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    A Zoom call.CNBC Ever get off of a video call and feel like it wiped you out? You're not alone — as people around the world left offices last March and replaced in-person meetings with videoconferences from spare bedrooms and kitchens, they started noticing that videoconferencing made them feel tired. The phenomenon was dubbed Zoom fatigue, after the popular videoconferencing software. As the pandemic enters its second year, with many people still working and attending school remotely, researchers from Stanford and other schools are starting to closely study how videoconferencing affects people on a psychological level. There are four main ways that videoconferencing could contribute to feelings of exhaustion, wrote Jeremy Bailenson, founding director of Stanford University's Virtual Human Interaction Lab, in a paper published on Wednesday: Videoconferencing forces users to make extended eye contact Non-verbal signals like nodding require more effort The little box where users see themselves...
    Mercedes have been on an upward trajectory since the dawn of the hybrid era in Formula 1 back in 2013. After seven consecutive constructor championship victories, one might assume that the team will be moving into the 2021 season with abundant confidence and pretty much no pressure from rivals. However, their’ technical director, James Allison, revealed that the team aren’t stress-free. Considering their endless accomplishments, the expectations are unsurprisingly high. Hence, James felt that the team are under more pressure to stay ahead of their rivals, going into the 2021 season. Allison on Mercedes coping with pressure Speaking to Mercedes, James opened up that anxiety has been hovering over the team, as the crew is aching to see where it stands amongst the rival teams. “We exist for one purpose. And that is to produce a racing car that’s capable of fighting at the front, and hopefully, securing wins and...
    WHAT if there was one ventilator left and two patients that needed it? Who should get it?  Ultimately, it is a doctor’s call; they are the ones qualified to weigh up the medical risks and benefits. 9I was on the BBC yesterday to debate the question: 'Is lockdown punishing too many for the greater good?'Credit: BBC ONE
    A SEXPERT has revealed the four mistakes we're all making in the bedroom - and what you should do instead. It can be hard to keep things exciting during lockdown, but Aussie David Smiedt told Body + Soul his tips for rejuvenating your love life. 2A sexpert has revealed four mistakes we're all making in the bedroomCredit: Getty Images - Getty And he says we need to focus on what happens outside the sexual experience itself. Here are the problems he sees most often... 1. Your focus is too narrow You could be unintentionally c*ck blocking yourself by leaving all the build-up to the bedroom. David says: "Get the ball rolling with compliments during the day, a hint or three that you can’t wait be alone with her later and a dollop of non-sexual affection." He describes this as a "trio of mental foreplay" which is sure to sweeten the...
    When you think of Black billionaires, the names Oprah Winfrey and Jay-Z may instantly come to mind. However, it was Reginald Lewis who paved the way for American moguls in the 1980s. The lawyer and entrepreneur was the first Black man in America to conduct a $985 million deal. After purchasing McCall Pattern Company for $22.5 million and selling it at a 90-1 return, Lewis then bought Beatrice International Foods in an almost billion-dollar deal, renamed it TLC Beatrice Holdings Inc. and within a year propelled the company to over $1 billion in sales (making it the first Black-owned company to have more than $1 billion in annual sales). Read More: The 50 most richest Americans are worth as much as the poorest 165 million In 1993, following a brain cancer diagnosis, Reginald Lewis faced an untimely death at 50. During his lifetime, he left a gift for...
    (CNN)When the pandemic first struck the United States with ferocity in March, the days were already getting longer. Spring was coming. Quarantined people could take to the outdoors when they needed a break. The second and more brutal wave of Covid-19 is coming now, and at a harsher time in much of the nation, as cold temperatures and earlier sunsets keep people indoors and increase the risk of spreading disease. "Short days, sharp days, long nights come on apace," wrote Thomas Nashe, an English playwright in the Elizabethan era. "Ah, who shall hide us from the winter's face? Cold doth increase, the sickness will not cease, And here we lie, God knows, with little ease. From winter, plague, & pestilence, good Lord, deliver us." Vaccines are on the way but too late to prevent an awful toll of death and disease. "We have failed to stop or even slow the...
    Senator Kevin Cramer (R- ND) downplayed concerns Sunday on Meet the Press about the Donald Trump team’s legal fight amid the president’s ongoing attacks on the election. Chuck Todd noted that after a judge rejected the Trump team’s arguments in Pennsylvania, that state’s Republican senator Pat Toomey congratulated President-elect Joe Biden and said it’s time for Trump to accept he lost. Todd asked Cramer, “Do you concur with Senator Toomey that it is now over?” “No, I do not,” Cramer said. “Although I think it’s very likely.” The senator told Todd, “I don’t know why we’re so easily offended by a president that’s carrying out all of his legal options in court, not encouraging any riots or burnings of buildings or beating up of Democrats coming out of Democratic meeting or events.” “I don’t think this is an attack on our democracy,” Cramer said, responding to the warning Todd...
    Ashlie D. Stevens October 22, 2020 9:03PM (UTC) As soon as Donald Trump was elected to the presidency in 2016, it seemed that all eyes turned to rural America for answers. I was working at a public radio station in Louisville, Kentucky on election night — a blue dot in a state that has reliably voted Republican since the 1950s — when the results began to roll in. As it became clear that Trump was pulling ahead, my phone began to light up with texts from friends and other journalists who lived in larger cities, most asking the same question: "How could this happen?"  Almost immediately, media members, policymakers, and academics set about trying to contextualize the beliefs of portions of the country that had seemed to fade below notice or were dismissed as "flyover country." America at large sought to understand "rural America," a term that quickly became...
    Jimmy Kimmel went off on NBC for hosting a town hall with President Donald Trump that directly competes with ABC’s Joe Biden town hall — questioning if the network is going to air a “new Bill Cosby special” next. Kimmel, who works for ABC, noted that there should have been a debate tomorrow night, but the president refused to settle for a virtual format once he tested positive for the coronavirus. The host then explained that because there would be no debate, Biden agreed to do a town hall on ABC Thursday night, but now, Trump is also doing a town hall on NBC at the same exact time as the Democratic presidential nominee. “So, that settles it — now I know what I’m gonna do: I’m going to vote for both of them, right?” Kimmel joked. “Thanks, NBC. First The Apprentice and now this. Why not a new Bill Cosby special while...
    Less than one week after a Texas grand jury indicted Netflix over its distribution of the controversial coming-of-age film Cuties, the company’s co-CEO Ted Sarandos has hit back at what he calls a discussion of “censoring storytelling.” The film, a feature debut from Maïmouna Doucouré, follows an 11-year-old Senegalese immigrant, Amy, as she attends her new school and befriends a dance group called the “Cuties.” As her family life becomes more stressful, Amy begins to teach the group racier and racier moves—all of which are at odds with her traditional upbringing. Netflix first promoted the film with an image of the girls in their dance uniforms—one that, out of context, does not convey the film’s investment in deconstructing and interrogating the sexualization of young girls. Netflix apologized for the misrepresentation, but by then the damage was done: Reactionaries on social media, particularly those on the right, have led a...
    A new draft report from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security warns that white supremacists are the “most persistent and lethal” threat in the United States, according to a new CNN report by Geneva Sands. It stands in sharp contrast to the notion of terroristic threats typically portrayed by conservatives, which focuses on the threat from Muslim attackers from other countries and, more recently “Antifa” and leftist groups. The DHS report warns that although foreign terrorist groups will continue to call for attacks on the U.S., those groups “probably will remain constrained in their ability to direct such plots over the next year.” But it predicts that the U.S. will face an “elevated threat environment at least through” early 2021 because of white supremacists. Sands notes that DHS has had three different drafts of that report. According to Sands, the language in the drafts varies. But all three versions cite white...
            by Daniel J. Flynn  Donald Trump wins reelection because his supporters enjoy but one means of political expression: the ballot box. Donald Trump loses reelection because his supporters enjoy but one means of political expression: the ballot box. We do not know who claims victory for another two months but we already know why it happened. One side cannot shut up. The other side cannot speak. Whereas sports, comedy, school curricula, library story hours, awards shows, and even restaurants become ideological instruments for Democrats, the ballot box alone acts as a safe space for Republican political expression. For one group of Americans, everything is politics; for another group of Americans, nothing, save for the voting booth, is politics. Republicans know the bumper sticker that says “Trump 2020” to some announces “smash my windshield” to others. Lawn signs, a target of the intolerant so often in 2016 and...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City By Annette Alcala I’ve worked as a bartender for the last 6 years. It is my chosen profession. There are millions like me who love this industry but were left with nothing when the pandemic shut us down. We love this industry, but it must change.  That’s why I’m joining dozens of my peers in the first national tipped workers’ strike to demand a full minimum wage with tips on top. NYC and Chicago went on strike today, but many more cities plan to follow soon. We need legislators to hear us: if we don’t get a full fair wage with tips on top and restaurant relief, millions of us will not be able to feed our families or stay housed, and thousands of your favorite restaurants won’t be around soon. ...
    I moved to LA mid-pandemic and furnished my apartment almost exclusively from Facebook Marketplace, a luxurious garden of budget goods that exploits all my weak points: deals, online shopping, haggling with strangers on the internet. One of the first things I bought was a table and four chairs that was not cheap, by my standards ($225!), but did look unique compared to the countless IKEA offerings. When I went to pick it up, however, it was clear this was in fact an IKEA offering — one that had been shoddily hand-painted by the enthusiastic acting student who sold it to me. I no longer wanted to buy it (why spend $225 on old furniture that costs $120 new?), and I probably should have just told the guy I’d made a mistake and apologized for wasting his time, but instead I thanked him profusely and complimented him...
    Karissa Lewis - Mary Kay Henry July 20, 2020 10:00AM (UTC) On April 3, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. stood up at the Mason Temple in Memphis and spoke in support of the city's 1,300 sanitation workers. The workers were on strike to fight for the ability to unionize, put better safety standards in place, and their right to a livable wage. They had stopped work, partially in response to the deaths of Echol Cole and Robert Walker, who had been crushed to death by a garbage truck while on the job. On that day, on the eve of his assassination, Dr. King said, "We've got to give ourselves to this struggle until the end. Nothing would be more tragic than to stop at this point, in Memphis. We've got to see it through. And when we have our march, you need to be there... Be concerned about your brother. You...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City For 22 years, brother-owned company Top Trenz has been a one-stop-shop for kids’ products. A real soup-to-nuts shop. So when the pandemic hit in April, customers began flooding the inbox of owners Corey and Jamie Glassberg with requests for protective masks.  As a seasoned designer, manufacturer, and distributor of consumer products, Top Trenz answered the call and introduced a line of face-covering, Mask Appeal. The masks can be worn during the summer months thanks to a breathable premium polyester blend. Each mask has a second inner layer of 100% cotton for added protection and comes with a moldable nose bridge and adjustable earloops for a secure fit. There’s also a built-in pocket for the optional insert of a filter.  “Our goal was to make face masks that would be less scary...
    Tesla stock hits fresh record as Wall Street awaits Q2 sales Test Drive: There’s More to the 2021 Toyota RAV4 Prime Than Quick Acceleration Incredible $49 Smart Watch Is Taking The US By Storm Ad Microsoft 20+ Gadgets We Bet You Haven't Seen Yet Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/13 SLIDES © Bettmann/Getty Images A princess for the ages There's no shortage of references and tributes to Princess Diana in modern culture—her "revenge dress" is still the standard for exes who want to steal the spotlight and movies are still being made about her life. Young women especially have kept her memory and message alive through their endless fascination with the Princess of Wales. From her fashion and her...
    Terror set free YET again innocent Brits have been murdered by a knife-wielding terrorist. We know that lone wolf attacks can be difficult to prevent. 2Saadallah was on MI5’s radar for wanting to fight in SyriaCredit: supplied by Pixel8000 Sometimes, people leading otherwise ordinary lives become radicalised online and then go on a killing rampage which couldn’t have been predicted. But that wasn’t the case with Reading suspect Khairi Saadallah. In fact, he was a ticking time bomb. A Libyan, granted asylum by Britain, he was on MI5’s radar for wanting to fight in Syria. He had a history of violent crime and was believed to have been diagnosed with mental health issues requiring regular medication before he was released from jail 16 days ago. All of which leaves the Home Office with some tricky questions to answer. Why was a violent criminal granted leave to remain in...
    There is a reason that photography and videography are frowned upon at protests like the ones currently sweeping the nation: Surveillance capitalism has made it easy for even masked protesters to be identified. Both authorities and everyday citizens have access to search tools that can “out” someone from even the tiniest clues; even peaceable demonstrators are right to fear being fired or publicly shunned if their presence at a protest is discovered and then widely broadcast. Thus it is no accident that civil rights and privacy are intimately interlinked. Indeed, as law enforcement departments have become more militarized, they have equipped themselves with increasingly sophisticated surveillance technology — from devices that intercept cell phone signals to backdoors into social media sites. Yet the civil rights battle over the right privacy is not waged on the street with protest signs and banners — at least, not generally. Privacy struggles are waged in more subtle ways, often through individual choices we make on...
    Former Detroit Pistons and Chicago Bulls great Dennis Rodman shared his thoughts about the violent protests in the aftermath of George Floyd’s death. On Sunday, Rodman shared a video on Instagram asking everyone to rise above the rioting, looting, and vandalism going on around the country. "It’s a bad situation and I think that we should all understand there’s a new generation,” Rodman said. “People my age knew about the Rodney King thing and things started to happen. People looting, setting fires, damaging people’s homes, businesses, stuff like that. SPURS' GREGG POPOVICH UNLEASHES ON PRESIDENT TRUMP FOLLOWING DEATH OF GEORGE FLOYD "And now we have this incident. I think someone needs to come out and say, ‘Hey guys, why are we looting Why are we stealing? Why are we creating more issues, more problems, stuff like that. Let’s get to the head of what’s really going on,'” Rodman added. “This...
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