t pass the evenly divided Senate without changes, and the president is interested in finding a bipartisan deal before Democrats resort to a procedural tactic that would allow them to force it through without any GOP support. “We take our responsibility seriously,” Sen. Bill Cassidy, a Louisiana Republican, told reporters ahead of a meeting involving members of the bipartisan group. A bipartisan group of lawmakers in both chambers are ready to help bridge the gap. The group was successful in 2020 in restarting stalled negotiations on a $900 billion coronavirus aid package and is ready to play a major role again. “The idea that we don't just have to wait for something to come down...
              A bipartisan group that advocates for an independent Supreme Court is crying foul after Google allegedly refused to place their online advertisements. “Keep Nine, a bipartisan organization that advocates for an independent Supreme Court,has had its Google ads suspended in an arbitrary move by the website,” ValueWalk reported. “According to Google, the ad was disapproved because of a ‘Sensitive Event’ surrounding the election, that event being Joe Biden’s inauguration as president Wednesday.” In a statement, Keep Nine said that it is “comprised of former state Attorneys General and elected officials from both major American political parties.” It blasted Google for targeting it, in what is the latest round of censorship from Silicon Valley tech giants. Keep Nine said: “This is beyond absurd. Keep Nine is and always has been an organization dedicated to bringing Americans together over an issue that we believe should concern...
    Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsBiden officials hold call with bipartisan group of senators on coronavirus relief plan The Hill's Morning Report - Biden's crisis agenda hits headwinds GOP senators say only a few Republicans will vote to convict Trump MORE (R-Maine), a key Republican moderate, said Monday that President Biden and Democratic lawmakers should set aside a proposal to increase the minimum wage from a new COVID-19 relief proposal. She was one of more than a dozen senators who participated on a conference call with National Economic Council Director Brian DeeseBrian DeeseBiden officials hold call with bipartisan group of senators on coronavirus relief plan Biden expands on Obama ethics pledge The Memo: Biden gambles that he can do it all MORE Sunday to discuss President Biden’s $1.9 trillion relief plan. Biden's proposed package would increase the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour, more than doubling the current rate of $7.25 an...
    A group of over a dozen senators, Democrat and Republican, has expressed unease with facets of President Biden’s $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief proposal, highlighting concerns with the individual stimulus payments and reportedly telling the Biden White House the measure offers too much to higher-income earners. Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) reportedly set up the Sunday call between sixteen senators and Biden administration officials, which included Biden’s coronavirus coordinator, Jeff Zients, and director of the White House National Economic Council, Brian Deese. The conversation, which centered around the president’s coronavirus relief proposal, which he outlined this month, spanned over an hour as lawmakers reached a “consensus” that vaccine distribution should remain a priority. However, lawmakers also expressed concern that the proposal offers too much aid to higher-income earners. According to Politico, some of the lawmakers “balked at the stimulus payments, urging the White House to make them targeted toward those in greater need, according to...
    WASHINGTON, D.C. (KDKA) — A bipartisan group of lawmakers met virtually on Sunday with leaders of the Biden administration to discuss some important elements in combating the Coronavirus pandemic — like vaccine distribution and a massive stimulus plan. One of the agenda items discussed were details on a $1.9 trillion rescue plan. Some senators suggested that President Biden needs to have more information on where the money is going. According to CBS News, the call involved 16 Senators and three senior White House advisors. The President’s proposed relief plan calls for $400 billion directed to slowing spread of COVID-19 and increasing vaccine capabilities. More than $1 trillion is set to assist families needing direct financial support. And about $440 billion is directed towards cash for small businesses and communities. Participants in the meeting want to know more on how quickly the vaccine can be distributed. They seemed to agree the...
    Officials in President Biden’s administration on Sunday held a call with a bipartisan group of senators to discuss the White House’s proposed $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package. Several senators confirmed their participation in the call, with a couple of Democratic senators describing the conversation as “productive.” Senate Majority Whip Dick DurbinDick DurbinCapitol insurrection fallout: A PATRIOT Act 2.0? Sunday shows preview: All eyes on Biden administration to tackle coronavirus Overnight Health Care — Fauci: Lack of facts 'likely' cost lives in coronavirus fight | CDC changes COVID-19 vaccine guidance to allow rare mixing of Pfizer, Moderna shots | Senate chaos threatens to slow Biden's agenda MORE (D-Ill.) categorized the discussion as “refreshing” and and said it was “long overdue” to have the White House “fully engaged in addressing this pandemic with a focus on science and federal leadership.” “In the spirit of unity that we saw on the West Front...
    JOE BIDEN'S coronavirus relief plan gives too much money to high earners, a bipartisan group of senators told the White House late Sunday night. The group finds fault with Biden's plan that would give $1,400 direct payments to all Americans - some of which don't need the money, the senators argue. The call, described as "consensus" by senators on the call, is the first rift between the president and Congress since Biden was inaugurated on Wednesday. However, the senators agreed with the president there was an urgent need to act quickly on vaccine distribution. It was also indicative of how open and responsive Biden would be over former President Donald Trump, who almost refused to sign the last relief bill after making 11th-hour requests to Congress, which had already passed the bill. The senators spoke with White House National Economic Council director Brian Deese, Biden’s coronavirus coordinator Jeff Zients,...
    President Biden's $1.9 trillion coronavirus aid proposal may end up less costly and more narrow after a bipartisan makeover some House and Senate lawmakers hope to achieve. A bipartisan group of senators has planned to meet with officials from the Biden administration in the coming days to discuss the president's proposal, which includes a provision to lift the minimum wage to $15. The Biden plan would also provide $1,400 stimulus checks (bringing the total aid for individuals to $2,000) at the cost of $1 trillion, in addition to $440 billion for state and local aid and $400 billion to fight the virus. Congress has already passed nearly $4 trillion in coronavirus relief since the pandemic started last year, including $900 billion last month. "Just show me why the $1.9 [trillion] is needed right now when it's going to be needed and what we didn't get out the door before...
    A bipartisan group of 16 senators is expected to speak this weekend with a White House aide about coronavirus relief. The phone call with National Economic Council Director Brian DeeseBrian DeeseBiden to extend eviction moratorium, student loan forbearance Biden to sign flurry of executive actions in first hours of presidency Sunday shows preview: Washington prepares for an inauguration and impeachment; coronavirus surges across the US MORE, confirmed by a source familiar with the plan, is expected to be used to discuss President Biden's roughly $1.9 coronavirus relief proposal. Spokespeople for the White House didn't immediately respond to a request for comment. The Senate group includes many of the same members as last year's "908" coalition, who created a framework credited by leadership as breaking a months-long stalemate on a fifth round of coronavirus help. The GOP senators in the group are Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGOP senators praise Biden's inauguration speech LIVE...
    Washington — A bipartisan group of senators, many of whom helped craft the framework for the most recent coronavirus relief package, is planning to meet with a top White House economic adviser in the coming days to discuss the next round of federal aid, according to lawmakers and sources familiar with the matter. "I expect that we will be meeting with one of the new President's economic advisors within a week," Republican Senator Susan Collins of Maine said in a statement. One source told CBS News that the group will have a call with Brian Deese, the director of the National Economic Council and President Joe Biden's top economic aide. Mr. Biden has proposed a COVID-19 relief package that includes funds to support vaccine distribution efforts, extend unemployment benefits and expand federal aid to families, small businesses and communities. The White House's plan, which Mr. Biden said he plans to...
    A bipartisan group of lawmakers wants to craft a narrow coronavirus aid package that can pass quickly, and some will meet as soon as this weekend with officials from the Biden administration. Sen. Joe Manchin, a West Virginia Democrat, told reporters Wednesday a bipartisan group of lawmakers will meet with Biden administration officials “probably” this weekend to discuss a new aid package. Manchin did not say whether he or other Democratic lawmakers would push for a more targeted measure, but there is a bipartisan push for something that stands an easier chance of clearing Congress quickly. A Manchin spokesman said the bipartisan caucus "hasn’t issued anything about the Biden plan." President Biden plans to send Congress a $1.9 trillion coronavirus aid spending request that includes an additional round of stimulus checks worth $1,400. Biden’s bill would also lift the minimum wage to $15 per hour. The steep...
    Bradley Cortright January 14, 2021 0 Comments Three lawmakers are pushing to recognize the actions of a U.S. Capitol Police officer who has been hailed as a hero for his actions that diverted a crowd of rioters away from an entrance to the U.S. Senate on January 6.  Freshman Rep. Nancy Mace (R-S.C.) along with Reps. Emanuel Cleaver (D-Mo.), and Charlie Crist (D-Fla.) unveiled legislation on Thursday to award Capitol Police Officer Eugene Goodman the Congressional Gold Medal for “his bravery and quick thinking during last week’s insurrection.” A press release noted, “Various media outlets witnessed as Officer Goodman valiantly put himself in harm’s way, luring a violent mob away from an unguarded entrance to the Senate chambers, protecting Senators, staff, and reporters inside.” A viral video from the rioter at the Capitol shows Goodman facing down several rioters. He is seen walking up a stairwell as the mob follows him....
              Three Virginia state Senators called for Governor Ralph Northam on Wednesday to reopen public schools across the Commonwealth and mandate in-person learning as an option for families struggling with virtual instruction. Just hours before the General Assembly kicked off its 2021 session, Senators Joe Morrissey (D-Richmond City), Siobhan Dunnavant (R-Henrico) and Chap Petersen (D-Fairfax City) held a press conference to discuss the matter. “To me, reopening the schools is the number one issue, it’s the most important issue,” Petersen said. “All we’re asking is to reopen in-person education [and] mandate in-person education, and if families don’t feel safe, they don’t have to go, but the school divisions must offer it,” Petersen continued. Petersen also said the group of legislators wanted to see the governor use the same urgency for reopening schools as he did when shutting down all public schools back on March...
    A bipartisan group of senators on Sunday urged their colleagues to support the Electoral College vote, as at least a dozen GOP senators prepare to challenge the election results on Wednesday.  GOP Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsToomey, Murkowski to oppose GOP effort to challenge election results Ex-GOP senator suggests forming new party, calls Trump 'ringmaster' of Republicans Hawley jams GOP with Electoral College fight MORE (Maine), Bill CassidyBill CassidyInsurers lose multiyear lobbying fight over surprise medical bills Louisiana Rep.-elect Luke Letlow dies of COVID-19 Don't let critics derail an imperfect coronavirus relief bill that still has a lot of good in it MORE (La.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiRomney: Plan to challenge election 'egregious ploy' that 'dangerously threatens' country Toomey, Murkowski to oppose GOP effort to challenge election results 11 Senate Republicans say they will oppose Electoral College results Wednesday MORE (Alaska) and Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyRomney: Plan to challenge...
    A group of Republican and Democratic lawmakers from the House and Senate is calling on President TrumpDonald TrumpMcCarthy to offer UC request to revisit foreign spending in omnibus GOP senator on Trump pardons: 'This is rotten to the core' Trump pardons Manafort, Stone and Charles Kushner in latest round MORE to sign a $900 billion coronavirus relief bill that he recently said should include bigger stimulus checks. The 13 lawmakers, who previously put forth a $908 billion compromise measure, urged Trump to sign the measure into law, citing the need to provide immediate help to workers, businesses, schools and hospitals. “As members of the bipartisan, bicameral ‘908 Coalition,’ we urge the President to sign the COVID relief package. The legislation would bring desperately needed help to struggling families, unemployed workers, hard-hit small businesses, an overburdened health care system, stressed schools, and so many others. It would provide robust funding for testing...
    A new bipartisan gang in Congress has gained respect and leverage after jump-starting critical negotiations on a massive coronavirus aid package. The House and Senate appeared likely to postpone a new round of significant federal spending after months of stalled talks, but a group of 60 Republican and Democratic lawmakers in the House and Senate forced a deal now poised to pass before Christmas. "We're responding to that silent majority, that voice of America, that's saying, 'Enough is enough,'" Rep. Tom Reed, a New York Republican and co-chairman of the bipartisan House Problem Solvers Caucus, told the Washington Examiner. The caucus joined with a group of eight senators to draft a bipartisan package, announcing it at a news conference in the Capitol and calling on leadership to bring it up for a vote this month. A few more senators joined the gang last week, further increasing its leverage....
    Washington — A bipartisan coalition of senators unveiled Monday the legislative text for a pair of coronavirus relief bills that aim to provide economic aid to American workers and small businesses that have been crippled by the ongoing pandemic. Senator Joe Manchin, a moderate Democrat from West Virginia, placed two thick stacks of paper on the podium as he announced a comprehensive $748 billion measure, and an additional $160 billion for state and local funding. "Bipartisanship and compromise is alive and well in Washington, contrary to what you've been hearing. We've proven that," said Manchin, who was surrounded by a group of his colleagues. Republican Senator Susan Collins called it a "Christmas miracle," saying lawmakers had worked during the Thanksgiving holiday to create this bill. Collins said she hoped House and Senate leadership, as well as the White House, would "take our products and use them as the basis...
    A bipartisan group of lawmakers on Monday unveiled its $908 billion coronavirus relief package as Congress faces a time crunch to pass more aid.   The proposal is split into two parts: One $748 billion piece includes another round of Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) assistance for small businesses; an unemployment benefit; and more money for schools, vaccine distribution and other widely agreed upon items.  The second, $160 billion piece ties together the two most controversial elements of the coronavirus negotiations: More money for state and local governments and protections for businesses from coronavirus-related lawsuits.  "I think we've had a Christmas miracle occur in Washington," said Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGOP senator blocks Smithsonian Latino, women's history museums Bipartisan group unveils new details on COVID-19 relief measure Democratic senators push for ,200 direct payments in new coronavirus relief package MORE (R-Maine). "These bills are not only bipartisan products, they are bicameral as well....
    Sen. Bernie SandersBernie Sanders2021: Reality politics vs. liberal fantasy Progressives frustrated with representation as Biden Cabinet takes shape Perdue, Ocasio-Cortez spar on Twitter over Georgia races MORE (I-Vt.) on Monday furthered his push for Congress to pass legislation this year to provide Americans with a second round of stimulus payments, as a bipartisan group of lawmakers prepared to roll out legislation that is not expected to include more checks. “As a result of the pandemic, tens of millions of Americans are facing economic desperation. They can't afford to pay their rent and face eviction, they can't afford to go to the doctor, they can't afford to feed their children and they are going deeper and deeper into debt," Sanders said in a statement. "Congress cannot go home for the Christmas holidays until we pass legislation which provides a $1,200 direct payment to working class adults, $2,400 for couples, and a...
    Representative Josh Gottheimer, a Democrat from New Jersey, center, speaks during a news conference with the Problem Solvers Caucus outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020.Stefani Reynolds | Bloomberg | Getty Images Congress faces more pressure than ever this week to pass another coronavirus relief bill. Lawmakers' ability to break a longstanding logjam and send more help will play a massive role in how much more the crisis ravages Americans' health and wallets. Congressional leaders aim to approve both pandemic aid and a spending package before government funding lapses Saturday. Republicans and Democrats still need to strike a deal on both fronts with only days to spare before millions would face eviction or the loss of unemployment benefits. A bipartisan group hopes to spur movement toward legislation that can get through the GOP-controlled Senate and Democratic-held House. Lawmakers from both chambers plan to release...
    Lawmakers are scrambling to get another coronavirus relief package passed before breaking for the holidays as several different versions of legislation are still floating around Capitol Hill. On Monday afternoon, the so-called bipartisan '908' group, named after the price tag on their bill, will unveil the details of their relief package. Two people familiar with negotiations over the $908 billion package told Politico on Sunday that the legislation will likely be split into two parts, giving it a better chance of passing. The first part would take a majority of the chunk of money – $748 billion – for less controversial coronavirus relief like funding for schools and healthcare. The remaining $160 billion would give money to local governments with a temporary liability shield attached. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has called the liability shield his 'red line', and suggested dropping it completely so negotiations could move forward more smoothly....
    A bipartisan group of lawmakers are splitting their $908 billion coronavirus relief proposal into two packages as they prepare to release text on Monday.  The plan, confirmed by a source familiar with the talks, will include a $160 billion proposal that ties together the two most controversial elements: more money for state and local governments and protections against coronavirus-related lawsuits.  The second proposal will total $748 billion and include ideas that garner broader support including another round of Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) funding for small businesses, unemployment benefits, and more money for vaccine distribution, testing and schools.  Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinSunday shows preview: Nation gears up for inoculation following FDA approval of Pfizer vaccine Window quickly closing for big coronavirus deal Bipartisan group unveils new details on COVID-19 relief measure MORE (D-W.Va.), a member of the group, announced earlier Sunday that they would release text on Monday. “The plan is alive...
    By David Shepardson and Nandita Bose | Reuters WASHINGTON – California asked to join the U.S. Department of Justice’s antitrust lawsuit against Google on Friday, making the state’s attorney general the first Democrat to openly support the litigation. The department in October accused the $1 trillion California-based company of illegally using its market muscle to hobble rivals, and was joined by 11 other states when it was filed. “California is not making substantive changes to the complaint. In particular, California is not seeking to add any new facts or claims,” Attorney General Xavier Becerra said in the filing, adding that it would not delay the case. Google has denied wrongdoing, and the company has said that its search engine and other products are dominant because consumers prefer them. “People use Google because they choose to, not because they’re forced to, or because they can’t find alternatives,” a Google spokeswoman said....
    WASHINGTON -- Congress sent a temporary government-wide funding bill to President Donald Trump on Friday that would avert a federal shutdown at midnight and buy time for on-again, off-again talks on COVID-19 aid.The bill sets a new deadline of midnight next Friday. The short-term measure passed the Senate by a unanimous voice vote without much drama and sent senators home for the weekend without a clear picture of what awaits next week. The House passed the bill Wednesday. Trump was expected to sign it before midnight.The talks are stalled but there is universal agreement that Congress won't adjourn for the year without passing a long-delayed round of pandemic relief. An emerging $900 billion aid package from a bipartisan group of lawmakers hit a rough patch after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., swung against the effort. Still, negotiations are ongoing anthe d pressure remains intense.The House has recessed for a...
    WASHINGTON -- An emerging $900 billion COVID-19 aid package from a bipartisan group of lawmakers has all but collapsed after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Republican senators won't support $160 billion in state and local funds as part of a potential trade-off in the deal.McConnell's staff conveyed to top negotiators Thursday that the GOP leader sees no path to an agreement on a key aspect of the lawmakers' existing proposal - a slimmed-down version of the liability shield he is seeking for companies and organizations facing potential COVID-19 lawsuits - in exchange for the state and local funds that Democrats want.The GOP leader criticized "controversial state bailouts" during a speech in the Senate, as he insists on a more targeted aid package.SEE ALSO: New White House offer adds $600 checks to COVID-19 relief EMBED More News Videos The Trump administration has dived back into Capitol Hill's confusing COVID-19 negotiations,...
    (CNN)A bipartisan group of senators is struggling to finalize negotiations over a massive package once viewed as the best bet in Congress to give relief to Americans suffering from the coronavirus pandemic, putting pressure on congressional leaders to take matters into their own hands ahead of a critical deadline next week.The senators, along with a handful of House members, have engaged in negotiations for days as they try to finalize a $908 billion spending package that they hoped would pressure Congress to break a stalemate that has persisted for months.But the group has failed to reached an agreement on a central issue critical for Republican support: Providing protections from lawsuits for businesses, universities and other entities that opened during the pandemic. Republicans in the group say there needs to be an agreement on liability protections in order for them to sign off on a top Democratic priority: $160 billion for...
    WASHINGTON - An emerging $900 billion COVID-19 aid package from a bipartisan group of U.S. lawmakers all but collapsed Thursday after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Republican senators won't support $160 billion in state and local funds as part of a potential trade-off in the deal. McConnell's staff conveyed to top negotiators that the Republican leader sees no path to an agreement on a key aspect of the lawmakers' existing proposal — a slimmed-down version of the liability shield he is seeking for companies and organizations facing potential COVID-19 lawsuits — in exchange for the state and local funds that Democrats want. The majority leader criticized “controversial state bailouts” during a speech in the Senate, as he insists on a more targeted aid package. The hardened stance from McConnell, who does not appear to have enough votes from his Republican majority for a far-reaching compromise, creates a new...
    A $900billion Covid-19 aid package has all but collapsed in Congress after Mitch McConnell said the GOP would not support $160billion in state and local funds as part of a potential trade-off in the deal. McConnell's staff told top negotiators last night that the Senate majority leader sees no path to an agreement on a key aspect of the proposal.   In exchange for the $160billion package supported by Democrats, lawmakers had offered McConnell a slimmed-down version of the liability shield he wants for companies facing potential pandemic-related lawsuits.    McConnell criticized 'controversial state bailouts' during a speech in the Senate, as he insists on a more targeted aid package. Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell, pictured, says Republican lawmakers will not support a $160billion aid package for state and local governments The hardened stance from McConnell, who does not appear to have enough votes from his Republican majority for a far-reaching...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — An emerging $900 billion COVID-19 aid package from a bipartisan group of lawmakers has all but collapsed after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Republican senators won’t support $160 billion in state and local funds as part of a potential trade-off in the deal. McConnell’s staff conveyed to top negotiators Thursday that the GOP leader sees no path to an agreement on a key aspect of the lawmakers’ existing proposal — a slimmed-down version of the liability shield he is seeking for companies and organizations facing potential COVID-19 lawsuits — in exchange for the state and local funds that Democrats want. The GOP leader criticized “controversial state bailouts” during a speech in the Senate, as he insists on a more targeted aid package. The hardened stance from McConnell, who does not appear to have enough votes from his Republican majority for a far-reaching compromise, creates a new...
    More On: Coronavirus USS Theodore Roosevelt searching for sailor who may have gone overboard Ex-Bin Laden henchman back in UK after early release from US prison Man threatens to kill New Jersey restaurant staff after refusing to wear mask Florida authorities release body cam footage of Rebekah Jones’ home raid WASHINGTON (AP) — An emerging $900 billion COVID-19 aid package from a bipartisan group of lawmakers has all but collapsed after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Republican senators won’t support $160 billion in state and local funds as part of a potential trade-off in the deal. McConnell’s staff conveyed to top negotiators Thursday that the GOP leader sees no path to an agreement on a key aspect of the lawmakers’ existing proposal — a slimmed-down version of the liability shield he is seeking for companies and organizations facing potential COVID-19 lawsuits — in exchange for the state and...
    By LISA MASCARO and ANDREW TAYLOR, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — An emerging $900 billion COVID-19 aid package from a bipartisan group of lawmakers has all but collapsed after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Republican senators won't support $160 billion in state and local funds as part of a potential trade-off in the deal. McConnell's staff conveyed to top negotiators Thursday that the GOP leader sees no path to an agreement on a key aspect of the lawmakers' existing proposal — a slimmed-down version of the liability shield he is seeking for companies and organizations facing potential COVID-19 lawsuits — in exchange for the state and local funds that Democrats want. The GOP leader criticized “controversial state bailouts” during a speech in the Senate, as he insists on a more targeted aid package. The hardened stance from McConnell, who does not appear to have enough votes from his Republican...
    WASHINGTON - An emerging $900 billion COVID-19 aid package from a bipartisan group of U.S. lawmakers all but collapsed Thursday after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Republican senators won't support $160 billion in state and local funds as part of a potential trade-off in the deal. McConnell's staff conveyed to top negotiators that the Republican leader sees no path to an agreement on a key aspect of the lawmakers' existing proposal — a slimmed-down version of the liability shield he is seeking for companies and organizations facing potential COVID-19 lawsuits — in exchange for the state and local funds that Democrats want. The majority leader criticized “controversial state bailouts” during a speech in the Senate, as he insists on a more targeted aid package. The hardened stance from McConnell, who does not appear to have enough votes from his Republican majority for a far-reaching compromise, creates a new...
    WASHINGTON -- Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is hitting the brakes on the emerging COVID-19 aid package from a bipartisan group of lawmakers, saying Republican senators won't support $160 billion in state and local funds as part of a potential trade-off in the deal.McConnell's staff conveyed to top negotiators that the GOP leader sees no path to an agreement on a key aspect of the lawmakers' existing proposal - a slimmed-down version of the liability shield for companies and organizations facing potential COVID-19 lawsuits - in exchange for $160 billion in state and local funds that Democrats want.A senior Democrat confirmed that McConnell's position was conveyed to negotiators and was granted anonymity to discuss the private talks. McConnell's office did not immediately respond for a request for comment.The hardened stance from McConnell, who does not appear to have the votes from Republicans for a far-reaching compromise, creates a new stalemate...
    Washington (CNN)With eight days to go until another spending deadline, the prospects of Congress agreeing to, writing and voting on a massive stimulus proposal before Christmas are slim.A bipartisan group of negotiators is still stuck on how to craft liability protections. Republican leaders are signaling their conference can never support the state and local aid Democrats want, and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer are still insisting the only way forward is to put their faith in an amorphous, bipartisan gang.The bottom line: These talks are falling apart as millions of Americans are desperate for some -- even temporary -- relief. The bipartisan group of lawmakers is still meeting and trying to find a solution. It's just that the window for them to find the sweet spot is closing. Republicans are making it clear they don't like aspects of that proposal. Democrats are still insisting it's...
    Reuters December 10, 2020 0 Comments The U.S. Senate is expected to vote as early as Thursday on a one-week extension of federal government funding to provide more time for legislators to work out a larger spending package including coronavirus relief, if lawmakers can reach a deal after months of argument. The Democratic-majority House voted 343-67 on the stopgap measure on Wednesday. If passed and signed by President Donald Trump, it would prevent federal programs from running out of money on Friday at midnight (0500 GMT on Saturday) by extending current funding levels until Dec. 18. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Republican, has said the Senate will take it up this week and send it to Trump in time to avoid a government shutdown. The move gives Congress seven more days to enact a broader, $1.4 trillion “omnibus” spending measure for all government agencies from the Pentagon to...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Still spinning their wheels on COVID-19 relief, lawmakers have grabbed a one-week government funding extension that buys time for more talks — though there is considerable disagreement over who is supposed to be taking the lead from there. Amid the uncertainty, the House easily passed a one-week government-wide funding bill Wednesday that sets a new Dec. 18 deadline for Congress to wrap up both the COVID-19 relief measure and a $1.4 trillion catchall spending bill that is also overdue. The 343-67 vote sent the one-week bill to the Senate, where it’s expected to easily pass before a deadline of midnight Friday to avert a partial government shutdown. The measure would give lawmakers more time to sort through the hot mess they have created for themselves after months of futile negotiations and posturing and recent rounds of flip-flopping. Top GOP leaders said the right people to handle endgame...
    By ANDREW TAYLOR, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Still spinning their wheels on COVID-19 relief, lawmakers have grabbed a one-week government funding extension that buys time for more talks — though there is considerable disagreement over who is supposed to be taking the lead from there. Amid the uncertainty, the House easily passed a one-week government-wide funding bill Wednesday that sets a new Dec. 18 deadline for Congress to wrap up both the COVID-19 relief measure and a $1.4 trillion catchall spending bill that is also overdue. The 343-67 vote sent the one-week bill to the Senate, where it's expected to easily pass before a deadline of midnight Friday to avert a partial government shutdown. The measure would give lawmakers more time to sort through the hot mess they have created for themselves after months of futile negotiations and posturing and recent rounds of flip-flopping. Top GOP leaders said the...
    Washington — A bipartisan group of lawmakers is circulating a framework for their $908 billion coronavirus relief proposal, but the six-page summary obtained by CBS News does not include specifics on liability protections and aid to state and local governments, two of the major sticking points in negotiations. The summary includes an "agreement in principle to provide $160 billion" for state and local governments "as the basis for good faith negotiations," which is critical for Democrats, as well as an "agreement in principle" on liability shields, a priority for Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. The summary also makes no mention of another round of direct payments to Americans, although it would reinstate a scaled-down version of the popular unemployment supplement that expired at the end of July. The proposal would provide an additional $300 per week benefit on top of unemployment insurance from the end of December until April...
    (CNN)A bipartisan group of congressional lawmakers has pulled together a summary of their proposal for a Covid-19 relief package. While negotiations continue, this framework could develop into legislation that is attached to a must-pass spending bill, expected to be voted on next week -- if enough lawmakers support it.Here's what the group will include, according to the summary, obtained by CNN on Wednesday:
    (CNN)We've entered the part of the negotiations over stimulus relief to the Covid-19 pandemic and its economic fallout where everyone is putting their ideas on the table. That's productive, but with just nine days to go until the next spending deadline, there's not much time left for it. There are a lot of proposals and none of them are ready to be voted on. The White House is officially back in the game on stimulus talks for the first time since the election. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is suggesting his own path forward, and the bipartisan group is still trying to solve for the problem of liability insurance that has confounded negotiators for months.The bottom line: The White House offer is dead on arrival by Democrats. All eyes on the bipartisan group and whether they can close their deal. The sticking point? Money for state and local governments and...
    WASHINGTON -- The Trump administration dove back into Capitol Hill's confusing COVID-19 negotiations on Tuesday, offering a $916 billion package to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that would send a $600 direct payment to most Americans - but eliminate a $300 per week unemployment benefit favored by a bipartisan group of Senate negotiators.Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin made the offer to Pelosi late Tuesday afternoon, he said in a statement. He offered few details, though House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy said it proposes the $600 direct payment for individuals and $1,200 for couples, which is half the payment delivered by the March pandemic relief bill.Mnuchin reached out to Pelosi after a call with top congressional GOP leaders, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who remains at odds with Democratic leaders over COVID-19 relief. Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., responded to Mnuchin's entreaty with a statement that said they would...
    WASHINGTON — The Trump administration dove back into Capitol Hill’s confusing COVID-19 negotiations on Tuesday, offering a $916 billion package to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that would send a $600 direct payment to most Americans — but eliminate a $300 per week employment benefit favored by a bipartisan group of Senate negotiators. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin made the offer to Pelosi late Tuesday afternoon, he said in a statement. He offered few details, though House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy said it proposes the $600 direct payment for individuals and $1,200 for couples, which is half the payment delivered by the March pandemic relief bill.  Mnuchin reached out to Pelosi after a call with top congressional GOP leaders, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who remains at odds with Democratic leaders over COVID-19 relief. Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., responded to Mnuchin’s entreaty with a statement that...
    More On: Coronavirus No drinking for two months after COVID-19 vaccine, Russia tells citizens Cruise cut short as passenger tests positive for COVID-19 NFL star quits, then un-quits after COVID-19 diagnosis UConn dealing with COVID uncertainty WASHINGTON — The Trump administration dove back into Capitol Hill’s confusing COVID-19 negotiations on Tuesday, offering a $916 billion package to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that would send a $600 direct payment to most Americans — but eliminate a $300 per week employment benefit favored by a bipartisan group of Senate negotiators. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin made the offer to Pelosi late Tuesday afternoon, he said in a statement. He offered few details, though House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy said it proposes the $600 direct payment for individuals and $1,200 for couples, which is half the payment delivered by the March pandemic relief bill.  Mnuchin reached out to Pelosi after a call with...
    The clout of a bipartisan group of lawmakers aimed at forging consensus is on the rise. With the House expected to have its most narrow Democratic margin of control in decades, members of the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus see the group’s influence growing exponentially in the next Congress. And its members are looking to flex their strength in pushing for policies that can pass both chambers.  The bipartisan group of roughly 50 members, which is co-chaired by Reps. Josh GottheimerJoshua (Josh) GottheimerDemocrats face increasing pressure to back smaller COVID-19 stimulus Democrat Gottheimer wins reelection in New Jersey Cook Political Report shifts 8 more House races toward Democrats MORE (D-N.J.) and Tom ReedTom ReedDemocrats face increasing pressure to back smaller COVID-19 stimulus Bipartisan lawmakers call for expedited diabetes research The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Dems push McConnell on COVID-19 relief; Grassley...
    A bipartisan group of lawmakers look less and less likely to debut the text of their COVID-19 stimulus deal Monday, as sticking points remain.  CNN reported that Republicans and Democrats still can't agree on two issues: lawsuit protections and state and local funding.  Lawmakers involved had aimed to release the text on Monday, but by mid-afternoon Wednesday looked more likely, Politico said.    A bipartisan group of lawmakers including Sen. Mark Warner (left), a Virginia Democrat, and Sen. Bill Cassidy (right), a Louisiana Republican are nearing a COVID-19 relief package deal  Lawmakers, including Sen. Joe Manchin (center) gathered last week to announce their framework last week. The bill is looking less and less likely to be released Monday  Sen. Joe Manchin (left), Sen. Bill Cassidy (center) and Rep. Fred Upton are among the group of bipartisan lawmakers hatching the package  There's no guarantee that House Speaker...
    Washington (CNN)Stimulus talks are as real as they have been in months right now, with Democratic leaders' embrace of the bipartisan group's framework on Wednesday a sign that this could begin a real negotiation. We are not quite there, but things are moving.What's happening behind the scenes? Leadership aides are still talking to try and find a path forward on spending. Meanwhile, the bipartisan group -- which aides tell CNN now includes about 10 members -- met again via Zoom on Wednesday to figure out how they are going to turn a one-page, $908 billion framework into legislative text. The goal is to have this ready by Monday, according to Sen. Joe Manchin, a Democrat from West Virginia.But, that's a very tough lift and here is why: This framework was a single page. It included top line numbers for items like state and local funding, unemployment insurance, the small business...
    REUTERS/Joshua RobertsA bipartisan group of lawmakers in the House and Senate has taken the initiative by proposing a $908 billion COVID aid bill as a transition package until President-elect Joe Biden takes office.The following is an editorial from the Mankato Free Press. The only obstacles to Congress passing another COVID relief bill appear to be bad politics and bad judgment. Food shelf lines are growing. Health care policies are lapsing. Kids are hurting. Yet, Democrats and Republican leaders in Congress appear unable to come to a compromise stimulus/relief bill for reasons that are hard to imagine in light of overwhelming support from Wall Street, Main Street and even President Donald Trump. Article continues after advertisement Now, a bipartisan group of lawmakers in the House and Senate has taken the initiative by proposing a $908 billion COVID aid bill as a transition package until President-elect Joe Biden takes office. The bill would...
    A fiscally conservative group is putting six figures behind new digital ads aimed at sinking a measure to ban the “surprise” medical bills patients get from hospitals and services that aren’t covered by insurance. The Taxpayers Protection Alliance will launch a new ad on Wednesday accusing big insurance companies of trying to push a bill through the lame duck Congress that aims to ban surprise medical bills through “benchmarking,” which sets prices based on the average for a provided service. The TPA and other fiscally conservative groups say the legislation is tantamount to “rate-setting” or “price controls” that give the government too much power. They’ve likened it to "Medicare for all." “A few lawmakers claim to have a deal to end surprise medical billing,” the ad states. “There’s just one problem. It isn’t really a deal. It’s a handout to the big insurance companies that would leave our front line doctors...
    Savannah Rychcik December 1, 2020 0 Comments A bipartisan group of lawmakers is unveiling a $908 billion coronavirus relief proposal in an effort to end the longstanding stalemate between Democrats and the White House. “We’re battling COVID-19 more fiercely now than we ever have before. We recognize that. It’s inexcusable for us to leave town and not have an agreement,” Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.V.) said during a press conference Tuesday. He added, “It’s not the time for political brinkmanship. You’ll not see any of that here today on this stage. We’re going to intend to move this forward after months of failing to act for one reason or another. We’re not blaming anybody for why they haven’t come to an agreement.” Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) stressed it is “absolutely essential that we pass emergency relief.” A reporter asked Manchin how quickly they could prepare a bill ready for a vote. “We’ve...
    A bipartisan group of lawmakers unveiled a $908 billion coronavirus relief proposal on Tuesday, as leadership faces growing pressure to cut a deal. The measure, rolled out by more than a dozen members from the House and Senate, comes as cases are climbing across the country and Congress is running out of time to clinch a long-stalled fifth bill with lawmakers scheduled to leave for the year as soon as next week. Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinOvernight Health Care: Moderna to apply for emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine candidate | Hospitals brace for COVID-19 surge | US more than doubles highest number of monthly COVID-19 cases Bipartisan Senate group holding coronavirus relief talks amid stalemate Major unions back Fudge for Agriculture secretary MORE (D-W.Va.) said it would be "inexcusable" for Congress to leave town for the year without providing more coronavirus relief with a slew of assistance programs set...
    Washington — A bipartisan group of lawmakers rolled out a $908 billion coronavirus relief plan that would provide aid to state and local governments, small businesses and jobless Americans but not include another round of stimulus checks, as Democratic leaders and the White House remain deadlocked on another economic package and the clock on crucial relief programs set to expire at the end of the year ticks down. The four-month proposal from the bicameral coalition would provide state and local governments facing a cash crunch due to declining revenues with $160 billion and small businesses with $288 billion, including through the Paycheck Protection Program. It also allocates $82 billion for education and $16 billion for vaccine development and distribution, as well as testing and contact tracing.  For Americans out of work, the measure sets aside $180 billion for additional unemployment insurance. The bipartisan plan also provides short-term liability protection from...
    Alex Wong/Getty Images A bipartisan group of “centrist” senators are reportedly pushing for a coronavirus deal with no second stimulus check. According to the Washington Post, the group of “centrist and dealmaker type” senators — that includes Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT), Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME), Sen. Joe Manchin III (D-WV), and Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) — are expected to announce their $908 billion proposal in a press conference on Tuesday. “It would provide $300 a week in federal unemployment benefits — a lower amount than the $600 per week sought by Democrats, while still offering substantial relief to tens of millions of jobless Americans — for four more months,” the Washington Post reported, adding that the “agreement includes $240 billion in funding for state and local governments,” and “a six-month moratorium on some coronavirus-related lawsuits against firms and other entities.” Americans protested the absence of a second stimulus check in...
    Both Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Minority Leader Chuck Schumer took to the Senate floor on Monday urged senators to come together to pass a pandemic relief package as sources confirmed to CBS News that a bipartisan group of senators have informally started talks about providing more economic relief to Americans. "There is no reason — none — why we should not deliver another major pandemic relief package" before the end of the year, McConnell said.  Several key programs enacted amid the pandemic are set to expire at the end of the year, including the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation, a federal student loan freeze and nationwide eviction moratorium. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox "Both sides must give," Schumer said. "We have a Democratic House, and in the Senate, there's a need for Democratic votes to pass any bill. So we need a true bipartisan bill. Not 'this...
    A bipartisan group of senators are trying to iron out a new coronavirus relief package after months of stalemate among congressional leaders and the Trump administration, The Hill reports. Included in the group are Sens. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, Rob Portman, R-Ohio, and Susan Collins, R-Maine. The group also includes Sens. Chris Coons, D-Del., Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., Mark Warner, D-Va., Michael Bennet, D-Colo., and Dick Durbin, D-Ill., the Senates No. 2 ranking Democrat. The group is looking at tying the plan to a government funding bill that must be passed by Dec. 11, The Hill reported. The group is aiming for a more modest plan than Senate Majority Leaders Mitch McConnells $500 billion spending package that has twice been blocked. Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., are seeking a $2.2 trillion package. Many of the programs from the March CARES Act are set to...
    A bipartisan group of senators are holding discussions about trying to get a fifth coronavirus deal amid a months-long stalemate between congressional leadership and the White House.  The talks, confirmed to The Hill by three sources, are one of the first signs of life on a potential coronavirus agreement as congressional Democrats and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellFive things to know about Georgia's Senate runoffs Obama chief economist says Democrats should accept smaller coronavirus relief package if necessary Memo to Biden: Go big — use the moment to not only rebuild but to rebuild differently MORE (R-Ky.) and the White House have remained far apart on both the price tag and the policy details.  The group includes Republicans Sens. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyVoters elected a record number of Black women to Congress this year — none were Republican Congress set for chaotic year-end sprint Biden's Cabinet a battleground...
    On Friday, Sen. Kelly Loeffler (R-GA) pushed for a bipartisan group to examine the mail-in ballots in the upcoming January 5 Georgia Senate runoffs. Loeffler and Sen. David Perdue (R-GA) are both seeking to fend off Democrats Rev. Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff. “Fox & Friends” host Brian Kilmeade asked Loeffler if she agrees with Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) that Georgia’s current system to verify signatures on mail-in ballots is ripe for fraud. With the Senate majority hinging on the Georgia runoff, Loeffler agreed with Graham. She emphasized that every legal vote should be counted since “everything is on the line.” “Lindsey’s right,” Loeffler responded. “We need a bipartisan look at these signatures at these ballots and make sure that every legal vote is counted and that no illegal vote is counted. Georgians deserve to know. Look, they went to the polls. They waited in line. They researched their candidates. They...
    (CNN)President-elect Joe Biden discussed a national mask mandate, plans to distribute a coronavirus vaccine and the need to help cash-strapped states Thursday in a meeting with Republican and Democratic governors. The meeting showed how Biden is working around President Donald Trump, dealing directly with states as Trump's outgoing administration continues to refuse granting Biden's transition team access to federal agencies and their plans, including one to eventually distribute a vaccine.He told reporters afterward that governors had expressed concern with how long it took to make coronavirus tests widely available and hope to avoid similar delays once a vaccine is ready for distribution. "This is not a one-off meeting," Biden said. "We agreed that we'll continue to meet with the governors on a regular basis; continue to seek their input."Biden, Vice President-elect Kamala Harris and a group of medical experts Biden has assembled as a coronavirus advisory board held a virtual...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- The 2020 election had everyone's eyes glued to the Electoral College map for days.While a candidate's popular vote is tallied, it doesn't guarantee victory.In order to win the presidency, the next elected president needs to get the most electoral votes."We're in recount craziness. We're going to have courts and lawyers pick a president again. That is not good for American democracy," says Patrick Rosenstiel, a member of the National Popular Vote.The bipartisan group is pushing to bypass the Electoral College and pick the president based on the overall number of votes received.The Electoral College was created at a time when slavery was legal and only white men who owned land could vote.Blacks were deemed three-fifths of a human and counted for congressional representation, but not allowed to vote.Most states now abide by a "winner-take-all" method for assigning their electors.That means even if a candidate earns just...
    The Center for Presidential Transition advisory board is urging the Trump administration to move forward “to immediately begin the post-election transition process.” Meanwhile, President-elect Joe Biden indicated on Sunday he plans to move quickly to build out his government, as Donald President Trump continues to challenge the results of the election and refuses the concede. Biden is launching a coronavirus task force, which will be co-chaired by former surgeon general Dr. Vivek Murthy and former food and drug administration commissioner Dr. David Kessler. A schedule for Biden and Vice President-Elect Kamala Harris was unveiled on Sunday, reports said. Follow below for more updates on the transition process. Mobile users click here.
    A bipartisan group of Senators on Thursday called on the Trump administration to impose new sanctions on Russia over the poisoning of Alexei Navalny, a leading opposition figure and prominent critic of Russian President Vladimir PutinVladimir Vladimirovich PutinThe foreign policy canyon between Americans over China Russia ready to freeze nuclear warheads in exchange for New START extension Safeguarding US elections by sanctioning Russian sovereign debt MORE. The call comes after the European Union and the United Kingdom imposed sanctions last week on six top Russian officials, including the chief of Russia’s internal security service and Putin’s deputy chief of staff, over Navalny's poisoning.  In a letter to Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoTrump and advisers considering firing FBI director after election: WaPo Brazil's OECD candidacy is best chance for reform Watch live: Pompeo news conference MORE and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnunchin, the lawmakers called for the U.S. to...
    WASHINGTON – A group of prominent Christians from both sides of the aisle, including a past faith adviser to former President Barack Obama, is forming a political action committee designed to chip away at Christian support for President Donald Trump in the final weeks of the 2020 campaign. Dubbed Not Our Faith, the new super PAC plans to roll out six-figure TV and digital ads focused on Christian voters — particularly the evangelical and Catholic voters who helped power Trump to victory in 2016. Its first digital ad, set to run in Michigan and Pennsylvania, takes sharp aim at Trump’s claim to a foothold with Christians. The ad, shared with The Associated Press in advance of its release, says Trump “has used Christianity for his own purposes,” invoking imagery of the Republican president’s photo op outside a historic Washington church amid this summer’s racial justice demonstrations. Urging Christians to break...
    By ELANA SCHOR, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — A group of prominent Christians from both sides of the aisle, including a past faith adviser to former President Barack Obama, is forming a political action committee designed to chip away at Christian support for President Donald Trump in the final weeks of the 2020 campaign. Dubbed Not Our Faith, the new super PAC plans to roll out six-figure TV and digital ads focused on Christian voters — particularly the evangelical and Catholic voters who helped power Trump to victory in 2016. Its first digital ad, set to run in Michigan and Pennsylvania, takes sharp aim at Trump’s claim to a foothold with Christians. The ad, shared with The Associated Press in advance of its release, says Trump “has used Christianity for his own purposes,” invoking imagery of the Republican president’s photo op outside a historic Washington church amid this summer’s racial...
    Forty former U.S. officials will launch a $4 million ad buy aimed at building voters’ trust in American elections, Axios reported. The group, called The National Council on Election Integrity, consists of top Republicans and Democrats, including former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, former Democratic National Committee Chair Donna Brazile, Dan Coats, who served as director of national intelligence in the Trump administration, former Republican Secretary of Homeland Security Tom Ridge and others. The ads, which are set to air Thursday and are part of the Count Every Vote campaign, will target Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania, three critical battleground states that could decide who wins November’s presidential election. (RELATED: Battleground Polls Shows Massive Shift Among Senior Voters) A spokesman for the group said that the ad buy was only part of a $20 million campaign designed to increase voters’ faith in the nation’s elections regardless of outcomes and restore voters’...
    Getty U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. A Congressional bipartisan group is calling on House leaders to dig deep and remain in session until another round of coronavirus relief is passed. For months, top legislators have been at an impasse in reaching a deal for a second stimulus package, including several failed attempts involving the Democrats’ HEROES Act, Republicans’ HEALS Act and Senate GOPs’ ‘Skinny Bill.’ As the House prepares to break for recess in early October, with several members heading home to campaign for re-election, the pressure mounts for additional aid to be sent to the millions of struggling Americans before the November 3 election, ValueWalk reported. A group of 34 Democratic and Republican representatives sent a September 22 letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy pleading to remain open until a bipartisan bill is passed — claiming “our constituents do not...
    Getty A bipartisan group of U.S. Home members unveiled a brand new stimulus bundle as a last-ditch effort to push lawmakers into reaching a call on one other spherical of coronavirus reduction earlier than the upcoming election. The Downside Solvers Caucus, which consists of 25 Home Democrats and 25 Home Republicans,publicized its roughly $1.5 trillion plan on Tuesday, in line with a web-based model of the proposal. The invoice requires as much as $2 trillion in extra help to the financial system and seeks to reignite the presently stagnant negotiations between legislators, stating: Having seen no progress on a brand new COVID-19 reduction bundle in 4 months, and in recognition of Individuals’ rising struggling, the Downside Solvers Caucus (PSC) has developed a complete, bipartisan framework to satisfy the nation’s wants for the following 6-12 months, that may go each chambers of Congress and...
    Getty A bipartisan group of U.S. House members unveiled a new stimulus package as a last-ditch effort to push lawmakers into reaching a decision on another round of coronavirus relief before the upcoming election. The Problem Solvers Caucus, which consists of 25 House Democrats and 25 House Republicans, publicized its roughly $1.5 trillion plan on Tuesday, according to an online version of the proposal. The bill calls for up to $2 trillion in additional aid to the economy and seeks to reignite the currently stagnant negotiations between legislators, stating: Having seen no progress on a new COVID-19 relief package in four months, and in recognition of Americans’ increasing suffering, the Problem Solvers Caucus (PSC) has developed a comprehensive, bipartisan framework to meet the nation’s needs for the next 6-12 months, that can pass both chambers of Congress and be signed into law by the President. If it...
    Rep. Tom Suozzi (D-N.Y.) joins other members of the Problem Solvers Caucus at a news conference to unveil their new coronavirus relief proposal.Caroline Brehman/AP For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.A bipartisan coalition of 50 House representatives unveiled a new coronavirus relief proposal on Tuesday, in hopes of restarting pandemic relief negotiations and passing an aid package in the weeks ahead of the November election. The plan splits the difference between the meager Senate GOP bill and the more expansive House Democratic one, but it’s unlikely to please either side or stand a real chance of passage. “What brings us together—25 Democrats and 25 Republicans—is our shared goal of finding a pragmatic solution—a bipartisan path forward—to help get negotiators to return to the table,” tweeted Rep. Josh Gottheimer (D-N.J.) on Tuesday.  The proposal, spearheaded by Gottheimer and Rep. Tom...
    Senate Republicans are eyeing a bipartisan House plan to provide a new round of coronavirus aid after weeks of stalled talks with Democrats. The House Problem Solvers Caucus on Tuesday unveiled a bipartisan “framework to help break the gridlock” over a new round of federal money to help the nation recover from the coronavirus. The bipartisan plan would provide $500 billion in aid to state and local governments, about half what the Democrats are seeking in their $3.7 trillion proposal but far more than the Senate GOP, which included no such funding in their own coronavirus measure. The bipartisan plan would provide $145 billion for schools and child care, as well as $400 billion in “election support.” Sen. Roy Blunt, a Missouri Republican who helped write the GOP bill, said the House Problem Solvers Caucus proposal could pave the way to deal that can pass Congress. “There’s a deal to...
    A bipartisan group of House lawmakers will introduce a coronavirus relief package on Tuesday meant to break the stalemate between the two parties by offering a compromise in the size and scope of aid. The House Problem Solvers Caucus’s approximately $2 trillion plan is likely to satisfy most Democrats but frustrate many Republican senators, particularly due to the included $500 billion for state and local governments, $15 billion for the U.S. Postal Service, and $400 million for election assistance. The package is closer to what Democrats want in terms of size. Democrats are seeking a package worth at least $2.2 trillion after initially proposing a measure worth up to $3.7 trillion. Democrats last week voted to block a Republican coronavirus aid package worth roughly $500 billion, arguing it was insufficient. The new bipartisan package is viewed as a final attempt to reach a deal regarding a relief package before Congress...
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